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  • 1.
    Dietrich-Zagonel, Franciele
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Hammerman, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Tätting, Love
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Dietrich, Fabricia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomgran, Parmis
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Eliasson, Pernilla T.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Stimulation of Tendon Healing With Delayed Dexamethasone Treatment Is Modified by the Microbiome2018In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0363-5465, E-ISSN 1552-3365, Vol. 46, no 13, p. 3281-3287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    The immune system reflects the microbiome (microbiota). Modulation of the immune system during early tendon remodeling by dexamethasone treatment can improve rat Achilles tendon healing. The authors tested whether changes in the microbiota could influence the effect of dexamethasone treatment.

    Hypothesis:

    A change in microbiome would influence the response to dexamethasone on regenerate remodeling, specifically tendon material properties (peak stress).

    Study Design:

    Controlled laboratory study.

    Methods:

    Specific opportunist and pathogen-free female rats were housed separately (n = 41) or together with specific pathogen-free rats carrying opportunistic microbes such as Staphylococcus aureus (n = 41). After 6 weeks, all co-housed rats appeared healthy but now carried S aureus. Changes in the gut bacterial flora were tested by API and RapID biochemical tests. All rats (clean and contaminated) underwent Achilles tendon transection under aseptic conditions. Flow cytometry was performed 8 days postoperatively on tendon tissue. Sixty rats received subcutaneous dexamethasone or saline injections on days 5 through 9 after transection. The tendons were tested mechanically on day 12. The predetermined primary outcome was the interaction between contamination and dexamethasone regarding peak stress, tested by 2-way analysis of variance.

    Results:

    Dexamethasone increased peak stress in all groups but more in contaminated rats (105%) than in clean rats (53%) (interaction, P = .018). A similar interaction was found for an estimate of elastic modulus (P = .021). Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment reduced transverse area but had small effects on peak force and stiffness. In rats treated with saline only, contamination reduced peak stress by 16% (P = .04) and elastic modulus by 35% (P = .004). Contamination led to changes in the gut bacterial flora and higher levels of T cells (CD3+CD4+) in the healing tendon (P < .05).

    Conclusion:

    Changes in the microbiome influence tendon healing and enhance the positive effects of dexamethasone treatment during the early remodeling phase of tendon healing.

    Clinical Relevance:

    The positive effect of dexamethasone on early tendon remodeling in rats is strikingly strong. If similar effects could be shown in humans, immune modulation by a few days of systemic corticosteroids, or more specific compounds, could open new approaches to rehabilitation after tendon injury.

  • 2.
    Gelmi, Amy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bioelectronic nanofibre scaffolds for tissue engineering and whole-cell biosensors2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Gelmi, Amy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Influence of conductive polymer doping on the viability of cardiac progenitor cells2014In: Journal of materials chemistry. B, ISSN 2050-750X, E-ISSN 2050-7518, Vol. 2, no 24, p. 3860-3867Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiac tissue engineering via the use of stem cells is the future for repairing impaired heart function that results from a myocardial infarction. Developing an optimised platform to support the stem cells is vital to realising this, and through utilising new smart materials such as conductive polymers we can provide a multi-pronged approach to supporting and stimulating the stem cells via engineered surface properties, electrical, and electromechanical stimulation. Here we present a fundamental study on the viability of cardiac progenitor cells on conductive polymer surfaces, focusing on the impact of surface properties such as roughness, surface energy, and surface chemistry with variation of the polymer dopant molecules. The conductive polymer materials were shown to provide a viable support for both endothelial and cardiac progenitor cells, while the surface energy and roughness were observed to influence viability for both progenitor cell types. Characterising the interaction between the cardiac progenitor cells and the conductive polymer surface is a critical step towards optimising these materials for cardiac tissue regeneration, and this study will advance the limited knowledge on biomaterial surface interactions with cardiac cells.

  • 4.
    Gelmi, Amy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Smart Electroactive Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Regeneration2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Gelmi, Amy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Electroactive scaffolds for cardiac tissue regeneration2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Myocardial Infarction (MI), commonly known as a heart attack, is the interruption of blood supply to a part of the heart, causing heart cells to die. In order to restore function by-pass surgery or ultimately heart transplantation is needed. However, due to the shortage of organ donors and complications associated with immune suppressive treatments, development of new strategies to help regenerate the injured heart is necessary. Stem cell therapy can be used to repair necrotic heart tissue and achieve myocardial regeneration. This research is focused on developing implantable electroactive fiber scaffolds that will increase the differentiation ratio of mesenchymal stem cells into cardiomyocytes and thus increase the formation of novel cardiac tissue to repair or replace the damaged cardiac tissue after MI. Composite nanofibrous scaffold of poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) have been coated with biodoped polypyrrole to create an electroactive fiber scaffold, with controllable fiber dimensions and alignment. The electrical properties of the polymers are an integral factor in creating these 'intelligent' 3-D materials; not only does the inherent conductivity provide a platform for electrical stimulation, but the ionic actuation of the polymer can also provide mechanical stimulation to the seeded cells. The biocompatibility of the polymer, PLGA scaffolds, and coated PLGA scaffolds has been investigated using primary cardiovascular progenitor cells.

  • 6.
    Gelmi, Amy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Jiabin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cieslar-Pobuda, Artur
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Los, Marek
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Electroactive polymer scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering2015In: Proc. SPIE 9430, Electroactive Polymer Actuators and Devices (EAPAD) 2015 / [ed] Bar-Cohen, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2015, Vol. 9430, p. 94301T-1-94301T-7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By-pass surgery and heart transplantation are traditionally used to restore the heart’s functionality after a myocardial Infarction (MI or heart attack) that results in scar tissue formation and impaired cardiac function. However, both procedures are associated with serious post-surgical complications. Therefore, new strategies to help re-establish heart functionality are necessary. Tissue engineering and stem cell therapy are the promising approaches that are being explored for the treatment of MI. The stem cell niche is extremely important for the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells and tissue regeneration. For the introduction of stem cells into the host tissue an artificial carrier such as a scaffold is preferred as direct injection of stem cells has resulted in fast stem cell death. Such scaffold will provide the proper microenvironment that can be altered electronically to provide temporal stimulation to the cells. We have developed an electroactive polymer (EAP) scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering. The EAP scaffold mimics the extracellular matrix and provides a 3D microenvironment that can be easily tuned during fabrication, such as controllable fibre dimensions, alignment, and coating. In addition, the scaffold can provide electrical and electromechanical stimulation to the stem cells which are important external stimuli to stem cell differentiation. We tested the initial biocompatibility of these scaffolds using cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs), and continued onto more sensitive induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). We present the fabrication and characterisation of these electroactive fibres as well as the response of increasingly sensitive cell types to the scaffolds.

  • 7.
    Henningsson, Anna J
    et al.
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Wilhelmsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gyllemark, Paula
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology.
    Matussek, Andreas
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Nyman, Dag
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Bimelix Biomedical Laboratory, Mariehamn, Åland, Finland .
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine.
    Low risk of seroconversion or clinical disease in humans after a bite by an Anaplasma phagocytophilum-infected tick2015In: Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases, ISSN 1877-959X, E-ISSN 1877-9603, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 787-792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The risk of contracting human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) after a tick bite is mainly unknown. In this study we investigated the clinical and serological response in 30 humans bitten by ticks positive for Anaplasma phagocytophilum (Group A), 30 humans bitten by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.)-positive ticks (Group B), and 30 humans bitten by ticks negative for both A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi s.l. (Group C). Ticks, blood samples and questionnaires were collected from tick-bitten humans at 34 primary healthcare centres in Sweden and in the Åland Islands, Finland, at the time of the tick bite and after three months. A total of 2553 ticks detached from humans in 2007-2009 were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction, and 31 (1.2%) were positive for A. phagocytophilum, 556 (21.8%) were positive for B. burgdorferi s.l., and eight (0.3%) were co-infected by A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi s.l. The overall prevalence of Anaplasma IgG antibodies in the included participants (n=90) was 17%, and there was no significant difference between the groups A-C. Only one of the participants (in Group C) showed a four-fold increase of IgG antibodies against A. phagocytophilum at the three-month follow-up, but reported no symptoms. The frequency of reported symptoms did not differ between groups A-C, and was unrelated to the findings of A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi s.l. in the detached ticks. We conclude that the risk for HGA or asymptomatic seroconversion after a tick bite in Sweden or in the Åland Islands is low, even if the tick is infected by A. phagocytophilum.

  • 8.
    Islam, Mohammad Mirazul
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ravichandran, Ranjithkumar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Olsen, D.
    FibroGen Inc, CA 94158 USA.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lee, Chyan-Jang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Self-assembled collagen-like-peptide implants as alternatives to human donor corneal transplantation2016In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 6, no 61, p. 55745-55749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extracellular matrix proteins like collagen promote regeneration as implants in clinical studies. However, collagens are large and unwieldy proteins, making small functional peptide analogs potentially ideal substitutes. Self-assembling collagen-like-peptides conjugated with PEG-maleimide were assembled into hydrogels. When tested pre-clinically as corneal implants in mini-pigs, they promoted cell and nerve regeneration, forming neo-corneas structurally and functionally similar to natural corneas.

  • 9.
    Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. LV Prasad Eye Inst, India.
    Haagdorens, Michel K. C.
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Belgium; Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Mirazul Islam, Mohammad Mirazul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lewis, Philip
    Cardiff Univ, Wales.
    Samanta, Ayan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Liszka, Aneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Buznyk, Oleksiy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alarcon, Emilio I.
    Univ Ottawa, Canada.
    Zakaria, Nadia
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Belgium; Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Meek, Keith M.
    Cardiff Univ, Wales.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Montreal, Canada; Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Correction: Short peptide analogs as alternatives to collagen in pro-regenerative corneal implants (vol 69, pg 120, 2018)2018In: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 81, p. 330-331Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 10.
    Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. LV Prasad Eye Inst, India.
    Haagdorens, Michel K. C.
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Belgium; Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Mirazul Islam, Mohammad Mirazul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lewis, Philip
    Cardiff Univ, Wales.
    Samanta, Ayan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Liszka, Aneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Buznyk, Oleksiy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alarcon, Emilio I.
    Univ Ottawa, Canada.
    Zakaria, Nadia
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Belgium; Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Meek, Keith M.
    Cardiff Univ, Wales.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Montreal, Canada; Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Short peptide analogs as alternatives to collagen in pro-regenerative corneal implants2018In: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 69, p. 120-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Short collagen-like peptides (CLPs) are being proposed as alternatives to full-length collagen for use in tissue engineering, on their own as soft hydrogels, or conjugated to synthetic polymer for mechanical strength. However, despite intended clinical use, little is known about their safety and efficacy, mechanism of action or degree of similarity to the full-length counterparts they mimic. Here, we show the functional equivalence of a CLP conjugated to polyethylene glycol (CLP-PEG) to full-length recombinant human collagen in vitro and in promoting stable regeneration of corneal tissue and nerves in a pre- clinicalmini-pig model. We also show that these peptide analogs exerted their pro-regeneration effects through stimulating extracellular vesicle production by host cells. Our results support future use of CLP-PEG implants for corneal regeneration, suggesting the feasibility of these or similar peptide analogs in clinical application in the eye and other tissues. Statement of significance Although biomaterials comprising full-length recombinant human collagen and extracted animal collagen have been evaluated and used clinically, these macromolecules provide only a limited number of functional groups amenable to chemical modification or crosslinking and are demanding to process. Synthetic, customizable analogs that are functionally equivalent, and can be readily scaled-up are therefore very desirable for pre-clinical to clinical translation. Here, we demonstrate, using cornea regeneration as our test bed, that collagen-like-peptides conjugated to multifunctional polyethylene glycol (CLP-PEG) when grafted into mini-pigs as corneal implants were functionally equivalent to recombinant human collagen-based implants that were successfully tested in patients. We also show for the first time that these materials affected regeneration through stimulation of extracellular vesicle production by endogenous host cells that have migrated into the CLP-PEG scaffolds. (C) 2018 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 11.
    Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Haagdorens, Michel K. C.
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Belgium; Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Mirazul Islam, Mohammad Mirazul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lewis, Philip
    Cardiff Univ, Wales.
    Samanta, Ayan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Liszka, Aneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Buznyk, Oleksiy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alarcon, Emilio I.
    Univ Ottawa Heart Inst, Canada.
    Zakaria, Nadia
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Belgium; Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Meek, Keith M.
    Univ Ottawa Heart Inst, Canada.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Montreal, Canada; Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Short peptide analogs as alternatives to collagen in pro-regenerative corneal implants (vol 69, pg 120, 2018)2019In: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 88, p. 556-557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 12.
    Kesik-Brodacka, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Institute Biotechnol and Antibiot, Poland.
    Lipiec, Agnieszka
    Warsaw University of Life Science, Poland.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Polish Academic Science, Poland.
    Jedlina, Luiza
    Polish Academic Science, Poland.
    Miedzinska, Katarzyna
    Polish Academic Science, Poland; Queens Medical Research Institute, Scotland.
    Mikolajczak, Magdalena
    Polish Academic Science, Poland.
    Plucienniczak, Andrzej
    Institute Biotechnol and Antibiot, Poland.
    Legocki, Andrzej B.
    Polish Academic Science, Poland.
    Wedrychowicz, Halina
    Polish Academic Science, Poland.
    Immune response of rats vaccinated orally with various plant-expressed recombinant cysteine proteinase constructs when challenged with Fasciola hepatica metacercariae2017In: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, ISSN 1935-2727, E-ISSN 1935-2735, Vol. 11, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Cysteine proteinases of Fasciola hepatica are important candidates for vaccine antigens because of their role in fluke biology and host-parasite relationships. In our previous experiments, we found that a recombinant cysteine proteinase cloned from adult F. hepatica ( CPFhW) can protect rats against liver fluke infections when it is administered intramuscularly or intranasally in the form of cDNA. We also observed considerable protection upon challenge following mucosal vaccination with inclusion bodies containing recombinant CPFhW produced in Escherichia coli. In this study, we explore oral vaccination, which may be the desired method of delivery and is potentially capable of preventing infections at the site of helminth entry. To provide antigen encapsulation and to protect the vaccine antigen from degradation in the intestinal tract, transgenic plant-based systems are used. Methodology Conclusions We obtained substantial protection after oral administration of the plant-produced hybrids of CPFhW and HBcAg. The highest level of protection (65.4%)was observed in animals immunised with transgenic plants expressing the mature CPFhW enzyme flanked by Gly-rich linkers and inserted into c/e1 epitope of truncated HBcAg. The immunised rats showed clear IgG1 and IgM responsesIn the present study, we aimed to evaluate the protective ability of mucosal vaccinations of 12-week- old rats with CPFhW produced in a transgenic-plant-based system. To avoid inducing tolerance and to maximise the immune response induced by oral immunisation, we used the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein ( HBcAg) as a carrier. Animals were immunised with two doses of the antigen and challenged with 25 or 30 metacercariae of F. hepatica. Conclusions We obtained substantial protection after oral administration of the plant-produced hybrids of CPFhW and HBcAg. The highest level of protection (65.4%) was observed in animals immunised with transgenic plants expressing the mature CPFhW enzyme flanked by Gly- rich linkers and inserted into c/e1 epitope of truncated HBcAg. The immunised rats showed clear IgG1 and IgM responses to CPFhW for 4 consecutive weeks after the challenge.

  • 13.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Elizondo, Rodolfo A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Edin, Joel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsen, David
    FibroGen Incorporated, San Francisco, CA, USA.
    Merrett, Kimberley
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Ottawa Hospital Research Institute–Vision Programme, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Lee, Chang-Jang
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Ottawa Hospital Research Institute–Vision Programme, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Polarek, James
    FibroGen Incorporated, San Francisco, CA, USA.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effect of Surgical Technique on Corneal Implant Performance2014In: Translational Vision Science & Technology, ISSN 2164-2591, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Our aim was to determine the effect of a surgical technique on biomaterial implant performance, specifically graft retention.

     

    Methods: Twelve mini pigs were implanted with cell-free, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) cross-linked recombinant human collagen type III (RHCIII) hydrogels as substitutes for donor corneal allografts using overlying sutures with or without human amniotic membrane (HAM) versus interrupted sutures with HAM. The effects of the retention method were compared as well as the effects of collagen concentration (13.7% to 15% RHCIII).

    Results: All implanted corneas showed initial haze that cleared with time, resulting in corneas with optical clarity matching those of untreated controls. Biochemical analysis showed that by 12 months post operation, the initial RHCIII implants had been completely remodeled, as type I collagen, was the major collagenous protein detected, whereas no RHCIII could be detected. Histological analysis showed all implanted corneas exhibited regeneration of epithelial and stromal layers as well as nerves, along with touch sensitivity and tear production. Most neovascularization was seen in corneas stabilized by interrupted sutures.

    Conclusions: This showed that the surgical technique used does have a significant effect on the overall performance of corneal implants, overlying sutures caused less vascularization than interrupted sutures.

    Translational Relevance: Understanding the significance of the suturing technique can aid the selection of the most appropriate procedure when implanting artificial corneal substitutes. The same degree of regeneration, despite a higher collagen content indicates that future material development can progress toward stronger, more resistant implants.

  • 14.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Animal models ad in vitro alternatives in regenerative medicine: Focus on biomaterials development2014In: Innovative Strategies in Tissue Engineering / [ed] Mayuri S. Prasad & Paolo Di Nardo, Aalborg, Denmark: River Publishers, 2014, p. 37-51Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Merrett, Kimberly
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mondal, Debasish
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Collagen Type I: A Promising Scaffold Material for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine2012In: Type I collagen: biological functions, synthesis & medicinal applications / [ed] Maria Eduarda Henriques and Marcio Pinto, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2012, p. 1-43Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is now recognized that biological macromolecules such as components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are important as instructive templates in Regenerative Medicine applications. They are now increasingly used in the development of a new generation of bio-mimetic materials that allow for restoration of function when the self-renewal capacity of a tissue or organ cannot overcome degeneration caused by disease, injury or age-related wear. For example, macromolecules derived from connective tissue have been isolated, chemically modified, and used in medical applications ranging from tissue repair and reconstruction to drug and cell delivery systems. Common ECM macromolecules of vertebrates include collagen, proteoglycans, elastin, and other cell-interactive proteins such as fibronectin and laminin. Of these, type I collagen is the most abundant ECM macromolecule and is the primary scaffolding material that maintains the 3-dimensional structure of tissues and organs within the body. It also provides the micro-environmental milieu for cellular attachment, migration, and proliferation.

    Animal-derived collagen is frequently used in tissue engineering applications due to its biocompatibility, but there are significant concerns about the immunogenicity of xenogeneic material as well as the possibility of pathogen transmission. Most recently, synthetic collagens and recombinant human collagens have been produced for medical application. Regardless of the source, however, macromolecules require processing and chemical treatment in order to improve their stability both in vitro and in vivo. This is most commonly achieved by cross-linking using a variety of agents. Cross-linking also allows for the development of “tailor-made” collagen-based biomaterials that possess specific properties for tissue engineering. Chemical cross-linkers such as glutaraldehyde and epoxy compounds are frequently used but their cytotoxicities have limited their clinical application. This has led to the use of zero-length cross-linkers such as carbodiimides and naturally derived agents such as genipin. Enzymatic cross-linking is becoming an attractive method to induce in situ biomaterial formation due to the mildness of the reaction. Naturally occurring enzymes such as transglutaminase are now commonly used. Photosensitizers used in combination with ultra-violet light irradiation can be used as exogenous cross-linkers. For example, riboflavin in combination with ultra-violet light is used clinically to augment the properties of collagen-based tissues such as the sclera and the cornea.

    Collagen type I is a good candidate for tissue engineering and in vivo delivery systems for cells, proteins, and drugs. Important to its versatile and functional nature are its chemotactic properties, which promote cellular proliferation and differentiation, richness in cross-linking sites, and biodegradability. Collagen based delivery matrices have been reported to improve the results of cell delivery by improving cell viability.

  • 16.
    Puckert, C.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gelmi, A.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Optimisation of conductive polymer biomaterials for cardiac progenitor cells2016In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 6, no 67, p. 62270-62277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The characterisation of biomaterials for cardiac tissue engineering applications is vital for the development of effective treatments for the repair of cardiac function. New smart materials developed from conductive polymers can provide dynamic benefits in supporting and stimulating stem cells via controlled surface properties, electrical and electromechanical stimulation. In this study we investigate the control of surface properties of conductive polymers through a systematic approach to variable synthesis parameters, and how the resulting surface properties influence the viability of cardiac progenitor cells. A thorough analysis investigating the effect of electropolymerisation parameters, such as current density and growth, and reagent variation on physical properties provides a fundamental understanding of how to optimise conductive polymer biomaterials for cardiac progenitor cells.

  • 17.
    Wesolowska, Agnieszka
    et al.
    Polish Acad Sci, Poland.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Polish Acad Sci, Poland.
    Jedlina, Luiza
    Polish Acad Sci, Poland.
    Basalaj, Katarzyna
    Polish Acad Sci, Poland.
    Legocki, Andrzej
    Polish Acad Sci, Poland.
    Wedrychowic, Halina
    Polish Acad Sci, Poland.
    Kesik-Brodacka, Malgorzata
    Inst Biotechnol and Antibiot, Poland.
    A Preliminary Study of a Lettuce-Based Edible Vaccine Expressing the Cysteine Proteinase of Fasciola hepatica for Fasciolosis Control in Livestock2018In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 9, article id 2592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oral vaccination with edible vaccines is one of the most promising approaches in modern vaccinology. Edible vaccines are an alternative to conventional vaccines, which are typically delivered by injection. Here, freeze-dried transgenic lettuce expressing the cysteine proteinase of the trematode Fasciola hepatica (CPFhVV) was used to orally vaccinate cattle and sheep against fasciolosis, which is the most important trematode disease due to the parasites global distribution, wide spectrum of host species and significant economic losses of farmers. In the study, goals such as reducing the intensity of infection, liver damage and F. hepatica fecundity were achieved. Moreover, we demonstrated that the host sex influenced the outcome of infection following vaccination, with female calves and male lambs showing better protection than their counterparts. Since differences occurred following vaccination and infection, different immunization strategies should be considered for different sexes and host species when developing new control methods. The results of the present study highlight the potential of oral vaccination with plant-made and plant-delivered vaccines for F. hepatica infection control.

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