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  • 1.
    Ahn, Henrik Casimir
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Baranowski, J
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Nielsen, Nils Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Wallby, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in high-risk surgical candidates with low risk-scores1984Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Allvin, Renée
    et al.
    Clinical Skills Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro.
    Berndtzon, Magnus
    Metodikum - Skill Centre of Medical Simulation Region County Jönköping, Jönköping.
    Carlzon, Liisa
    Simulation Centre West, Department of Research, Education and Development, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hultin, Magnus
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Medical Faculty, Umeå University, Umeå.
    Karlgren, Klas
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Department of Research, Education and Development and Innovation, Södersjukhuset Hospital, Stockholm.
    Masiello, Italo
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Södersjukhuset Hospital, Stockholm.
    Södersved Källestedt, Marie-Louise
    Clinical Skills Centre, Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Västerås.
    Tamás, Éva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Confident but not theoretically grounded: experienced simulation educators perceptions of their own professional development2017In: Advances in Medical Education and Practice, ISSN 1179-7258, E-ISSN 1179-7258, Vol. 8, p. 99-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Medical simulation enables the design of learning activities for competency areas (eg, communication and leadership) identified as crucial for future health care professionals. Simulation educators and medical teachers follow different career paths, and their education backgrounds and teaching contexts may be very different in a simulation setting. Although they have a key role in facilitating learning, information on the continuing professional development (pedagogical development) of simulation educators is not available in the literature.

    Objectives: To explore changes in experienced simulation educators’ perceptions of their own teaching skills, practices, and understanding of teaching over time.

    Methods: A qualitative exploratory study. Fourteen experienced simulation educators participated in individual open-ended interviews focusing on their development as simulation educators. Data were analyzed using an inductive thematic analysis.

    Results: Marked educator development was discerned over time, expressed mainly in an altered way of thinking and acting. Five themes were identified: shifting focus, from following to utilizing a structure, setting goals, application of technology, and alignment with profession. Being confident in the role as an instructor seemed to constitute a foundation for the instructor’s pedagogical development.

    Conclusion: Experienced simulation educators’ pedagogical development was based on self-confidence in the educator role, and not on a deeper theoretical understanding of teaching and learning. This is the first clue to gain increased understanding regarding educational level and possible education needs among simulation educators, and it might generate several lines of research for further studies.

  • 3.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Allvin, Renée
    Universitetssjukhuset Örebro, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hjelmqvist, Hans
    Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brandt, Jonathan
    Aleris specialistvård Motala, Sweden.
    Tamás, Éva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    I nterprofessionell simulering är engagerande och relevant[Interprofessional simulation: an engaging and relevant technique for teamwork practice]2019In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stakeholders in healthcare and education find interprofessional teamwork to be crucial for todays complex healthcare. Consequently, the students need to prepare for future collaboration with other professions. Interprofessional simulation (IPS) is a technique in which several professions can engage together in clinical scenarios. Using a survey we studied the perceived relevance of two IPS settings in which last-year medical and nursing students participated in acute care scenarios. The findings showed that students perceive IPS as being highly relevant and that students from the other profession contributed to their learning. IPS holds promise as a pedagogical tool towards future interprofessional competence. However, pedagogical improvements can be made, and the professional perspectives can be better balanced. Furthermore, in order to equip students with broader interprofessional competence, scenarios should include several professions and a variety of clinical contexts.

  • 4.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Karlsson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Meyer, Frida
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tamás, Éva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Utvärdering av IPL-simulering på Clinicum: Simuleringsdag ”Akuta situationer” för sistaårsstudenter från sjuksköterske- och läkarprogrammen HT 20162017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En gemensam simuleringsdag för sjuksköterske- och läkarstudenter har utvärderats och diskuteras här i relation till interprofessionellt lärande och simuleringsbaserat lärande.

    IPL-simuleringen kännetecknas av ett starkt studentengagemang och upplevs som mycket relevant och kliniskt autentisk. Den simuleringsbaserade satsningen är alltså fortsatt aktuell och har utvecklats till en hög nivå med relevans för lärande och klinisk förberedelse. Innehållet rör såväl kliniska som team­relaterade kunskaper och kompetenser. Simulering som undervisningsform uppskattas högt och simulerings­instruktörens bidrag till lärandet lyfts fram. Ambitionsnivån kan ytterligare höjas på några punkter. Kurskamraternas bidrag i lärandet kan ytterligare stärkas, likaså omvårdnads­innehållet i scenarierna.

    IPL-mål adresseras i aktiviteten, i synnerhet ökar teamsamverkan progressivt under dagen. Det inter­professionella lärandet kan stärkas ännu mer  genom att linjera tydligare med övriga IPL-moment samt knyta an till de uttalade IPL-curriculum-målen.

  • 5.
    Forsberg, Lena M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Tamés, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Exercise echocardiography predicts postoperative left ventricular remodeling in aortic regurgitation2014In: SCANDINAVIAN CARDIOVASCULAR JOURNAL, ISSN 1401-7431, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 4-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. We aimed to investigate if preoperative left ventricular (LV) function assessed by exercise echocardiography could predict late postoperative LV function in aortic regurgitation (AR) patients and to evaluate how LV long-axis function is affected late after aortic valve surgery. Design. A total of 21 male chronic AR patients, aged 49 (12) years, accepted for surgery were examined preoperatively, 6 months-, and 4 years postoperatively, at rest and during exercise. Besides conventional echocardiographic parameters, the atrioventricular plane displacement (AVPD) by M-mode and peak systolic velocity (s) in the basal LV by color tissue Doppler were measured. Results. Preoperatively EFrest and EFexercise, were 55(7)% and 54(9)%, respectively, and Delta EF 0(8)%. LV dimensions and volumes indexed to BSA had decreased at the 6-month follow-up and were stable at late follow-up. s(rest), s(exercise), AVPD(rest), and AVPD(exercise) were unchanged at both the postoperative examinations (all P >= 0.05). Preoperative EFexercise and AVPD(exercise) showed inverse correlation to late postoperative indexed LV enddiastolic volume (r = -0.68, p < 0.004 and r = -0.86, P < 0.001) and indexed LV endsystolic volume (r = -0.68, P = 0.004 and r = -0.81, P < 0.001), while there was no correlation to preoperative EFrest and AVPD(rest) (all r < 0.2). Conclusions. Preoperative exercise echocardiography can detect AR patients with suboptimal LV remodeling late postoperatively.

  • 6.
    Forsberg, Lena M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Vánky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Left and right ventricular function in aortic stenosis patients 8 weeks post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation or surgical aortic valve replacement2011In: European Journal of Echocardiography, ISSN 1525-2167, E-ISSN 1532-2114, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 603-611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Knowledge of longitudinal left and right ventricular (LV and RV) function after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is scarce. We hypothesized that the longitudinal systolic biventricular function in aortic stenosis (AS) patients is affected differently by TAVI and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods and results Thirty-three AS patients (all-TAVI group, age 81 +/- 9 years, 18 female), with EuroSCORE 18 +/- 9%, were accepted for TAVI. Seventeen of these patients were matched (by gender, age, and LV function) to 17 patients undergoing SAVR. Conventional echocardiographic parameters, systolic atrioventricular plane displacement (AVPD) at standard sites and peak systolic velocity (PSV) by pulsed tissue Doppler at basal RV free wall, LV lateral wall, and septum were studied before and 8 weeks after the procedure. Procedural success was 100%, and 30-day mortality 9%. In all TAVI patients, AVPD(lateral), PSV(lateral), AVPD(septal), and PSV(septal) increased (P andlt; 0.001, 0.003, 0.006 and 0.002). When studying the matched patients postoperatively, both the SAVR and TAVI patients had increased PSV(lateral) and AVPD(lateral) (SAVR: P = 0.03 and P = 0.04, TAVI: P = 0.04 and P = 0.01). The PSV(RV) increased in the all-TAVI group (P = 0.007), while the AVPD(RV) was unchanged. SAVR patients had decreased AVPD(RV) (P = 0.001) and PSV(RV) (P = 0.004), while the matched TAVI patients had unchanged RV function parameters. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion An improvement in regional longitudinal LV function in the septal and lateral wall could be seen after TAVI. Among the matched patients, both the TAVI and SAVR patients seemed to improve LV function in the lateral wall. RV systolic function increased in TAVI patients, but was impaired in the matched SAVR group at the 8-week follow-up.

  • 7.
    Forsberg, Lena M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Tamás, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Vánky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Differences in recovery of left and right ventricular function following aortic valve interventions: a longitudinal echocardiographic study in patients undergoing surgical, transapical or transfemoral aortic valve implantation2013In: Catheterization and cardiovascular interventions, ISSN 1522-1946, E-ISSN 1522-726X, Vol. 82, no 6, p. 1004-1014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    To evaluate longitudinal left and right ventricular function (LVF and RVF) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) as compared to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and LVF and RVF after TAVI by the transfemoral (TF) or transapical (TA) approach.

    Background

    Knowledge about differences in recovery of LVF and RVF after TAVI and SAVR is scarce.

    Methods

    Sixty patients (age 81 ± 7 years, logistic EuroSCORE 16 ± 10%), undergoing TAVI (TF: n = 35 and TA: n  = 25), were examined by echocardiography including atrioventricular plane displacement (AVPD) and peak systolic velocities (PSV) by tissue Doppler at basal RV free wall, LV lateral wall and septum preprocedurally, 7 weeks and 6 months postprocedurally. Twenty-seven SAVR patients were matched to 27 TAVI patients by age, gender and LVF.

    Results

    Early postintervention, TAVI patients had improved longitudinal LVF. However, when analyzed separately, only TF, but not TA patients, had improved LV lateral and septal AVPD and PSV (all P ≤ 0.01). All TAVI patients, as well as the TF and TA group had unchanged longitudinal LVF between the early and late follow-ups (all P > 0.05). The SAVR group had higher septal LVF than the matched TAVI group preprocedurally, while postoperatively this difference was diminished. Longitudinal RVF was better in the TF group than in the TA group pre- and postprocedurally. Although the SAVR group had superior longitudinal RVF preoperatively, this was inferior to TAVI postoperatively.

    Conclusions

    Postprocedural longitudinal LVF and RVF in patients undergoing TF-TAVI, TA-TAVI, or SAVR differ considerably. Preservation of longitudinal RVF after TAVI might influence the selection of aortic valve intervention in the future.

  • 8.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Henriksson, Jan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bjarnegård, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital, Sweden.
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE INFERIOR VENA CAVA IN TRAINED AND UNTRAINED FEMALES2016In: Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0301-5629, E-ISSN 1879-291X, Vol. 42, no 12, p. 2794-2802Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to explore the long-and short-axis dimensions, shape and collapsibility of the inferior vena cava in 46 trained and 48 untrained females (mean age: 21 +/- 2 y). Echocardiography in the subcostal view revealed a larger expiratory long-axis diameter (mean: 24 +/- 3 vs. 20 +/- 3 mm, p amp;lt; 0.001) and short-axis area (mean: 5.5 +/- 1.5 vs. 4.7 +/- 1.4 cm(2), p = 0.014) in trained females. IVC shape (the ratio of short-axis major to minor diameters) and the relative decrease in IVC dimension with inspiration were similar for the two groups. The IVC long-axis diameter reflected short-axis minor diameter and was correlated to maximal oxygen uptake (r = 0.52, p amp;lt; 0.01). In summary, the results indicate that trained females have a larger IVC similar in shape and respiratory decrease in dimensions to that of untrained females. The long-axis diameter corresponded closely to short-axis minor diameter and, thus, underestimates maximal IVC diameter. (E-mail: kristofer.hedman@liu.se) (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine amp; Biology.

  • 9.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Henriksson, Jan
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjarnegård, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Physiology, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Physiology, County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Tamás, Éva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    The size and shape of the inferior vena cava in trained and untrained females in relation to maximal oxygen uptake2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The increase in cardiac dimensions following endurance training is well acknowledged. A few studies report a larger inferior vena cava (IVC) in trained, predominatly male subjects while athlete-control studies upon females are lacking. Previous studies were constrained to long-axis measurements, and there are no reports in the literature on IVC short-axis dimensions and shape in athletes.

    Methods and Results. Forty-eight sedentary and 46 endurance trained females (mean age 21±2 years, VO2max 39±5 vs. 52±5 mL×kg-1×min-1, p<0.001) underwent echocardiographic examination including IVC diameter and cross-sectional area measured in the subcostal view. IVC shape was calculated as the ratio of short-axis major-to-minor diameter.

    Five out of eight IVC dimensions were larger in trained females, including maximal long-axis diameter (mean 24±3 vs. 20±3 mm, p<0.001) and maximal short-axis area (mean 5.5±1.5 vs. 4.7±1.4 cm2, p=0.022). Both groups presented with a slightly oval IVC with no differences between the groups in IVC shape or inspiratory decrease in any IVC dimension. The IVC long-axis diameter reflected the minor-axis diameter obtained in the short-axis view, during both expiration and inspiration. Positive correlations were seen between maximal IVC long-axis diameter and maximal oxygen uptake (r=0.52, p<0.01), left ventricular end-diastolic volume (r=0.46, p<0.01) and right atrial area (r=0.49, p<0.01).

    Conclusion. The IVC was larger in endurance trained than in untrained females but showed similar shape and inspiratory decrease in dimensions. The long-axis IVC diameter was related to maximal oxygen uptake.

  • 10.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Decreased aerobic capacity 4 years after aortic valve replacement in male patients operated upon for chronic aortic regurgitation2012In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 167-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exercise testing is underutilized in patients with valve disease. We have previously found a low physical work capacity in patients with aortic regurgitation 6 months after aortic valve replacement (AVR). The aim of this study was to evaluate aerobic capacity in patients 4 years after AVR, to study how their peak oxygen uptake (peakVO2) had changed postoperatively over a longer period of time. Twenty-one patients (all men, 52 +/- 13 years) who had previously undergone cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) pre- and 6 months postoperatively underwent maximal exercise testing 49 +/- 15 months postoperatively using an electrically braked bicycle ergometer. Breathing gases were analysed and the patients physical fitness levels categorized according to angstrom strands and Wassermans classifications. Mean peakVO2 was 22.8 +/- 5.1 ml x kg-1 x min-1 at the 49-month follow-up, which was lower than at the 6-month follow-up (25.6 +/- 5.8 ml x kg-1 x min-1, P = 0.001). All but one patient presented with a physical fitness level below average using angstrom strands classification, while 13 patients had a low physical capacity according to Wassermans classification. A significant decrease in peakVO2 was observed from six to 49 months postoperatively, and the decrease was larger than expected from the increased age of the patients. CPET could be helpful in timing aortic valve surgery and for the evaluation of need of physical activity as part of a rehabilitation programme.

  • 11.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Tamás, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Henriksson, J
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Bjarnegård, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. County Hospital Kalmar.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Female athlete's heart: Systolic and diastolic function related to circulatory dimensions2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 372-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are relatively few studies on female athletes examining cardiac size and function and how these measures relate to maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max ). When determining sports eligibility, it is important to know what physiological adaptations and characteristics may be expected in female athletes, taking body and cardiac size into account. The purposes of this study were (a) to compare right and left heart dimensions and function in female endurance athletes (ATH) and in non-athletic female controls of similar age (CON); and (b) to explore how these measures related to VO2max . Forty-six ATH and 48 CON underwent a maximal bicycle exercise test and an echocardiographic examination at rest, including standard and color tissue Doppler investigation. All heart dimensions indexed for body size were larger in ATH (all P < 0.01). The diastolic mitral E/A ratio was 27% higher in ATH (P < 0.001) while systolic left and right atrio-ventricular longitudinal displacement was 7% (P = 0.002) and 15% (P < 0.001) larger in ATH, respectively. Half (50.3%) of the variability in VO2max could be explained by left ventricular end-diastolic volume. Our results could be useful in evaluating female endurance athletes with suspected cardiac disease and contribute to understanding differences between female athletes and non-athletes.

  • 12.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Tamás, Éva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Bjarnegård, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Physiology, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Physiology, County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Cardiac systolic regional function and synchrony in endurance trained and untrained females2015In: BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine, ISSN 2055-7647, Vol. 25, no 1, article id :e000015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Most studies on cardiac function in athletes describe overall heart function in predominately male participants. We aimed to compare segmental, regional and overall myocardial function and synchrony in female endurance athletes (ATH) and in age-matched sedentary females (CON).

    Methods In 46 ATH and 48 CON, echocardiography was used to measure peak longitudinal systolic strain and myocardial velocities in 12 left ventricular (LV) and 2 right ventricular (RV) segments. Regional and overall systolic function were calculated together with four indices of dyssynchrony.

    Results There were no differences in regional or overall LV systolic function between groups, or in any of the four dyssynchrony indices. Peak systolic velocity (s′) was higher in the RV of ATH than in CON (9.7±1.5 vs 8.7±1.5 cm/s, p=0.004), but not after indexing by cardiac length (p=0.331). Strain was similar in ATH and CON in 8 of 12 LV myocardial segments. In septum and anteroseptum, basal and mid-ventricular s′ was 6–7% and 17–19% higher in ATH than in CON (p<0.05), respectively, while s′ was 12% higher in CON in the basal LV lateral wall (p=0.013). After indexing by cardiac length, s′ was only higher in ATH in the mid-ventricular septum (p=0.041).

    Conclusions We found differences between trained and untrained females in segmental systolic myocardial function, but not in global measures of systolic function, including cardiac synchrony. These findings give new insights into cardiac adaptation to endurance training and could also be of use for sports cardiologists evaluating female athletes.

  • 13.
    Helin Forsberg,, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Preoperative Longitudinal Left Ventricular Function by Tissue Doppler Echocardiography at Rest and During Exercise Is Valuable in Timing of Aortic Valve Surgery in Male Aortic Regurgitation Patients2010In: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, ISSN 0894-7317, E-ISSN 1097-6795, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 387-395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate if left ventricular (LV) systolic function by tissue Doppler echocardiography at rest and during exercise preoperatively could predict postoperative LV function and thereby be useful in the timing of aortic valve surgery in patients with severe aortic regurgitation. Methods: In 29 patients (median age, 59 years; interquartile range, 39-64 years), echocardiography, tissue Doppler echocardiography, and radionuclide ventriculography were performed preoperatively and postoperatively at rest and during supine bicycle exercise. Results: Preoperative ejection fraction (EF) was 62%. Patients formed two groups, with basal LV peak systolic velocity (PSV) 5.9 cm/s preoperatively as the cutoff value between low and high PSV. Preoperatively, patients with low PSV had lower PSV during exercise (Pandlt;.005), EF during exercise (Pandlt;.05), and atrioventricular plane displacement (AVPD) at rest (Pandlt;.005) and during exercise (P andlt;.05) than those with high PSV. Postoperatively, patients with low PSV had smaller AVPD at rest (P andlt;.05), AVPD during exercise (Pandlt;.01), and PSV during exercise (Pandlt;.01). Conclusion: In patients with chronic aortic regurgitation with EFs and LV dimensions not fulfilling criteria for surgery according to guidelines, preoperative PSV and AVPD at rest and during exercise detected postoperative LV dysfunction.

  • 14.
    Kvernby, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Rönnerfalk, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). SyntheticMR AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Longitudinal Changes in Myocardial T-1 and T-2 Relaxation Times Related to Diffuse Myocardial Fibrosis in Aortic Stenosis; Before and After Aortic Valve Replacement2018In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 799-807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Diffuse myocardial fibrosis is associated with adverse outcomes, although detection and quantification is challenging. Cardiac MR relaxation times mapping represents a promising imaging biomarker for diffuse myocardial fibrosis. Purpose: To investigate whether relaxation times can detect longitudinal changes in myocardial tissue composition associated with diffuse fibrosis in patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) before and after aortic valve replacement (AVR). Study type: Prospective longitudinal study. Population/Subjects/Phantom/Specimen/Animal Model: Fifteen patients with severe AS. Field Strength/Sequence: 3T /3(3) 3(3) 5-MOLLI, T2-GraSE, and 3D-QALAS. Assessment: Patients underwent MR examinations at three timepoints: before AVR, as well as 3 and 12 months after AVR. Data from each patient was analyzed in 16 myocardial segments. Statistical Tests: The segment-wise T1 and T2 data were analyzed over time after surgery using linear mixed models for repeated measures analysis. Results: The results showed that T1 relaxation times were significantly (Pamp;lt; 0.05) shorter 3 and 12 months postoperative than preoperative and that the T2 relaxation times were significantly (Pamp;lt; 0.05) longer 3 and 12 months postoperative than preoperative for both 3D and 2D mapping methods. No significant changes were seen between 3 and 12 months postoperative for any of the methods (P50.06/0.19 for T1 with 3D-QALAS/MOLLI and P50.09/0.25 for T2 with 3DQALAS/ GraSE). Data Conclusion: We demonstrated that changes in myocardial relaxation times and thus tissue characteristics can be observed within 3 months after AVR surgery. The significant changes in relaxation times from preoperative examinations to the follow-up may be interpreted as a reduction of interstitial fibrosis in the left ventricular wall. Level of Evidence: 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 3

  • 15.
    Malin, Södling
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Clinicum.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Clinicum.
    Tamás, Éva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Färdighetsträning i simulerad miljö: Undervisning av praktiska färdigheter på Clinicum, Läkarutbildning, Stadium III, Termin 92018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Från och med 2009 erbjuds praktiska färdighetsövningar på Clinicum där läkarstudenter under handledning går genom teoretisk bakgrund och övar genomförande av praktiska färdigheter kopplade till mål inom cirkulation, respiration och ortopedi på anatomiska modeller. En observationsstudie genomfördes med fokus på studentcentrerat lärande, meningsfullhet och relevans, samt lärande i samarbete med andra. Det konstaterades att lärmomentet genomförs i enlighet med grundläggande principer för PBL, är stark kopplat till den kliniska praktiken, samt att det bjuder in till att lära i samarbete med andra.

    Förbättringsmöjligheter identifierades i tillgänglighet av referensmaterial om teoretisk bakgrund före utbildningsmomentet för att underlätta undervisningens anpassning till studenternas aktuella kunskaper. Att dessutom göra det möjligt att skicka frågor till lärarna som förberedelse skulle bidra till ökad individualisering och effektivisering av utbildningsmomenten.

  • 16.
    Nilsson, Henric
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Borg, Sabina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing for evaluation of a randomized exercise training intervention following aortic valve replacement2019In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 103-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aortic valve surgery is the definitive treatment for aortic stenosis (AS). No specific recommendation is available on how exercise training should be conducted and evaluated after aortic valve replacement (AVR). This study aimed to examine the effect of aerobic exercise training on exercise capacity following AVR. In addition to our primary outcome variable, peak oxygen uptake (peakVO(2)), the effect on submaximal cardiopulmonary variables including oxygen uptake kinetics (tau), oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) and ventilatory efficiency (VE/VCO2 slope) was evaluated. Following AVR due to AS, 12 patients were randomized to either a group receiving 12 weeks of supervised aerobic exercise training (EX) or a control group (CON). Exercise capacity was assessed by a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET). There was a significant increase in peak load (+28%, P = 0 center dot 031) and in peakVO(2) (+23%, P = 0 center dot 031) in EX, corresponding to an increase in achieved percentage of predicted peakVO(2) from 88 to 104% (P = 0 center dot 031). For submaximal variables, there were only non-statistically significant trends in improvement between CPETs in EX. In CON, there were no significant differences in any maximal or submaximal variable between CPETs. We conclude that 12 weeks of supervised aerobic exercise training induces significant adaptations in cardiopulmonary function following AVR, especially in regard to maximal variables including peakVO(2). In addition, we provide novel data on the effect on several submaximal variables following exercise training in this group of patients.

  • 17.
    Rönnerfalk, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Edston, Erik
    Rättsmedicinska institutet, Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Tamás, Evá
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Fibros i vänster kammare vid aortastenos och dess påverkan på vänsterkammarfunktion2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Rönnerfalk, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Structure and function of the tricuspid and bicuspid regurgitant aortic valve: an echocardiographic study2015In: Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1569-9293, E-ISSN 1569-9285, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 71-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The emerging new treatment options for aortic valve disease call for more sophisticated diagnostics. We aimed to describe the echocardiographic pathophysiology and characteristics of the purely regurgitant aortic valve in detail.

    METHODS: Twenty-nine men, with chronic aortic regurgitation without concomitant heart disease referred for aortic valve intervention, underwent 2D transoesophageal echocardiographic (TEE) examination prior to surgery according to a previously published matrix. Measurements of the aortic valve apparatus in long and short axis view were made in systole and diastole and analysed off-line. The aortic valves were grouped as tricuspid (TAV) or bicuspid (BAV), and classified by regurgitation mechanism.

    RESULTS: Twenty-four examinations were eligible for analysis of which 13 presented TAV and 11 BAV. The regurgitation mechanism was classified as dilatation of the aorta in 6 cases, as prolapse in 11 cases and as poor cusp tissue quality or quantity in 7 cases. The ventriculo-aortic junction (VAJ) and valve opening were closely related (TAV r = 0.5, BAV r = 0.73) but no correlation was found between the VAJ and the maximal sinus diameter (maxSiD) or the sinotubular junction (STJ). However, the STJ and maxSiD were significantly related (TAV vs BAV: systole r = 0.9, r = 0.8; diastole r = 0.9, r = 0.7), forming an entity. The conjoined BAV cusps were shorter than the anterior cusps when closed (P = 0.002); the inter-commissural distances of the cusps in the BAV group were significantly different (P = 0.001 resp. 0.03) in both systole and diastole.

    CONCLUSIONS: The VAJ was independent of other aortic dimensions and should thereby be considered as a separate entity with influence on valve opening. The detailed 2D TEE measurements of this study add further important information to our knowledge about the function and echocardiographic anatomy of the pathological aortic valve and root either as a stand-alone examination or as a benchmark and complement to 3D echocardiography. This may have an impact on decisions regarding repairability of the native aortic valve.

  • 19.
    Szabó, Zoltán
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center.
    Träff, Stefan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center.
    Hermansson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center.
    Tamas, Eva
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center.
    Maros, Tamás
    University of Debrecen, Hungary.
    Szentkiralyi, István
    University of Debrecen, Hungary.
    Kiegészítő klinikai módszer a nyitott szívműtéteknél fellépő légembolisatio csökkentésére: [A complementary clinical method to minimize air embolism during open-heart surgery]2008In: Magyar Sebeszet, ISSN 0025-0295, Vol. 61, p. 57-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Air from the left heart is ejected even up to several hours after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) despite the use of CO 2 . The following method is complementary in addition to surgical de-airing in order to further reduce the chance of air embolism, especially from the pulmonary veins. After re-expanding the lungs with standard bag inflation, the ventilation is restarted in consultation with the surgeon. The ventilator is set to the respiratory minute volume used before the CPB but at a respiratory frequency of 10/minutes whereas the regularly beating heart is filled from the heart lung machine. Transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) reliably controls the effect.

  • 20. Szentgyörgyi, Lajos
    et al.
    Leny, Andrij
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Péterffy, Arpád
    Intraoperative fires caused by alcoholic skin antiseptic and diathermy2008In: Magyar sebészet, ISSN 0025-0295, Vol. 61, p. 71-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [hu]

    UNLABELLED: The authors describe two intraoperative fires during cardiac surgery. In both cases, in addition to the usual disinfection and isolation of the operating field, they wanted to reduce the infection hazard and to restore the partly ruined isolation by 70% alcoholic skin antiseptic solution. Soon after the disinfection, but before the evaporation of alcohol, diathermy was used and caused fire. In case of the first patient the fire spread over the isolation film and resulted second grade (5%) and third-grade (1%) burn injury which required plastic surgery. In the second case the patient's beard caught fire causing second-grade (1%) burn that was treated locally. Despite these burn injuries both patients recovered after the heart surgery. These two intraoperative fires are 0.003-0.004% of all surgical procedures.

    CONCLUSION: Fires during surgery are rare and might have serious consequences. They can be prevented by keeping the discipline of work and instructions of fire protection. The best way of prevention is regular education of all the staff (doctors, nurses, etc.) working in the operating theatre.

  • 21.
    Tamas, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Galajda, Zoltán
    Maros, Tamás
    Szentkirályi, István
    Palotás, Lehel
    Jagamos, Endre
    Péterffy, Arpád
    [Simple surgical method for intraoperative evaluation of adequacy of tricuspid annuloplasty].2008In: Magyar sebészet, ISSN 0025-0295, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 49-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [hu]

    In tricuspid annuloplasty intraoperative "real time" evaluation using transoesophageal echocardiography requires normal flow to get reliable result. It means that the patient has to be already weaned from the cardiopulmonary bypass by the time of evaluation. In the authors' experience a well functioning tricuspid annuloplasty prevents back-flow through the valve. It can be observed on on-pump beating heart. If the tricuspid valve is competent, it is unnecessary to suck the blood flowing back through the coronary sinus while closing the right atrium. This observation seems to correlate well with post cardiopulmonary bypass transoesophageal echocardiography measurements and the control transthoracic echocardiography right before discharging the patients. These statements are based on a group of 72 patients. Sixty-nine patients (95.8%) were discharged (early mortality 4.2%). Only in one case we could observe a discrepancy between the intraoperative surgical observation and the postoperative echocardiographic finding. Development of functional tricuspid regurgitation in left-sided heart disease is a warning sign for myocardial impairment, which is an indication for surgery. Tricuspid annuloplasty can be performed even with moderate to medium grade regurgitation because it improves the early and late outcome. The described method is an adequate method for intraoperative evaluation of the repaired tricuspid valve competency.

  • 22.
    Tamas, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Kallestedt, Marie-Louise Sodersved
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Hult, Hakan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Karlgren, Klas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Allvin, Renee
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Closing the Gap: Experienced Simulation Educators Role and Impact on Everyday Health care2019In: Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, ISSN 0894-1912, E-ISSN 1554-558X, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Trained simulation educators (SEs) usually work both at simulation centers and in everyday health care, and thus, they possess dual expertise. Experienced SEs are known to grow confident with their expanding experience, but evidence is scarce about how this affects their development as clinical professionals. The aim of this study was to explore how experienced SEs describe their role within the context of everyday health care. Methods: An explorative descriptive study including 14 semistructured interviews and 27 questionnaires was conducted with 41 experienced SEs. An inductive thematic analysis was used to identify and analyze patterns describing SEs perceptions of the influence of their educational work on everyday health care. Results: The SEs descriptions of their encounters during everyday clinical work, which were affected by the fact that they had experience of facilitating simulation training, were gathered into three main themes with three of their own subthemes: education (educational needs, routines/guidelines, and being a resource), nontechnical skills (communication, feedback, and leadership/ coworkership), and clinical proficiency (situational insight, role model, and confidence in clinical practice). The insights gained and actions taken as clinical professionals are all intended to be implemented with the ultimate aim of safe patient care. Discussion: All the aspects of the SEs work are perceived to be successfully translated into clinical practice and can be summarized by the main themes of education, nontechnical skills, and clinical proficiency as delineated by this study. These themes are demonstrated at the individual, team, and organizational levels through increased competence and confidence.

  • 23. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Tamás, Éva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Surgical treatment in chronic aortic regurgitation: Timing, results, prognosis and left ventricular function2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic aortic regurgitation (AR) of varying degree affects 13% of men and 8.5% of women. In persons with severe AR, the expected length of life and its quality are influenced. Some individuals remain asymptomatic for a long period, due to effective compensatory mechanisms, but dysfunction of the left ventricle (LV) usually begins before symptoms appear and can be irreversible by then. This thesis addresses questions of LV function and optimal time for operation of patients suffering from chronic AR. Moreover, detailed echocardiographic studies of the anatomy of the normal aortic valve have been performed to obtain a better understanding of the in vivo anatomic relations within the aortic root.

    Patients with chronic AR, without concomitant cardiac disease, were studied both retrospectively (n=88) and prospectively (n=29) and the aortic valves of persons (n=32) free from cardiac disease were investigated.

    For the retrospectively studied patients, survival was 82% at 10 years which is an improvement compared with previously published results. The majority of the patients, however, had LV dysfunction preoperatively. By studying patients prospectively by echocardiography, radionuclide ventriculography (MUGA) and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) our aim was to evaluate the predictive value of measurements of LV function at rest and during exercise for postoperative outcome. LV diameters were markedly elevated prior to and diminished significantly after surgery. Patients with an abnormal exercise ejection fraction (EF) response by MUGA preoperatively, presented the same reaction postoperatively. This could not be predicted by LV function determination at rest, or by NYHA functional class. In spite of median NYHA class II, these patients had a low work capacity on CPET, which was neither improved 6 months postoperatively nor correlated to echocardiographic LV dimensions. Thus, both MUGA and CPET may be useful complements for timing of surgery in patients with chronic AR.

    Assuming that patients would benefit from preservation of their native valves the normal aortic valve was studied to gain detailed information about the echocardiographic anatomy and relations within the normal aortic root. This extended examination of the aortic root may facilitate a better planning of aortic valve‐preserving interventions in the future.

    List of papers
    1. Are patients with isolated chronic aortic regurgitation operated in time?: Analysis of survival data over a decade
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are patients with isolated chronic aortic regurgitation operated in time?: Analysis of survival data over a decade
    2005 (English)In: Clinical Cardiology, ISSN 0160-9289, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 329-332Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients suffering from chronic isolated aortic regurgitation have a less favorable outcome than patients with aortic stenosis. According to international recommendations, these patients should undergo surgery as soon as left ventricular function begins to deteriorate, that is, surgery is not to be postponed until clinical symptoms become relevant.

    Hypothesis: The study was undertaken to evaluate how satisfactory our timing of surgery was, as reflected by survival data.

    Methods: Survival was studied retrospectively in a consecutive series of patients undergoing surgery for chronic isolated aortic regurgitation during a 10-year period in our institution. Results were compared with data from the literature. By excluding patients with aortic aneurysms and acute endocarditis, we formed a homogeneous patient group of 88 subjects.

    Results: Thirty-day mortality was 1% and late mortality after a mean follow-up period of 6 years was 11%. Compared with survival data from an earlier study in which the patient population was similar and resided in the same geographic area, the results in our patient group seem to be better. It is noteworthy that despite a strong effort to recommend surgery at an earlier stage of the disease than previously, 35% of the patients had moderate or severe left ventricular dysfunction pre-operatively because of late referrals.

    Conclusion: This stresses the importance of early detection and careful preoperative follow-up with noninvasive methods in patients with aortic regurgitation.

    Keywords
    aortic regurgitation, left ventricular function, surgery
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13337 (URN)10.1002/clc.4960280705 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-06-18 Created: 2008-06-18 Last updated: 2009-06-05
    2. Exercise radionuclide ventriculography for predicting postoperative left ventricular function in chronic aortic regurgitation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exercise radionuclide ventriculography for predicting postoperative left ventricular function in chronic aortic regurgitation
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 1936-878X, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 48-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Ejection fraction (EF) reaction upon exercise by radionuclide ventriculography and standard echocardiographic parameters was evaluated as predictors for post-operative left ventricular (LV) function in chronic aortic regurgitation (AR).

    Background: The optimal timing of surgery for chronic AR is when the left ventricle is still compensating for the volume and pressure overload without irreversible dysfunction. For asymptomatic patients when EF is normal and LV diameters are borderline, exercise testing is recommended by present guidelines. However, only a limited number of studies have been performed, and data are scarce on this subject.

    Methods: Radionuclide ventriculography with multiple gated acquisition at rest and during exercise was performed in 29 consecutive patients with severe chronic aortic regurgitation pre-operatively and 6 months post-operatively. Patient subgroups were formed based on pre-operative EF exercise response (ΔEF) and were categorized as decreasing (ΔEF <−5%), unaltered (−5% ≤ ΔEF ≤ 5%), and increasing (ΔEF > 5%). A 5% or higher increase was considered normal. The LV diameters and mass were measured by echocardiography.

    Results: Pre-operative LV diameters were markedly elevated before surgery and diminished significantly after surgery. Left ventricular diameters, LV mass, EF at rest (EFrest), and EF change from rest to exercise (ΔEF) were independent of New York Heart Association functional class. Pre-operative end-diastolic diameter proved to be a predictor for pre- and post-operative ΔEF (p = 0.003; p = 0.04) but not for the nature of the exercise response post-operatively. Patients with decreasing and unaltered EF pre-operatively presented a significantly higher but still abnormal ΔEF post-operatively. Those with increasing EF pre-operatively had a similar response and a normal ΔEF post-operatively. Pre-operative ΔEF was not only a predictor for post-operative ΔEF (p = 0.02) but also classified patients into post-operative subgroups (EF decreasing, p = 0.03; unaltered, p = 0.02; increasing, p = 0.0008).

    Conclusions: An abnormal EF response to exercise may also occur in patients who do not fulfill criteria for surgery based on LV dimensions or EF. A follow-up of exercise LV function and adjusting the timing of surgery according to the nature of exercise response could, therefore, be beneficial.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2009
    Keywords
    radionuclide ventriculography, ejection fraction, exercise testing, aortic regurgitation, cardiac surgery
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13338 (URN)10.1016/j.jcmg.2008.09.009 (DOI)000287651900008 ()
    Available from: 2008-06-18 Created: 2008-06-18 Last updated: 2011-03-11
    3. Measurement of physical work capacity in patients with chronic aortic regurgitation: A potential improvement in patient management
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measurement of physical work capacity in patients with chronic aortic regurgitation: A potential improvement in patient management
    2009 (English)In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 453-457Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Timing of surgery in aortic regurgitation (AR) is important. Exercise testing is recommended upon uncertainty about functional limitations but reports on cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in populations with pure chronic AR are scarce. METHOD: Twenty-eight patients referred for surgery because of chronic AR (13 in NYHA I, 10 in NYHA II and five in NYHA III) were tested by CPET pre- and 6 months postoperatively. Echocardiography, with measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), diameters (LVED, LVES) and volumes (LVEDV, LVESV) was also performed. RESULTS: The patients had normal LVEF pre- and postoperatively. LV diameters and volumes diminished significantly postoperatively (LVED from 67 to 57, LVES from 49 to 41 mm; P < 0.001). The majority of the patients had a 'low' physical work capacity, none of them performed better than 'average' according to Astrand's classification preoperatively and there was no significant postoperative improvement. The mean peak oxygen uptake (VO(2peak)) was 25 ml kg(-1) min(-1) both pre- and postoperatively, and six of the 28 patients had a VO(2peak) of less than 20 ml kg(-1) min(-1). VO(2peak) was not significantly related to NYHA class. CONCLUSION: LVEF, diameters and volumes at rest did not fulfil the criteria for surgery in most of our AR patients, of whom 46% were asymptomatic. However, many had a remarkably low work capacity, which was neither improved 6 months postoperatively nor correlated to echocardiographic LV dimensions. CPET predicted the postoperative work capacity and may, therefore, be a useful complement for timing of surgery in patients with chronic AR.

    Keywords
    aortic regurgitation • cardiac surgery • cardiopulmonary exercise testing • left ventricular function • work capacity
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13339 (URN)10.1111/j.1475-097X.2009.00895.x (DOI)19744088 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2008-06-18 Created: 2008-06-18 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    4. Echocardiographic Description of the Anatomic Relations within the Normal Aortic Root
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Echocardiographic Description of the Anatomic Relations within the Normal Aortic Root
    2007 (English)In: The Journal of Heart Valve Disease, ISSN 0966-8519, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 240-246Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim of the study: Diagnostic procedures continue to contain much hidden information that may substantially improve the understanding of the mechanisms of aortic valve disease and its treatment planning. The study aim, using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), was to describe in detail the anatomical and physiological properties of the normal human aortic root in vivo.

    Methods: The study included 32 patients referred for TEE for suspected cardiac sources of emboli, but diagnosed as normal. Images of the aortic valve in long axis (100-120∞) and short-axis (45-60∞) views were recorded in mid-systole and end-diastole. Parameters of the aortic root (subaortic diameter, sinotubular junction (STJ), maximal sinus diameter, sinus height, cusp diameter, cusp height, opening, coaptation and intercommissural distance) were measured. For repeatability and reliability, two investigators performed the same series of measurements on a subgroup of 11 patients.

    Results: Aortic valve parameters proved to be independent of age, gender, body weight and height, and also of body mass index and body surface area. The subaortic diameter showed no statistically significant connection to maximal sinus diameter or to STJ. No connection was found between STJ and cusp or sinus length in the long-axis view. A simplified regression equation describes the STJ as being three-quarters of the maximal sinus diameter. The valve opening was found to be ca. 80% of the subaortic diameter in systole. Length of coaptation proved to be independent of aortic diameters, but was approximately half of the left coronary (LC) and right coronary (RC) cusp height in diastole. This measurement model proved to be both reliable and reproducible.

    Conclusion: This reliable description of normal anatomic and geometric relations within the aortic root, through extended examination of the aortic root by echocardiography, may facilitate a better planning of aortic valve-preserving interventions.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13340 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-06-18 Created: 2008-06-18 Last updated: 2009-08-21
  • 24.
    Tamás, Éva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Broqvist, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Franzén, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Exercise radionuclide ventriculography for predicting postoperative left ventricular function in chronic aortic regurgitation2009In: JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 1936-878X, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 48-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Ejection fraction (EF) reaction upon exercise by radionuclide ventriculography and standard echocardiographic parameters was evaluated as predictors for post-operative left ventricular (LV) function in chronic aortic regurgitation (AR).

    Background: The optimal timing of surgery for chronic AR is when the left ventricle is still compensating for the volume and pressure overload without irreversible dysfunction. For asymptomatic patients when EF is normal and LV diameters are borderline, exercise testing is recommended by present guidelines. However, only a limited number of studies have been performed, and data are scarce on this subject.

    Methods: Radionuclide ventriculography with multiple gated acquisition at rest and during exercise was performed in 29 consecutive patients with severe chronic aortic regurgitation pre-operatively and 6 months post-operatively. Patient subgroups were formed based on pre-operative EF exercise response (ΔEF) and were categorized as decreasing (ΔEF <−5%), unaltered (−5% ≤ ΔEF ≤ 5%), and increasing (ΔEF > 5%). A 5% or higher increase was considered normal. The LV diameters and mass were measured by echocardiography.

    Results: Pre-operative LV diameters were markedly elevated before surgery and diminished significantly after surgery. Left ventricular diameters, LV mass, EF at rest (EFrest), and EF change from rest to exercise (ΔEF) were independent of New York Heart Association functional class. Pre-operative end-diastolic diameter proved to be a predictor for pre- and post-operative ΔEF (p = 0.003; p = 0.04) but not for the nature of the exercise response post-operatively. Patients with decreasing and unaltered EF pre-operatively presented a significantly higher but still abnormal ΔEF post-operatively. Those with increasing EF pre-operatively had a similar response and a normal ΔEF post-operatively. Pre-operative ΔEF was not only a predictor for post-operative ΔEF (p = 0.02) but also classified patients into post-operative subgroups (EF decreasing, p = 0.03; unaltered, p = 0.02; increasing, p = 0.0008).

    Conclusions: An abnormal EF response to exercise may also occur in patients who do not fulfill criteria for surgery based on LV dimensions or EF. A follow-up of exercise LV function and adjusting the timing of surgery according to the nature of exercise response could, therefore, be beneficial.

  • 25.
    Tamás, Éva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vanhanen, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Measurement of physical work capacity in patients with chronic aortic regurgitation: A potential improvement in patient management2009In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 453-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Timing of surgery in aortic regurgitation (AR) is important. Exercise testing is recommended upon uncertainty about functional limitations but reports on cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in populations with pure chronic AR are scarce. METHOD: Twenty-eight patients referred for surgery because of chronic AR (13 in NYHA I, 10 in NYHA II and five in NYHA III) were tested by CPET pre- and 6 months postoperatively. Echocardiography, with measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), diameters (LVED, LVES) and volumes (LVEDV, LVESV) was also performed. RESULTS: The patients had normal LVEF pre- and postoperatively. LV diameters and volumes diminished significantly postoperatively (LVED from 67 to 57, LVES from 49 to 41 mm; P < 0.001). The majority of the patients had a 'low' physical work capacity, none of them performed better than 'average' according to Astrand's classification preoperatively and there was no significant postoperative improvement. The mean peak oxygen uptake (VO(2peak)) was 25 ml kg(-1) min(-1) both pre- and postoperatively, and six of the 28 patients had a VO(2peak) of less than 20 ml kg(-1) min(-1). VO(2peak) was not significantly related to NYHA class. CONCLUSION: LVEF, diameters and volumes at rest did not fulfil the criteria for surgery in most of our AR patients, of whom 46% were asymptomatic. However, many had a remarkably low work capacity, which was neither improved 6 months postoperatively nor correlated to echocardiographic LV dimensions. CPET predicted the postoperative work capacity and may, therefore, be a useful complement for timing of surgery in patients with chronic AR.

  • 26.
    Tamás, Éva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Decision support for assessment of left ventricular diastolic function2018In: Physiological Reports, E-ISSN 2051-817X, Vol. 6, no 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Echocardiographic assessment of the left ventricular diastolic function (LVDF), an integrated part of evaluation of left ventricular function is still a delicate task and is performed with substantial inter-rater variability. Therefore, we aimed to create and evaluate a guidelines-based automated decision support. An algorithm was created for a hierarchical analysis of LVDF based on variables as recommended by the latest guidelines. Age-adjusted normal ranges were pooled from previously published studies into an integrated reference table. For proof-of-concept, 20 echocardiographic examinations were analyzed offline by four experienced physicians with more than 10 years of echocardiographic experience. The first assessments were to be performed as they would be in the clinical practice. Six months later, the assessments were repeated based on the 2017 ASE/EACVI guidelines. The overall inter-rater agreement for the first clinical assessments was moderate, while the guidelines-based assessments had only fair inter-rater agreement. Both kinds of manual assessment had poor agreement with the standardized automated assessment algorithm of LVDF. In conclusion, the presented automated decision support for evaluation of diastolic LV function by Doppler echocardiography is mainly based on current guidelines involving multiple parameters in combination. Incorporating age dependency aspects in our program (available for use at https://liu.se/en/research/left-ventricular-diastolic-function-decision-support) enhances the accuracy of the evaluation and reduces variability in evaluation of LVDF. The large inter-rater variation in classification in this study also underscores the usefulness of tools to support a standardized evaluation.

  • 27.
    Tamás, Éva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Echocardiographic Description of the Anatomic Relations within the Normal Aortic Root2007In: The Journal of Heart Valve Disease, ISSN 0966-8519, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 240-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim of the study: Diagnostic procedures continue to contain much hidden information that may substantially improve the understanding of the mechanisms of aortic valve disease and its treatment planning. The study aim, using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), was to describe in detail the anatomical and physiological properties of the normal human aortic root in vivo.

    Methods: The study included 32 patients referred for TEE for suspected cardiac sources of emboli, but diagnosed as normal. Images of the aortic valve in long axis (100-120∞) and short-axis (45-60∞) views were recorded in mid-systole and end-diastole. Parameters of the aortic root (subaortic diameter, sinotubular junction (STJ), maximal sinus diameter, sinus height, cusp diameter, cusp height, opening, coaptation and intercommissural distance) were measured. For repeatability and reliability, two investigators performed the same series of measurements on a subgroup of 11 patients.

    Results: Aortic valve parameters proved to be independent of age, gender, body weight and height, and also of body mass index and body surface area. The subaortic diameter showed no statistically significant connection to maximal sinus diameter or to STJ. No connection was found between STJ and cusp or sinus length in the long-axis view. A simplified regression equation describes the STJ as being three-quarters of the maximal sinus diameter. The valve opening was found to be ca. 80% of the subaortic diameter in systole. Length of coaptation proved to be independent of aortic diameters, but was approximately half of the left coronary (LC) and right coronary (RC) cusp height in diastole. This measurement model proved to be both reliable and reproducible.

    Conclusion: This reliable description of normal anatomic and geometric relations within the aortic root, through extended examination of the aortic root by echocardiography, may facilitate a better planning of aortic valve-preserving interventions.

  • 28.
    Tamás, Éva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olin, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Are patients with isolated chronic aortic regurgitation operated in time?: Analysis of survival data over a decade2005In: Clinical Cardiology, ISSN 0160-9289, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 329-332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients suffering from chronic isolated aortic regurgitation have a less favorable outcome than patients with aortic stenosis. According to international recommendations, these patients should undergo surgery as soon as left ventricular function begins to deteriorate, that is, surgery is not to be postponed until clinical symptoms become relevant.

    Hypothesis: The study was undertaken to evaluate how satisfactory our timing of surgery was, as reflected by survival data.

    Methods: Survival was studied retrospectively in a consecutive series of patients undergoing surgery for chronic isolated aortic regurgitation during a 10-year period in our institution. Results were compared with data from the literature. By excluding patients with aortic aneurysms and acute endocarditis, we formed a homogeneous patient group of 88 subjects.

    Results: Thirty-day mortality was 1% and late mortality after a mean follow-up period of 6 years was 11%. Compared with survival data from an earlier study in which the patient population was similar and resided in the same geographic area, the results in our patient group seem to be better. It is noteworthy that despite a strong effort to recommend surgery at an earlier stage of the disease than previously, 35% of the patients had moderate or severe left ventricular dysfunction pre-operatively because of late referrals.

    Conclusion: This stresses the importance of early detection and careful preoperative follow-up with noninvasive methods in patients with aortic regurgitation.

  • 29.
    Vánky, Farkas B.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Håkansson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tamás, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Risk factors for postoperative heart failure in patients operated on for aortic stenosis2006In: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, Vol. 81, no 4, p. 1297-1304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Risk factors for postoperative heart failure (PHF) have not been specifically studied in valve surgery although it has been acknowledged that patient variables may have a more profound influence on postoperative outcome than valve-related factors.

    Methods

    All patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis from January 1995 to December 2000 in the southeast region of Sweden were studied (n = 398). Forty-five patients with aortic valve replacement required treatment for PHF. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was carried out to identify risk factors for PHF.

    Results

    Thirty-day mortality was 6.7% versus 1.4% for patients with and without PHF, respectively (p = 0.05). With regard to clinical presentation of aortic stenosis, angina was associated with reduced risk, whereas history of congestive heart failure increased the risk for PHF. Five preoperative (hypertension, history of congestive heart failure, severe systolic left ventricular dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, preoperative hemodynamic instability) and two intraoperative (aortic cross-clamp time, intraoperative myocardial infarction) variables were identified as independent risk factors for PHF. Patient–prosthesis mismatch did not influence the risk of PHF significantly.

    Conclusions

    Postoperative heart failure was associated with a marked increase in postoperative mortality and morbidity. Risk factors for PHF were variables indicating preexisting myocardial dysfunction, increased right or left ventricular afterload, and intraoperative myocardial injury. Our results highlight issues concerning cross-clamp time and myocardial protection, particularly for patients with preoperatively compromised myocardial function. Asymptomatic patients with significant aortic stenosis should be considered for surgery before substantial echocardiographic evidence of left ventricular dysfunction or increased pulmonary artery pressure develops.

  • 30.
    Vánky, Farkas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Håkansson, Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Marós, T
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Different characteristics of postoperative heart failure after surgery for aortic stenosis and coronary disease: implications for short-term and long-term outcome2005In: EWCI European Workgruoup for Cardiothoracic Intensivists,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Vánky, Farkas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Håkansson, Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Svedjeholm, Rolf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Risk factors for postoperative heart failure in patients operated for aortic stenosis2005In: Scandinavian Association for Thoracic Surgery,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Wickham, Abeni M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Islam, Mohammad Mirazul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mondal, Debasish
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sadhu, Veera
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tamás, Éva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Polisetti, Naresh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Polycaprolactone–thiophene-conjugated carbon nanotube meshes as scaffolds for cardiac progenitor cells2014In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 102, no 7, p. 1553-1561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The myocardium is unable to regenerate itself after infarct, resulting in scarring and thinning of the heart wall. Our objective was to develop a patch to buttress and bypass the scarred area, while allowing regeneration by incorporated cardiac stem/progenitor cells (CPCs). Polycaprolactone (PCL) was fabricated as both sheets by solvent casting, and fibrous meshes by electrospinning, as potential patches, to determine the role of topology in proliferation and phenotypic changes to the CPCs. Thiophene-conjugated carbon nanotubes (T-CNTs) were incorporated to enhance the mechanical strength. We showed that freshly isolated CPCs from murine hearts neither attached nor spread on the PCL sheets, both with and without T-CNT. As electrospun meshes, however, both PCL and PCL/T-CNT supported CPC adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. The incorporation of T-CNT into PCL resulted in a significant increase in mechanical strength but no morphological changes to the meshes. In turn, proliferation, but not differentiation, of CPCs into cardiomyocytes was enhanced in T-CNT containing meshes. We have shown that changing the topology of PCL, a known hydrophobic material, dramatically altered its properties, in this case, allowing CPCs to survive and differentiate. With further development, PCL/T-CNT meshes or similar patches may become a viable strategy to aid restoration of the postmyocardial infarction myocardium.

1 - 32 of 32
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