liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Brooke, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Franco Gonzalez, Felipe
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wijeratne, Kosala
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pavlopoulou, Eleni
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Galliani, Daniela
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Italy.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Valiollahi Bisheh, Roudabeh
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vapor phase synthesized poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy-thiophene)-trifluoromethanesulfonate as a transparent conductor material2018In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 6, no 43, p. 21304-21312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inorganic transparent conductive oxides have dominated the market as transparent electrodes due to their high conductivity and transparency. Here, we report the fabrication and optimization of the synthesis of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) trifluoromethanesulfonate via vapor phase polymerization for the potential replacement of such inorganic materials. The parameters and conditions of the polymerization were investigated and an electrical conductivity of 3800 S cm(-1) and 4500 S cm(-1) after acid treatment were obtained while maintaining an absorbance similar to that of commercial indium tin oxide. This increase in electrical conductivity was rationalized experimentally and theoretically to an increase in the oxidation level and a higher order of crystallinity which does not disrupt the pi-pi stacking of PEDOT chains.

  • 2.
    Franco Gonzalez, Felipe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Autonomous Univ Madrid, Spain.
    Rolland, Nicolas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Substrate-Dependent Morphology and Its Effect on Electrical Mobility of Doped Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) Thin Films2018In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 10, no 34, p. 29115-29126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deposition dynamics, crystallization, molecular packing, and electronic mobility of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) thin films are affected by the nature of the substrate. Computational microscopy has been carried out to reveal the morphology-substrate dependence for PEDOT thin films doped with molecular tosylate deposited on different substrates including graphite, Si3N4, silicon, and amorphous SiO2. It is shown that the substrate is instrumental in formation of the lamellar structure. PEDOT films on the ordered substrates (graphite, Si3N4, and silicon) exhibit preferential face-on orientation, with graphite showing the most ordered and pronounced face-on packing. In contrast, PEDOT on amorphous SiO2 exhibits the dominant edge-on orientation, except in the dry state where both packings are equally presented. The role of water and the porosity of the substrate in formation of the edge-on structure on SiO2 is outlined. On the basis of the calculated morphology, the multiscale calculations of the electronic transport and percolative analysis are performed outlining how the character of the substrate affects the electron mobility. It is demonstrated that good crystallinity (PEDOT on graphite substrate) and high content of edge-on (PEDOT on SiO2 substrate) are not enough to achieve the highest electrical in-plane mobility. Instead, the least ordered material with lower degree of the edge-on content (PEDOT on silicon substrate) provides the highest mobility because it exhibits an efficient network of pi-pi stacked chain extending throughout the entire sample.

  • 3.
    Franco Gonzalez, Felipe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Molecular Dynamics Study of Morphology of Doped PEDOT: From Solution to Dry Phase2017In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 121, no 16, p. 4299-4307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Morphology of the conducting polymer PEDOT:TOS (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiopherre) doped with molecular, tosylate) and its crystallization in aqueous solution, were Studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. It was foirnd that (a) PEDOT comprises crystallite aggregates consisting of 3-6 pi-pi stacked chains. The crystallites are linked by interpenetrating pi-pi stacked chains such that percolative paths in the structure are formed. (b) The size of the crystallites.deperids on the water content, but the pi-pi stacking distance is practically independent of the chain length, charge,Concentration and water content. (c) TOS counterions are located either on the top of the,chains or on the side of the crystalliteS and their distribution depends on the charge concentration but is practically independent of the water content; (d) PEDOT depends On their length and water,content. 2 chains and crystallites exhibit bending that depends On their length and water content.

  • 4.
    Franco Gonzalez, Juan Felipe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pavlopoulou, Eleni
    Bordeaux INP, Université de Bordeaux, CNRS, LCPO UMR 5629, 33600 Pessac, France.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simon, Daniel T
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor V
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Morphology of a self-doped conducting oligomer for green energy applications2017In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 9, no 36, p. 13717-13724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recently synthesized self-doped conducting oligomer, salt of bis[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]3thiophene butyric acid, ETE-S, is a novel promising material for green energy applications. Recently, it has been demonstrated that it can polymerize in vivo, in plant systems, leading to a formation of long-range conducting wires, charge storage and supercapacitive behaviour of living plants. Here we investigate the morphology of ETE-S combining the experimental characterisation using Grazing Incidence Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (GIWAXS) and atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The GIWAXS measurements reveal a formation of small crystallites consisting of π–π stacked oligomers (with the staking distance 3.5 Å) that are further organized in h00 lamellae. These experimental results are confirmed by MD calculations, where we calculated the X-ray diffraction pattern and the radial distribution function for the distance between ETE-S chains. Our MD simulations also demonstrate the formation of the percolative paths for charge carriers that extend throughout the whole structure, despite the fact that the oligomers are short (6–9 rings) and crystallites are thin along the π–π stacking direction, consisting of only two or three π–π stacked oligomers. The existence of the percolative paths explains the previously observed high conductivity in in vivo polymerized ETE-S. We also explored the geometrical conformation of ETE-S oligomers and the bending of their aliphatic chains as a function of the oligomer lengths.

  • 5.
    Modarresi, Mohsen
    et al.
    Ferdawsi Univ Mashhad, Iran.
    Franco Gonzalez, Felipe
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Autonomous Univ Madrid, Spain.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Computational microscopy study of the granular structure and pH dependence of PEDOT:PSS2019In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 21, no 12, p. 6699-6711Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computational microscopy based on Martini coarse grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a doped conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)polystyrene sulfonate (best known as PEDOT:PSS) was performed focussing on the formation of the granular structure and PEDOT crystallites, and the effect of pH on the material morphology. The PEDOT:PSS morphology is shown to be sensitive to the initial distribution of PEDOT and PSS in the solution, and the results of the modelling suggest that the experimentally observed granular structure of PEDOT:PSS can be only obtained if the PEDOT/PSS solution is in the dispersive state in the initial crystallization stages. Variation of the pH is demonstrated to strongly affect the morphology of PEDOT:PSS films, altering their structure between granular-type and homogeneous. It also affects the size of crystallites and the relative arrangement of PEDOT and PSS chains. It is shown that the crystallites in PEDOT:PSS are smaller than those in PEDOT with molecular counterions such as PEDOT:tosylate, which is consistent with the available experimental data. The predicted changes of the PEDOT:PSS morphology with variation of the pH can be tested experimentally, and the calculated atomistic picture of PEDOT:PSS films (not accessible by conventional experimental techniques) is instrumental for understanding the material structure and building realistic models of PEDOT:PSS morphology.

  • 6.
    Modarresi, Mohsen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Iran.
    Franco Gonzalez, Felipe
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Morphology and ion diffusion in PEDOT:Tos. A coarse grained molecular dynamics simulation2018In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 20, no 25, p. 17188-17198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Martini coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics (MD) model for the doped conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) is developed. The morphology of PEDOT:Tos (i.e. PEDOT doped with molecular tosylate) and its crystallization in aqueous solution for different oxidation levels were calculated using the developed method and compared with corresponding all atomistic MD simulations. The diffusion coefficients of Na+ and Cl- ions in PEDOT:Tos are studied using the developed coarse-grained MD approach. It is shown that the diffusion coefficients decrease exponentially as the hydration level is reduced. It is also predicted that the diffusion coefficients decrease when the doping level of PEDOT is increased. The observed behavior is related to the evolution of water clusters and trapping of ions around the polymer matrix as the hydration level changes. The predicted behavior of the ionic diffusion coefficients can be tested experimentally, and we believe that molecular picture of ionic diffusion in PEDOT unraveled in the present study is instrumental for the design of polymeric materials and devices for better and enhanced performance.

  • 7.
    Munoz, William Armando
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Singh, Sandeep Kumar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Franco Gonzalez, Felipe
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Insulator to semimetallic transition in conducting polymers2016In: Physical Review B, ISSN 2469-9950, E-ISSN 2469-9969, Vol. 94, no 20, article id 205202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a multiscale modeling of electronic structure of a conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiopehene) (PEDOT) based on a realistic model of its morphology. We show that when the charge carrier concentration increases, the character of the density of states (DOS) gradually evolves from the insulating to the semimetallic, exhibiting a collapse of the gap between the bipolaron and valence bands with the drastic increase of the DOS between the bands. The origin of the observed behavior is attributed to the effect of randomly located counterions giving rise to the states in the gap. These results are discussed in light of recent experiments. The method developed in this work is general and can be applied to study the electronic structure of other conducting polymers.

  • 8.
    Rolland, Nicolas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Franco Gonzalez, Juan Felipe
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Volpi, Riccardo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. RIST, Romania.
    Linares, Mathieu
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Understanding morphology-mobility dependence in PEDOT:Tos2018In: PHYSICAL REVIEW MATERIALS, ISSN 2475-9953, Vol. 2, no 4, article id 045605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential of conjugated polymers to compete with inorganic materials in the field of semiconductor is conditional on fine-tuning of the charge carriers mobility. The latter is closely related to the material morphology, and various studies have shown that the bottleneck for charge transport is the connectivity between well-ordered crystallites, with a high degree of pi-pi stacking, dispersed into a disordered matrix. However, at this time there is a lack of theoretical descriptions accounting for this link between morphology and mobility, hindering the development of systematic material designs. Here we propose a computational model to predict charge carriers mobility in conducting polymer PEDOT depending on the physicochemical properties of the system. We start by calculating the morphology using molecular dynamics simulations. Based on the calculated morphology we perform quantum mechanical calculation of the transfer integrals between states in polymer chains and calculate corresponding hopping rates using the Miller-Abrahams formalism. We then construct a transport resistive network, calculate the mobility using a mean-field approach, and analyze the calculated mobility in terms of transfer integrals distributions and percolation thresholds. Our results provide theoretical support for the recent study [Noriega et al., Nat Mater 12, 1038 (2013)] explaining why the mobility in polymers rapidly increases as the chain length is increased and then saturates for sufficiently long chains. Our study also provides the answer to the long-standing question whether the enhancement of the crystallinity is the key to designing high-mobility polymers. We demonstrate, that it is the effective pi-pi stacking, not the long-range order that is essential for the material design for the enhanced electrical performance. This generic model can compare the mobility of a polymer thin film with different solvent contents, solvent additives, dopant species or polymer characteristics, providing a general framework to design new high mobility conjugated polymer materials.

  • 9.
    Rudd, Sam
    et al.
    University of South Australia, Australia.
    Franco Gonzalez, Felipe
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Singh, Sandeep Kumar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ullah Khan, Zia
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andreasen, Jens W.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Evans, Drew
    University of South Australia, Australia.
    Charge transport and structure in semimetallic polymers2018In: Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics, ISSN 0887-6266, E-ISSN 1099-0488, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 97-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Owing to changes in their chemistry and structure, polymers can be fabricated to demonstrate vastly different electrical conductivities over many orders of magnitude. At the high end of conductivity is the class of conducting polymers, which are ideal candidates for many applications in low-cost electronics. Here, we report the influence of the nature of the doping anion at high doping levels within the semi-metallic conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) on its electronic transport properties. Hall effect measurements on a variety of PEDOT samples show that the choice of doping anion can lead to an order of magnitude enhancement in the charge carrier mobilityamp;gt;3 cm(2)/Vs at conductivities approaching 3000 S/cm under ambient conditions. Grazing Incidence Wide Angle X-ray Scattering, Density Functional Theory calculations, and Molecular Dynamics simulations indicate that the chosen doping anion modifies the way PEDOT chains stack together. This link between structure and specific anion doping at high doping levels has ramifications for the fabrication of conducting polymer-based devices. (c) 2017 The Authors. Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2018, 56, 97-104

  • 10.
    Seitanidou, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Franco-Gonzalez, Juan Felipe
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Arbring Sjöström, Theresia
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simon, Daniel T.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    pH Dependence of γ-Aminobutyric Acid Iontronic Transport2017In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 121, no 30, p. 7284-7289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The organic electronic ion pump (OEIP) has been developed as an “iontronic” tool for delivery of biological signaling compounds. OEIPs rely on electrophoretically “pumping” charged compounds, either at neutral or shifted pH, through an ion-selective channel. Significant shifts in pH lead to an abundance of H+ or OH–, which are delivered along with the intended substance. While this method has been used to transport various neurotransmitters, the role of pH has not been explored. Here we present an investigation of the role of pH on OEIP transport efficiency using the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as the model cationic delivery substance. GABA transport is evaluated at various pHs using electrical and chemical characterization and compared to molecular dynamics simulations, all of which agree that pH 3 is ideal for GABA transport. These results demonstrate a useful method for optimizing transport of other substances and thus broadening OEIP applications.

  • 11.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, K. Peter R.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry.
    Singh, Sandeep Kumar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Franco- Gonzalez, Juan Felipe
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Volkov, Anton V.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonsson, Magnus P.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Grimoldi, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Elgland, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor V.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    In vivo polymerization and manufacturing of wires and supercapacitors in plants2017In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 114, no 11, p. 2807-2812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electronic plants, e-Plants, are an organic bioelectronic platform that allows electronic interfacing with plants. Recently we have demonstrated plants with augmented electronic functionality. Using the vascular system and organs of a plant, we manufactured organic electronic devices and circuits in vivo, leveraging the internal structure and physiology of the plant as the template, and an integral part of the devices. However, this electronic functionality was only achieved in localized regions, whereas new electronic materials that could be distributed to every part of the plant would provide versatility in device and circuit fabrication and create possibilities for new device concepts. Here we report the synthesis of such a conjugated oligomer that can be distributed and form longer oligomers and polymer in every part of the xylem vascular tissue of a Rosa floribunda cutting, forming long-range conducting wires. The plant’s structure acts as a physical template, whereas the plant’s biochemical response mechanism acts as the catalyst for polymerization. In addition, the oligomer can cross through the veins and enter the apoplastic space in the leaves. Finally, using the plant’s natural architecture we manufacture supercapacitors along the stem. Our results are preludes to autonomous energy systems integrated within plants and distribute interconnected sensor-actuator systems for plant control and optimization

  • 12.
    Volkov, Anton
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Singh, Sandeep Kumar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Franco Gonzalez, Felipe
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cruce, Alex
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Spectroelectrochemistry and Nature of Charge Carriers in Self-Doped Conducting Polymer2017In: Advanced Electronic Materials, ISSN 2199-160X, Vol. 3, no 8, article id 1700096Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recently developed water-soluble self-doped sodium salt of bis[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene] 3thiophene butyric acid (ETE-S) is electropolymerized and characterized by means of spectroelectrochemistry, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry, combined with the density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations. The focus of the studies is to underline the nature of the charge carriers when the electrochemically polymerized ETE-S films undergo a reversible transition from reduced to electrically conductive oxidized states. Spectroelectrochemistry shows clear distinctions between absorption features from reduced and charged species. In the reduced state, the absorption spectrum of ETE-S electropolymerized film shows a peak that is attributed to HOMO. LUMO transition. As the oxidation level increases, this peak diminishes and the absorption of the film is dominated by spinless bipolaronic states with some admixture of polaronic states possessing a magnetic momentum. For fully oxidized samples, the bipolaronic states fully dominate, and the features in the absorption spectra are related to the drastic changes of the band structure, exhibiting a strong decrease of the band gap when a polymeric film undergoes oxidation.

1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf