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  • 1.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Paul, Biplab
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Magnusson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Broitman, Esteban
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Novel transparent Mg-Si-O-N thin films with high hardness and refractive index2016In: Vacuum, ISSN 0042-207X, E-ISSN 1879-2715, Vol. 131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increasing demand for glass materials with better mechanical and optical properties for display and electronic applications. This paper describes the deposition of novel thin films of Mg-circle divide-Si-O-N onto float glass substrates. Amorphous thin films in the Mg-Si-O-N system with high nitrogen and magnesium contents were deposited by reactive RF magnetron co-sputtering from Mg and Si targets in Ar/N-2/O-2 gas mixtures. The thin films studied span an unprecedented range of compositions up to 45 at% Mg and 80 at% N out of cations and anions respectively. Thin films in the Mg-Si-O-N system were found to be homogeneous and transparent in the visible region. Mechanical properties like hardness (H) and reduced elastic modulus (Er) show high values, up to 21 GPa and 166 GPa respectively. The refractive index (1.87-2.00) increases with increasing magnesium and nitrogen contents. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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  • 2.
    Aouadi, Samir
    et al.
    Univ North Texas, TX 76203 USA.
    Broitman, Esteban
    SKF Res and Technol Dev, Netherlands.
    Figuero, Carlos A.
    Univ Caxias do Sul, Brazil.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zapien, Juan Antonio
    City Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Stueber, Michael
    Karlsruhe Inst Technol, Germany.
    ICMCTF 2018-Preface2019In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 357, p. 1014-1014Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 3.
    Aouadi, Samir
    et al.
    University of North Texas, TX 76203 USA.
    Broitman, Esteban
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Figueroa, Carlos A.
    University of Caxias do Sul, Brazil.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Muratore, Christopher
    University of Dayton, OH 45469 USA.
    Stueber, Michael
    Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany.
    ICMCTF 2017-Preface2017In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 644Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 4.
    Aouadi, Samir
    et al.
    Univ North Texas, TX 76203 USA.
    Broitman, Esteban
    SKF Res and Technol Dev Nieuwegein, Netherlands.
    Figueroa, Carlos A.
    Univ Caxias SulRua, Brazil.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zapien, Juan Antonio
    City Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Stueber, Michael
    Karlsruhe Inst Technol, Germany.
    Editorial Material: ICMCTF 2018-Preface in THIN SOLID FILMS, vol 669, issue , pp 670-6702019In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 669, p. 670-670Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 5.
    Azina, Clio
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Germany.
    Mraz, Stanislav
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Germany.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hans, Marcus
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Germany.
    Primetzhofer, Daniel
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Schneider, Jochen M.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Germany.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Oxidation behaviour of V2AlC MAX phase coatings2020In: Journal of the European Ceramic Society, ISSN 0955-2219, E-ISSN 1873-619X, Vol. 40, no 13, p. 4436-4444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the oxidation behaviour of V2AlC coatings up to 800 degrees C, in air. The coatings were deposited at 580 degrees C using magnetron sputtering from a powder metallurgical composite V2AlC target and were subsequently oxidised for 5, 15 and 30 min. The microstructural evolution of the samples was investigated, and X-ray diffraction patterns were collected to track the formation of oxides. The first indications of oxidation appear after just 15 min at 500 degrees C, as V-based oxides grew on the surface of the coatings. Later, the presence of mostly V-based oxides and ternary (V, Al)-oxides was observed starting after 5 min at 600 degrees C. Further analyses confirmed outward diffusion of V and inward diffusion of O, while Al tends to sublimate. alpha-A12O3 was only indexed after 5 min at 800 degrees C. Ex-situ electrical resistivity measurements allowed tracking the oxidation progress of the V2AlC coating.

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  • 6.
    Baer, Donald R.
    et al.
    Pacific Northwest Natl Lab, WA 99352 USA.
    Artyushkova, Kateryna
    Phys Elect, MN 55317 USA.
    Cohen, Hagai
    Weizmann Inst Sci, Israel.
    Easton, Christopher D.
    CSIRO Mfg, Australia.
    Engelhard, Mark
    Pacific Northwest Natl Lab, WA 99352 USA.
    Gengenbach, Thomas R.
    CSIRO Mfg, Australia.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mack, Paul
    Thermo Fisher Sci, England.
    Morgan, David J.
    Cardiff Univ, Wales.
    Roberts, Adam
    Kratos Analyt Ltd, England.
    XPS guide: Charge neutralization and binding energy referencing for insulating samples2020In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 38, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This guide deals with methods to control surface charging during XPS analysis of insulating samples and approaches to extracting useful binding energy information. The guide summarizes the causes of surface charging, how to recognize when it occurs, approaches to minimize charge buildup, and methods used to adjust or correct XPS photoelectron binding energies when charge control systems are used. There are multiple ways to control surface charge buildup during XPS measurements, and examples of systems on advanced XPS instruments are described. There is no single, simple, and foolproof way to extract binding energies on insulating material, but advantages and limitations of several approaches are described. Because of the variety of approaches and limitations of each, it is critical for researchers to accurately describe the procedures that have been applied in research reports and publications.

  • 7.
    Bakhit, Babak
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dorri, Samira
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kooijman, Agnieszka
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands.
    Wu, Zhengtao
    School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, China.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mol, Johannes M.C.
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Materials Research Laboratory and Department of Materials Science, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan .
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Materials Research Laboratory and Department of Materials Science, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan .
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Multifunctional ZrB2-rich Zr1-xCrxBy thin films with enhanced mechanical, oxidation, and corrosion properties2021In: Vacuum, ISSN 0042-207X, E-ISSN 1879-2715, Vol. 185, article id 109990Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Refractory transition-metal (TM) diborides have high melting points, excellent hardness, and good  chemical  stability.  However, these properties are not sufficient for applications involving extreme  environments that require high mechanical strength as well as oxidation and corrosion resistance. Here, we study the effect of Cr addition on the properties of ZrB2-rich Zr1-xCrxBy thin films grown by hybrid high-power impulse and dc magnetron co-sputtering (Cr-HiPIMS/ZrB2-DCMS) with a 100-V Cr-metal-ion synchronized potential. Cr metal fraction, x = Cr/(Zr+Cr), is increased from 0.23 to 0.44 by decreasing the power Pzrb2 applied to the DCMS ZrB2 target from 4000 to 2000 W, while the average power, pulse width, and frequency applied to the HiPIMS Cr target are maintained constant. In addition, y decreases from 2.18 to 1.11 as a function of Pzrb2, as a result of supplying Cr to the growing film and preferential B resputtering caused by the pulsed Cr-ion flux. ZrB2.18, Zr0.77Cr0.23B1.52, Zr0.71Cr0.29B1.42, and Zr0.68Cr0.32B1.38 2 films have hexagonal AlB2 crystal structure with a columnar nanostructure, while Zr0.64Cr0.36B1.30 and Zr0.56Cr0.44B1.11 are  amorphous. All films show hardness above 30 GPa. Zr0.56Cr0.44B1.11 alloys exhibit much better toughness, wear, oxidation, and corrosion resistance than ZrB2.18. This combination of properties   makes Zr0.56Cr0.44B1.11 ideal candidates for numerous strategic applications.

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  • 8.
    Bakhit, Babak
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dorri, Samira
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kosari, Ali
    Delft Univ Technol, Netherlands.
    Mol, Arjan
    Delft Univ Technol, Netherlands.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA; Natl Taiwan Univ Sci & Technol, Taiwan.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Microstructure, mechanical, and corrosion properties of Zr1-xCrxBy diboride alloy thin films grown by hybrid high power impulse/DC magnetron co-sputtering2022In: Applied Surface Science, ISSN 0169-4332, E-ISSN 1873-5584, Vol. 591, article id 153164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study microstructure, mechanical, and corrosion properties of Zr1-xCrxBy coatings deposited by hybrid high power impulse/DC magnetron co-sputtering (CrB2-HiPIMS/ZrB2-DCMS). Cr/(Zr + Cr) ratio, x, increases from 0.13 to 0.9, while B/(Zr + Cr) ratio, y, decreases from 2.92 to 1.81. As reference, ZrB2.18 and CrB1.81 layers are grown at 4000 W DCMS. ZrB2.18 and CrB1.81 columns are continual from near substrate toward the surface with open column boundaries. We find that the critical growth parameter to achieve dense films is the ratio of Cr+- dominated ion flux and the (Zr + B) neutral flux from the ZrB2 target. Thus, the alloys are categorized in two groups: films with x < 0.32 (low Cr+/(Zr + B) ratios) that have continuous columnar growth, rough surfaces, and open column boundaries, and films with x >= 0.32 (high Cr+/(Zr + B) ratios) that Cr+-dominated ion fluxes are sufficient to interrupt continuous columns, resulting in smooth surface and dense fine-grain microstructure. The pulsed metal-ion irradiation is more effective in film densification than continuous Ar+ bombardment. Dense Zr0.46Cr0.54B2.40 and Zr0.10Cr0.90B1.81 alloys are hard (> 30 GPa) and almost stress-free with relative nano indentation toughness of 1.3 MPa root m and 2.3 MPa root m, respectively, and remarkedly low corrosion rates (~& nbsp;1.0 x 10(-6) mA/cm(2) for Zr0.46Cr0.54B2.40 and~& nbsp; 2.1 x 10(-6) mA/cm(2) for Zr0.10Cr0.90B1.81).

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  • 9.
    Bakhit, Babak
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Engberg, David
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Högberg, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Strategy for simultaneously increasing both hardness and toughness in ZrB2-rich Zr1-xTaxBy thin films2019In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 37, no 3, article id 031506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Refractory transition-metal diborides exhibit inherent hardness. However, this is not always sufficient to prevent failure in applications involving high mechanical and thermal stress, since hardness is typically accompanied by brittleness leading to crack formation and propagation. Toughness, the combination of hardness and ductility, is required to avoid brittle fracture. Here, the authors demonstrate a strategy for simultaneously enhancing both hardness and ductility of ZrB2-rich thin films grown in pure Ar on Al2O3(0001) and Si(001) substrates at 475 degrees C. ZrB2.4 layers are deposited by dc magnetron sputtering (DCMS) from a ZrB2 target, while Zr1-xTaxBy alloy films are grown, thus varying the B/metal ratio as a function of x, by adding pulsed high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) from a Ta target to deposit Zr1-xTaxBy alloy films using hybrid Ta-HiPIMS/ZrB2-DCMS sputtering with a substrate bias synchronized to the metal-rich portion of each HiPIMS pulse. The average power P-Ta (and pulse frequency) applied to the HiPIMS Ta target is varied from 0 to 1800W (0 to 300 Hz) in increments of 600W (100 Hz). The resulting boron-to-metal ratio, y = B/(Zr+Ta), in as-deposited Zr1-xTaxBy films decreases from 2.4 to 1.5 as P-Ta is increased from 0 to 1800W, while x increases from 0 to 0.3. A combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD), glancing-angle XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), analytical Z-contrast scanning TEM, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atom-probe tomography reveals that all films have the hexagonal AlB2 crystal structure with a columnar nanostructure, in which the column boundaries of layers with 0 amp;lt;= x amp;lt; 0.2 are B-rich, whereas those with x amp;gt;= 0.2 are Ta-rich. The nanostructural transition, combined with changes in average column widths, results in an similar to 20% increase in hardness, from 35 to 42 GPa, with a simultaneous increase of similar to 30% in nanoindentation toughness, from 4.0 to 5.2MPa root m. Published by the AVS.

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  • 10.
    Bakhit, Babak
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mráz, Stanislav
    Materials Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schneider, Jochen M.
    Materials Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Materials Research Laboratory and Department of Materials Science, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dense Ti0.67Hf0.33B1.7 thin films grown by hybrid HfB2-HiPIMS/TiB2-DCMS co-sputtering without external heating2021In: Vacuum, ISSN 0042-207X, E-ISSN 1879-2715, Vol. 186, article id 110057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for developing synthesis techniques that allow the growth of high-quality functional films at low substrate temperatures to minimize energy consumption and enable coating temperature-sensitive substrates. A typical shortcoming of conventional low-temperature growth strategies is insufficient atomic mobility, which leads to porous microstructures with impurity incorporation due to atmosphere exposure, and, in turn, poor mechanical properties. Here, we report the synthesis of dense Ti0.67Hf0.33B1.7 thin films with a hardness of ∼41.0 GPa grown without external heating (substrate temperature below ∼100 °C) by hybrid high-power impulse and dc magnetron co-sputtering (HfB2-HiPIMS/TiB2-DCMS) in pure Ar on Al2O3(0001) substrates. A substrate bias potential of −300 V is synchronized to the target-ion-rich portion of each HiPIMS pulse. The limited atomic mobility inherent to such desired low-temperature deposition is compensated for by heavy-mass ion (Hf+) irradiation promoting the growth of dense Ti0.67Hf0.33B1.7.

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  • 11.
    Bakhit, Babak
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Per O.Å.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Alling, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosen, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Materials Research Laboratory and Department of Materials Science, University of Illinois, Urbana IL 61801, USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Materials Research Laboratory and Department of Materials Science, University of Illinois, Urbana IL 61801, USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Self-organized columnar Zr0.7Ta0.3B1.5 core/shell-nanostructure thin films2020In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 401, article id 126237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We recently showed that Zr1−xTaxBy thin films have columnar nanostructure in which column boundaries are B-rich for x < 0.2, while Ta-rich for x ≥ 0.2. Layers with x ≥ 0.2 exhibit higher hardness and, simultaneously, enhanced toughness. Here, we determine the atomic-scale nanostructure of sputter-deposited columnar Zr0.7Ta0.3B1.5 thin films. The columns, 95 ± 17 Å, are core/shell nanostructures in which 80 ± 15-Å cores are crystalline hexagonal-AlB2-structure Zr-rich stoichiometric Zr1−xTaxB2. The shell structure is a narrow dense, disordered region that is Ta-rich and highly B-deficient. The cores are formed under intense ion mixing via preferential Ta segregation, due to the lower formation enthalpy of TaB2 than ZrB2, in response to the chemical driving force to form a stoichiometric compound. The films with unique combination of nanosized crystalline cores and dense metallic-glass-like shells provide excellent mechanical properties.

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  • 12.
    Bakhit, Babak
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Thörnberg, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Per O A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA; Natl Taiwan Univ Sci & Technol, Taiwan.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA; Natl Taiwan Univ Sci & Technol, Taiwan.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Improving the high-temperature oxidation resistance of TiB2 thin films by alloying with Al2020In: Acta Materialia, ISSN 1359-6454, E-ISSN 1873-2453, Vol. 196, p. 677-689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Refractory transition-metal diborides (TMB2) are candidates for extreme environments due to melting points above 3000 degrees C, excellent hardness, good chemical stability, and thermal and electrical conductivity. However, they typically suffer from rapid high-temperature oxidation. Here, we study the effect of Al addition on the oxidation properties of sputter-deposited TiB2-rich Ti1-xAlxBy thin films and demonstrate that alloying the films with Al significantly increases the oxidation resistance with a slight decrease in hardness. TiB2.4 layers are deposited by dc magnetron sputtering (DCMS) from a TiB2 target, while Ti1-xAlxBy alloy films are grown by hybrid high-power impulse and dc magnetron co-sputtering (Al-HiPIMS/TiB2-DCMS). All as-deposited films exhibit columnar structure. The column boundaries of TiB2.4 are B-rich, while Ti0.68Al0.32B1.35 alloys have Ti-rich columns surrounded by a Ti(1-x)Al(x)By tissue phase which is predominantly Al rich. Air-annealing TiB2.4 at temperatures above 500 degrees C leads to the formation of oxide scales that do not contain B and mostly consist of a rutile-TiO2 (s) phase. The resulting oxidation products are highly porous due to the evaporation of B2O3 (g) phase as well as the coarsening of TiO2 crystallites. This poor oxidation resistance is significantly improved by alloying with Al. While air-annealing at 800 degrees C for 0.5 h results in the formation of an similar to 1900-nm oxide scale on TiB2.4, the thickness of the scale formed on the Ti0.68Al0.32B1.35 alloys is similar to 470 nm. The enhanced oxidation resistance is attributed to the formation of a dense, protective Al-containing oxide scale that considerably decreases the oxygen diffusion rate by suppressing the oxide-crystallites coarsening. (C) 2020 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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  • 13.
    Bakhit, Babak
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wu, Zhengtao
    School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, China.
    Sortica, Mauritio A.
    Applied Nuclear Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Primetzhofer, Daniel
    Applied Nuclear Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Persson, Per O. Å.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Materials Research Laboratory and Department of Materials Science, University of Illinois, USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan.
    Greene, Joseph E.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Materials Research Laboratory and Department of Materials Science, University of Illinois, USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Age hardening in superhard ZrB2-rich Zr1-xTaxBy thin films2021In: Scripta Materialia, ISSN 1359-6462, E-ISSN 1872-8456, Vol. 191, p. 120-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We recently showed that sputter-deposited Zr1-xTaxBy thin films have hexagonal AlB2-type columnar nanostructure in which column boundaries are B-rich for x < 0.2, while Ta-rich for x ≥ 0.2. As-deposited layers with x ≥ 0.2 exhibit higher hardness and, simultaneously, enhanced toughness. Here, we study the mechanical properties of ZrB2.4, Zr0.8Ta0.2B1.8, and Zr0.7Ta0.3B1.5 films annealed in Ar atmosphere as a function of annealing temperature Ta up to 1200 °C. In-situ and ex-situ nanoindentation analyses reveal that all films undergo age hardening up to Ta = 800 °C, with the highest hardness achieved for Zr0.8Ta0.2B1.8 (45.5±1.0 GPa). The age hardening, which occurs without any phase separation or decomposition, can be explained by point-defect recovery that enhances chemical bond density. Although hardness decreases at Ta > 800 °C due mainly to recrystallization, column coarsening, and planar defect annihilation, all layers show hardness values above 34 GPa over the entire Ta range.

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  • 14.
    Bakhit, Babak
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA; Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA; Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Controlling the B/Ti ratio of TiBx thin films grown by high-power impulse magnetron sputtering2018In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 36, no 3, article id 030604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    TiBx thin films grown from compound TiB2 targets by magnetron sputter deposition are typically highly over-stoichiometric, with x ranging from 3.5 to 2.4, due to differences in Ti and B preferential-ejection angles and gas-phase scattering during transport from the target to the substrate. Here, the authors demonstrate that stoichiometric TiB2 films can be obtained using highpower impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) operated in power-controlled mode. The B/Ti ratio x of films sputter-deposited in Ar is controllably varied from 2.08 to 1.83 by adjusting the length of HiPIMS pulses t(on) between 100 and 30 mu s, while maintaining average power and pulse frequency constant. This results in peak current densities J(T), peak ranging from 0.27 to 0.88 A/cm(2). Energy- and time-resolved mass spectrometry analyses of the ion fluxes incident at the substrate position show that the density of metal ions increases with decreasing t(on) due to a dramatic increase in J(T, peak) resulting in the strong gas rarefaction. With t(on)amp;lt;60 mu s (J(T),(peak)amp;gt; 0.4 A/cm(2)), film growth is increasingly controlled by ions incident at the substrate, rather than neutrals, as a result of the higher plasma dencity and, hence, electron-impact ionization probablity. Thus, since sputter- ejected Ti atoms have a higher probability of being ionized than B atoms, due to their lower first-ionization potential and larger ionization cross-section, the Ti concentration in as-deposited films increases with decreasing ton (increasing J(T,peak)) as ionized sputtered species are steered to the substrate by the plasma in order to maintain charge neutrality. Published by the AVS.

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  • 15.
    Bakhit, Babak
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Primetzhofer, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Pitthan, Eduardo
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sortica, Mauricio A.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ntemou, Eleni
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, USA; National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Systematic compositional analysis of sputter-deposited boron-containing thin films2021In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 39, no 6, article id 063408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Boron-containing materials exhibit a unique combination of ceramic and metallic properties that are sensitively dependent on their given chemical bonding and elemental compositions. However, determining the composition, let alone bonding, with sufficient accuracy is cumbersome with respect to boron, being a light element that bonds in various coordinations. Here, we report on the comprehensive compositional analysis of transition-metal diboride (TMBx) thin films (TM = Ti, Zr, and Hf) by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF-ERDA), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). The films are grown on Si and C substrates by dc magnetron sputtering from stoichiometric TMB2 targets and have hexagonal AlB2-type columnar structures. EDX considerably overestimates B/TM ratios, x, compared to the other techniques, particularly for ZrBx. The B concentrations obtained by XPS strongly depend on the energy of Ar+ ions used for removing surface oxides and contaminants prior to analyses and are more reliable for 0.5 keV Ar+. ToF-ERDA, RBS, and NRA yield consistent compositions in TiBx. They also prove TiBx and ZrBx films to be homogeneous with comparable B/TM ratios for each film. However, ToF-ERDA, employing a 36-MeV 127I8+ beam, exhibits challenges in depth resolution and quantification of HfBx due to plural and multiple scattering and associated energy loss straggling effects. Compared to ToF-ERDA, RBS (for the film grown on C substrates) and NRA provide more reliable B/Hf ratios. Overall, a combination of methods is recommended for accurately pinpointing the compositions of borides that contain heavy transition metals.

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  • 16.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Broitman, Esteban
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nanotribological properties of wear resistant a-CNx thin films deposited by mid-frequency magnetron sputteringManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The nanotribological properties of amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films deposited with mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS) were investigated at the nanoscale using an in-situ technique in a Hysitron Triboindenter TI 950. The friction coefficient, wear rate, track roughness, and the track profiles were recorded as a function of the number of linear reciprocal cycles, revealing the manner that the nanotribological and surface properties change during the wear test. The surface composition of  the films was evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The friction coefficient ranges between 0.05 – 0.07, while the wear coefficient ranges from 9.4 x 10-8 up to 1.5 x 10-4 mm3/Nm. Debris particles and surface modifications characterize the friction and lubrication behavior in the track. The friction and main lubrication mechanism on the modified surface changes after the removal of debris particles, while this change appears at different cycle for each CNx film depending on the substrate bias voltage. Films grown at higher bias are modified earlier than films grown at lower bias. The wear behavior can be divided into two, track roughnessdependent, regimes; (1) films with track roughness > 1 nm showed wear with obvious tracks and (2) the films with roughness < 1 nm showed negative wear at the nanometer scale with a volume of material projected in the area of the wear track. This material volume is believed to be result of a surface modification, where the molar volume of the modified surface is larger than the molar volume of the surface before the wear test.

  • 17.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Garbrecht, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ivanov, Ivan G.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Low-temperature growth of low friction wear-resistant amorphous carbon nitride thin films by mid-frequency, high power impulse, and direct current magnetron sputtering2015In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 33, no 5, article id 05E112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films were deposited on steel AISI52100 and Si(001) substrates using mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS) with an MF bias voltage, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) with a synchronized HiPIMS bias voltage, and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) with a DC bias voltage. The films were deposited at a low substrate temperature of 150 °C and a N2/Ar flow ratio of 0.16 at the total pressure of 400 mPa. The negative bias voltage (Vs) was varied from 20 V to 120 V in each of the three deposition modes. The microstructure of the films was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), while the film morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All films possessed amorphous microstructure with clearly developed columns extending throughout the entire film thickness. Layers grown with the lowest substrate bias of 20 V exhibited pronounced intercolumnar porosity, independent of the technique used. Voids closed and dense films formed at Vs ≥ 60 V, Vs ≥ 100 V and Vs = 120 V for MFMS, DCMS and HiPIMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the nitrogen-to-carbon ratio, N/C, of the films ranged between 0.2 and 0.24. Elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) showed that Ar content varied between 0 and 0.8 at% and increases as a function of Vs for all deposition techniques. All films exhibited compressive residual stress, σ, which depends on the growth method; HiPIMS produces the least stressed films with stress between – 0.4 and – 1.2 GPa for all Vs values, while for CNx films deposited by MFMS σ = – 4.2 GPa. Nanoindentation showed a significant increase in film hardness and reduced elastic modulus with increasing Vs for all techniques. The harder films were produced by MFMS with hardness as high as 25 GPa. Low friction coefficients, between 0.05 and 0.06, were recorded for all films. Furthermore, CNx films produced by MFMS and DCMS at Vs = 100 V and 120 V presented a high wear resistance with wear coefficients of k ≤ 2.3 x 10-5 mm3/Nm.

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  • 18.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Glenat, Herve
    Laboratoire Procédés, Materiaux et Energie Solaire (PROMES)-CNRS, Perpignan, France.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Grillo, Stefano
    Laboratoire Procédés, Materiaux et Energie Solaire (PROMES)-CNRS, Perpignan, France; Universitè de Perpignan Via Domita, Perpignan, France.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Broitman, Esteban
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Comparative study of macro- and microtribological properties of carbon nitride thin films deposited by HiPIMS2017In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The macro- and microtribological properties of carbon nitride thin films deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering at different substrate bias voltages (V-b) were investigated. V-b of -100, -150, -200, and-300 V were used. A Hysitron Triboindenter TI950 and a reciprocating Tribotechnic tribometer with diamond counterparts were used in order to assess the tribological performance of the films at the micro- and macroscale, respectively. Initial Hertzian contact pressures of 2.5 GPa, 3.3 GPa and 3.9 GPa were chosen for the comparative measurements at both scales. At the macroscale, films with higher initial roughness present an increased wear. Debris creation and asperity deformation takes place causing abrasive wear. At the microscale, compression of the surface material occurs. The run-in friction shows similar trends at both scales; an initial decrease and an increase thereafter. Steady-state friction is not reached at the microscale, attributed to the absence of a graphitic tribolayer in the contact. At the macroscale, all films show abrasive wear and debris creation. Here, the changes in friction coefficients are attributed to the debris loss from the contact during the tribotests. The CN film tested at 2.5 GPa shows a continuous increase of friction, due to the continuous loss of debris from the contact. The other films reach a steady-state friction coefficient, since most of the debris is lost before the end of the tribotests. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 19.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. SKF Engineering and Research Centre, Tribology and Lubrication Department, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands.
    Nedelcu, Ileana
    SKF Engineering and Research Centre, Tribology and Lubrication Department, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands.
    Ivanov, Ivan Gueorguiev
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Meeuwenoord, Ralph
    SKF Engineering and Research Centre, Tribology and Lubrication Department, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands.
    Schmidt, Susann
    IHI Ionbond AG, Olten, Switzerland.
    Janzén, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ehret, Pascal
    SKF Engineering and Research Centre, Tribology and Lubrication Department, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rolling performance of carbon nitride-coated bearing components in different lubrication regimes2017In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 114, p. 141-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The performance of carbon nitride (CN) coated roller bearings is investigated, using a micropitting rig. The rolling performance is evaluated using Stribeck test, with a continuously varying rolling speed (0.2 - 2 m/s). Rolling contact fatigue tests with constant speeds (0.5, 1, 2, and 3.5 m/s) are also conducted in order to study the high-cycle performance of the rollers. The obtained Stribeck curve shows that the presence of coatings eliminates run-in, resulting in low friction coefficients (similar to 0.08). Raman spectroscopy, performed at the wear tracks, reveals that CNx maintain stable chemical state. Coatings show abrasion although the wear rate is not detrimental for the performance of the rollers, since a CNx to-steel contact is retained during the entire rolling contact fatigue test.

  • 20.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nedelcu, Ileana
    SKF Engn and Research Centre, Netherlands.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ehret, Pascal
    SKF Engn and Research Centre, Netherlands.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rolling contact fatigue of bearing components coated with carbon nitride thin films2016In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 98, p. 100-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bearing rollers were coated with CNx films using high power impulse magnetron sputtering deposition in order to reduce their rolling-contact fatigue as investigated using a Micro-Pitting Rig tribometer under poly-alpha-olefin lubricated conditions. Coated rollers with a similar to 15 nm thick W adhesion layer to the substrate, exhibit the best performance, presenting mild wear and no fatigue after 700 kcycles. The steady-state friction coefficient was similar to 0.05 for both uncoated and coated rollers. Uncoated rollers show run-in friction in the first 50 kcycles, because of steel-to-steel contact, which is absent for coated rollers. Analytical transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy show that the presence of a CNx coating prevents steel-to-steel contact of the counterparts, prior to the elastohydrodynamic lubrication, reducing their wear and increasing the lifetime expectancy. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 21.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Improved adhesion of carbon nitride coatings on steel substrates using metal HiPIMS pretreatments2016In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 302, p. 454-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the effect of low-temperature metal pretreatments in order to improve the adhesion of CNx coatings on steel substrates, which is crucial for tribological applications. The substrate pretreatments were conducted using five different metal targets: Ti, Zr, Al, Cr, and W, operated in high power impulse magnetron sputtering mode, known to produce significant ionization of the sputtered material flux. The CNx adhesion, as assessed by Rockwell C tests, did not improve upon Ti and Zr pretreatments. This is primarily ascribed to the fact that no interlayer was formed owing to severe re-sputtering due to high fluxes of doubly-ionized metal species in the plasma. A slight improvement in adhesion was observed in the case an Al pretreatment was carried out, while the best results were obtained using Cr and W. Here, 30-s-long pretreatments were sufficient to clean the steel surface and form a metallic interlayer between substrate and coating. Transmission electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that Al, Cr, and W created intermixing zones at the interlayer/substrate and the interlayer/CNx interfaces. The steel surfaces, pretreated using Cr or W, showed the highest work of adhesion with W-adh(Cr) = 1.77 J/m(2) and W-adh(W) = 1.66 J/m(2), respectively. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 22.
    Bonninghoff, Niklas
    et al.
    Natl Taiwan Univ Sci & Technol, Taiwan.
    Diyatmika, Wahyu
    Natl Taiwan Univ Sci & Technol, Taiwan; Natl Taiwan Univ Sci & Technol, Taiwan.
    Chu, Jinn P.
    Natl Taiwan Univ Sci & Technol, Taiwan; Natl Taiwan Univ Sci & Technol, Taiwan.
    Mraz, Stanislav
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Germany.
    Schneider, Jochen M.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Germany.
    Lin, Chien-Liang
    Natl Taiwan Univ Sci & Technol, Taiwan; Natl Taiwan Univ Sci & Technol, Taiwan.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    ZrCuAlNi thin film metallic glass grown by high power impulse and direct current magnetron sputtering2021In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 412, article id 127029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is a thin film deposition technique that combines the advantages of energetic deposition methods with magnetron sputtering. HiPIMS has so far mostly been utilized for the growth of crystalline coatings. Here we offer a study devoted to metallic glasses, in which we compare Zr60Cu25Al10Ni5 (target composition) thin films deposited by conventional direct current magnetron sputtering (DC) and HiPIMS. Film microstructure is strongly dependent on the choice of the sputtering method. The DC layers show a columnar structure with intra-columnar porosity, which provides a pathway for oxygen diffusion into the film. In contrast, HiPIMS films are column-free and possess about 4% higher density, as revealed by X-ray reflectivity. Electron diffraction reveals a decrease in average atomic spacing for the latter film of about 12%. These differences in film properties and morphology can be attributed to an increase in ad-atom mobility during HiPIMS caused by an increase in ion energy and flux of the film-forming species enabling a more efficient energy and momentum transfer to the growing film surface. The relative contribution of metallic and hence film forming ions to the overall ion flux of the DC plasma compared to the HiPIMS plasma is 13% and 96%, respectively. Additionally, a substrate bias causes the ionized film forming species during HiPIMS to arrive close to the substrate normal reducing shadowing effects. Different microstructures have a direct effect on the average roughness values, which for DC and HiPIMS films are 1.4 nm and 0.2 nm, respectively. The indentation hardness H and Youngs modulus E are higher for the HiPIMS sample, at 9.2 +/- 0.3 GPa and 131.6 +/- 3.6 GPa, respectively. The increase in hardness for the HiPIMS sample as compared to the DC sample (similar to 35%) can be attributed to higher film density, compressive (HiPIMS) as opposed to tensile (DC) stress and the lack of a columnar structure.

  • 23.
    Broitman, Esteban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Czigany, Zs.
    Res Inst Tech Phys and Mat Sci,Budapest.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bohlmark, J.
    Sandvik Tooling RandD.
    Cremer, R.
    CemeCon AG.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Industrial-scale deposition of highly adherent CNx films on steel substrates2010In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 204, no 21-22, p. 3349-3357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly adherent carbon nitride (CNx) films were deposited using a novel pretreatment with two high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) power supplies in a master-slave configuration: one to establish the discharge and one to produce a pulsed substrate bias. During the pretreatment, SKF3 (AISI 52100) steel substrates were pulse-biased in the environment of a HIPIMS Cr plasma in order to sputter clean the surface and to implant Cr metal ions. Subsequently. CNx films were prepared at room temperature by DC unbalanced magnetron sputtering from a high purity graphite target in a N-2/Ar discharge at 3 mTorr. All processing was done in an industrial CemeCon CC800 system. A series of depositions were obtained with samples at different bias voltages (DC and pulsed) in the range of 0-800 V. Scanning transmission microscopy (STEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) show the formation of an interface comprising a polycrystalline Cr layer of 100 nm and an amorphous transition layer of 5 nm. The adhesion of CNx films evaluated by the Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C reach strength quality HF1, and the scratch tests gives critical loads of 84 N. Adhesion results are correlated to the formation of an optimal interfacial mixing layer of Cr and steel.

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  • 24.
    Bruckner, Barbara
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Johannes Kepler Univ Linz, Austria.
    Hans, Marcus
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Germany.
    Nyberg, Tomas
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bauer, Peter
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Johannes Kepler Univ Linz, Austria.
    Primetzhofer, Daniel
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Electronic excitation of transition metal nitrides by light ions with keV energies2020In: Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, ISSN 0953-8984, E-ISSN 1361-648X, Vol. 32, no 40, article id 405502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the specific electronic energy deposition by protons and He ions with keV energies in different transition metal nitrides of technological interest. Data were obtained from two different time-of-flight ion scattering setups and show excellent agreement. For protons interacting with light nitrides, i.e. TiN, VN and CrN, very similar stopping cross sections per atom were found, which coincide with literature data of N(2)gas for primary energies &lt;= 25 keV. In case of the chemically rather similar nitrides with metal constituents from the 5(th)and 6(th)period, i.e. ZrN and HfN, the electronic stopping cross sections were measured to exceed what has been observed for molecular N(2)gas. For He ions, electronic energy loss in all nitrides was found to be significantly higher compared to the equivalent data of N(2)gas. Additionally, deviations from velocity proportionality of the observed specific electronic energy loss are observed. A comparison with predictions from density functional theory for protons and He ions yields a high apparent efficiency of electronic excitations of the target for the latter projectile. These findings are considered to indicate the contributions of additional mechanisms besides electron hole pair excitations, such as electron capture and loss processes of the projectile or promotion of target electrons in atomic collisions.

  • 25.
    Chang, Jui-Che
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kostov Gueorguiev, Gueorgui
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bakhit, Babak
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hsiao, Ching-Lien
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Domain epitaxial growth of Ta3N5 film on c-plane sapphire substrate2022In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 443, article id 128581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tritantalum pentanitride (Ta3N5) semiconductor is a promising material for photoelectrolysis of water with high efficiency. Ta3N5 is a metastable phase in the complex system of TaN binary compounds. Growing stabilized single-crystal Ta3N5 films is correspondingly challenging. Here, we demonstrate the growth of a nearly single-crystal Ta3N5 film with epitaxial domains on c-plane sapphire substrate, Al2O3(0001), by magnetron sputter epitaxy. Introduction of a small amount ~2% of O2 into the reactive sputtering gas mixed with N2 and Ar facilitates the formation of a Ta3N5 phase in the film dominated by metallic TaN. In addition, we indicate that a single-phase polycrystalline Ta3N5 film can be obtained with the assistance of a Ta2O5 seed layer. With controlling thickness of the seed layer smaller than 10 nm and annealing at 1000 °C, a crystalline β phase Ta2O5 was formed, which promotes the domain epitaxial growth of Ta3N5 films on Al2O3(0001). The mechanism behind the stabilization of the orthorhombic Ta3N5 structure resides in its stacking with the ultrathin seed layer of orthorhombic β-Ta2O5, which is energetically beneficial and reduces the lattice mismatch with the substrate.

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  • 26.
    Chang, Jui-Che
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sortica, Mauricio A.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bakhit, Babak
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Primetzhofer, Daniel
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hsiao, Ching-Lien
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Orthorhombic Ta3-xN5-yOy thin films grown by unbalanced magnetron sputtering: The role of oxygen on structure, composition, and optical properties2021In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 406, article id 126665Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct growth of orthorhombic Ta3N5-type Ta-O-N compound thin films, specifically Ta3-xN5-yOy, on Si and sapphire substrates with various atomic fractions is realized by unbalanced magnetron sputtering. Low-degree fiber-textural Ta3-xN5-yOy films were grown through reactive sputtering of Ta in a gas mixture of N-2, Ar, and O-2 with keeping a partial pressure ratio of 3:2:0.1 in a total working pressure range of 5-30 mTorr. With increasing total pressure from 5 to 30 mTorr, the atomic fraction of O in the as-grown Ta3-xN5-yOy films was found to increase from 0.02 to 0.15 while that of N and Ta decrease from 0.66 to 0.54 and 0.33 to 0.31, respectively, leading to a decrease in b lattice constant up to around 1.3%. Metallic TaNx phases were formed without oxygen. For a working pressure of 40 mTorr, an amorphous, O-rich Ta-N-O compound film with a high O fraction of similar to 0.48, was formed, mixed with non-stoichiometric TaON and Ta2O5. By analyzing the plasma discharge, the increasing O incorporation is associated with oxide formation on top of the Ta target due to a higher reactivity of Ta with O than with N. The increase of O incorporation in the films also leads to a optical bandgap widening from similar to 2.22 to similar to 2.96 eV, which is in agreement with the compositional and structural changes from a crystalline Ta3-xN5-yOy to an amorphous O-rich Ta-O-N compound.

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  • 27.
    Chipatecua Godoy, Yuri
    et al.
    CINVESTAV, Mexico.
    Tengstrand, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Olaya Florez, Jairo
    Univ Nacl Colombia, Colombia.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA; Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Bustos, Erika
    CIDETEQ, Mexico.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Herrera-Gomez, Alberto
    CINVESTAV, Mexico.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA; Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA; Natl Taiwan Univ Sci and Technol, Taiwan.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Corrosion Resistant TiTaN and TiTaAlN Thin Films Grown by Hybrid HiPIMS/DCMS Using Synchronized Pulsed Substrate Bias with No External Substrate Heating2019In: Coatings, ISSN 2079-6412, COATINGS, Vol. 9, no 12, article id 841Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ti0.92Ta0.08N and Ti0.41Al0.51Ta0.08N thin films grown on stainless-steel substrates, with no external heating, by hybrid high-power impulse and dc magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS/DCMS), were investigated for corrosion resistance. The Ta target was operated in HiPIMS mode to supply pulsed Ta-ion fluxes, while two Ti (or Ti and Al) targets were operated in DCSM mode in order to provide a high deposition rate. Corrosion resistance was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy employing a 3.5% NaCl solution at room temperature. The 300-nm-thick transition-metal nitride coatings exhibited good corrosion resistance due to film densification resulting from pulsed heavy Ta-ion irradiation during film growth. Corrosion protective efficiencies were above 99.8% for both Ti0.41Al0.51Ta0.08N and Ti0.92Ta0.08N, and pore resistance was apparently four orders of magnitude higher than for bare 304 stainless-steel substrates.

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  • 28.
    Chowdhury, Susmita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hjort, Victor
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Shu, Rui
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Le Febvrier, Arnaud
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Magnuson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Thermoelectric properties and electronic structure of Cr(Mo,V)Nx thin films studied by synchrotron and lab-based x-ray spectroscopy2023In: Physical Review B, ISSN 2469-9950, E-ISSN 2469-9969, Vol. 108, no 20, article id 205134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chromium-based nitrides are used in hard, resilient coatings and show promise for thermoelectric applications due to their combination of structural, thermal, and electronic properties. Here, we investigate the electronic structures and chemical bonding correlated to the thermoelectric properties of epitaxially grown chromium-based multicomponent nitride Cr(Mo,V)Nx thin films. The small amount of N vacancies causes Cr 3d and N 2p states to appear at the Fermi level and reduces the band gap in Cr0.51N0.49. Incorporating holes by alloying of V in N-deficient CrN results in an enhanced thermoelectric power factor with marginal change in the charge transfer of Cr to N compared with Cr0.51N0.49. Further alloying of Mo, isoelectronic to Cr, increases the density of states at the Fermi level due to hybridization of the (Cr, V) 3d and Mo 4d-N 2p states in Cr(Mo,V)Nx. This hybridization and N off-stoichiometry result in more metal-like electrical resistivity and reduction in Seebeck coefficient. The N deficiency in Cr(Mo,V)Nx also depicts a critical role in reduction of the charge transfer from metal to N site compared with Cr0.51N0.49 and Cr0.50V0.03N0.47. In this paper, we envisage ways for enhancing thermoelectric properties through electronic band engineering by alloying and competing effects of N vacancies.

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  • 29.
    Dobruchowska, Ewa
    et al.
    Koszalin Univ Technol, Poland.
    Suszko, Tomasz
    Koszalin Univ Technol, Poland.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Adamczewska, Dorota
    Koszalin Univ Technol, Poland.
    Gulbinski, Witold
    Koszalin Univ Technol, Poland.
    Amorphous/quasi-amorphous CoCrMo-C coatings for improved electrochemical properties and tribocorrosion resistance of biomedical alloys2023In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 460, article id 129398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coatings based on CoCrMo cobalt alloy have been designed to increase corrosion resistance of AISI 316L austenitic steel in body fluids. The CoCrMo-C coatings, with different carbon content (from 0 to 65 at.%), were synthesised by reactive magnetron sputtering of the medical CoCrMo (ISO 5832-12) alloy in the argon -acetylene atmosphere. Evolution of their structure, crystalline phase and chemical composition with increasing carbon fraction were investigated by X-ray diffractometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evaluation of corrosion resistance of CoCrMo-C films on 316L steel substrates was performed in Hanks Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarisation tests. The studies have revealed high chemical inertness of all coatings. Passive/blocking layers formed on their surfaces exhibit a capacitive character, while their resistivity is nearly two orders of magnitude higher compared to the corresponding values obtained for the CoCrMo and 316L alloys tested under similar conditions. The CoCrMo-C coatings provide pitting corrosion protection for 316L austenitic steel. This is expected to extend the residence time of stainless steel in the tissue environment. The 316L/CoCrMo-C systems were also subjected to tribocorrosion tests in HBSS at three electrochemical potentials, i.e. at open circuit, cathodic, and anodic potential. A model was developed to relate the electrical values recorded during tribocorrosion experiments with the phenomena that characterize the coating wear process. It was found that the friction coefficient systematically decreased from 0.7 to 0.1 with increasing the carbon content under all potentials applied. The wear rate observed for majority of the coatings was lower than that for CoCrMo and 316L alloys. For the samples with the highest carbon content, the wear rate under oxidative conditions became even lower than for the cathodic potential.

  • 30.
    Dorri, Samira
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA; National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bakhit, Babak
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Oxidation kinetics of overstoichiometric TiB2 thin films grown by DC magnetron sputtering2022In: Corrosion Science, ISSN 0010-938X, E-ISSN 1879-0496, Vol. 206, article id 110493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We systematically study the oxidation properties of sputter-deposited TiB2.5 coatings up to 700 °C. Oxide-scale thickness dox increases linearly with time ta for 300, 400, 500, and 700 °C, while an oxidation-protective behavior occurs with dox=250∙ta0.2 at 600 °C. Oxide-layer’s structure changes from amorphous to rutile/anatase-TiO2 at temperatures ≥ 500 °C. Abnormally low oxidation rate at 600 °C is attributed to a highly dense columnar TiO2-sublayer growing near oxide/film interface with a top-amorphous thin layer, suppressing oxygen diffusion. A model is proposed to explain the oxide-scale evolution at 600 °C. Decreasing heating rate to 1.0 °C/min plays a noticeable role in the TiB2.5 oxidation.

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  • 31.
    Eriksson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zhu, Jianqiang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ghafoor, Naureen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Seco Tools AB, Sweden.
    Sjölen, Jacob
    Seco Tools AB, Sweden.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ti-Si-C-N Thin Films Grown by Reactive Arc Evaporation from Ti3SiC2 Cathodes2011In: Journal of Materials Research, ISSN 0884-2914, E-ISSN 2044-5326, Vol. 26, p. 874-881Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ti-Si-C-N thin films were deposited onto WC-Co substrates by industrial scale arc evaporation from Ti3SiC2 compound cathodes in N2 gas. Microstructure and hardness were found to be highly dependent on the wide range of film compositions attained, comprising up to 12 at.% Si and 16 at.% C. Nonreactive deposition yielded films consisting of understoichiometric TiCx, Ti and silicide phases with high (27 GPa) hardness. At a nitrogen pressure of 0.25-0.5 Pa, below that required for N saturation, superhard, 45-50 GPa, (Ti,Si)(C,N) films with a nanocrystalline feathered structure were formed. Films grown above 2 Pa displayed crystalline phases of more pronounced nitride character, but with C and Si segregated to grain boundaries to form weak grain boundary phases. In abundance of N, the combined presence of Si and C disturb cubic phase growth severely and compromises the mechanical strength of the films.

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  • 32.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ghafoor, Naureen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Broekhuijsen, Sjoerd
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schell, Norbert
    Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Institute for Materials Research, Germany.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Morphology control in Ni/Ti multilayer neutron mirrors by ion-assisted interface engineering and B4C incorporation2023In: Optical Materials Express, ISSN 2159-3930, E-ISSN 2159-3930, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 1424-1439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The optical contrast and minimum layer thickness of Ni/Ti broadband neutron multilayer supermirrors is usually hampered by an interface width, typically 0.7 nm, caused by nanocrystallites, interdiffusion, and/or intermixing. We explore the elimination of nanocrystallites in combination with interface smoothening by modulation of ion assistance during magnetron sputter deposition of 0.8 to 6.4 nm thick Ni and Ti layers. The amorphization is achieved through incorporation of natural B4C where B and C preferably bond to Ti. A two-stage substrate bias was applied to each layer; -30 V for the initial 1 nm followed by -100 V for the remaining part, generating multilayer mirrors with interface widths of 0.40-0.45 nm. The results predict that high performance supermirrors with m-values as high as 10 are feasible by using 11B isotope-enriched B4C combined with temporal control of the ion assistance.

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  • 33.
    Fager, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Growth and properties of amorphous Ti-B-Si-N thin films deposited by hybrid HIPIMS/DC-magnetron co-sputtering from TiB2 and Si targets2014In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 259, p. 442-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amorphous nitrides are explored for their homogenous structure and potential use as wear-resistant coatings, beyond their much studied nano-and microcrystalline counterparts. (TiB2)1−xSixNy thin films were deposited on Si(001) substrates by a hybrid technique of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) combined with dc magnetron sputtering (DCMS) using TiB2 and Si targets in a N2/Ar atmosphere. By varying the sputtering dc power to the Si target from 200 to 2000 W while keeping the average power to the TiB2-target, operated in HIPIMS mode, constant at 4000 W, the Si content in the films increased gradually from x=0.01 to x=0.43. The influence of the Si content on the microstructure, phase constituents, and mechanical properties were systematically investigated. The results show that the microstructure of as-deposited (TiB2)1−xSixNy films changes from nanocrystalline with 2-4 nm TiN grains for x=0.01 to fully electron diffraction amorphous for x=0.22. With increasing Si content, the hardness of the films increases from 8.5 GPa with x=0.01 to 17.2 GPa with x=0.43.

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  • 34.
    Fager, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Howe, B.M.
    Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, USA.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mei, A. R. B.
    Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory and Materials Science Department, University of Illinois, USA.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, J.E.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hf-Al-Si-N multilayers deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering from a single Hf0.6Al0.2Si0.2 target using high-flux, low-energy modulated substrate bias: film growth and properties2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hf1−x−yAlxSiyN (0≤x≤0.14, 0≤y≤0.13) single layers and multilayer films are grown on Si(001) at a substrate temperature Ts=250 °C using ultrahigh vacuum magnetically-unbalanced reactive magnetron sputtering from a single Hf0.6Al0.2Si0.2 target in a 5%-N2/Ar atmosphere at a total pressure of 20 mTorr (2.67 Pa). The composition and nanostructure of Hf1−x−yAlxSiyN is controlled during growth by varying the ion energy (Ei) of the ions incident at the film surface, keeping the ion-to-metal flux ratio (Ji/JMe) constant at 8. By sequentially switching Ei between 10 and 40 eV, Hf0.77Al0.10Si0.13N/Hf0.78Al0.14Si0.08N multilayers with bilayer periods Λ = 2-20 nm are grown, in which the Si2p bonding state changes from predominantly Si-Si bonds for films grown at Ei = 10 eV, to mainly Si-N bonds at Ei = 40 eV. Multilayer hardness values increase monotonically from 20 GPa with Λ = 20 nm to 27 GPa with Λ = 2 nm, while multilayer fracture toughness increases with increasing Λ. Multilayers with Λ = 10 nm have the optimized property combination of being bothrelatively hard, H∼24 GPa, and fracture tough.

  • 35.
    Fager, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Howe, Brandon M.
    US Air Force, OH 45433 USA.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mei, A. B.
    University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Novel hard, tough HfAlSiN multilayers, defined by alternating Si bond structure, deposited using modulated high-flux, low-energy ion irradiation of the growing film2015In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 05E103-1-05E103-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hf1-x-yAlxSiyN (0 less than= x less than= 0.14, 0 less than= y less than= 0.12) single layer and multilayer films are grown on Si(001) at 250 degrees C using ultrahigh vacuum magnetically unbalanced reactive magnetron sputtering from a single Hf0.6Al0.2Si0.2 target in mixed 5%-N-2/Ar atmospheres at a total pressure of 20 mTorr (2.67 Pa). The composition and nanostructure of Hf1-x-yAlxSiyN films are controlled by varying the energy Ei of the ions incident at the film growth surface while maintaining the ion-to-metal flux ratio constant at eight. Switching E-i between 10 and 40 eV allows the growth of Hf0.78Al0.10Si0.12N/Hf0.78Al0.14Si0.08N multilayers with similar layer compositions, but in which the Si bonding state changes from predominantly Si-Si/Si-Hf for films grown with E-i = 10 eV, to primarily Si-N with E-i = 40 eV. Multilayer hardness values, which vary inversely with bilayer period Lambda, range from 20 GPa with Lambda = 20 nm to 27 GPa with Lambda = 2 nm, while fracture toughness increases directly with Lambda. Multilayers with Lambda = 10nm combine relatively high hardness, H similar to 24GPa, with good fracture toughness. (C) 2015 American Vacuum Society.

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  • 36.
    Fager, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tengstrand, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bolz, S.
    CemeCon AG, Germany.
    Mesic, B.
    CemeCon AG, Germany.
    Koelker, W.
    CemeCon AG, Germany.
    Schiffers, Ch.
    CemeCon AG, Germany.
    Lemmer, O.
    CemeCon AG, Germany.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Low-temperature growth of dense and hard Ti0.41Al0.51Ta0.08N films via hybrid HIPIMS/DC magnetron co-sputtering with synchronized metal-ion irradiation2017In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 121, no 17, article id 171902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hard Ti1-xAlxN thin films are of importance for metal-cutting applications. The hardness, thermal stability, and oxidation resistance of these coatings can be further enhanced by alloying with TaN. We use a hybrid high-power pulsed and dc magnetron co-sputtering (HIPIMS/DCMS) technique to grow dense and hard Ti0.41Al0.51Ta0.08N alloys without external heating (T-s amp;lt; 150 degrees C). Separate Ti and Al targets operating in the DCMS mode maintain a deposition rate of similar to 50 nm/min, while irradiation of the growing film by heavy Ta+/Ta2+ ions from the HIPIMS-powered Ta target, using dc bias synchronized to the metal-ion-rich part of each HIPIMS pulse, provides effective near-surface atomic mixing resulting in densification. The substrate is maintained at floating potential between the short bias pulses to minimize Ar+ bombardment, which typically leads to high compressive stress. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy analyses reveal dramatic differences in the microstructure of the co-sputtered HIPIMS/DCMS films (Ta-HIPIMS) compared to films with the same composition grown at floating potential with all targets in the DCMS mode (Ta-DCMS). The Ta-DCMS alloy films are only similar to 70% dense due to both inter-and intra-columnar porosity. In contrast, the Ta-HIPIMS layers exhibit no inter-columnar porosity and are essentially fully dense. The mechanical properties of Ta-HIPIMS films are significantly improved with hardness and elastic modulus values of 28.0 and 328 GPa compared to 15.3 and 289 GPa for reference Ta-DCMS films. Published by AIP Publishing.

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  • 37.
    Fashandi, Hossein
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lai, Chung-Chuan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlqvist, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andersson, Mike
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ti2Au2C and Ti3Au2C2 formed by solid state reaction of gold with Ti2AlC and Ti3AlC22017In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 53, no 69, p. 9554-9557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Incorporation of layers of noble metals in non-van der Waals layered materials may be used to form novel layered compounds. Recently, we demonstrated a high-temperature-induced exchange process of Au with Si in the layered phase Ti3SiC2, resulting in the formation of Ti3AuC2 and Ti3Au2C2. Here, we generalize this technique showing that Au/Ti2AlC and Au/Ti3AlC2 undergo an exchange reaction at 650 [degree]C to form Ti2Au2C and Ti3Au2C2 and determine their structures by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and ab initio calculations. These results imply that noble-metal-containing layered phases should be possible to synthesize in many systems. The metal to be introduced should be inert to the transition-metal carbide layers, and exhibit negative heat of mixing with the initial A element in a liquid phase or two-phase liquid/solid region at the annealing temperature.

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  • 38.
    Fursatz, Marian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Skog, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. S2Med AB, Linnegatan 9, SE-58225 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sivlér, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. S2Med AB, Linnegatan 9, SE-58225 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Palm, Eleonor
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Aronsson, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Skallberg, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khalaf, Hazem
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Torbjorn
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Functionalization of bacterial cellulose wound dressings with the antimicrobial peptide epsilon-poly-L-Lysine2018In: Biomedical Materials, ISSN 1748-6041, E-ISSN 1748-605X, Vol. 13, no 2, article id 025014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wound dressings based on bacterial cellulose (BC) can form a soft and conformable protective layer that can stimulate wound healing while preventing bacteria from entering the wound. Bacteria already present in the wound can, however, thrive in the moist environment created by the BC dressing which can aggravate the healing process. Possibilities to render the BC antimicrobial without affecting the beneficial structural and mechanical properties of the material would hence be highly attractive. Here we present methods for functionalization of BC with epsilon-poly-L-Lysine (epsilon-PLL), a non-toxic biopolymer with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. Low molecular weight epsilon-PLL was crosslinked in pristine BC membranes and to carboxymethyl cellulose functionalized BC using carbodiimide chemistry. The functionalization of BC with epsilon-PLL inhibited growth of S. epidermidis on the membranes but did not affect the cytocompatibility to cultured human fibroblasts as compared to native BC. The functionalization had no significant effects on the nanofibrous structure and mechanical properties of the BC. The possibility to functionalize BC with epsilon-PLL is a promising, green and versatile approach to improve the performance of BC in wound care and other biomedical applications.

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  • 39.
    Gangaprasad Rao, Smita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Shu, Rui
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Boyd, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Le Febvrier, Arnaud
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Phase formation and structural evolution of multicomponent (CrFeCo)Ny films2021In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 412, article id 127059Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Cantor alloy (CoCrFeMnNi) and its variants, in bulk as well as thin films, have been extensively studied. They are known to exhibit cubic crystal structures and thermodynamic stability regardless of their complex chemical composition. Therefore, they may find use as hard, wear-resistant, corrosion and oxidation-resistant coatings. The addition of light elements, such as nitrogen, is known to help improve these properties further through processes such as amorphization and nitride compound formation. Here, we investigate the ternary CrFeCo system to study the effects of nitrogen addition. (CrFeCo)Ny multicomponent thin films are grown on silicon substrates by DC magnetron sputtering. Changes in crystal structure, morphology, mechanical and electrical properties with gradual increases of nitrogen in the film are described and discussed. Increased addition of nitrogen from 14 at.% to 28 at.% in the film leads to a transformation from an fcc to a bcc crystal structure, affects both the mechanical and electrical properties. XPS analysis shows the tendency of nitrogen to bond with Cr over other metals. The films display hardness values between 7 and 11 GPa with resistivities values ranging between 28 and 165 μΩ cm.

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  • 40.
    Ghafoor, Naureen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dorri, Samira
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rogström, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bakhit, Babak
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Phase separation paths in metastable Zr1-xAlxN monolithic layers compared to multilayers with TiN: Growth versus annealing temperatures2023In: Materialia, E-ISSN 2589-1529, Vol. 28, article id 101758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metastable super-saturated Zr1_xAlxN alloys tend to phase separate into the equilibrium cubic (c) ZrN and wurtzite (w) AlN due to a deep miscibility gap. Transformation is shown here to follow distinctly different paths depending on if Zr1_xAlxN (x = 0.3 and 0.6) is sputter deposited as a single layer or multi-layered with TiN, and further varied by post-deposition annealing. Using in situ high-energy synchrotron wide-angle X-ray scattering and analytical transmission electron microscopy, surface segregation effects are compared to secondary phase transformations occurring in as-deposited layers during thermal annealing up to 1000 degrees C. For the primary phase transformation from the vapor phase, w-AlN nucleates and an AlN-ZrN labyrinthine structure evolves at elevated deposition temperature with semi-coherent interfaces over several nanometers, where the higher Al content narrows the structure in both single and multilayers. Transformation in thinner alloy layers is governed by epitaxial forces which stabilize single-phase c-Zr0.4Al0.6N, which enables c-Zr0.4Al0.6N/TiN superlattice growth at temperatures as low as 350 degrees C. Regardless of the decomposition route, the formation of c-AlN is impeded and w-AlN instantaneously forms during transformation. In contrast, isostructural decomposition into w-AlN and w-Zr (Al)N occurs in w-Zr0.4Al0.6N alloys during annealing.

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  • 41.
    Ghafoor, Naureen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andrew, Aquila
    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California, USA.
    Gullikson, Eric
    Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, California, USA.
    Franz, Schäfers
    Institute for Nanometre Optics and Technology Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, Berlin, Germany.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Impact of B4C co-sputtering on structure and optical performance of Cr/Sc multilayer X-ray mirrors2017In: Optics Express, E-ISSN 1094-4087, Vol. 25, no 15, p. 18274-18287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of B4C incorporation during magnetron sputter deposition of Cr/Sc multilayers intended for soft X-ray reflective optics is investigated. Chemical analysis suggests formation of metal: boride and carbide bonds which stabilize an amorphous layer structure, resulting in smoother interfaces and an increased reflectivity. A near-normal incidence reflectivity of 11.7%, corresponding to a 67% increase, is achieved at λ = 3.11 nm upon adding 23 at.% (B + C). The advantage is significant for the multilayer periods larger than 1.8 nm, where amorphization results in smaller interface widths, for example, giving 36% reflectance and 99.89% degree of polarization near Brewster angle for a multilayer polarizer. The modulated ion-energy-assistance during the growth is considered vital to avoid intermixing during the interface formation even when B + C are added.

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  • 42.
    Ghafoor, Naureen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA; Univ Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Holec, D.
    Univ Leoben, Austria.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Per O A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Self-structuring in Zr1-xAlxN films as a function of composition and growth temperature2018In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 16327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanostructure formation via surface-diffusion-mediated segregation of ZrN and AIN in Zr1-xAlxN films during high mobility growth conditions is investigated for 0 amp;lt;= x amp;lt;= 1. The large immiscibility combined with interfacial surface and strain energy balance resulted in a hard nanolabyrinthine lamellar structure with well-defined (semi) coherent c-ZrN and w-AlN domains of sub-nm to similar to 4 nm in 0.2 amp;lt;= x amp;lt;= 0.4 films, as controlled by atom mobility. For high AlN contents (x amp;gt; 0.49) Al-rich ZrN domains attain wurtzite structure within fine equiaxed nanocomposite wurtzite lattice. Slow diffusion in wurtzite films points towards crystal structure dependent driving force for decomposition. The findings of unlikelihood of isostructural decomposition in c-Zr1-xAlxN, and stability of w-Zr1-xAlxN (in large x films) is complemented with first principles calculations.

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  • 43.
    Gharavi, Mohammad Amin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Balke, B.
    Univ Stuttgart, Germany.
    Fournier, D.
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Le Febvrier, Arnaud
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pallier, Camille
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Synthesis and characterization of single-phase epitaxial Cr2N thin films by reactive magnetron sputtering2019In: Journal of Materials Science, ISSN 0022-2461, E-ISSN 1573-4803, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 1434-1442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cr2N is commonly found as a minority phase or inclusion in stainless steel, CrN-based hard coatings, etc. However, studies on phase-pure material for characterization of fundamental properties are limited. Here, Cr2N thin films were deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering onto (0001) sapphire substrates. X-ray diffraction and pole figure texture analysis show Cr2N (0001) epitaxial growth. Scanning electron microscopy imaging shows a smooth surface, while transmission electron microscopy and X-ray reflectivity show a uniform and dense film with a density of 6.6gcm(-3), which is comparable to theoretical bulk values. Annealing the films in air at 400 degrees C for 96h shows little signs of oxidation. Nano-indentation shows an elastic-plastic behavior with H=18.9GPa and E-r=265GPa. The moderate thermal conductivity is 12Wm(-1)K(-1), and the electrical resistivity is 70cm. This combination of properties means that Cr2N may be of interest in applications such as protective coatings, diffusion barriers, capping layers and contact materials.

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  • 44.
    Gharavi, Mohammad Amin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Le Febvrier, Arnaud
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Alling, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Armiento, Rickard
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Phase Transformation and Superstructure Formation in (Ti-0.5, Mg-0.5)N Thin Films through High-Temperature Annealing2021In: Coatings, ISSN 2079-6412, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    (Ti-0.5, Mg-0.5)N thin films were synthesized by reactive dc magnetron sputtering from elemental targets onto c-cut sapphire substrates. Characterization by theta-2 theta X-ray diffraction and pole figure measurements shows a rock-salt cubic structure with (111)-oriented growth and a twin-domain structure. The films exhibit an electrical resistivity of 150 m omega center dot cm, as measured by four-point-probe, and a Seebeck coefficient of -25 mu V/K. It is shown that high temperature (similar to 800 degrees C) annealing in a nitrogen atmosphere leads to the formation of a cubic LiTiO2-type superstructure as seen by high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The corresponding phase formation is possibly influenced by oxygen contamination present in the as-deposited films resulting in a cubic superstructure. Density functional theory calculations utilizing the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals show that the LiTiO2-type TiMgN2 structure has a 0.07 eV direct bandgap.

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  • 45.
    Gomaa, M. M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Natl Res Ctr, Egypt.
    Yazdi, Gholamreza
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rodner, Marius
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Boshta, M.
    Natl Res Ctr, Egypt.
    Osman, M. B. S.
    Ain Shams Univ, Egypt.
    Khranovskyy, Volodymyr
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Exploring NiO nanosize structures for ammonia sensing2018In: Journal of materials science. Materials in electronics, ISSN 0957-4522, E-ISSN 1573-482X, Vol. 29, no 14, p. 11870-11877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficient ammonia gas sensor devices were fabricated based on nickel oxide (NiO) nanostructures films. Two chemical synthesis approaches were used: chemical spray pyrolysis (CSP) and chemical bath deposition (CBD), aiming at obtaining highly developed surface area and high chemical reactivity of NiO. Crystal structure, morphology, and composition of NiO films and nanostructures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. CSP method results in the synthesis of NiO films with pure cubic crystalline structure of preferred orientation along (111) direction. The type of the precursors used (nickel acetate, nickel chloride and nickel nitrate) affects the morphology and crystallites average size of the deposited films. CBD method consisted of two stages: (i) deposition of nickel hydroxide phase and (ii) thermal annealing of nickel hydroxide at 450 A degrees C in air for 4 h. Resulted structures were nanoflakes, vertically arranged in a "wall-like" morphology. Fabricated structures were found to be sensitive to ammonia differently, depending on the synthesis approach and material morphology. NiO films deposited by CBD demonstrated a stable response to ammonia with maximum magnitude at the operating temperature of 300 A degrees C. The highest average response for the CBD-NiO sample was 114.3-141.3% for 25 and 150 ppm NH3, respectively, whereas the response range observed for the film processed by spray pyrolysis using nickel chloride was 31.7-142.5% for 25 and 150 ppm NH3, respectively.

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  • 46.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Measurement Technology, Biology and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Photoelectron spectroscopy of conjugated polymer surfaces and interfaces for light emitting devices2000Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bakhit, Babak
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    High Si content TiSiN films with superior oxidation resistance2020In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 398, article id 126087Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The high-temperature oxidation resistance of Ti1-xSixN films with Si content varying in wide range, 0.13 &lt;= x &lt;= 0.91, is evaluated. Films are grown in Ar/N-2 atmospheres using a hybrid high-power impulse and dc magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS/DCMS) configuration with Si target powered by HiPIMS and Ti target operated in DCMS mode. The substrate bias is synchronized to the Si+-rich portions of the HiPIMS pulses in order to promote solid solution formation. A combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, and cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy reveals a sharp increase in the oxidation resistance for layers with x &gt; 0.50. The thickness of the oxide layer, following 1 h anneal at 800 degrees C in air, is in the range 150-200 nm for 0.13 &lt;= x &lt;= 0.50 and decreases to only 4 nm with x = 0.91, which is similar to 30 times lower than for the best performing Ti1-xAlxN film (x = 0.64) tested under the same conditions. The oxide forming on top of Ti1-xSixN films with x = 0.41 consists of a SiO2-TiO2 two-phase mixture with a molar ratio given by Si/Ti ratio. In Ti1-xSixN layers with x &lt;= 0.31, the presence of grain boundaries, which act as diffusion paths facilitates Si diffusion towards the bulk of the film resulting in that TiO2, the thermodynamically more stable oxide, terminates the surface. Ti0.09Si0.91N films, are essentially unaffected by the anneal and exhibit a hardness of 23 GPa, which is similar to 30% higher than for the reference SiNz film. Moreover, we demonstrate that 25 nm thick Ti0.09Si0.91N capping layers successfully prevent Ti(0.36A)l(0.64)N oxidation at 800 degrees C. Such approach provides superior oxidation protection compared to alloying TiAlN with Si. Our results suggest that multilayers including nm thin layers of high Si-content TiSiN is a most effective approach to improve high-temperature oxidation resistance of functional ceramic thin films.

  • 48.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Haasch, Richard T.
    Univ Illinois, IL USA.
    Hellgren, Niklas
    Messiah Univ, PA USA.
    Lewin, Erik
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of thin films2023In: NATURE REVIEWS METHODS PRIMERS, ISSN 2662-8449, Vol. 3, no 1, article id 40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a popular analytical technique in materials science as it can assess the surface chemistry of a broad range of samples. This Primer concerns best practice in XPS analysis, aimed at both entry-level and advanced users, with a focus on thin film samples synthesized under vacuum conditions. The high surface to volume ratio of thin films means that factors such as substrate choice and air exposure time are important for the final result. Essential concepts are introduced, such as binding energy, photoelectric effect, spectral referencing and chemical shift, as well as practical aspects including surface sensitivity, probing depth, energy resolution, sample handling and sputter etching. Correct procedures for experimental planning, instrument set-up, sample preparation, data acquisition, results analysis and presentation are reviewed in connection with physical principles and common applications. Typical problems, including charging, spectral overlap, sputter damage and binding energy referencing, are discussed along with possible solutions or workarounds. Finally, a workflow is presented for arriving at high-quality results. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) can be used to investigate chemical bonding and elemental composition. This Primer discusses how XPS can be used to characterize thin films, including key considerations for sample preparation, experimental set-up and data analysis.

  • 49.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A step-by-step guide to perform x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy2022In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 132, no 1, article id 011101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing concern within the surface science community that the massive increase in the number of XPS articles over the last few decades is accompanied by a decrease in work quality including in many cases meaningless chemical bond assignment. Should this trend continue, it would have disastrous consequences for scientific research. While there are many factors responsible for this situation, the lack of insight of physical principles combined with seeming ease of XPS operation and insufficient training are certainly the major ones. To counter that, we offer a comprehensive tutorial written in the form of a step-by-step guide starting from experimental planning, through sample selection and handling, instrument setup, data acquisition, spectra analysis, and results presentation. Six application examples highlight the broad range of research questions that can be answered by XPS. The topic selection and the discussion level are intended to be accessible for novices yet challenging possible preconceptions of experienced practitioners. The analyses of thin film samples are chosen for model cases as this is from where the bulk of XPS reports presently emanate and also where the authors key expertise lies. At the same time, the majority of discussed topics is applicable to surface science in general and is, thus, of relevance for the analyses of any type of sample and material class. The tutorial contains ca. 160 original spectra and over 290 references for further reading. Particular attention is paid to the correct workflow, development of good research practices, and solid knowledge of factors that impact the quality and reliability of the obtained information. What matters in the end is that the conclusions from the analysis can be trusted. Our aspiration is that after reading this tutorial each practitioner will be able to perform error-free data analysis and draw meaningful insights from the rich well of XPS. Published under an exclusive license by AIP Publishing.

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  • 50.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    C1s Peak of Adventitious Carbon Aligns to the Vacuum Level: Dire Consequences for Materials Bonding Assignment by Photoelectron Spectroscopy2017In: ChemPhysChem, ISSN 1439-4235, E-ISSN 1439-7641, Vol. 18, no 12, p. 1507-1512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The C1s signal from ubiquitous carbon contamination on samples forming during air exposure, so called adventitious carbon (AdC) layers, is the most common binding energy (BE) reference in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies. We demonstrate here, by using a series of transition-metal nitride films with different AdC coverage, that the BE of the C1s peak E-B(F) varies by as much as 1.44 eV. This is a factor of 10 more than the typical resolvable difference between two chemical states of the same element, which makes BE referencing against the C1s peak highly unreliable. Surprisingly, we find that C1s shifts correlate to changes in sample work function phi(SA), such that the sum E-B(F) + phi(SA) is constant at 289.50 +/- 0.15 eV, irrespective of materials system and air exposure time, indicating vacuum level alignment. This discovery allows for significantly better accuracy of chemical state determination than offered by the conventional methods. Our findings are not specific to nitrides and likely apply to all systems in which charge transfer at the AdC/substrate interface is negligible.

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