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  • 1.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Birgit Nilsson: entreprenör besjälad av förbättring2004In: Den offentliga sektorns entreprenörer: en porträttbok / [ed] Elisabeth Sundin, Stockholm: Kommentus , 2004, p. 107-116Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration .
    Competence development projects in R&D2008In: Nationell workshop i HRM 2008,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 3.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration .
    Critical Realism and Product development: a perfect match?2003In: 19:th EGOS Colloquium,2003, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 4.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Leveraging inventors' skills for exploitative and explorative purposes in large firms' R&D departments2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Organisering för individualitet: transparenta och opaka aspekter i utvecklingsprocesser2002Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The doctoral dissertation 'Organising for individuality - transparent and opaque aspects of development processes' deals with the relationship between a company's ability to develop new products and its ability to change the way it organises its product development activities. The dissertation is based on a real time study of two product development and two organizational change processes at Orrefors Kosta Boda AB.

    The company has a tradition of innovative product development based on a high degree of individuality. In this study, individuality refers to situations where differences between individuals' (i.e. designers') distinctive features are important for a company's success and not to individuals talents or capabilities per se.

    In studying and analysing the product deveopment processes an (opaque) underlying thought structure appears in terms of a tension between 'a separating and a unifying logic of effectiveness'. The two logics of effectiveness constituted underlying assumptions and answers to the question of how to be an innovative and commercially successful company in the high quality glass industry.

    The product development was conducted in an "inescapable" tension of separating and unifying, indicating that the separating and unifying logics of effectiveness should - in the context of product development - be viewed as a 'neccessary relation of incompatibility' rather than mutually exclusive.

    In spite of two attempts to change the organising of the product development in the company, the measures taken did not alter any fundamental conditions of the product development within the company, and therefore not the problems the change initiatives were designed to address.

    In the literature on product development and innovation scholars require research with an approach that links structural conditions to action and interaction. Using Archer's (1995) morphogenetic perspective to relate product development to organizational change, this dissertation is an attempt to do this.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration .
    The role of patenting and patent departments in new product development work2008In: 15th International Product Development Mangement Conference, Hamburg July 2008, Hamburg: EIASM , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

           

  • 7.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration .
    The role of patenting knowledge in new product development work2008In: RADMA Workshop on Knowledge Integration,2008, 2008, p. 1-14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 8.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Business Administration.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship .
    Competence development projects in R&D: the case of North's inventors2007In: 8th International Research Network on Organizing by Projects Conference,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

            

  • 9.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration .
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship .
    Individual Inventors in the R&D Factory2007In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 437-446Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Business Administration.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    Inventors and innovators in large organisations - the challenge of maintaining creative space and capabilities2006In: EIASM International Product Development Management Conference,2006, Bryssel: EIASM , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inventors as innovators and knowledge integrators2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kreativitet och patentering i storföretag: om de innovativa individernas betydelse2012In: Management of Innovation and Technology, no 1, p. 10-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kreativitet och patentering i storföretag: Om de innovativa individernas betydelse för att skapa och bedöma nya idéer2012In: Innovationsledning och kreativitet i svenska företag / [ed] Anders Richtnér & Johan Frishammar, VINNOVA , 2012, p. 86-97Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bokens syfte är att ge kunskap och inspiration åt chefer, ledare och medarbetare med intresse för kreativitet och innovation. Den baseras på forskning och tar upp exempel hämtade från många av Sveriges ledande företag. Avsikten är att belysa hur organisatoriska förhållanden påverkar förutsättningarna för kreativitet och innovation samt att ge uppslag till hur företags innovationsförmåga kan utvecklas.

  • 14.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berggren, ChristianLinköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Sussex.
    Kunskapsintegration och innovation i en internationaliserande ekonomi: Slutrapport från ett forskningsprogram2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här skriften presenterar ett urval resultat och texter från forskningsprogrammet ”Kunskapsintegration och innovation i en internationaliserande ekonomi” (Knowledge Integration and Innovation in Transnational Enterprise, KITE) som finansierats av Riksbankens Jubileumsfond i två faser under åren 2007–2015. I programmet har vi analyserat hur företag, speciellt i tekniktunga industrier, påverkas av den allt mer globala konkurrensen om nya produkter och tjänster, hur nya specialiserade kunskaper växer fram och tas tillvara, och hur de kan förenas med existerande kunskapsbas. I denna skrift finns studier på tre olika nivåer: branschnivån, med analyser av innovationsprocesser och kunskapsutmaningar i industriella sektorer; företagsnivån, med skildringar av förändringar i företagens interna organisering av kunskapsbildande processer och undersökningar av nya former för utbyte och samspel mellan företag; samt mikronivån, med undersökningar av samspelet mellan individuella specialister inom företag. Skriften vänder sig både till den intresserade allmänheten och till forskare med annan vetenskaplig bakgrund. Fokus är på internationellt konkurrerande branscher och företag, men analyserna av kunskapens delning och sammanflätning, separation och integration, har bäring också på andra kunskapsintensiva sektorer och verksamheter, från statliga verk till sjukvård.

    En vetenskaplig presentation av programmets forskning under de första fyra åren finns i boken Knowledge Integration and Innovation: Critical Challenges Facing International Technology-Based Firms (redigerad av Berggren, Bergek, Bengtsson, Hobday & Söderlund och utgiven av Oxford University Press 2011). En uppföljande volym, Managing Knowledge Integration Across Boundaries, planeras av samma förlag 2016 (redigerad av Tell, Berggren, Brusoni & Van de Ven). I den medverkar ett antal internationella författare vilket visar kunskapsområdets globala tyngd och intresse. Under programmets drygt åtta år har deltagarna publicerat ett mycket stort antal artiklar, konferensbidrag, bokkapitel och liknande. För dessa hänvisar vi till programmets hemsida www.liu.se/kite.

    Vi har under hela programperioden arbetat intensivt med att diskuteraoch konstruktivt kritisera och utveckla varandras bidrag. Därför har det varit naturligt att denna skrift inbegriper många programdeltagares medverkan. En presentation av samtliga medverkande finns i slutet av denna skrift. Följande KITE-forskare har medverkat i nedan angivna kapitel:

    Hans Andersson (kapitel 4)

    Lars Bengtsson (kapitel 7)

    Marie Bengtsson (kapitel 3)

    Anna Bergek (kapitel 2)

    Christian Berggren (kapitel 1)

    Karin Bredin (kapitel 6)

    Cecilia Enberg (kapitel 5, 7)

    Mattias Johansson (kapitel 4)

    Nicolette Lakemond (kapitel 7)

    Lars Lindkvist (kapitel 3)

    Thomas Magnusson (kapitel 1)

    Camilla Niss (kapitel 6)

    Jonas Söderlund (kapitel 6)

    Fredrik Tell (kapitel 5)

    Vi vill också tacka Jenny Björkman på Riksbankens Jubileumsfond och Makadam förlag för deras engagerade arbete med redigering och produktion av slutresultatet.

  • 15.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Leveraging inventors' creativity2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While creativity is often understood as the generation of valuable novelty, we extend that view into a framework based on well-known and established models from the creativity literature. In addition to generation of novelty which forms our frameworks first dimension, we add selection of novelty, and type of creative contribution.  

    Based on interviews with inventors and managers in three large, patent-intensive firms, representing completely different industries, we show how the framework can be employed in order to better understand in what ways different practices exploit and/or support the inventors’ creative abilities. By relating the practices not to creativity in general but to components of creativity (c.f Amabile 1997) the paper enriches the discussion of how inventors’ can be leveraged in technology-based firms.

  • 16.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Business Administration.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    Bruzelius, Maria
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    Innovation in Large Organizations what's the role of Individual Innovators in Developing Complex Technologies.2005In: CINet conference,2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Exploring and exploiting inventors at Westco: a case of ambidexterity in R&D2010In: International Journal of Project Organisation and Management, ISSN 1740-2891, E-ISSN 1740-2905, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 254-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Achieving both exploration and exploitation at the same time has become an increasingly important success factor for both firms and units within firms. Based on a single case study, this paper addresses how R&D units, traditionally regarded as responsible for firms’ explorative activities, work to also increase exploitation in R&D. The results suggest that in a project intensive context such as R&D, the role of project management becomes more important to achieve ambidexterity. It is, however, not an easy task for project managers to take on, and the Westco case provides illustrative examples of both pitfalls and structures designed to help the managers.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Exploring and exploiting inventors at Westco: A case of contextual ambidexterity in R&D2009In: IRNOP IX: International Research Network on Organizing by Projects, Berlin, 11-13 October 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Role of Patent Engineer - Inventor Interaction for Research and Development Creativity2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patents as a strategic tool has been much in focus lately, both in research and in the corporate world. Considering this, there has been surprisingly little interest paid to the process in which patents are generated within firms. Based on interviews with patent engineers and inventors who have been involved in interaction with each other in patenting processes, plus their patent managers, this study describe and discuss the patent drafting process as one (partly) driven by interaction. The patent drafting process is described as a process of asymmetrical collaboration delivering two distinct, but related outcomes – a refined invention and a patent application that most likely is better than it would have been otherwise. These outcomes are not cases of collective creativity as patent engineers do not invent and inventors do not (normally) define patent claims. This does not diminish the importance of the collaboration. Three roles - “opportunity recognizer”,“konstruktiver opponent”, and “enabling bureaucrat” – are identified and used to frame the patent engineers’ work and contributions to creativity.

  • 20.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Mattias
    Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut.
    Värdet av konstruktiva opponenter: om uppfinnare och patentingenjörer i kreativ samverkan2015In: Kunskapsintegration och innovation i en internationaliserande ekonomi: slutrapport från ett forskningsprogram / [ed] Hans Andersson, Christian Berggren, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2015, p. 51-61Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nehler, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Strategi och styrning2012In: Styrning: med projekt och kunskap i fokus / [ed] Jonas Söderlund och Fredrik Tell, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, 1, p. 39-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Åman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Design as change - from teleology to guided evolution?2014In: Proceedings of the 19th DMI: AcademicDesign Management Conference / [ed] Erik Bohemia, Alison Rieple, Jeanne Liedtka, Rachel Cooper, Boston, USA: Design Management Institute , 2014, p. 1948-1971Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design is connected to change. Whether we start from Herbert Simons often cited ’the transformation of existing conditions into preferred ones’ (1996, p.111), or design as linked to innovation, design is a future oriented, change inducing activity. But how is design thinking (in a wide sense) different from traditional managerial thinking in terms of change? This paper explores and identifies change perspectives in design literature, very selectively represented by ‘classic views’, design thinking, and C-K theory. By using Van de Ven and Poole’s (1995) four ‘basic types of process theories that explain how and why change unfolds’; Life Cycle, Dialectics, Teleology, and Evolution, and Pettigrew’s (1987) distinction between process and content of change, we find that design processes are commonly described as similar to an evolutionary process with gradual development (divergence), combined with some characteristics of teleology (convergence), that together constitute the motor(s) of the process. By using Heskett’s (2002) distinction between ‘utility’ and ‘significance’ it is possible to further dissect design processes. Processes aiming for ‘utility’ eventually must converge into a solution, but is it necessarily the same for processes by which ‘significance’ is designed, created and maintained? Further, the uncontrollability and emergence aspects of evolutionary processes are interesting challenges from a managerial viewpoint. A generative way to frame design processes may be to see them as guided evolutionary processes (Lovas and Ghoshal, 2000). ‘Guided’ maintains manageability, while ‘evolutionary’ provides essential variety.

  • 23.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Åman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Design as Change - From Teleology to Guided Evolution?2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Design is connected to change. Whether we start from Herbert Simon’s often cited “the transformation of existing conditions into preferred ones” (1996 p.111) or design as linked to innovation (Brown 2008, Verganti 2006) or even Heskett’s (2002) ‘betterment of the human condition’, design is a future oriented (Buchanan 2001), change inducing activity. But how is design thinking (in a wide sense) different from traditional managerial thinking in terms of the concept of change? What of the process(es) by which the existing conditions are transformed into the preferred ones, i.e. how may the change process be conceptualized in design? How does the general concern of change in the design community relate to the advances in strategic and organizational change theories? Our aim is to begin an exploration of how design may be conceptualized in relation to change.

    We do this by using two out of Pettigrew’s (1987) three related aspects of change: ‘process’, how something changes, and ‘content’, i.e. what is changed, to frame design as change (the third is ‘context’, the why of change). We make an attempt to explore and identify change perspectives, explicit or implicit, in design by using Van de Ven and Poole’s (1995) synthetic model of four “basic types of process theories” (p. 511): teleology, evolution, life cycle, and dialectic, all driven by different generative mechanisms or ‘motors of change’. Van de Ven & Poole’s ideal process types do though not handle the content aspect. To capture design content, we therefore use Heskett’s (2002) division of the designed artifacts’ function into two concepts, ‘utility’ and ‘significance’.

    Design processes are normally described as either of a teleological kind, i.e. driven by a goal set at the beginning of the process, or as similar to an evolutionary process. Some elements of the evolutionary model are frequent in descriptions of design processes, e.g. iterativity, prototyping and gradual development. However, the uncontrollability and slowness of evolution are less salient. A better way to frame design processes as evolutionary may therefore be to see them as guided (Lovas and Ghoshal 2000), i.e. driven not only by random mutation and competition but also by intent.

    By using Heskett’s distinction between utility and significance it is possible to further dissect the design process/design processes. Processes aiming for ‘utility’ eventually must converge into a solution, but is it necessarily the same when it regards the process by which ‘significance’ is designed, created and maintained? By analytically separating (c.f. Archer 1995) the by definition integrative design process, we argue that discussing design as process and content expands previous views of design as change.

  • 24.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Åman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Knowledge integration of and by industrial design2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Jan Carlzon, the Scandinavian airline SAS’ CEO during the successful eighties, tells a little story in his recently written comment to the 2008 Swedish re-issue of his 1985 book “Moments of Truth” [Swedish title: “Riv pyramiderna!” (2008)]. Carlzon describes how NOKIA’s CEO in the early 2000’s had told him that they worked like dogs to fill their mobile phones with values people were willing to pay for in order to keep the margins required. A short time later the telecom company Ericsson had its annual shareholder meeting and during the meeting a young girl asked: “Why does not Ericsson make phones that people want?” The chairman ignored the question – according to Carlzon the only relevant question asked – and instead he talked about lowering costs.

    Was there something that Ericsson had not understood at the time? Their phones’ technical functionality was good so why did not people want them? Roughly ten years later we would like to, somewhat simplified, say that Ericsson had not quite understood the need for beauty in their sophisticated high-tech products. They managed to integrate everything apart from a sense of beauty, i.e. the aesthetic and symbolic aspect that made the young girl and others prefer other brands. Even if Ericson had been aware, had they able to integrate beauty and knowledge about “beauty aspects” in their products? No doubt had Ericsson been able to integrate a number of more or less related, complementary technological knowledge bases, but can knowledge about aesthetic and symbolic aspects, what we call “beauty”, be dealt with in the same way?

    The contemporary need for depth of knowledge leads to increasing specialization and subsequently companies’ need for increasingly sophisticated means for integration of knowledge has increased. This is reflected in the field of knowledge integration (KI) which empirically has explored integration of knowledge bases from a rather technical, rationalistic perspective, and outputs of KI processes have in earlier research been framed in terms of efficiency, effectiveness and innovation (Tell, 2011). This is a limitation it shares with strategic management research (Dalpiaz et al 2010). However, we argue that the complexity in today’s products and services may extend beyond what the KI field have hitherto acknowledged.

    A future development of the KI field could be to explore the user perspective on, and role in, the value creation and appropriation system, and to include the aesthetic and symbolic nature of products and services. This paper aims to contribute to the KI field, by exploring some consequences of extending the scope of knowledge integration to include integration of and by Industrial design.

    Industrial design is a practice and a field of knowledge that spans the divide between rationalistic problem-solving and the seeming irrationality of the aesthetic and the socio-cultural (Verganti 2003). Industrial design is interesting in this context both for its content, i.e. as a field of knowledge to be integrated, and because of its process view that may be seen as an approach on how to integrate. This paper thus aims to discuss integration of and by design in order to broaden the dominating technological empirical scope of KI. We will relate integration of and by design to previous understandings of KI as a way to explore the hierarchy of capabilities (Grant 1996a).

    The coming section gives a very brief introduction to KI and its relative neglect of the increasingly important knowledge about what makes people want and desire things apart from their technical functionality or use value. Then follows a section on Design and especially Industrial design where we use Grant’s (1996a) characteristics of KI to discuss how industrial design can contribute to competitive advantage from a KI view. The following section “Integration of and by design” somewhat artificially separates the content of industrial design as a field of knowledge from the view that industrial design may be a leading function pushing the envelope of technological knowledge, and thus a way of integration knowledge(s). Finally there is a discussion summarizing our arguments and findings and proposing how to go on.

  • 25.
    Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Åman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rose is a rose is a rose is a rose? Design, knowledge, diversity2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Berggren, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Individual integrators - a key factor for knowledge and innovation in technology-based firms2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently the role of individuals in knowledge formation and innovation has been rediscovered by several authors. This paper builds on a study of extra inventive individuals, defined by their high patenting activity, in large technology-based firms to explore the importance of individual inventive activity also for firms in mature industries; to investigate the horizontal practices of these individuals and the role of collaboration; to understand how these horizontal practices permeate vertical innovation structures; and to extend the evolutionary framework on knowledge generation and innovation by adding knowledge integration as a key process, and distinguishing different types of knowledge retention.

  • 27.
    Berggren, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Inventors and innovators and knowledge integrators2011In: Knowledge Integration and Innovation: Critical Challenges Facing International Technology-based Firms / [ed] Christian Berggren, Anna Bergek, Lars Bengtsson, Jonas Söderlund, Mike Hobday, Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press , 2011, 1, p. 77-95Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we argue that knowledge integration is not just an organizational- and team-level practice but concerns the everyday activities of inventive engineers and researchers involved in development activities. The chapter investigates and illustrates how inventive individuals in non-managerial positions contribute to innovation and knowledge integration. The focus is on inventors who generate ideas and scan new knowledge fields to complement deep knowledge in their own domains in order to turn ideas into new solutions. The chapter illustrates the practices of those innovative individuals, such as combining knowledge across different fields, pursuing individual exploration as well as collaborative search, and participating in formal projects but simultaneously using them as permeable entities to further their own innovative ideas. In this way, the chapter contributes to an understanding of the micro-level of knowledge integration activities in technology-based firms.

  • 28.
    Gunaratne, Tharaka
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Krook, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Framework of principal guidelines for improved valorization of heterogenic industrial production residues2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Residue products often pose a huge challenge to material recycling industry. Especially heterogenic and fine granular residues. It increases the cost and reduces the efficiency of material separation and recovery. Currently, the most common practice is to landfill such residue products. However, decreasing availability of landfills, increasing landfill costs, and new policy instruments require higher rates of resource recovery. In spite of that, business initiatives for recovering secondary raw material from residue products are often deterred by stringent environmental legislation emphasizing human toxicity concerns. Shredding industry plays a huge role in the context of circular economy via recycling important waste streams such as end-oflife vehicles (ELVs), municipal white goods, construction and demolition waste, and different industrial wastes. The core business model of industrial shredding is driven by recovering different metals while a variety of residue products including plastics, rubber, foam, wood, glass, and sand are generated. Shredder fine residue (also called shredder fines) is a fine granular residue product with intrinsic heterogeneity, which is produced by the shredding industry. A share of 15-20% of the input would end up as shredder fines in a typical plant.

    The overall aim of this study is to draw technical, market and regulatory boundary conditions for improved material recovery from shredder fines. Thereby to build a framework of principal guidelines to support systematic identification, development, and evaluation of different valorization options for shredder fines. The outcome of this study is also envisioned to provide generic conclusions to the valorization of heterogenic residue products in general.

    The study is performed in collaboration with a major shredding company in Sweden. The methodology reflects the Swedish context and consists of two phases. During the initial phase, firstly, the overall shredding industry structure of Sweden is studied to understand the governing regulatory framework, level of competition, and the scale of operation. Secondly, the collaborating company is studied to gain knowledge on technical feasibility of implementing recovery processes, economic, business and market aspects, and implications of national and local legislation, from the shredding company perspective. Empirical methods such as interviews and study of documentation are used in this phase.

    During the second phase, detailed material and elemental characterization tests are performed on shredder fine samples. Thereby the distribution of basic elements, metals, heating value, and ash, in shredder fines as well as across different size fractions of shredder fines is established. The results are compared and contrasted against literature values. An extensive survey is also carried out to identify potential users for different materials which are possibly recoverable from shredder fines. Such potential users are then mapped against materials. Leaching tests are also performed to assess the mobility of heavy metals and thereby the potential environmental risk and human toxicity.

    As the main contribution of this study, knowledge is developed and synthesized, boundary conditions are set, and principal guidelines of general relevance are drawn in order to facilitate improved valorization of fine granular residue products.

  • 29.
    Gunaratne, Tharaka
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management.
    Krook, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Framework of principal guidelines for improved valorization of heterogenic industrial production residues2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Residue products often pose a huge challenge to material recycling industry. Especially heterogenic and fine granular residues. It increases the cost and reduces the efficiency of material separation and recovery. Currently, the most common practice is to landfill such residue products. However, decreasing availability of landfills, increasing landfill costs, and new policy instruments require higher rates of resource recovery. In spite of that, business initiatives for recovering secondary raw material from residue products are often deterred by stringent environmental legislation emphasizing human toxicity concerns. Shredding industry plays a huge role in the context of circular economy via recycling important waste streams such as end-oflife vehicles (ELVs), municipal white goods, construction and demolition waste, and different industrial wastes. The core business model of industrial shredding is driven by recovering different metals while a variety of residue products including plastics, rubber, foam, wood, glass, and sand are generated. Shredder fine residue (also called shredder fines) is a fine granular residue product with intrinsic heterogeneity, which is produced by the shredding industry. A share of 15-20% of the input would end up as shredder fines in a typical plant.

    The overall aim of this study is to draw technical, market and regulatory boundary conditions for improved material recovery from shredder fines. Thereby to build a framework of principal guidelines to support systematic identification, development, and evaluation of different valorization options for shredder fines. The outcome of this study is also envisioned to provide generic conclusions to the valorization of heterogenic residue products in general.

    The study is performed in collaboration with a major shredding company in Sweden. The methodology reflects the Swedish context and consists of two phases. During the initial phase, firstly, the overall shredding industry structure of Sweden is studied to understand the governing regulatory framework, level of competition, and the scale of operation. Secondly, the collaborating company is studied to gain knowledge on technical feasibility of implementing recovery processes, economic, business and market aspects, and implications of national and local legislation, from the shredding company perspective. Empirical methods such as interviews and study of documentation are used in this phase.

    During the second phase, detailed material and elemental characterization tests are performed on shredder fine samples. Thereby the distribution of basic elements, metals, heating value, and ash, in shredder fines as well as across different size fractions of shredder fines is established. The results are compared and contrasted against literature values. An extensive survey is also carried out to identify potential users for different materials which are possibly recoverable from shredder fines. Such potential users are then mapped against materials. Leaching tests are also performed to assess the mobility of heavy metals and thereby the potential environmental risk and human toxicity.

    As the main contribution of this study, knowledge is developed and synthesized, boundary conditions are set, and principal guidelines of general relevance are drawn in order to facilitate improved valorization of fine granular residue products.

  • 30.
    Gunaratne, Tharaka
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Krook, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Initial feasibility assessment of potential applications for valorisation of shredder fines: A Swedish case study on gate requirements and legislative conditions2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shredder fines is a residue of the shredding industry and is currently landfilled or used as landfill cover in Sweden. Throughout the time, the heterogeneity and small particle size have rendered resource recovery and recycling of it challenging. In spite of that, European policies envisioning circular economy, in concomitance with stringent resource recovery requirements and increased landfill taxes are challenging the current disposal practices of the shredding industry. As an attempt to address this issue, the present study has developed a systematic approach for performing an initial assessment of the feasibility of several selected mainstream applications for valorisation of shredder fines.

    First, sampling of shredder fines from a major shredding plant was obtained twice a week over a 10 weeks period. The main focus of the sampling program was to encompass the variation in the material’s physical and chemical composition. The two samples from each week were then mixed and divided into six subsamples. That is, one original fraction and five size fractions; ZA (7.10-5.00 mm), ZB (5.00-3.35 mm), ZC (3.35-2.00 mm), ZD (2.00-0.25 mm), and ZE (0.25-0.063 mm). These sub-samples were subsequently sent for laboratory analysis for characterisation of contaminants, potentially valuable metals and energy recovery related properties. Second, three potential main stream applications for shredder fines were identified based on existing research on similar industrial residues (e.g. municipal waste incineration bottom ash) and current practices of the Swedish shredding industry. The selected applications are; Smelting for copper, Energy recovery in cement kilns and municipal solid waste incinerators, and Substitution of aggregates in concrete making and road construction. Third, the gate requirements of potential users and legislative requirements with regards to the identified applications were established, and the characteristics of shredder fines were benchmarked against them.

    As far as copper smelting is concerned, the presence of high concentrations of lead and chromium is the biggest challenge. Otherwise, the fractions; ZA, ZB, and ZD show some potential due to manageable concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, and mercury. Concerning energy recovery, the calorific value apparently narrows down the options to municipal waste incinerators. There, the chlorine concentration only allows utilisation of the ZC fraction whereas heavy metal concentrations are too high with regards to all the fractions. With regards to the use as substitute material in construction, legislative requirements in Sweden for total content and leachate content of metals are too strict for shredder fines.

    In conclusion, the benchmarking reveals the need for prior upgrading of shredder fines with respect to the different applications. Thus, integrated upgrading processes that could handle the complexity of the material in terms of contaminants and valuable recoverables is needed in order to achieve holistic valorisation of the material.

  • 31.
    Johansson, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project management, Innovations and Entrepreneurship . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Taking the inventive step: The role of the patent department in new product development2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on an interview-based case study of R&D specialists in two patent intensive firms, we suggest that patent engineers are an important resource for R&D specialists’ work throughout the inventive process. In addition to the role prior literature indicates the patent department to have for supplying R&D with information needed from and about patents to plan R&D work, the findings suggest that patent engineers contribute to the actual development work whereby R&D specialists turn ideas into inventions, and inventions into patents. In virtue of their patent expertise and their technological competence, patent engineers can help R&D specialists to shape and refine their ideas into patentable inventions by appraising potential obstacles, suggesting promising lines of approach to a determined problem, or at times even by assisting with the technological solution per se. We suggest that such contributions of the patent department are particularly important in mature industries where demands for patentable inventions to protect new products are in constant conflict with that many of the knowledge domains in which firms compete are already heavily patented. The results further indicate an increasing need for firms to integrate not only the functionally specialized departments of R&D, marketing and manufacturing, as is often indicated in new product development literatures, but also a need to integrate R&D with the patent department. Indeed, in mature industries at least, the responsibilities for R&D and patenting may be intimately related, making it difficult to analyze the two separately.

  • 32.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    From niches to local and global market formation: The qualification of the Swedish biogas sector2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents a case study of market formation for biogas in Sweden and analyses the case with concepts derived from literature on socio-technical transitions and business-to-business marketing. Based on the case study analysis, the paper outlines two different models that describe market formation processes for renewable energy technologies: a local model and a global model. Different perspectives on the market offer, different actors involved, and different institutional dynamics characterize these models. The models do not necessarily describe different stages in the market formation process. Rather, they describe different patterns by which the market for renewable energy alternatives may grow. 

  • 33.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Biogas in the Nordic forest industry: current state and future business potential2016In: Industrial Efficiency 2016 - Going beyond energy efficiency to deliver savings, competitiveness and a circular economy: proceedings, European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ECEEE), 2016, p. 1-15, article id 2-007-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The forest industry is of great importance to the Nordic countries in terms of exports and employment. Today the industry faces tough challenges related to future higher energy prices, increased competition for wood raw material, and a declining demand for traditional paper products. However, there are also possibilities related to the transition to a bio-based economy. This paper focuses on one such avenue, the business potential in using wastewater from pulp and paper mills as a basis for biogas production. The paper identifies biogas plants at Nordic mills currently operating or under construction and, positions the mills according to their decisions on how to engage in activities related to biogas production and use. Requirements for and consequences and of the different positions are discussed in terms of resources and capabilities, governance, and strategy focus.

    The paper shows that cost reduction is an important driver for biogas production in the pulp and paper industry, but public financial support is needed to justify the investments. Since forest firms do not view biogas production as a core business activity, external actors that can offer turnkey solutions or runt the operations may be needed to facilitate biogas production in the forest industry. While internal use of gas is an option for some mills, it is evident that external demand for biogas, i.e. as vehicle fuel, differ in the three different Nordic countries. In Norway, whose forest industry is the least significant of the three countries, the situation for external use seem to be the most promising, emphasizing the role of public policy interventions in the transport sector for the development of biogas in the forest industry.

  • 34.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration.
    Local and global market formation: the shaping of the Swedish biogas sector2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies of sustainability transitions have used the technological innovation systems approach to study market introduction of renewable new energy technologies (Negro, Hekkert et al. 2007, Alkemade and Suurs 2012, Negro, Alkemade et al. 2012, Jacobsson and Karltorp 2013, Bento and Fontes 2015, Tigabu, Berkhout et al. 2015). These studies have shown that during these early stages, the new technologies and markets tend to be relatively crude. Moreover, established infrastructure, industry structures and institutional practices are often inadequate for the new technologies. This means that the new technology alternatives are rarely competitive on regular markets, which are dominated by existing technologies. Therefore, policy makers are advised to facilitate the formation of protective spaces – niches – which allow for the new technologies to enter the market (Kemp, Schot et al. 1998, Caniëls and Romijn 2008, Smith and Raven 2012). Gathering relevant stakeholders in the formation of networks, such protective spaces will nurture experimentation activities and assist the development and diffusion of knowledge. Moreover these protective spaces will empower proponents of the new technology, helping them to attract resources and build legitimacy for the new technology.While sustainability transitions literature have investigated the early stages of market introduction of renewable new energy technologies thoroughly, the critical step from having an established position in a protected niche to facilitating a broader diffusion to an actual market has received less attention in transition studies. According to Suurs and Hekkert (2009), this step would imply different kinds of innovation system dynamics, in which market formation would be an essential process and Jacobsson (2008) plead for a different set of policy instruments to support such broader market diffusion. Still the market formation processes for renewable new energy technologies are not well understood in sustainability transitions literature.Such formation processes are however well analyzed within the business to business marketing field. Araujo (2007) states that the creation of new markets can be achieved by various activities from different actors. Such market-shaping activities stretch from traditional firm level activities such as sales to activities that involve the entire markets institution e.g. changing the rules of the market (Kjellberg & Helgesson, 2007; Mele, Pels & Storbacka, 2015). In the center of a new market is the market offer. The process of qualifying the product involves different actors’ attempts to qualify desirable attributes and characteristics related to the offer (Callon et al. 2002). This process is especially important in shaping new markets since the market offer in itself is not fixed but rather something in the making. In the center of our study is the overall research question: What actors are involved in shaping the Swedish biogas market and what qualifications does these actors attribute to the product?

  • 35.
    Åman, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Knowledge integration of and by design2016In: Swedish Design Research Journal, ISSN 2000-964X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 21-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible uses, benefits, limitations and future directions of a formal knowledge integration perspective on design management. The paper develops the concepts of management thinking and design(erly) thinking, and questions the implied contention. With a knowledge perspective, design management may be seen as including the capability to integrate specialized, distributed and heterogeneous knowledge bases. Consequences regarding the characteristics of scope, flexibility and efficiency of knowledge integration indicate both greater difficulties and greater possibilities.  Regarding the architecture of knowledge, integration of design indicates a functional orientation and a limited role for design, while integration by design may indicate a strategic role.

  • 36.
    Åman, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Knowledge integration of and by design2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The capability to integrate across a range of specialized knowledge bases is a crucial contemporary source of competitive advantage, and the field of knowledge integration aims at structuring the issues. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible uses, benefits, limitations and future directions of a formal knowledge integration perspective on design management. The paper develops the concepts of management thinking and design(erly) thinking, and questions the contention. With a knowledge perspective, design management may be seen as including the capability to integrate specialized, distributed and heterogeneous knowledge bases. Consequences regarding the characteristics of scope, flexibility and efficiency of knowledge integration indicate both greater difficulties and greater possibilities. Regarding the architecture of knowledge, the integration of design indicates a functional orientation and a limited role for design, while integration by design may indicate a strategic role.

  • 37.
    Åman, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Knowledge integration of and by design2014In: Proceedings of the 19th DMI: AcademicDesign Management Conference / [ed] Erik Bohemia, Alison Rieple, Jeanne Liedtka, Rachel Cooper, Boston, USA: Design Management Institute , 2014, p. 1741-1763Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The capability to integrate across a range of specialized knowledge bases is a crucial contemporary source of competitive advantage, and the field of knowledge integration aims at structuring the issues. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible uses, benefits, limitations and future directions of a formal knowledge integration perspective on design management. The paper develops the concepts of management thinking and design(erly) thinking, and questions the contention. With a knowledge perspective, design management may be seen as including the capability to integrate specialized, distributed and heterogeneous knowledge bases. Consequences regarding the characteristics of scope, flexibility and efficiency of knowledge integration indicate both greater difficulties and greater possibilities. Regarding the architecture of knowledge, the integration of design indicates a functional orientation and a limited role for design, while integration by design may indicate a strategic role. Also, whether integration of design or by design, the construction of common knowledge, bridging the specialized fields, seems a prerequisite for the effective knowledge integration of management thinking and design(erly thinking.

  • 38.
    Åman, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Knowledge integration of and by industrial design2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Åman, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hobday, Mike
    University of Brighton, England.
    The Scope of Design Knowledge: Integrating the Technically Rational and Human-Centered Dimensions2017In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 58-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

1 - 39 of 39
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