liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eawag, Switzerland.
    Binz, Christian
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Regional benefits of servitization processes: evidence from the wind-to-energy industry2019In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 366-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By studying servitization processes and service competencies in the wind-to-energy industry in European regions, this paper provides a framework for territorial servitization. The framework resonates with the concepts of knowledge-intensive business services (KIBS) and industry life cycles, and its elements can be embedded into concepts of regional development (e.g., lead-market models, sustainability transitions, territorial innovation models). The framework suggests that regions benefit from servitization processes via the interplay of generating employment opportunities, enabling an efficient allocation of technology resources, opening up new markets, strengthening territorial competitiveness, raising the odds of securing employment in the consolidation period and enabling technological leaps.

  • 2.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Univ St Gallen, Switzerland; Fraunhofer IMW, Germany.
    Fleisch, Elgar
    Univ St Gallen, Switzerland; Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland.
    Lamprecht, Claudio
    Univ St Gallen, Switzerland.
    Wortmann, Felix
    Univ St Gallen, Switzerland.
    Growth paths for overcoming the digitalization paradox2020In: Business Horizons, ISSN 0007-6813, E-ISSN 1873-6068, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 313-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the demonstrated opportunities for revenue enhancement through digitalization, companies often experience a digitalization paradox. This paradox suggests that although companies may invest in digitalization, they often fail to achieve the expected revenue enhancement. In reporting research on 52 companies, we make the following fou r contributions: First, we focus on industrial companies in the business-to-business context, which largely have been neglected in previous research on digitalization. Second, we introduce the digitalization paradox as an important phenomenon in the discussion of revenue enhancement through digitalization. Third, we describe three growth paths: (1) commercializing digital solutions, (2) utilizing product connectivity, and (3) establishing an IoT-platform-based application business. For each growth path, the article takes a dynamic perspective on business models, highlighting triggers and modifications in business-model components (including value proposition, value-creation activities, and profit equation). Fourth, while the described modifications require initial investments to let these growth paths develop, we highlight how growth traps can prevent investments in business-model modifications from leading to revenue enhancement and how they can ultimately lead to the digitalization paradox. (C) 2020 Kelley School of Business, Indiana University. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eawag, Switzerland; Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Haldimann, Mirella
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eawag, Switzerland.
    Jennings Saul, Caroline
    Eawag, Switzerland; Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Business model innovations for overcoming barriers in the base-of-the-pyramid market2017In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 543-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many barriers must be overcome when entering the base-of-the-pyramid (BoP) market. Firms facing these barriers need to innovate new business models and reinvent existing ones to suit the BoP context. While previous literature has focused on the innovations of particular components of business models in BoP markets, we investigate the reconfigurations in the business model components that underpin the successful business model innovations. This study is based on multiple case studies in the water sector that we carried out in several different countries. Our findings suggest five business model innovations: (a) design, (b) renewal, (c) expansion, (d) diversification and (e) replication. Each business model innovation is a specific response to the barriers met in the BoP market and requires consistent configuration between its various components (i.e. value proposition, value creation and profit equation). These findings add, in two important aspects, to the academic realm of the business model domain: by contributing to the debate of business models in BoP markets and by advancing the configurational view of business models.

  • 4.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eawag, Switzerland; Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Haldimann, Mirella
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eawag, Switzerland.
    Jennings Saul, Caroline
    Eawag, Switzerland; Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Competing in business-to-business sectors through pay-per-use services2017In: Journal of Service Management, ISSN 1757-5818, E-ISSN 1757-5826, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 914-935Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Despite the opportunities provided by pay-per-use (PPU) services, product companies in business-to-business sectors often fail to compete systematically by using them. The purpose of this paper is to explain how companies can avoid failures when it comes to PPU services. The paper describes the "seizing" capabilities needed to achieve the strategic objectives of PPU services. Design/methodology/approach - The research process is divided into a pilot and an in-depth study. Altogether, 17 companies participated in the study. Findings - The findings reveal that the seizing capabilities depend on the strategic objectives of PPU services. To expand the market share with PPU services, companies need to broaden the customer portfolio for PPU services, to align individual services within the entire service portfolio and to balance profits made by PPU services and other business lines. For strategic objectives such as rapid sales growth early in the market development and new market creation other seizing capabilities are required. Research limitations/implications - The findings are not generalizable, due to the use of a qualitative study. The study is restricted to product companies in the business-to-business sector. Practical implications - Managers often believe that extending and modularizing the service portfolio is beneficial. When achieving sales growth during the market development phase, these capabilities are in fact sometimes counterproductive. Practitioners have to look into the costs and benefits of setting-up their own financing company and working with banks. Social implications - PPU services contribute to a more sustainable consumption and make product design more resource-efficient. Originality/value - The study is original by virtue of systematically studying PPU services, providing a microfoundation for seizing capabilities and developing testable propositions for future research.

  • 5.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eawag Environm Social Science Business Innovat Sustai, Switzerland; Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Jennings Saul, Caroline
    Eawag Environm Social Science Business Innovat Sustai, Switzerland.
    Haldimann, Mirella
    Eawag Environm Social Science Business Innovat Sustai, Switzerland.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Organizational capabilities for pay-per-use services in product-oriented companies2017In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 192, p. 157-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pay-per-use services are an interesting phenomenon, both empirically and theoretically. Despite the alleged benefits, companies still struggle to succeed with pay-per-use services. Theoretically, it is common sense that existing service capabilities cannot easily be converted into organizational capabilities for pay-per-use services. Based on multiple case studies, the present article narrows down the existing empirical and theoretical gaps through an inductive research approach. Our findings make the following contributions to the field of services in product-oriented companies and to the servitization literature. We describe the organizational capabilities necessary for pay-per-use services (e.g., financing such services, aligning costs with equipment usage, and collaborating with customers). We reveal that companies should convert these capabilities into three core competencies (strategizing pay-per-use services, utilizing technologies for pay-per-use services, and de-risking pay-per-use services), in order to achieve competitive advantages.

  • 6.
    Kohtamaki, Marko
    et al.
    Univ Vaasa, Finland; Univ South Eastern Norway, Norway.
    Parida, Vinit
    Univ Vaasa, Finland; Lulea Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Sodertorn Univ, Sweden.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Fraunhofer IMW, Germany; Univ St Gallen, Switzerland.
    Baines, Tim
    Aston Univ, England.
    Digital servitization business models in ecosystems: A theory of the firm2019In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 104, p. 380-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study extends the discussion of digital servitization business models by adopting the perspective of the theory of the firm. We use four theories of the firm (industrial organization, the resource-based view, organizational identity, and the transaction cost approach) to understand digital servitization business models of firms in the context of ecosystems. Digitalization transforms the business models of solution providers and shapes their firm boundary decisions as they develop digital solutions across organizational boundaries within ecosystems such as harbors, mines, and airports. Thus, digitalization not only affects individual firms business models but also requires the alignment of the business models of other firms within the ecosystem. Hence, business models in digital servitization should be viewed from an ecosystem perspective. Based on a rigorous literature review, we provide suggestions for future research on digital servitization business models within ecosystems.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Kohtamaki, Marko
    et al.
    Univ Vaasa, Finland.
    Parida, Vinit
    Univ Vaasa, Finland; Lulea Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Patel, Pankaj C.
    Villanova Univ, PA 19085 USA.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The relationship between digitalization and servitization: The role of servitization in capturing the financial potential of digitalization2020In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 151, article id UNSP 119804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates the effect of the interaction between digitalization and servitization on the financial performance of manufacturing companies. We challenge the simple linear assumption between digitalization and financial performance with a sample of 131 manufacturing firms and hypothesize a nonlinear U-shaped interaction effect between digitalization and servitization on financial performance. From low to moderate levels of digitalization, the interaction effect between digitalization and high servitization on company financial performance is negative and significant. From moderate to high levels of digitalization, the interplay between digitalization and high servitization becomes positive and significant, improving companies financial performance. The results demonstrate the need for an effective interplay between digitalization and servitization, the digital servitization. Without this interplay, a manufacturing company may face the paradox of digitalization. For managers of manufacturing companies, the study provides insights into the complex relationship between digitalization and financial performance, emphasizing the value of servitization in driving financial performance from digitalization. Thus, the study demonstrates how manufacturing companies can become data-driven by advancing servitization.

  • 8.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Hanken School Econ, Finland.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eawag Swiss Federal Institute Aquat Research, Switzerland.
    Kamp, Bart
    Orkestra Fdn Deusto, Spain; University of Catholic Louvain La Neuve, Belgium; University of Deusto, Spain.
    Parry, Glenn
    UWE, England.
    Servitization and deservitization: Overview, concepts, and definitions2017In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The topic of servitization has generated a considerable body of research and many conferences, as well as industry engagement. Yet, despite the extensive literature associated with this now-mature discipline, there is no broad-based consensus on the core concepts and definitions deployed by servitization scholars, and both terminology and usage often seem ambiguous. This paper examines challenges related to service growth strategies, as well as strategies involving deservitization or a retreat from service offerings. Showing that these strategies have been pursued for more than fifty years, clarification is sought here by framing the corresponding processes and proposing definitions for four core terms: servitization, service infusion, deservitization and service dilution. It becomes clear that in focusing on the organizational change entailed by these processes, future research must elucidate "softer" issues such as leadership and business logic. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Department of Marketing, CERS – Centre for Relationship Marketing and Service Management, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eawag (Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Research), Dübendorf, Switzerland.
    Oliva, Rogelio
    Mays Business School, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA.
    Service growth in product firms: Past, present, and future2017In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 60, p. 82-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service growth in product firms is one of the most active service research domains and is open to a variety of conceptualizations. This article provides a critical inquiry into the past, present, and future of the research domain. The evolution of the research on service growth is discussed in two phases: (1) setting the boundaries of the research domain, and (2) emergence of the conceptual foundation. We find that while research in this area has a well-established tradition in terms of output, theoretically it is still largely in a ‘nascent’ phase. Next, we highlight the contributions of the papers in this special section, emphasizing their challenges to prevailing assumptions in the research domain. We conclude by identifying, from the contributions to this special section, suggested themes for further research on service growth: the assessment of empirical evidence of the impact of service growth on firm performance, the role of merger & acquisitions in the service growth strategy, the exploration of single/multiple positions along the transition line, the process of adding or removing services, and expanding the context of service growth beyond product manufacturing firms.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Myhren, Per
    et al.
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karlstad Univ, Sweden; Eawag, Switzerland.
    Incremental and radical open service innovation2018In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 101-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Open service innovation is an emergent new service development practice, where knowledge on how to organize development work is scarce. The purpose of the present research is to identify and describe relevant archetypes of open service innovation. The study views an archetype as an organizing template that includes the competence of participants, organizing co-creation among participants and ties between participants. In particular, the studys interest lies in how open service innovation archetypes are used for incremental and radical service innovation. Design/methodology/approach For the research, a nested case study was performed, in which an industrial firm with nine open service innovation groups was identified. Forty-five interviews were conducted with participants. For each case, first a within-case analysis was performed, and how to perform open service innovation in practice was described. Then, a cross-case analysis identifying similarities and differences between the open service innovation groups was performed. On the basis of the cross-case analysis, three archetypes for open service innovation were identified. Findings The nested case study identified three archetypes for open service innovation: internal group development, satellite team development and rocket team development. This study shows that different archetypes are used for incremental and radical service innovation and that a firm can have multiple open service innovation groups using different archetypes. Practical implications This study provides suggestions on how firms can organize for open service innovation. The identified archetypes can guide managers to set up, develop or be part of open service innovation groups. Originality/value This paper uses open service innovation as a mid-range theory to extend existing research on new service development in networks or service ecosystems. In particular, it shows how open service innovation can be organized to develop both incremental and radical service innovations.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Saul, Caroline Jennings
    et al.
    Eawag, Switzerland; Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eawag, Switzerland; Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Born solution providers - Dynamic capabilities for providing solutions2018In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 73, p. 31-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our investigation draws on a qualitative study, which explores the anomaly of Born Solution Providers. Compared to the traditional assumption that product companies shift toward solutions during the maturity phase, companies can already offer solutions in the market development phase. We investigate the dynamic capabilities for providing solutions in the market development phase. Our findings reveal a microfoundation of dynamic capabilities. This microfoundation is structured into 10 dimensions along sensing, seizing, and reconfiguring activities. Within these 10 dimensions, we disaggregate the dynamic capabilities into individual skills and organizational routines. Interestingly, organizations utilize routines underlying the options for each dimension (e.g., routines for sensing internal and external opportunities, seizing standardization, and customization), but they tend to stick to routines for one of these options. Individual skills enable organizations to balance the options. Our results suggest that these individual skills evolve through higher-order processes, namely, single- and double-loop learning activities.

    The full text will be freely available from 2021-02-09 12:01
  • 12.
    Saul, Caroline Jennings
    et al.
    Eawag Swiss Fed Inst Aquat Sci and Technol, Switzerland; Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eawag Swiss Fed Inst Aquat Sci and Technol, Switzerland; Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Digital Transformation as an Enabler for Advanced Services in the Sanitation Sector2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 3, article id 752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People in Base of the Pyramid markets still face difficulties when it comes to sanitation. Container-based Sanitation (CBS) services represent a promising advanced sanitation service. Despite the observed outcomes of CBS services, organizations face obstacles when providing these services. To overcome these obstacles, digital transformations of these services are being carried out. We rely on multiple case studies to understand these digital transformations. Our findings highlight (1) the challenges these case organizations faced before engaging in the digital transformation, (2) their individual digital transformation pathways, and (3) a general framework for digital transformations in BoP markets.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    van Welie, Mara J.
    et al.
    Eawag, Switzerland; Univ Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Truffer, Bernhard
    Eawag, Switzerland; Univ Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eawag, Switzerland; Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Innovation challenges of utilities in informal settlements: Combining a capabilities and regime perspective2019In: Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, E-ISSN 2210-4232, Vol. 33, p. 84-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The provision of basic services is falling short in informal settlements of cities in the Global South. In particular, public utilities have had difficulties expanding their services to the urban poor. Why is this the case despite utilities having improved their capabilities substantially over the last years? This paper investigates how innovation strategies of utilities are aligned or misaligned with the broader contexts in informal settlements, which are populated by different socio-technical regimes. We propose a framework to identify new capabilities needed by utilities to deal with these different regimes. The paper reconstructs pro-poor initiatives of a water and sewerage utility in a large East-African city and explains why they tended to fail in terms of livelihood improvement. We show how the alignment between capability portfolios and specific regime structures have set limits to the success of pro-poor innovation strategies in informal settlement contexts.

1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf