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  • 1.
    Andersson, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Co-morbidity and health care utilisation five years prior to diagnosis for depression: A register-based study in a Swedish population2011In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 11, p. 552-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Depressive disorders have been associated with a number of co-morbidities, and we   hypothesized that patients with a depression diagnosis would be heavy users of health   care services, not only when first evaluated for depression, but also for preceding   years. The aim of this study was to investigate whether increased health care utilisation   and co-morbidity could be seen during five years prior to an initial diagnosis of   depression.

    Methods

    We used a longitudinal register-based study design. The setting comprised the general   population in the county of Östergötland, south-east Sweden. All 2470 patients who   were 20 years or older in 2006 and who received a new diagnosis of depression (F32   according to ICD-10) in 2006, were selected and followed back to the year 2001, five   years before their depression diagnosis. A control group was randomly selected among   those who were aged 20 years or over in 2006 and who had received no depression diagnosis   during the period 2001-2006.

    Results

    Predictors of a depression diagnosis were a high number of physician visits, female   gender, age below 60, age above 80 and a low socioeconomic status.

    Patients who received a diagnosis of depression used twice the amount of health care   (e.g. physician visits and hospital days) during the five year period prior to diagnosis   compared to the control group. A particularly strong increase in health care utilisation   was seen the last year before diagnosis. These findings were supported with a high   level of co-morbidity as for example musculoskeletal disorders during the whole five-year   period for patients with a depression diagnosis.

    Conclusions

    Predictors of a depression diagnosis were a high number of physician visits, female   gender, age below 60, age above 80 and a low socioeconomic status. To find early signs   of depression in the clinical setting and to use a preventive strategy to handle these   patients is important.

  • 2.
    Carstensen, John
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, David
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    André, Malin
    Landstinget i Uppsala län.
    Engström, Sven
    Landstinget i Jönköpings län.
    Magnusson, Henric
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    How does comorbidity influence healthcare costs? A population-based cross-sectional study of depression, back pain and osteoarthritis2012In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 2, p. e000809-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To analyse how comorbidity among patients with back pain, depression and osteoarthritis influences healthcare costs per patient. A special focus was made on the distribution of costs for primary healthcare compared with specialist care, hospital care and drugs.

    Design Population-based cross-sectional study.

    Setting The County of Östergötland, Sweden.

    Patients Data on diagnoses and healthcare costs for all 266 354 individuals between 20 and 75 years of age, who were residents of the County of Östergötland, Sweden, in the year 2006, were extracted from the local healthcare register and the national register of drug prescriptions.

    Main outcome measures The effects of comorbidity on healthcare costs were estimated as interactions in regression models that also included age, sex, number of other health conditions and education.

    Results The largest diagnosed group was back pain (11 178 patients) followed by depression (7412 patients) and osteoarthritis (5174 patients). The largest comorbidity subgroup was the combination of back pain and depression (772 patients), followed by the combination of back pain and osteoarthritis (527 patients) and the combination of depression and osteoarthritis (206 patients). For patients having both a depression diagnosis and a back pain diagnosis, there was a significant negative interaction effect on total healthcare costs. The average healthcare costs among patients with depression and back pain was SEK 11 806 lower for a patient with both diagnoses. In this comorbidity group, there were tendencies of a positive interaction for general practitioner visits and negative interactions for all other visits and hospital days. Small or no interactions at all were seen between depression diagnoses and osteoarthritis diagnoses.

    Conclusions A small increase in primary healthcare visits in comorbid back pain and depression patients was accompanied with a substantial reduction in total healthcare costs and in hospital costs. Our results can be of value in analysing the cost effects of comorbidity and how the coordination of primary and secondary care may have an impact on healthcare costs.

  • 3.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Askling, Carl
    Swedish School Sport and Health Science, Sweden .
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mithoefer, Kai
    Harvard University, MA USA .
    Return to play after thigh muscle injury in elite football players: implementation and validation of the Munich muscle injury classification2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 769-774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Owing to the complexity and heterogeneity of muscle injuries, a generally accepted classification system is still lacking. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanAims To prospectively implement and validate a novel muscle injury classification and to evaluate its predictive value for return to professional football. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods The recently described Munich muscle injury classification was prospectively evaluated in 31 European professional male football teams during the 2011/2012 season. Thigh muscle injury types were recorded by team medical staff and correlated to individual player exposure and resultant time-loss. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults In total, 393 thigh muscle injuries occurred. The muscle classification system was well received with a 100% response rate. Two-thirds of thigh muscle injuries were classified as structural and were associated with longer lay-off times compared to functional muscle disorders (pandlt;0.001). Significant differences were observed between structural injury subgroups (minor partial, moderate partial and complete injuries) with increasing lay-off time associated with more severe structural injury. Median lay-off time of functional disorders was 5-8 days without significant differences between subgroups. There was no significant difference in the absence time between anterior and posterior thigh injuries. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions The Munich muscle classification demonstrates a positive prognostic validity for return to play after thigh muscle injury in professional male football players. Structural injuries are associated with longer average lay-off times than functional muscle disorders. Subclassification of structural injuries correlates with return to play, while subgrouping of functional disorders shows less prognostic relevance. Functional disorders are often underestimated clinically and require further systematic study.

  • 4.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Karolina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walden, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fewer ligament injuries but no preventive effect on muscle injuries and severe injuries: an 11-year follow-up of the UEFA Champions League injury study2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 732-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanLimited information is available on the variation in injury rates over multiple seasons of professional football. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanAim less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanTo analyse time-trends in injury characteristics of male professional football players over 11 consecutive seasons. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanA total of 1743 players comprising 27 teams from 10 countries were followed prospectively between 2001 and 2012. Team medical staff recorded individual player exposure and time loss injuries. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanA total of 8029 time loss injuries were recorded. The match unavailability due to injury was 14% and constant over the study period. On average, a player sustained two injuries per season, resulting in approximately 50 injuries per team and season. The ligament injury rate decreased during the study period (R-2=0.608, b=-0.040, 95% CI -0.065 to -0.016, p=0.005), whereas the rate of muscle injury (R-2=0.228, b=-0.013, 95% CI -0.032 to 0.005, p=0.138) and severe injury (R-2=0.141, b=0.015, 95% CI -0.013 to 0.043, p=0.255) did not change over the study period. In addition, no changes in injury rates over the 11-year period were found for either training (R-2=0.000, b=0.000, 95% CI -0.035 to 0.034, p=0.988) or match play (R-2=0.282, b=-0.015, 95% CI -0.032 to 0.003, p=0.093). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe injury rate has decreased for ligament injuries over the last 11years, but overall training, match injury rates and the rates of muscle injury and severe injury remain high.

  • 5.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tornqvist, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Karolina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bengtsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Electronic Devices. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Upper extremity injuries in male elite football players2013In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 1626-1632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate the epidemiology of upper extremity injuries in male elite football players and to describe their characteristics, incidence and lay-off times. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanBetween 2001 and 2011, 57 male European elite football teams (2,914 players and 6,215 player seasons) were followed prospectively. Time-loss injuries and exposure to training and matches were recorded on individual basis. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanIn total, 11,750 injuries were recorded, 355 (3 %) of those affected the upper extremities giving an incidence of 0.23 injuries/1,000 h of football. The incidence in match play was almost 7 times higher than in training (0.83 vs. 0.12 injuries/1,000 h, rate ratio 6.7, 95 % confidence interval 5.5-8.3). As much as 32 % of traumatic match injuries occurred as a result of foul play situations. Goalkeepers had a significantly higher incidence of upper extremity injuries compared to outfield players (0.80 vs. 0.16 injuries/1,000 h, rate ratio 5.0, 95 % confidence interval 4.0-6.2). The average absence due to an upper extremity injury was 23 +/- A 34 days. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanUpper extremity injuries are uncommon among male elite football players. Goalkeepers, however, are prone to upper extremity injury, with a five times higher incidence compared to outfield players. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanII.

  • 6.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun protection advice mediated by the general practitioner: An effective way to achieve long-term change of behaviour and attitudes related to sun exposure?2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 135-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To investigate, in primary health care, differentiated levels of prevention directed at skin cancer, and how the propensity of the patients to change sun habits/sun protection behaviour and attitudes towards sunbathing were affected, three years after intervention. Additionally, the impact of the performance of a phototest as a complementary tool for prevention was evaluated. Design. Randomized controlled study. Setting and subjects. During three weeks in February, all patients andgt;= 18 years of age registering at a primary health care centre in southern Sweden were asked to fill in a questionnaire mapping sun exposure habits, attitudes towards sunbathing, and readiness to increase sun protection according to the Transtheoretical Model of Behaviour Change (TTM) (n = 316). They were randomized into three intervention groups, for which sun protection advice was given, in Group 1 by means of a letter, and in Groups 2 and 3 orally during a personal GP consultation. Group 3 also underwent a phototest to demonstrate individual skin UV sensitivity. Main outcome measures. Change of sun habits/sun protection behaviour and attitudes, measured by five-point Likert scale scores and readiness to increase sun protection according to the TTM, three years after intervention, by a repeated questionnaire. Results. In the letter group, almost no improvement in sun protection occurred. In the two doctors consultation groups, significantly increased sun protection was demonstrated for several items, but the difference compared with the letter group was significant only for sunscreen use. The performance of a phototest did not appear to reinforce the impact of intervention. Conclusion. Sun protection advice, mediated personally by the GP during a doctors consultation, can lead to improvement in sun protection over a prolonged time period.

  • 7.
    Fältström, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Physiotherapy, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Forssblad, Magnus
    Carpio Artro Clinic AB, Sophiahemmet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Predictors for additional anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: data from the Swedish national ACL register.2016In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 885-894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To identify predictors for additional anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction.

    METHODS: Patients from the Swedish national ACL register who underwent ACL reconstruction between January 2005 and February 2013 (follow-up duration 6-104 months) were included. Cox regression analyses included the following independent variables regarding primary injury: age, sex, time between injury and primary ACL reconstruction, activity at primary injury, concomitant injuries, injury side, graft type, and pre-surgery KOOS and EQ-5D scores.

    RESULTS: Among ACL reconstruction procedures, 93 % involved hamstring tendon (HT) autografts. Graft type did not predict additional ACL reconstruction. Final regression models only included patients with HT autograft (n = 20,824). Of these, 702 had revision and 591 contralateral ACL reconstructions. The 5-year post-operative rates of revision and contralateral ACL reconstruction were 4.3 and 3.8 %, respectively. Significant predictors for additional ACL reconstruction were age (fourfold increased rate for <16-year-old patients vs. >35-year-old patients), time between injury and primary surgery (two to threefold increased rate for ACL reconstruction within 0-90 days vs. >365 days), and playing football at primary injury.

    CONCLUSION: This study identified younger age, having ACL reconstruction early after the primary injury, and incurring the primary injury while playing football as the main predictors for revision and contralateral ACL reconstruction. This suggests that the rate of additional ACL reconstruction is increased in a selected group of young patients aiming to return to strenuous sports after primary surgery and should be taken into consideration when discussing primary ACL reconstruction, return to sports, and during post-surgery rehabilitation. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II.

  • 8.
    Gajhede-Knudsen, Mariann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Maffulli, Nicola
    University of Salerno, Italy .
    Recurrence of Achilles tendon injuries in elite male football players is more common after early return to play: an 11-year follow-up of the UEFA Champions League injury study2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 763-768Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background There is limited information about Achilles tendon disorders in professional football. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanAims To investigate the incidence, injury circumstances, lay-off times and reinjury rates of Achilles tendon disorders in male professional football. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods A total of 27 clubs from 10 countries and 1743 players have been followed prospectively during 11 seasons between 2001 and 2012. The team medical staff recorded individual player exposure and time-loss injuries. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults A total of 203 (2.5% of all injuries) Achilles tendon disorders were registered. A majority (96%) of the disorders were tendinopathies, and nine were partial or total ruptures. A higher injury rate was found during the preseason compared with the competitive season, 0.25 vs 0.18/1000 h (rate ratio (RR) 1.4, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.0; p=0.027). The mean lay-off time for Achilles tendinopathies was 23 +/- 37 (median=10, Q(1)=4 and Q(3)=24) days, while a rupture of the Achilles tendon, on average, caused 161 +/- 65 (median=169, Q(1)=110 and Q(3)=189) days of absence. Players with Achilles tendon disorders were significantly older than the rest of the cohort, with a mean age of 27.2 +/- 4 years vs 25.6 +/- 4.6 years (pandlt;0.001). 27% of all Achilles tendinopathies were reinjuries. A higher reinjury risk was found after short recovery periods (31%) compared with longer recovery periods (13%) (RR 2.4, 95% CI 2.1 to 2.8; pandlt;0.001). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions Achilles tendon disorders account for 3.8% of the total lay-off time and are more common in older players. Recurrence is common after Achilles tendinopathies and the reinjury risk is higher after short recovery periods.

  • 9.
    Gauffin, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Tagesson (Sonesson), Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Meunier, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Knee Arthroscopic Surgery in Middle-Aged Patients With Meniscal Symptoms A 3-Year Follow-up of a Prospective, Randomized Study2017In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0363-5465, E-ISSN 1552-3365, Vol. 45, no 9, p. 2077-2084Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The optimal treatment for middle-aged patients with knee pain and meniscal lesions has been extensively debated. Most previous studies have revealed only short-term beneficial results of knee arthroscopic surgery. The authors have previously shown a positive benefit of knee arthroscopic surgery and an exercise program after 1 year when compared with an exercise program alone. Purpose: To evaluate if knee arthroscopic surgery combined with an exercise program provided an additional long-term benefit after 3 years compared with an exercise program alone in middle-aged patients with meniscal symptoms. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. Methods: Of 179 eligible patients, aged 45 to 64 years, 150 were randomized to (1) a 3-month exercise program (nonsurgery group) or (2) the same as group 1 plus knee arthroscopic surgery within 4 weeks (surgery group). The primary outcome was the change in the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscore of pain between baseline and the 3-year follow-up. Results from the 1-year follow-up have been published previously. Results: Both treatment groups improved significantly in the KOOS pain subscore at 3 years follow-up in the intention-to-treat and as-treated analyses (P amp;lt; .001). The between-group difference for the change in the KOOS pain subscore between baseline and the 3-year follow-up was no longer statistically significant, neither in the intention-to-treat analysis (7.6 points; 95% CI, -0.6 to 15.9; P = .068) nor in the as-treated analysis (5.3 points; 95% CI, -3.1 to 13.8; P = .216). The factorial analysis of the effect of the intervention and age, onset of pain, and mechanical symptoms indicated that older patients improved more, regardless of treatment, and surgery may be more beneficial for patients without mechanical symptoms (as-treated analysis). The effect of the predictive factors on the KOOS pain subscore was uncertain because of the small sample size in the subgroup analyses. Conclusion: The benefit of knee arthroscopic surgery, seen at 1 year in middle-aged patients with meniscal symptoms, was diminished at 3 years and was no longer statistically significant.

  • 10.
    Gauffin, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Tagesson (Sonesson), Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Meunier, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Knee arthroscopic surgery is beneficial to middle-aged patients with meniscal symptoms: a prospective, randomised, single-blinded study2014In: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, ISSN 1063-4584, E-ISSN 1522-9653, Vol. 22, no 11, p. 1808-1816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: There is no evidence that a knee arthroscopy is more beneficial to middle-aged patients with meniscal symptoms compared to other treatments. This randomised controlled trial aimed to determine whether an arthroscopic intervention combined with a structured exercise programme would provide more benefit than a structured exercise programme alone for middle-aged patients with meniscal symptoms that have undergone physiotherapy. Method: 150 out of 179 eligible patients, aged 45 to 64 (mean: 54 +/- 5), symptom duration more than 3 months and standing X-ray with Ahlback grade 0, were randomised to: (1) a physiotherapy appointment within 2 weeks of inclusion that included instructions for a 3-month exercise programme (non-surgery group); or (2) the same as (1) plus, within 4 weeks of inclusion, knee arthroscopy for resection of any significant meniscal injuries (surgery group). The primary outcome was change in pain at 12 months, assessed with the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOSPAIN). Results: In the Intention-To-Treat analysis, pain at 12 months was significantly lower in the surgery than in the non-surgery group. The change in KOOSPAIN was significantly larger in the surgery than in the non-surgery group (between-group difference was 10.6 points of change; 95% CI: 3.4 to 17.7, P = 0.004). The As-Treated analysis results were consistent with the Intention-To-Treat analysis results. Conclusion: Middle-aged patients with meniscal symptoms may benefit from arthroscopic surgery in addition to a structured exercise programme. Patients age or symptom history (i.e., mechanical symptoms or acute onset of symptoms) didnt affect the outcome.

  • 11.
    Hägglund, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walden, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Karolina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bengtsson, Hakan
    Football Research Group, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Injuries affect team performance negatively in professional football: an 11-year follow-up of the UEFA Champions League injury study2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 738-742Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The influence of injuries on team performance in football has only been scarcely investigated.

    Aim To study the association between injury rates and team performance in the domestic league play, and in European cups, in male professional football.

    Methods 24 football teams from nine European countries were followed prospectively for 11 seasons (2001–2012), including 155 team-seasons. Individual training and match exposure and time-loss injuries were registered. To analyse the effect of injury rates on performance, a Generalised Estimating Equation was used to fit a linear regression on team-level data. Each team's season injury rate and performance were evaluated using its own preceding season data for comparison in the analyses.

    Results 7792 injuries were reported during 1 026 104 exposure hours. The total injury incidence was 7.7 injuries/1000 h, injury burden 130 injury days lost/1000 h and player match availability 86%. Lower injury burden (p=0.011) and higher match availability (p=0.031) were associated with higher final league ranking. Similarly, lower injury incidence (p=0.035), lower injury burden (p<0.001) and higher match availability (p<0.001) were associated with increased points per league match. Finally, lower injury burden (p=0.043) and higher match availability (p=0.048) were associated with an increase in the Union of European Football Association (UEFA) Season Club Coefficient, reflecting success in the UEFA Champions League or Europa League.

    Conclusions Injuries had a significant influence on performance in the league play and in European cups in male professional football. The findings stress the importance of injury prevention to increase a team's chances of success.

  • 12.
    Lundblad, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walden, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jon
    Sahlgrenska University, Sweden .
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The UEFA injury study: 11-year data concerning 346 MCL injuries and time to return to play2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 759-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury is the most common knee ligament injury in professional football. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanAim To investigate the rate and circumstances of MCL injuries and development over the past decade. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods Prospective cohort study, in which 27 professional European teams were followed over 11 seasons (2001/2002 to 2011/2012). Team medical staffs recorded player exposure and time loss injuries. MCL injuries were classified into four severity categories. Injury rate was defined as the number of injuries per 1000 player-hours. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults 346 MCL injuries occurred during 1057 201 h (rate 0.33/1000 h). The match injury rate was nine times higher than the training injury rate (1.31 vs 0.14/1000 h, rate ratio 9.3, 95% CI 7.5 to 11.6, pandlt;0.001). There was a significant average annual decrease of approximately 7% (p=0.023). The average lay-off was 23 days, and there was no difference in median lay-off between index injuries and reinjuries (18 vs 13, p=0.20). Almost 70% of all MCL injuries were contact-related, and there was no difference in median lay-off between contact and non-contact injuries (16 vs 16, p=0.74). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions This largest series of MCL injuries in professional football suggests that the time loss from football for MCL injury is 23 days. Also, the MCL injury rate decreased significantly during the 11-year study period.

  • 13.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Guorgis, Ghassan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Anderson, Chris D
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Kärna, Linköping.
    Sustainable effect of individualised sun protection advice on sun protection behaviour: a 10-year follow-up of a randomised controlled study in primary care.2019In: BJGP open, ISSN 2398-3795, Vol. 3, no 3, article id bjgpopen19X101653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In the light of increasing skin cancer incidences worldwide, preventive measures to promote sun protection in individuals with risky sun habits have continued relevance and importance.

    AIM: To report the long-term effect of individualised sun protection advice given in primary health care (PHC), on sun habits and sun protection behaviour.

    DESIGN & SETTING: In 2005, 309 PHC patients were enrolled in a randomised controlled study performed in a Swedish PHC setting.

    METHOD: At baseline, the study participants completed a Likert scale-based questionnaire, mapping sun habits, propensity to increase sun protection, and attitudes towards sun exposure, followed by randomisation into three intervention groups, all receiving individualised sun protection advice: in Group 1 (n = 116) by means of a letter, and in Group 2 (n = 97) and 3 (n = 96) communicated personally by a GP. In Group 3, participants also underwent a skin ultraviolet-sensitivity phototest, with adjusted sun protection advice based on the result. A repeated questionnaire was administered after 3 and 10 years.

    RESULTS: Statistically significant declines were observed in all groups for sun exposure mean scores over time. When using a cumulative score, according to the Sun Exposure and Protection Index (SEPI), significantly greater decrease in SEPI mean score was observed in Groups 2 and 3 (GP), compared to Group 1 (letter); P<0.01. The addition of a phototest did not enhance the effect of the intervention.

    CONCLUSION: Individualised sun protection advice mediated verbally by the GP can lead to sustained improvement of sun protective behaviour.

  • 14.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Dedering, Asa
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hedevik, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Postoperative structured rehabilitation in patients undergoing surgery for cervical radiculopathy: a 2-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial2019In: Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, ISSN 1547-5654, E-ISSN 1547-5646, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 60-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE Information about postoperative rehabilitation for cervical radiculopathy (CR) is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate the additional benefits of structured postoperative rehabilitation (SPT), which was performed in all patients, compared with a pragmatic standard postoperative approach (SA), in which rehabilitation was used as needed and patients sought physiotherapy on their own without a referral, in patients with MRI evidence of disc herniation and concomitant clinical signs who underwent surgery for CR. METHODS Patients (n = 202) were randomized to receive SPT or SA. Included key variables in the present study were primary and selected secondary outcomes of a prospective randomized controlled multicenter study. The main outcome was the Neck Disability Index (NDI) score. The NDI score, pain variables, self-efficacy, and health-related quality of life were investigated at baseline and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. RESULTS SPT provided no additional benefits over SA (p = 0.08 to p = 0.99) at the postoperative 2-year follow-up. Both groups improved over time (p amp;lt; 0.0001), with no reported adverse effects. CONCLUSIONS One can conclude that SPT offered no additional benefits over SA; however, patients tolerated postoperative neck exercises without any negative side effects. These findings are important for the development of future active and neck-specific post-operative rehabilitation interventions for patients with CR.

  • 15.
    Waldén, Markus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Atroshi, Isam
    Hassleholm Kristianstad Ystad Hospital.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wagner, Philippe
    Lund University.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Prevention of acute knee injuries in adolescent female football players: cluster randomised controlled trial2012In: BMJ. British Medical Journal, E-ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of neuromuscular training in reducing the rate of acute knee injury in adolescent female football players. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign Stratified cluster randomised controlled trial with clubs as the unit of randomisation. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSetting 230 Swedish football clubs (121 in the intervention group, 109 in the control group) were followed for one season (2009, seven months). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanParticipants 4564 players aged 12-17 years (2479 in the intervention group, 2085 in the control group) completed the study. Intervention 15 minute neuromuscular warm-up programme (targeting core stability, balance, and proper knee alignment) to be carried out twice a week throughout the season. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMain outcome measures The primary outcome was rate of anterior cruciate ligament injury; secondary outcomes were rates of severe knee injury (andgt;4 weeks absence) and any acute knee injury. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults Seven players (0.28%) in the intervention group, and 14 (0.67%) in the control group had an anterior cruciate ligament injury. By Cox regression analysis according to intention to treat, a 64% reduction in the rate of anterior cruciate ligament injury was seen in the intervention group (rate ratio 0.36, 95% confidence interval 0.15 to 0.85). The absolute rate difference was -0.07 (95% confidence interval -0.13 to 0.001) per 1000 playing hours in favour of the intervention group. No significant rate reductions were seen for secondary outcomes. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions A neuromuscular warm-up programme significantly reduced the rate of anterior cruciate ligament injury in adolescent female football players. However, the absolute rate difference did not reach statistical significance, possibly owing to the small number of events.

  • 16.
    Waldén, Markus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Hässleholm-Kristianstad-Ystad Hospitals, Hässleholm, Sweden .
    Atroshi, Isam
    Hässleholm-Kristianstad-Ystad Hospitals, Hässleholm and Lund University, Sweden .
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wagner, Philippe
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Republished research: Prevention of acute knee injuries in adolescent female football players: cluster randomised controlled trial2012In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 46, no 13, p. 904-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study question Does a neuromuscular warm-up programme reduce the rate of anterior cruciate ligament injury in adolescent female football players? 

    Summary answer The neuromuscular warm-up programme reduced the overall rate of anterior cruciate ligament injury by 64%.

    What is known and what this paper adds Knee injuries are common in football regardless of the playing level, and adolescent female players are more susceptible to anterior cruciate ligament injury than their male counterparts. Almost two thirds of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in adolescent female football players can be prevented with a 15 minute neuromuscular warm-up programme.

  • 17.
    Waldén, Markus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Hassleholm Kristianstad Ystad Hospital, Sweden.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    ACL injuries in mens professional football: a 15-year prospective study on time trends and return-to-play rates reveals only 65% of players still play at the top level 3 years after ACL rupture2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 744-750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Studies investigating the development of ACL injuries over time in football are scarce and more data on what happens before and after return to play (RTP) are needed. Aim To investigate (1) time trends in ACL injury rates, (2) complication rates before return to match play following ACL reconstruction, and (3) the influence of ACL injury on the subsequent playing career in male professional football players. Methods 78 clubs were followed between 2001 and 2015. Time trend in ACL injury rate was analysed using linear regression. ACL-injured players were monitored until RTP and tracked for 3 years after RTP. Results We recorded 157 ACL injuries, 140 total and 17 partial ruptures, with a non-significant average annual increase in the ACL injury rate by 6% (R-2=0.13, b=0.059, 95% CI -0.04 to 0.15, p=0.20). The match ACL injury rate was 20-fold higher than the training injury rate (0.340 vs 0.017 per 1000 h). 138 players (98.6%) with a total rupture underwent ACL reconstruction; all 134 players with RTP data (4 players still under rehabilitation) were able to return to training, but 9 of them (6.7%) suffered complications before their first match appearance (5 reruptures and 4 other knee surgeries). The median layoff after ACL reconstruction was 6.6 months to training and 7.4 months to match play. We report 3-year follow-up data for 106 players in total; 91 players (85.8%) were still playing football and 60 of 93 players (65%) with ACL reconstruction for a total rupture played at the same level. Conclusions The ACL injury rate has not declined during the 2000s and the rerupture rate before return to match play was 4%. The RTP rate within a year after ACL reconstruction was very high, but only two-thirds competed at the highest level 3 years later.

  • 18.
    Waldén, Markus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Sports Medicine .
    Anterior cruciate ligament injury in elite football: a prospective three-cohort study.2011In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 11-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury causes long lay-off time and is often complicated with subsequent new knee injury and osteoarthritis. Female gender is associated with an increased ACL injury risk, but few studies have adjusted for gender-related differences in age although female players are often younger when sustaining their ACL injury. The objective of this three-cohort study was to describe ACL injury characteristics in teams from the Swedish men's and women's first leagues and from several European men's professional first leagues. Over a varying number of seasons from 2001 to 2009, 57 clubs (2,329 players) were followed prospectively and during this period 78 ACL injuries occurred (five partial). Mean age at ACL injury was lower in women compared to men (20.6 ± 2.2 vs. 25.2 ± 4.5 years, P = 0.0002). Using a Cox regression, the female-to-male hazard ratio (HR) was 2.6 (95% CI 1.4-4.6) in all three cohorts studied and 2.6 (95% CI 1.3-5.3) in the Swedish cohorts; adjusted for age, the HR was reduced to 2.4 (95% CI 1.3-4.2) and 2.1 (95% CI 1.0-4.2), respectively. Match play was associated with a higher ACL injury risk with a match-to-training ratio of 20.8 (95% CI 12.4-34.8) and 45 ACL injuries (58%) occurred due to non-contact mechanisms. Hamstrings grafts were used more often in Sweden than in Europe (67 vs. 34%, P = 0.028), and there were no differences in time to return to play after ACL reconstruction between the cohorts or different grafts. In conclusion, this study showed that the ACL injury incidence in female elite footballers was more than doubled compared to their male counterparts, but also that they were significantly younger at ACL injury than males. These findings suggest that future preventive research primarily should address the young female football player.

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