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  • 1.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wäster, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Ida
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Lysosomal exocytosis and caspase-8-mediated apoptosis in UVA-irradiated keratinocytes2013In: Journal of Cell Science, ISSN 0021-9533, E-ISSN 1477-9137, Vol. 126, no 24, p. 5578-5584Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is a major environmental carcinogen involved in the development of skin cancer. To elucidate the initial signaling during UV-induced damage in human keratinocytes, we investigated lysosomal exocytosis and apoptosis induction. UVA, but not UVB, induced plasma membrane damage, which was repaired by Ca2+-dependent lysosomal exocytosis. The lysosomal exocytosis resulted in extracellular release of cathepsin D and acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase). Two hours after UVA irradiation, we detected activation of caspase-8, which was reduced by addition of anti-aSMAse. Furthermore, caspase-8 activation and apoptosis was reduced by prevention of endocytosis and by the use of cathepsin inhibitors. We conclude that lysosomal exocytosis is part of the keratinocyte response to UVA and is followed by cathepsin-dependent activation of caspase-8. The findings have implications for the understanding of UV-induced skin damage and emphasize that UVA and UVB initiate apoptosis through different signaling pathways in keratinocytes.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Joosten, M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    The histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A reduces lysosomal pH and enhances cisplatin-induced apoptosis2013In: Experimental Cell Research, ISSN 0014-4827, E-ISSN 1090-2422, Vol. 319, no 1, p. 12-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs) has been documented in several types of cancer and may be associated with survival advantage. In a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell line, cisplatin-induced apoptosis was augmented by pretreatment with the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin Apoptosis was accompanied by lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), as shown by immunoblotting of the lysosomal marker protease cathepsin B in extracted cytosol and by immunofluorescence. Moreover, LAMP-2 (lysosomal associated membrane protein-2) was translocated from lysosomal membranes and found in a digitonin extractable fraction together with cytosolic proteins and pretreatment with trichostatin A potentiated the release. Overall, protein level of LAMP-2 was decreased during cell death and, interestingly, inhibition of cysteine cathepsins, by the pan-cysteine cathepsin inhibitor zFA-FMK, prevented loss of LAMP-2. The importance of LAMP-2 for lysosomal membrane stability, was confirmed by showing that LAMP-2 knockout MEFs (mouse embryonic fibroblasts) were more sensitive to cisplatin as compared to the corresponding wildtype cells. Trichostatin A reduced lysosomal pH from 4.46 to 4.25 and cell death was prevented when lysosomal pH was increased by NH4Cl, or when inhibiting the activity of lysosomal proteases. We conclude that trichostatin A enhances cisplatin induced cell death by decreasing lysosomal pH, which augments cathepsin activity resulting in reduced LAMP-2 level, and might promote LMP.

  • 3.
    Eriksson, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nath, Sangeeta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bornefall, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Villamil Giraldo, Ana Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Impact of high cholesterol in a Parkinsons disease model: Prevention of lysosomal leakage versus stimulation of alpha-synuclein aggregation2017In: European Journal of Cell Biology, ISSN 0171-9335, E-ISSN 1618-1298, Vol. 96, no 2, p. 99-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parkinsons disease is characterized by accumulation of intraneuronal cytoplasmic inclusions, Lewy bodies, which mainly consist of aggregated alpha-synuclein. Controversies exist as to whether high blood cholesterol is a risk factor for the development of the disease and whether statin treatment could have a protective effect. Using a model system of BE(2)-M17 neuroblastoma cells treated with the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), we found that MPP+-induced cell death was accompanied by cholesterol accumulation in a lysosomal-like pattern in pre-apoptotic cells. To study the effects of lysosomal cholesterol accumulation, we increased lysosomal cholesterol through pre-treatment with U18666A and found delayed leakage of lysosomal contents into the cytosol, which reduced cell death. This suggests that increased lysosomal cholesterol is a stress response mechanism to protect lysosomal membrane integrity in response to early apoptotic stress. However, high cholesterol also stimulated the accumulation of alpha-synuclein. Treatment with the cholesterol-lowering drug lovastatin reduced MPP+-induced cell death by inhibiting the production of reactive oxygen species, but did not prevent lysosomal cholesterol increase nor affect alpha-synuclein accumulation. Our study indicates a dual role of high cholesterol in Parkinsons disease, in which it acts both as a protector against lysosomal membrane permeabilization and as a stimulator of alpha-synuclein accumulation. (C) 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Eriksson, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Analysis of Lysosomal pH by Flow Cytometry Using FITC-Dextran Loaded Cells2017In: Lysosomes: Methods and Protocols / [ed] Karin Öllinger;Hanna Appelqvist, Humana Press, 2017, Vol. 1594, p. 179-189Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The acidic environment of the lysosomal lumen provides an optimal milieu for the acid hydrolases and is also essential for fusion/fission of endo-lysosomal compartments and sorting of cargo. Evidence suggests that maintaining lysosomal acidity is essential to avoid disease. In this chapter, we describe a protocol for analyzing the lysosomal pH in cultured cells using the fluorescent probe fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran together with a dual-emission ratiometric technique suitable for flow cytometry. Fluorescence-labeled dextran is endocytosed and accumulated in the lysosomal compartment. FITC shows a pH-dependent variation in fluorescence when analyzed at maximum emission wavelength and no variation when analyzing at the isosbestic point, thereby the ratio can be used to determine the lysosomal pH. A standard curve is obtained by equilibrating intralysosomal pH with extracellular pH using the ionophore nigericin. The protocol also includes information regarding procedures to induce lysosomal alkalinization and lysosomal membrane permeabilization.

  • 5.
    Persson, Hans Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Vainikka, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Ida
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wennerstrom, Urban
    Hospital Vastervik, Sweden .
    TNF-alpha-stimulated macrophages protect A549 lung cells against iron and oxidation2013In: Experimental and Toxicological Pathology, ISSN 0940-2993, E-ISSN 1618-1433, Vol. 65, no 1-2, p. 81-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previously, we have shown that TNF-alpha protects iron-exposed J774 macrophages against iron-catalyzed oxidative lysosomal disruption and cell death by increasing reduced glutathione and H-ferritin in cells. Because J774 cells are able to harbor large amounts of iron, which is potentially harmful in a redox-active state, we hypothesized that TNF-alpha-stimulated J774 macrophages will prevent iron-driven oxidative killing of alveolar epithelial A549 cells in co-culture. In the present study, iron trichloride (which is endocytosed by cells as hydrated iron-phosphate complexes) was mainly deposited inside the lysosomes of J774 macrophages, while A549 cells, equally iron exposed, accumulated much less iron. When challenged by oxidants, however, reactive lysosomal iron in A549 cells promoted lysosomal disruption and cell death, particularly in the presence of TNF-alpha. This effect resulted from an elevation in ROS generation by TNF-alpha, while a compensatory upregulation of protective molecules (H-ferritin and/or reduced glutathione) by TNF-alpha was absent. A549 cell death was particularly pronounced when iron and TNF-alpha were present in the conditioned medium during oxidant challenge; thus, iron-driven oxidative reactions in the culture medium were a much greater hazard to A549 cells than those taking place inside their lysosomes. Consequently, the iron chelator, deferoxamine, efficiently prevented A549 cell death when added to the culture medium during an oxidant challenge. In co-cultures of TNF-alpha-stimulated lung cells, J774 macrophages sequestered iron inside their lysosomes and protected A549 cells from oxidative reactions and cell death. Thus, the collective effect of TNF-alpha on co-cultured lung cells was mainly cytoprotective.

  • 6.
    Wäster, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Ida
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vainikka, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Extracellular vesicles are transferred from melanocytes to keratinocytes after UVA irradiation2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, no 27890Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induces skin pigmentation, which relies on the intercellular crosstalk of melanin between melanocytes to keratinocytes. However, studying the separate effects of UVA and UVB irradiation reveals differences in cellular response. Herein, we show an immediate shedding of extracellular vesicles (EVs) from the plasma membrane when exposing human melanocytes to UVA, but not UVB. The EV-shedding is preceded by UVA-induced plasma membrane damage, which is rapidly repaired by Ca2+-dependent lysosomal exocytosis. Using co-cultures of melanocytes and keratinocytes, we show that EVs are preferably endocytosed by keratinocytes. Importantly, EV-formation is prevented by the inhibition of exocytosis and increased lysosomal pH but is not affected by actin and microtubule inhibitors. Melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes is equally stimulated by UVA and UVB and depends on a functional cytoskeleton. In conclusion, we show a novel cell response after UVA irradiation, resulting in transfer of lysosome-derived EVs from melanocytes to keratinocytes.

  • 7.
    Wäster, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Ida
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vainikka, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Sunbathing: What’ve lysosomes got to do with it?2014In: Communicative & Integrative Biology, ISSN 1942-0889, E-ISSN 1942-0889, Vol. 7, no 1, p. e28723-1-e28723-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solar radiation is an important risk factor for skin cancer, the incidence of which is increasing, especially in the fair-skinned populations of the world. While the ultraviolet (UV)B component has direct DNA damaging ability, UVA-induced effects are currently mainly attributed to the production of reactive oxygen species. In our recent study, we compared the effects of UVA and UVB radiation on human keratinocytes and found that UVA-induced plasma membrane damage was rapidly repaired by lysosomal exocytosis, which was detected based on the expression of lysosomal membrane associated protein-1 (LAMP-1) on the plasma membrane of non-permeabilized cells. Later, the keratinocytes died through caspase-8 mediated apoptosis. In contrast, the plasma membranes of keratinocytes exposed to UVB showed no LAMP-1 expression, and, although the cells died by apoptosis, no initial caspase-8 activity was detected. We have also demonstrated the occurrence of UVA-induced lysosomal exocytosis in reconstructed skin and shown the relocation of lysosomes from the center of cells to the vicinity of the plasma membrane. Thus, we suggest that lysosomal exocytosis also occurs in keratinocytes covered by the stratum corneum following exposure to UVA. Our findings provide new insight into the mechanism of UVA-induced skin damage.

  • 8.
    Wäster, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Orfanidis, Kyriakos
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Eriksson, Ida
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Seifert, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Hospital, Sweden.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    UV radiation promotes melanoma dissemination mediated by the sequential reaction axis of cathepsins-TGF-beta 1-FAP-alpha2017In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 117, no 4, p. 535-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the major risk factor for development of malignant melanoma. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-alpha is a serine protease expressed on the surface of activated fibroblasts, promoting tumour invasion through extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. The signalling mechanism behind the upregulation of FAP-alpha is not yet completely revealed. Methods: Expression of FAP-alpha was analysed after UVR exposure in in vitro co-culture systems, gene expression arrays and artificial skin constructs. Cell migration and invasion was studied in relation to cathepsin activity and secretion of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1. Results: Fibroblast activation protein-a expression was induced by UVR in melanocytes of human skin. The FAP-alpha expression was regulated by UVR-induced release of TGF-beta 1 and cathepsin inhibitors prevented such secretion. In melanoma cell culture models and in a xenograft tumour model of zebrafish embryos, FAP-alpha mediated ECM degradation and facilitated tumour cell dissemination. Conclusions: Our results provide evidence for a sequential reaction axis from UVR via cathepsins, TGF-beta 1 and FAP-alpha expression, promoting cancer cell dissemination and melanoma metastatic spread.

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