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  • 1.
    Blystad, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Håkansson, Irene
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tisell, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Quantitative MRI for Analysis of Active Multiple Sclerosis Lesions without Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agent2016In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 94-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Contrast-enhancing MS lesions are important markers of active inflammation in the diagnostic work-up of MS and in disease monitoring with MR imaging. Because intravenous contrast agents involve an expense and a potential risk of adverse events, it would be desirable to identify active lesions without using a contrast agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether pre-contrast injection tissue-relaxation rates and proton density of MS lesions, by using a new quantitative MR imaging sequence, can identify active lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-four patients with a clinical suspicion of MS were studied. MR imaging with a standard clinical MS protocol and a quantitative MR imaging sequence was performed at inclusion (baseline) and after 1 year. ROIs were placed in MS lesions, classified as nonenhancing or enhancing. Longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates, as well as proton density were obtained from the quantitative MR imaging sequence. Statistical analyses of ROI values were performed by using a mixed linear model, logistic regression, and receiver operating characteristic analysis. RESULTS: Enhancing lesions had a significantly (P < .001) higher mean longitudinal relaxation rate (1.22 0.36 versus 0.89 +/- 0.24), a higher mean transverse relaxation rate (9.8 +/- 2.6 versus 7.4 +/- 1.9), and a lower mean proton density (77 +/- 11.2 versus 90 +/- 8.4) than nonenhancing lesions. An area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value of 0.832 was obtained. CONCLUSIONS: Contrast-enhancing MS lesions often have proton density and relaxation times that differ from those in nonenhancing lesions, with lower proton density and shorter relaxation times in enhancing lesions compared with nonenhancing lesions.

  • 2.
    Hellberg, Sandra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eklund, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gawel, Danuta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Köpsén, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Huan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nestor, Colm
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kockum, Ingrid
    Karolinska Institute, Department Clin Neurosci, Neuroimmunol Unit, S-17177 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Karolinska Institute, Department Clin Neurosci, Neuroimmunol Unit, S-17177 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Kastbom, Alf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Håkansson, Irene
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Dynamic Response Genes in CD4+T Cells Reveal a Network of Interactive Proteins that Classifies Disease Activity in Multiple Sclerosis2016In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 16, no 11, p. 2928-2939Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the CNS and has a varying disease course as well as variable response to treatment. Biomarkers may therefore aid personalized treatment. We tested whether in vitro activation of MS patient-derived CD4+ T cells could reveal potential biomarkers. The dynamic gene expression response to activation was dysregulated in patient-derived CD4+ T cells. By integrating our findings with genome-wide association studies, we constructed a highly connected MS gene module, disclosing cell activation and chemotaxis as central components. Changes in several module genes were associated with differences in protein levels, which were measurable in cerebrospinal fluid and were used to classify patients from control individuals. In addition, these measurements could predict disease activity after 2 years and distinguish low and high responders to treatment in two additional, independent cohorts. While further validation is needed in larger cohorts prior to clinical implementation, we have uncovered a set of potentially promising biomarkers.

  • 3.
    Håkansson, Irene
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology in Linköping.
    Biomarkers and Disease Activity in Multiple Sclerosis: A cohort study on patients with clinically isolated syndrome and relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on disease activity in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and newly diagnosed relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). The papers are based on data from 41 patients in a prospective longitudinal cohort study. All patients were untreated at baseline. Age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n=22) for blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were recruited from blood donors.

    Paper I evaluated the prognostic value of baseline levels of CXCL1, CXCL8, CXCL10, CXCL13, CCL22, neurofilament light chain (NFL), neurofilament heavy chain, glial fibrillary acidic protein, chitinase-3-like-1 (CHI3L1), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and osteopontin in CSF in relation to disease activity during the first two years of follow-up. Disease activity was defined as clinical relapses, new T2 lesions in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or sustained Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) progression. Absence of these three signs of disease activity was called no evidence of disease activity (NEDA-3). Logistic regression analysis showed that NFL in CSF was the best predictive marker of disease activity and correctly classified 93% of the patients with evidence of disease activity during two years of follow-up and 67% of those without.

    Paper II presented four year follow-up data from the cohort and also included brain volume data as well as serum levels of NFL. The correlation between NFL in CSF and serum was fairly strong (r=0.74, p<0.001). NFL in CSF was associated with new T2 lesions as well as with brain volume loss, whereas CHI3L1 in CSF was associated mainly with brain volume loss and CXCL1, CXCL10, CXCL13, CCL22 and MMP-9 in CSF were mainly associated with new T2 lesions. Taken together, paper I and II confirm and extend the knowledge of NFL as a useful biomarker in CIS and RRMS and suggests that NFL, rather than total brain volume loss, could be included in an expanded NEDA concept and used in clinical monitoring of disease activity/treatment effect. Although serum levels of NFL were correlated with the corresponding CSF levels, CSF-NFL showed a stronger association to subsequent disease activity (NEDA-3).

    Paper III addressed the patients´ self-reported Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) scores in relation to other cohort study data. MFIS scores correlated with other self-assessment questionnaire data (Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD), Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale 29 (MSIS-29) and Short Form 36 (SF-36) scores (Spearman´s rho 0.45-0.78, all p≤0.01)) but not with EDSS ratings, number of T2 lesions, total brain volume or NFL levels, indicating that subjective fatigue scores are not well reflected by some commonly used and objectively measurable disease parameters.

    Paper IV focused on the complement factors C1q, C3, C3a and sC5b-9 in CSF and plasma. CSFC1q was significantly higher in patients than in controls at baseline. The subgroup of patients with ongoing relapse at baseline also had higher levels of CSF-C3a than controls. Baseline levels of CSF-C1q and CSF-C3a correlated significantly with several pro-inflammatory chemokines as well as with MMP-9, CHI3L1 and NFL in CSF. Baseline CSF-C3a also correlated significantly with the number of T2 lesions and Gadolinium enhancing lesions in brain MRI at baseline, as well as with the number of new T2 lesions during follow-up. This study indicates that the complement system is involved already at early stages of MS. It also suggests that especially CSF-C1q and CSF-C3a levels are associated with other neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative markers and that CSF-C3a levels may carry some prognostic information.

    List of papers
    1. Neurofilament light chain in cerebrospinal fluid and prediction of disease activity in clinically isolated syndrome and relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neurofilament light chain in cerebrospinal fluid and prediction of disease activity in clinically isolated syndrome and relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis
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    2017 (English)In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 703-712Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose: Improved biomarkers are needed to facilitate clinical decision-making and as surrogate endpoints in clinical trials in multiple sclerosis (MS). We assessed whether neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory markers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at initial sampling could predict disease activity during 2 years of follow-up in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and relapsing-remitting MS. Methods: Using multiplex bead array and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, CXCL1, CXCL8, CXCL10, CXCL13, CCL20, CCL22, neurofilament light chain (NFL), neurofilament heavy chain, glial fibrillary acidic protein, chitinase-3-like-1, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and osteopontin were analysed in CSF from 41 patients with CIS or relapsing-remitting MS and 22 healthy controls. Disease activity (relapses, magnetic resonance imaging activity or disability worsening) in patients was recorded during 2 years of follow-up in this prospective longitudinal cohort study. Results: In a logistic regression analysis model, NFL in CSF at baseline emerged as the best predictive marker, correctly classifying 93% of patients who showed evidence of disease activity during 2 years of follow-up and 67% of patients who did not, with an overall proportion of 85% (33 of 39 patients) correctly classified. Combining NFL with either neurofilament heavy chain or osteopontin resulted in 87% overall correctly classified patients, whereas combining NFL with a chemokine did not improve results. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the potential prognostic value of NFL in baseline CSF in CIS and relapsing-remitting MS and supports its use as a predictive biomarker of disease activity.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    WILEY, 2017
    Keywords
    biomarker; clinically isolated syndrome; disease activity; multiple sclerosis; neurofilament light chain
    National Category
    Neurology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-137379 (URN)10.1111/ene.13274 (DOI)000399704400010 ()28261960 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [K2013-61X-22310-01-4]; Linkoping University, Sweden; University Hospital Linkoping, Sweden; Novartis; Torsten Soderberg foundation; Royal Academy of Sciences, Sweden

    Available from: 2017-05-18 Created: 2017-05-18 Last updated: 2020-01-16
    2. Neurofilament levels, disease activity and brain volume during follow-up in multiple sclerosis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neurofilament levels, disease activity and brain volume during follow-up in multiple sclerosis
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    2018 (English)In: Journal of Neuroinflammation, ISSN 1742-2094, E-ISSN 1742-2094, Vol. 15, article id 209Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a need for clinically useful biomarkers of disease activity in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and relapsing remitting MS (RRMS). The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between neurofilament light chain (NFL) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum and the relationship between NFL and other biomarkers, subsequent disease activity, and brain volume loss in CIS and RRMS. Methods: A panel of neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory markers were analyzed in repeated CSF samples from 41 patients with CIS or RRMS in a prospective longitudinal cohort study and from 22 healthy controls. NFL in serum was analyzed using a single-molecule array (Simoa) method. "No evidence of disease activity-3" (NEDA-3) status and brain volume (brain parenchymal fraction calculated using SyMRI (R)) were recorded during 4 years of follow-up. Results: NFL levels in CSF and serum correlated significantly (all samples, n = 63, r 0.74, p amp;lt; 0.001), but CSF-NFL showed an overall stronger association profile with NEDA-3 status, new T2 lesions, and brain volume loss. CSF-NFL was associated with both new T2 lesions and brain volume loss during follow-up, whereas CSF-CHI3L1 was associated mainly with brain volume loss and CXCL1, CXCL10, CXCL13, CCL22, and MMP-9 were associated mainly with new T2 lesions. Conclusions: Serum and CSF levels of NFL correlate, but CSF-NFL predicts and reflects disease activity better than S-NFL. CSF-NFL levels are associated with both new T2 lesions and brain volume loss. Our findings further add to the accumulating evidence that CSF-NFL is a clinically useful biomarker in CIS and RRMS and should be considered in the expanding NEDA concept. CSF-CXCL10 and CSF-CSF-CHI3L1 are potential markers of disease activity and brain volume loss, respectively.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BMC, 2018
    Keywords
    Multiple sclerosis; Clinically isolated syndrome; Disease activity; Neurofilament light chain; CHI3L1; CXCL10; Brain volume
    National Category
    Neurology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150263 (URN)10.1186/s12974-018-1249-7 (DOI)000439133500001 ()30021640 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [K2013-61X-22310-01-4]; Linkoping University; University Hospital of Linkoping, Sweden; Novartis; Torsten Soderberg Foundation; Royal Academy of Sciences, Sweden

    Available from: 2018-08-17 Created: 2018-08-17 Last updated: 2020-01-16
    3. Fatigue scores correlate with other self-assessment data, but not with clinical and biomarker parameters, in CIS and RRMS
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fatigue scores correlate with other self-assessment data, but not with clinical and biomarker parameters, in CIS and RRMS
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    2019 (English)In: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, ISSN 2211-0348, E-ISSN 2211-0356, Vol. 36, article id UNSP 101424Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Fatigue is common in multiple sclerosis and is associated with reduced quality of life. This study aimed to assess the correlation between fatigue scores and data from other self-assessment questionnaires, neuropsychological tests and neuroimaging, as well as data on neuroimmunological markers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum/plasma, in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and relapsing remitting MS (RRMS). Methods: Modified fatigue impact scale (MFIS) scores were determined in 38 patients with newly diagnosed CIS or RRMS at baseline and after one year in a prospective longitudinal cohort study. Non-parametric correlation analyses were used to assess associations between MFIS scores and other self-assessment questionnaire data (Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD), Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale 29 (MSIS-29) and Short Form 36 (SF-36)), as well as with neuropsychological test performances (e.g. Auditory Consonant Trigram Test (ACTT)), clinical parameters (e.g. disease duration and expanded disability status scale (EDSS)), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data (number of T2 lesions in brain MRI and total brain volume) and several neurodegenerative/neuroinflammatory markers in CSF and serum/plasma (IL-1 beta, IL-6, CXCL1, CXCL10, CXCL13, CCL-22 in plasma; neurofilament light chain (NFL) in serum; IL-6, CXCL1, CXCL10, CXCL13, CCL22, NFL and chitinase-3-like-1 (CHI3L1) in CSF. CSF and serum/plasma from 21 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were available for comparison. Results: At both baseline and one-year follow-up, fatigue scores correlated significantly with HAD, MSIS-29 and SF-36 scores and ACTT performance (Spearmans rho 0.45-0.78, all p amp;lt;= 0.01) but not with the other neuropsychological test results, disease duration, EDSS ratings, number of T2 lesions, total brain volume or neurodegenerative/neuroinflammatory markers, including neurofilament light chain levels in CSF and serum. In group comparisons, MFIS scores were similar in patients fulfilling no evidence of disease activity-3 (NEDA-3) (n = 18) and patients not fulfilling NEDA-3 (n = 20) during one year of follow-up (p amp;gt; 0.01). Conclusions: In this cohort of patients with newly diagnosed CIS and RRMS, fatigue scores were associated with mood, disease impact on daily life and quality of life as well as with alterations of attentive functions. Study results indicate that subjective fatigue scores are not well reflected by some commonly used and objectively measurable disease parameters like EDSS, T2 lesions and NFL levels.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2019
    Keywords
    Fatigue; Multiple sclerosis; Neuropsychology; Neurofilament light chain; Chemokine
    National Category
    Immunology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-163049 (URN)10.1016/j.msard.2019.101424 (DOI)000502098900023 ()31586802 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council [K2013-61X-22310-01-4]; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden [FORSS-758461]; Neuro Sweden; University Hospital of Linkoping, Sweden

    Available from: 2020-01-09 Created: 2020-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-16
    4. Complement activation in cerebrospinal fluid in clinically isolated syndrome and early stages of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Complement activation in cerebrospinal fluid in clinically isolated syndrome and early stages of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis
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    2020 (English)In: Journal of Neuroimmunology, ISSN 0165-5728, E-ISSN 1872-8421, Vol. 340, article id 577147Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    To assess if markers of complement activation are associated with disease activity, C1q, C3, C3a and sC5b-9 levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were determined in 41 patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) or remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), in a prospective longitudinal four-year cohort study. C1q in CSF (CSF-C1q) was significantly higher in patients than in controls. Baseline CSF-C1q and CSF-C3a correlated with several neuroinflammatory markers and neurofilament light chain levels. Baseline CSF-C3a correlated with the number of T2 lesions at baseline and new T2 lesions during follow-up. Baseline CSF-C3a was also significantly higher in patients with (n = 21) than in patients without (n = 20) signs of disease activity according to the NEDA-3 concept during one year of follow-up (p ≀ .01) Study results support that complement activation is involved in MS pathophysiology and that CSF-C3a carries prognostic information.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2020
    Keywords
    Complement system, C1q, C3a, Multiple sclerosis, Clinically isolated syndrome, Disease activity
    National Category
    Neurology Rheumatology and Autoimmunity Clinical Laboratory Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-163143 (URN)10.1016/j.jneuroim.2020.577147 (DOI)
    Available from: 2020-01-16 Created: 2020-01-16 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
  • 4.
    Håkansson, Irene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology in Linköping.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology in Linköping.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ekdahl, Kristina N.
    Centre of Biomaterials Chemistry, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden ; Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Complement activation in cerebrospinal fluid in clinically isolated syndrome and early stages of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis2020In: Journal of Neuroimmunology, ISSN 0165-5728, E-ISSN 1872-8421, Vol. 340, article id 577147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To assess if markers of complement activation are associated with disease activity, C1q, C3, C3a and sC5b-9 levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were determined in 41 patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) or remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), in a prospective longitudinal four-year cohort study. C1q in CSF (CSF-C1q) was significantly higher in patients than in controls. Baseline CSF-C1q and CSF-C3a correlated with several neuroinflammatory markers and neurofilament light chain levels. Baseline CSF-C3a correlated with the number of T2 lesions at baseline and new T2 lesions during follow-up. Baseline CSF-C3a was also significantly higher in patients with (n = 21) than in patients without (n = 20) signs of disease activity according to the NEDA-3 concept during one year of follow-up (p ≀ .01) Study results support that complement activation is involved in MS pathophysiology and that CSF-C3a carries prognostic information.

  • 5.
    Håkansson, Irene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ghafouri, Nazdar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Nording, Malin
    Umea Univ, Sweden; Univ Calif Davis, CA 95616 USA.
    Oxylipins in cerebrospinal fluid in clinically isolated syndrome and relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis2018In: Prostaglandins & other lipid mediators, ISSN 1098-8823, E-ISSN 2212-196X, Vol. 138, p. 41-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although oxylipins are involved in inflammation, data on these lipid mediators in multiple sclerosis are sparse. In this study, a panel of oxylipins were analysed swith liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 41 treatment naive patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) or relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) and 22 healthy controls. CSF levels of 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9-HODE) and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HODE) were significantly higher in patients than in healthy controls (9-HODE median 380 nM (interquartile range 330-450 nM) in patients and 290 nM (interquartile range 250-340 nM) in controls, 13-HODE median 930 nM (interquartile range 810-1080 nM) in patients and 690 nM (interquartile range 570-760 nM) in controls, p amp;lt; 0.001 in Mann-Whitney U tests). 9-HODE and 13-HODE performed well for separation of patients and healthy controls (AUC 0.85 and 0.88, respectively, in ROC curve analysis). However, baseline CSF levels of the oxylipins did not differ between patients with signs of disease activity during one, two and four years of follow-up and patients without. In conclusion, this study indicates that 9-HODE and 13-HODE levels are increased in CSF from CIS and RRMS patients compared with healthy controls, but does not support 9-HODE or 13-HODE as prognostic biomarkers of disease activity in patients during follow-up.

  • 6.
    Håkansson, Irene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology in Linköping.
    Johansson, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology in Linköping.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Fatigue scores correlate with other self-assessment data, but not with clinical and biomarker parameters, in CIS and RRMS2019In: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, ISSN 2211-0348, E-ISSN 2211-0356, Vol. 36, article id UNSP 101424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Fatigue is common in multiple sclerosis and is associated with reduced quality of life. This study aimed to assess the correlation between fatigue scores and data from other self-assessment questionnaires, neuropsychological tests and neuroimaging, as well as data on neuroimmunological markers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum/plasma, in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and relapsing remitting MS (RRMS). Methods: Modified fatigue impact scale (MFIS) scores were determined in 38 patients with newly diagnosed CIS or RRMS at baseline and after one year in a prospective longitudinal cohort study. Non-parametric correlation analyses were used to assess associations between MFIS scores and other self-assessment questionnaire data (Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD), Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale 29 (MSIS-29) and Short Form 36 (SF-36)), as well as with neuropsychological test performances (e.g. Auditory Consonant Trigram Test (ACTT)), clinical parameters (e.g. disease duration and expanded disability status scale (EDSS)), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data (number of T2 lesions in brain MRI and total brain volume) and several neurodegenerative/neuroinflammatory markers in CSF and serum/plasma (IL-1 beta, IL-6, CXCL1, CXCL10, CXCL13, CCL-22 in plasma; neurofilament light chain (NFL) in serum; IL-6, CXCL1, CXCL10, CXCL13, CCL22, NFL and chitinase-3-like-1 (CHI3L1) in CSF. CSF and serum/plasma from 21 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were available for comparison. Results: At both baseline and one-year follow-up, fatigue scores correlated significantly with HAD, MSIS-29 and SF-36 scores and ACTT performance (Spearmans rho 0.45-0.78, all p amp;lt;= 0.01) but not with the other neuropsychological test results, disease duration, EDSS ratings, number of T2 lesions, total brain volume or neurodegenerative/neuroinflammatory markers, including neurofilament light chain levels in CSF and serum. In group comparisons, MFIS scores were similar in patients fulfilling no evidence of disease activity-3 (NEDA-3) (n = 18) and patients not fulfilling NEDA-3 (n = 20) during one year of follow-up (p amp;gt; 0.01). Conclusions: In this cohort of patients with newly diagnosed CIS and RRMS, fatigue scores were associated with mood, disease impact on daily life and quality of life as well as with alterations of attentive functions. Study results indicate that subjective fatigue scores are not well reflected by some commonly used and objectively measurable disease parameters like EDSS, T2 lesions and NFL levels.

  • 7.
    Håkansson, Irene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandstedt, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Lundin, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Askmark, Håkan
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Pirskanen, Ritva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Carlson, Kristina
    University Hospital, Sweden.
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hägglund, Hans
    University Hospital, Sweden.
    Successful autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for refractory myasthenia gravis - a case report2017In: Neuromuscular Disorders, ISSN 0960-8966, E-ISSN 1873-2364, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 90-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease, with immune reactivity against the post-synaptic endplate of the neuromuscular junction. Apart from symptomatic treatment with choline esterase blockers, many patients also require immunomodulatory treatment. Despite existing treatment options, some patients are treatment refractory. We describe a patient with severe MG refractory to corticosteroids, four oral immunosuppressants, cyclophosphamide, rituximab and bortezomib who was treated with autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Two years after this, the patient has significantly improved in objective tests and in quality of life and leads an active life. Diplopia is her only remaining symptom and she is completely free of medication for MG. We believe that autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation can be an effective therapeutic option for carefully selected cases of severe, treatment refractory MG. (c) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Håkansson, Irene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Cassel, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blennow, K.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, H.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; UCL Institute Neurol, England.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Neurofilament light chain in cerebrospinal fluid and prediction of disease activity in clinically isolated syndrome and relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis2017In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 703-712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose: Improved biomarkers are needed to facilitate clinical decision-making and as surrogate endpoints in clinical trials in multiple sclerosis (MS). We assessed whether neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory markers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at initial sampling could predict disease activity during 2 years of follow-up in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and relapsing-remitting MS. Methods: Using multiplex bead array and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, CXCL1, CXCL8, CXCL10, CXCL13, CCL20, CCL22, neurofilament light chain (NFL), neurofilament heavy chain, glial fibrillary acidic protein, chitinase-3-like-1, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and osteopontin were analysed in CSF from 41 patients with CIS or relapsing-remitting MS and 22 healthy controls. Disease activity (relapses, magnetic resonance imaging activity or disability worsening) in patients was recorded during 2 years of follow-up in this prospective longitudinal cohort study. Results: In a logistic regression analysis model, NFL in CSF at baseline emerged as the best predictive marker, correctly classifying 93% of patients who showed evidence of disease activity during 2 years of follow-up and 67% of patients who did not, with an overall proportion of 85% (33 of 39 patients) correctly classified. Combining NFL with either neurofilament heavy chain or osteopontin resulted in 87% overall correctly classified patients, whereas combining NFL with a chemokine did not improve results. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the potential prognostic value of NFL in baseline CSF in CIS and relapsing-remitting MS and supports its use as a predictive biomarker of disease activity.

  • 9.
    Håkansson, Irene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Cassel, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; UCL Inst Neurol, England; UCL, England.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Neurofilament levels, disease activity and brain volume during follow-up in multiple sclerosis2018In: Journal of Neuroinflammation, ISSN 1742-2094, E-ISSN 1742-2094, Vol. 15, article id 209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a need for clinically useful biomarkers of disease activity in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and relapsing remitting MS (RRMS). The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between neurofilament light chain (NFL) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum and the relationship between NFL and other biomarkers, subsequent disease activity, and brain volume loss in CIS and RRMS. Methods: A panel of neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory markers were analyzed in repeated CSF samples from 41 patients with CIS or RRMS in a prospective longitudinal cohort study and from 22 healthy controls. NFL in serum was analyzed using a single-molecule array (Simoa) method. "No evidence of disease activity-3" (NEDA-3) status and brain volume (brain parenchymal fraction calculated using SyMRI (R)) were recorded during 4 years of follow-up. Results: NFL levels in CSF and serum correlated significantly (all samples, n = 63, r 0.74, p amp;lt; 0.001), but CSF-NFL showed an overall stronger association profile with NEDA-3 status, new T2 lesions, and brain volume loss. CSF-NFL was associated with both new T2 lesions and brain volume loss during follow-up, whereas CSF-CHI3L1 was associated mainly with brain volume loss and CXCL1, CXCL10, CXCL13, CCL22, and MMP-9 were associated mainly with new T2 lesions. Conclusions: Serum and CSF levels of NFL correlate, but CSF-NFL predicts and reflects disease activity better than S-NFL. CSF-NFL levels are associated with both new T2 lesions and brain volume loss. Our findings further add to the accumulating evidence that CSF-NFL is a clinically useful biomarker in CIS and RRMS and should be considered in the expanding NEDA concept. CSF-CXCL10 and CSF-CSF-CHI3L1 are potential markers of disease activity and brain volume loss, respectively.

  • 10.
    Söderfeldt, Birgitta
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Ragnehed, Mattias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Håkansson, Irene
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, M
    Ahlner, Johan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Influence of Diazepam on Clinically Designed fMRI2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). SyntheticMR AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Håkansson, Irene
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Improved Precision of Automatic Brain Volume Measurements in Patients with Clinically Isolated Syndrome and Multiple Sclerosis Using Edema Correction2018In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 296-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The presence of edema will result in increased brain volume, which may obscure progressing brain atrophy. Similarly, treatment-induced edema reduction may appear as accelerated brain tissue loss (pseudoatrophy). The purpose of this study was to correlate brain tissue properties to brain volume, to investigate the possibilities for edema correction and the resulting improvement of the precision of automated brain volume measurements. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A group of 38 patients with clinically isolated syndrome or newly diagnosed MS were imaged at inclusion and after 1, 2, and 4 years using an MR quantification sequence. Brain volume, relaxation rates (R-1 and R-2), and proton density were measured by automated software. RESULTS: The reduction of normalized brain volume with time after inclusion was 0.273%/year. The mean SDs were 0.508%, 0.526%, 0.454%, and 0.687% at baseline and 1, 2, and 4 years. Linear regression of the relative change of normalized brain volume and the relative change of R-1, R-2, and proton density showed slopes of -0.198 (P amp;lt; .001), 0.156 (P = .04), and 0.488 (P amp;lt; .001), respectively. After we applied the measured proton density as a correction factor, the mean SDs decreased to 24.2%, 4.8%, 33.3%, and 17.4%, respectively. The observed atrophy rate reduced from 0.273%/year to 0.238%/year. CONCLUSIONS: Correlations between volume and R-1, R-2, and proton density were observed in the brain, suggesting that a change of brain tissue properties can affect brain volume. Correction using these parameters decreased the variation of brain volume measurements and may have reduced the effect of pseudoatrophy.

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