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  • 1.
    Campos, Alexandre
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Danielsson, Gabriela
    Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Science for Life Laboratory, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Farinha, Ana Paula
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kuruvilla, Jacob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Warholm, Per
    Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Science for Life Laboratory, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University.
    Shotgun proteomics to unravel marine mussel (Mytilus edulis) response to long-term exposure to low salinity and propranolol in a Baltic Sea microcosm2016In: Journal of Proteomics, ISSN 1874-3919, E-ISSN 1876-7737, Vol. 137, p. 97-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pharmaceuticals, among them the β-adrenoreceptor blocker propranolol, are an important group of environmental contaminants reported in European waters. Laboratory exposure to pharmaceuticals on marine species has been performed without considering the input of the ecosystem flow. To unravel the ecosystem response to long-term exposure to propranolol we have performed long-term exposure to propranolol and low salinity in microcosms. We applied shotgun proteomic analysis to gills of Mytilus edulis from those Baltic Sea microcosms and identified 2071 proteins with a proteogenomic strategy. The proteome profiling patterns from the 587 highly reproductive proteins among groups define salinity as a key factor in the mussel´s response to propranolol. Exposure at low salinity drives molecular mechanisms of adaptation based on a decrease in the abundance of several cytoskeletal proteins, signalling and intracellular membrane trafficking pathway combined with a response towards the maintenance of transcription and translation. The exposure to propranolol combined with low salinity modulates the expression of structural proteins including cilia functions and decrease the expression membrane protein transporters. This study reinforces the environment concerns of the impact of low salinity in combination with anthropogenic pollutants and anticipate critical physiological conditions for the survival of the blue mussel in the northern areas.

  • 2.
    Fleenor, Courtney J.
    et al.
    Natl Jewish Hlth, CO 80206 USA; Univ Colorado, CO 80045 USA; Globeimmune Inc, CO USA.
    Arends, Tessa
    Univ Colorado, CO 80045 USA.
    Lei, Hong
    Natl Jewish Hlth, CO 80206 USA; Univ Colorado, CO 80045 USA.
    Åhsberg, Josefine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Okuyama, Kazuki
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kuruvilla, Jacob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rabe, Jennifer L.
    Univ Colorado, CO 80045 USA.
    Pandey, Ahwan
    Univ Colorado, CO USA; Univ Colorado, CO USA.
    Danhorn, Thomas
    Natl Jewish Hlth, CO USA.
    Straign, Desiree
    Natl Jewish Hlth, CO 80206 USA.
    Espinosa, Joaquin M.
    Univ Colorado, CO USA; Univ Colorado, CO USA.
    Warming, Soren
    Genentech Inc, CA 94080 USA.
    Pietras, Eric M.
    Univ Colorado, CO USA.
    Sigvardsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hagman, James R.
    Natl Jewish Hlth, CO 80206 USA; Univ Colorado, CO 80045 USA; Univ Colorado, CO 80045 USA.
    Zinc Finger Protein 521 Regulates Early Hematopoiesis through Cell-Extrinsic Mechanisms in the Bone Marrow Microenvironment2018In: Molecular and Cellular Biology, ISSN 0270-7306, E-ISSN 1098-5549, Vol. 38, no 17, article id UNSP e00603-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zinc finger protein 521 (ZFP521), a DNA-binding protein containing 30 Kruppel-like zinc fingers, has been implicated in the differentiation of multiple cell types, including hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) and B lymphocytes. Here, we report a novel role for ZFP521 in regulating the earliest stages of hematopoiesis and lymphoid cell development via a cell-extrinsic mechanism. Mice with inactivated Zfp521 genes (Zfp521(-/-)) possess reduced frequencies and numbers of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, common lymphoid progenitors, and B and T cell precursors. Notably, ZFP521 deficiency changes bone marrow microenvironment cytokine levels and gene expression within resident HSPC, consistent with a skewing of hematopoiesis away from lymphopoiesis. These results advance our understanding of ZFP521s role in normal hematopoiesis, justifying further research to assess its potential as a target for cancer therapies.

  • 3.
    Helander, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Montecchio, Meri
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pilstål, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Su, Yulong
    Department of Molecular and Medical Genetics, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA.
    Kuruvilla, Jacob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine and Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Malin
    Division of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Mohammed, Javed
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundström, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sears, Rosalie
    Department of Molecular and Medical Genetics, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA.
    Wallner, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sunnerhagen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pre-Anchoring of Pin1 to Unphosphorylated c-Myc in a Fuzzy Complex Regulates c-Myc Activity2015In: Structure, ISSN 0969-2126, E-ISSN 1878-4186, Vol. 23, no 12, p. 2267-2279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hierarchic phosphorylation and concomitant Pin1-mediated proline isomerization of the oncoprotein c-Myc controls its cellular stability and activity. However, the molecular basis for Pin1 recognition and catalysis of c-Myc and other multisite, disordered substrates in cell regulation and disease is unclear. By nuclear magnetic resonance, surface plasmon resonance, and molecular modeling, we show that Pin1 subdomains jointly pre-anchor unphosphorylated c-Myc1–88 in the Pin1 interdomain cleft in a disordered, or “fuzzy”, complex at the herein named Myc Box 0 (MB0) conserved region N-terminal to the highly conserved Myc Box I (MBI). Ser62 phosphorylation in MBI intensifies previously transient MBI-Pin1 interactions in c-Myc1–88 binding, and increasingly engages Pin1PPIase and its catalytic region with maintained MB0 interactions. In cellular assays, MB0 mutated c-Myc shows decreased Pin1 interaction, increased protein half-life, but lowered rates of Myc-driven transcription and cell proliferation. We propose that dynamic Pin1 recognition of MB0 contributes to the regulation of c-Myc activity in cells

  • 4.
    Irigoyen, Sonia
    et al.
    Texas A&M University.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    University of Gothenburg.
    Kuruvilla, Jacob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Spetea Wiklund, Cornelia
    University of Gothenburg.
    Versaw, Wayne K
    Texas A&M University.
    The Sink-Specific Plastidic Phosphate Transporter PHT4;2 Influences Starch Accumulation and Leaf Size in Arabidopsis2011In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 157, no 4, p. 1765-1777Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nonphotosynthetic plastids are important sites for the biosynthesis of starch, fatty acids, and amino acids. The uptake and subsequent use of cytosolic ATP to fuel these and other anabolic processes would lead to the accumulation of inorganic phosphate (Pi) if not balanced by a Pi export activity. However, the identity of the transporter(s) responsible for Pi export is unclear. The plastid-localized Pi transporter PHT4;2 of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is expressed in multiple sink organs but is nearly restricted to roots during vegetative growth. We identified and used pht4;2 null mutants to confirm that PHT4; 2 contributes to Pi transport in isolated root plastids. Starch accumulation was limited in pht4; 2 roots, which is consistent with the inhibition of starch synthesis by excess Pi as a result of a defect in Pi export. Reduced starch accumulation in leaves and altered expression patterns for starch synthesis genes and other plastid transporter genes suggest metabolic adaptation to the defect in roots. Moreover, pht4; 2 rosettes, but not roots, were significantly larger than those of the wild type, with 40% greater leaf area and twice the biomass when plants were grown with a short (8-h) photoperiod. Increased cell proliferation accounted for the larger leaf size and biomass, as no changes were detected in mature cell size, specific leaf area, or relative photosynthetic electron transport activity. These data suggest novel signaling between roots and leaves that contributes to the regulation of leaf size.

  • 5.
    Kuruvilla, Jacob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Proteomics as a multifaceted tool in medicine and environmental assessment2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Proteomics is evolving as a multi-faceted tool for addressing various biochemical and biomedical queries in the field of scientific research. This involves various stages, ranging from sample preparation to data analysis and biological interpretation. Sample preparation involves isolating proteins from the sample source, purifying and digesting them to initiate shotgun proteomics. Shotgun proteomics identifies proteins by bottom-up proteomic approaches where proteins are identified from the fragmentation spectra of their own peptides.

    Paper I: deals with the simplification of functional characterization for nanoparticles intended for use in biomedicine. Proteomics was constructive in differentiating and semi-quantifying the surface of protein corona. This could be beneficial in predicting the interactions between nanoparticles and a biological entity like the cell or a receptor protein and provide initial valuable information related to targeting, uptake and safety.

    Paper II: deals with understanding effects of TiO2 nanoparticles on endothelial cells. A combinatorial approach, involving transcriptomics and proteomics was used to identify aberrations in the permeability and integrity of endothelial cells and tissues. Our study also investigated the correlation of size and how they motivated a differential cellular response. In case of intravenous entry for nanoparticles in targeted drug delivery systems, endothelial cells are the first barrier encountered by these drug carriers. This evaluation involving endothelial cell response could be very instrumental during the designing of NP based drug delivery systems.

    Paper III: Pharmaceuticals and its metabolites could be very hazardous, especially if its disposal is not managed properly. Since water bodies are the ultimate sink, these chemicals could end up there, culminating in toxicity and other ‘mixture effects’ in combination with other factors. To evaluate the effects of the pharmaceutical, propranolol and climatic factors like low salinity conditions, a microcosm exposure was designed and shotgun proteomics helped understand its impact on mussel gills. In this study too, a combination of transcriptomics and proteomics unveiled molecular mechanisms altered in response to stressors, both individually and in combination.

    Paper IV: An interplay of various factors like EBF1 and PAX5 determines B-cell lineage and commitment. This might have been materialized by direct and transient proteinprotein interactions. A unique method called BioID helped screen relevant interactions in living cells by the application of a promiscuous biotin ligase enzyme capable of tagging proteins through biotinylation based on a proximity radius. Biotinylation of endogenous proteins enabled their selective isolation by exploiting the high affinity of biotin and streptavidin on streptavidin coated agarose beads, leading to their identification by mass spectrometry. The biotinylated proteins were potential candidate interactors of EBF1 and PAX5, which were later confirmed by sequencing techniques like ChIP-Seq, ATAC seq, and visualization techniques like proximity ligation assay (PLA).

    List of papers
    1. Surface proteomics on nanoparticles, a step to simplify the rapid prototyping of nanoparticles
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surface proteomics on nanoparticles, a step to simplify the rapid prototyping of nanoparticles
    2017 (English)In: Nanoscale Horizons, ISSN 2055-6756, no 1, p. 55-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Engineered nanoparticles for biomedical applications requireincreasing effectiveness in targeting specific cells while preservingnon-target cell’s safety. We developed a surface proteomicsmethod for a rapid and systematic analysis of the interphasebetween the nanoparticle protein corona and the targeting cellsthat could implement the rapid prototyping of nanomedicines.Native nanoparticles entering in a protein-rich liquid mediaquickly form a macromolecular structure called protein corona.This protein structure defines the physical interaction betweennanoparticles and target cells. The surface proteins compose thefirst line of interaction between this macromolecular structureand the cell surface of a target cell. We demonstrated that SUSTU(SUrface proteomics, Safety, Targeting, Uptake) provides aqualitative and quantitative analysis from the protein coronasurface. With SUSTU, the spatial dynamics of the protein coronasurface can be studied. Data from SUSTU would ascertain thenanoparticle functionalized groups exposed at destiny that couldcircumvent preliminary in vitro experiments. Therefore thismethod could implement the analysis of nanoparticle targetingand uptake capability and could be integrated into a rapidprototyping strategy which is a major challenge in nanomaterialscience. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifierPXD004636.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Royal Society of Chemistry, 2017
    Keywords
    nanoparticle, protein corona, mass spectrometry, surface proteomics, targeting, rapid prototyping, nanomedicine
    National Category
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-132406 (URN)10.1039/c6nh00162a (DOI)000391450000006 ()
    Projects
    Nanoimpact; nanoparticles and rapid prototyping
    Available from: 2016-11-09 Created: 2016-11-09 Last updated: 2018-04-17Bibliographically approved
    2. Shotgun proteomics to unravel marine mussel (Mytilus edulis) response to long-term exposure to low salinity and propranolol in a Baltic Sea microcosm
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shotgun proteomics to unravel marine mussel (Mytilus edulis) response to long-term exposure to low salinity and propranolol in a Baltic Sea microcosm
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Proteomics, ISSN 1874-3919, E-ISSN 1876-7737, Vol. 137, p. 97-106Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Pharmaceuticals, among them the β-adrenoreceptor blocker propranolol, are an important group of environmental contaminants reported in European waters. Laboratory exposure to pharmaceuticals on marine species has been performed without considering the input of the ecosystem flow. To unravel the ecosystem response to long-term exposure to propranolol we have performed long-term exposure to propranolol and low salinity in microcosms. We applied shotgun proteomic analysis to gills of Mytilus edulis from those Baltic Sea microcosms and identified 2071 proteins with a proteogenomic strategy. The proteome profiling patterns from the 587 highly reproductive proteins among groups define salinity as a key factor in the mussel´s response to propranolol. Exposure at low salinity drives molecular mechanisms of adaptation based on a decrease in the abundance of several cytoskeletal proteins, signalling and intracellular membrane trafficking pathway combined with a response towards the maintenance of transcription and translation. The exposure to propranolol combined with low salinity modulates the expression of structural proteins including cilia functions and decrease the expression membrane protein transporters. This study reinforces the environment concerns of the impact of low salinity in combination with anthropogenic pollutants and anticipate critical physiological conditions for the survival of the blue mussel in the northern areas.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2016
    Keywords
    Mytilus edulis, shotgun proteomics, propranolol, low salinity, environmental monitoring, climate change
    National Category
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124213 (URN)10.1016/j.jprot.2016.01.010 (DOI)000374368800010 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council
    Note

    Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council-Natural Science; VR-NT; Carl Trygger Foundation; Oscar and Lilli Lamms Minne Foundation; Angpanneforening Research Foundation; Magnus Bergsvall Foundation; IKERBASQUE; Basque Foundation for Science; VINNOVA; County Council of Oste

    Available from: 2016-01-22 Created: 2016-01-22 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
  • 6.
    Kuruvilla, Jacob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bayat, Narges
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Basque Country, Spain.
    Proteomic Analysis of Endothelial Cells Exposed to Ultrasmall Nanoparticles Reveals Disruption in Paracellular and Transcellular Transport2019In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 19, no 5, article id 1800228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The large interactive surfaces of nanoparticles (NPs) increase the opportunities to develop NPs for vascular targeting. Proteomic analysis of endothelial cells exposed to NPs reveals the cellular response and turns the focus into the impairment of the endothelial permeability. Here, quantitative proteomics and transcriptome sequencing are combined to evaluate the effects of exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of TiO2-USNPs and TiO2-NPs on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Endothelial cells react to preserve the semi-permeable properties that are essential for vascular tissue fluid homeostasis, vascular development, and angiogenesis. The main impact of the exposure was alteration of functional complexes involved in cell adhesion, vesicular transport, and cytoskeletal structure. Those are the core cellular structures that are linked to the permeability and the integrity of the endothelial tissue. Moreover, the extracellular proteins uptake along wih the NPs into the endothelial cells escape the lysosomal degradation pathway. These findings improve the understanding of the interaction of NPs with endothelial cell. The effects of the studied NPs modulating cell-cell adhesion and vesicular transport can help to evaluate the distribution of NPs via intravenous administration.

  • 7.
    Kuruvilla, Jacob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Farinha, Ana Paula
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bayat, Narges
    Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Arrhenius laboratories, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentristy, University of the Basque Country, Leioa, Spain.
    Surface proteomics on nanoparticles, a step to simplify the rapid prototyping of nanoparticles2017In: Nanoscale Horizons, ISSN 2055-6756, no 1, p. 55-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineered nanoparticles for biomedical applications requireincreasing effectiveness in targeting specific cells while preservingnon-target cell’s safety. We developed a surface proteomicsmethod for a rapid and systematic analysis of the interphasebetween the nanoparticle protein corona and the targeting cellsthat could implement the rapid prototyping of nanomedicines.Native nanoparticles entering in a protein-rich liquid mediaquickly form a macromolecular structure called protein corona.This protein structure defines the physical interaction betweennanoparticles and target cells. The surface proteins compose thefirst line of interaction between this macromolecular structureand the cell surface of a target cell. We demonstrated that SUSTU(SUrface proteomics, Safety, Targeting, Uptake) provides aqualitative and quantitative analysis from the protein coronasurface. With SUSTU, the spatial dynamics of the protein coronasurface can be studied. Data from SUSTU would ascertain thenanoparticle functionalized groups exposed at destiny that couldcircumvent preliminary in vitro experiments. Therefore thismethod could implement the analysis of nanoparticle targetingand uptake capability and could be integrated into a rapidprototyping strategy which is a major challenge in nanomaterialscience. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifierPXD004636.

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