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  • 1.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Department of Radiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Maret, Eva
    Department of Radiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping / Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Brudin, Lars
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar.
    Starck, Sven-Åke
    Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University / Department of Oncology, Hospital Physics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    An echo-planar imaging sequence is superior to a steady-state free precession sequence for visual as well as quantitative assessment of cardiac magnetic resonance stress perfusion2017In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 37, no 1, 52-61 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background To assess myocardial perfusion, steady-state free precession cardiac magnetic resonance (SSFP, CMR) was compared with gradient-echo–echo-planar imaging (GRE-EPI) using myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) as reference. Methods Cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion was recorded in 30 patients with SSFP and in another 30 patients with GRE-EPI. Timing and extent of inflow delay to the myocardium was visually assessed. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were calculated. Myocardial scar was visualized with a phase-sensitive inversion recovery sequence (PSIR). All scar positive segments were considered pathologic. In MPS, stress and rest images were used as in clinical reporting. The CMR contrast wash-in slope was calculated and compared with the stress score from the MPS examination. CMR scar, CMR perfusion and MPS were assessed separately by one expert for each method who was blinded to other aspects of the study. Results Visual assessment of CMR had a sensitivity for the detection of an abnormal MPS at 78% (SSFP) versus 91% (GRE-EPI) and a specificity of 58% (SSFP) versus 84% (GRE-EPI). Kappa statistics for SSFP and MPS was 0·29, for GRE-EPI and MPS 0·72. The ANOVA of CMR perfusion slopes for all segments versus MPS score (four levels based on MPS) had correlation r = 0·64 (SSFP) and r = 0·96 (GRE-EPI). SNR was for normal segments 35·63 ± 11·80 (SSFP) and 17·98 ± 8·31 (GRE-EPI), while CNR was 28·79 ± 10·43 (SSFP) and 13·06 ± 7·61 (GRE-EPI). Conclusion GRE-EPI displayed higher agreement with the MPS results than SSFP despite significantly lower signal intensity, SNR and CNR.

  • 2.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Maret, Eva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Development and validation of a questionnaire evaluating patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging: the Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire (MRI-AQ)2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 6, 1368-1380 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To develop and validate a new instrument measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations, Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire. Background. Questionnaires measuring patients anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations have been the same as used in a wide range of conditions. To learn about patients experience during examination and to evaluate interventions, a specific questionnaire measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging is needed. Design. Psychometric cross-sectional study with test-retest design. Methods. A new questionnaire, Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire, was designed from patient expressions of anxiety in Magnetic Resonance Imaging-scanners. The sample was recruited between October 2012-October 2014. Factor structure was evaluated with exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency with Cronbachs alpha. Criterion-related validity, known-group validity and test-retest was calculated. Results. Patients referred for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of either the spine or the heart, were invited to participate. The development and validation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire resulted in 15 items consisting of two factors. Cronbachs alpha was found to be high. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire correlated higher with instruments measuring anxiety than with depression scales. Known-group validity demonstrated a higher level of anxiety for patients undergoing Magnetic Resonance Imaging scan of the heart than for those examining the spine. Test-retest reliability demonstrated acceptable level for the scale. Conclusion. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire bridges a gap among existing questionnaires, making it a simple and useful tool for measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations.

  • 3.
    Almeida, Nuno
    et al.
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium; GE Vingmed Ultrasound AS, Norway.
    Papachristidis, Alexandros
    Kings Coll Hospital London, England.
    Pearson, Peter
    Kings Coll Hospital London, England.
    Imre Sarvari, Sebastian
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Edvardsen, Thor
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Monaghan, Mark
    Kings Coll Hospital London, England.
    Gerard, Olivier
    GE Vingmed Ultrasound AS, Norway.
    Samset, Eigil
    GE Vingmed Ultrasound AS, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Dhooge, Jan
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Left atrial volumetric assessment using a novel automated framework for 3D echocardiography: a multi-centre analysis2017In: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2404, E-ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 18, no 9, 1008-1015 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims This study aims at validating a software tool for automated segmentation and quantification of the left atrium (LA) from 3D echocardiography. Methods and results The LA segmentation tool uses a dual-chamber model of the left side of the heart to automatically detect and track the atrio-ventricular plane and the LA endocardium in transthoracic 3D echocardiography. The tool was tested in a dataset of 121 ultrasound images from patients with several cardiovascular pathologies (in a multi-centre setting), and the resulting volumes were compared with those assessed manually by experts in a blinded analysis using conventional contouring. Bland-Altman analysis showed good agreement between the automated method and the manual references, with differences (mean +/- 1.96 SD) of 0.5 +/- 5.7 mL for LA minimum volume and -1.6 +/- 9.7 mL for LA maximum volume (comparable to the inter-observer variability of manual tracings). The automated tool required no user interaction in 93% of the recordings, while 4% required a single click and only 2% required contour adjustments, reducing considerably the amount of time and effort required for LA volumetric analysis. Conclusion The automated tool was validated in a multi-centre setting, providing quantification of the LA volume over the cardiac cycle with minimal user interaction. The results of the automated analysis were in agreement with those estimated manually by experts. This study shows that such approach has clinical utility for the assessment of the LA morphology and function, automating and facilitating the time-consuming task of analysing 3D echocardiographic recordings.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Charlotta
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Physiology in Norrköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lindström, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Phase-contrast MRI volume flow - a comparison of breath held and navigator based acquisitions2016In: BMC Medical Imaging, ISSN 1471-2342, E-ISSN 1471-2342, Vol. 16, no 26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) 2D phase-contrast flow measurement has been regarded as the gold standard in blood flow measurements and can be performed with free breathing or breath held techniques. We hypothesized that the accuracy of flow measurements obtained with segmented phase-contrast during breath holding, and in particular higher number of k-space segments, would be non-inferior compared to navigator phase-contrast. Volumes obtained from anatomic segmentation of cine MRI and Doppler echocardiography were used for additional reference. Methods: Forty patients, five women and 35 men, mean age 65 years (range 53-80), were randomly selected and consented to the study. All underwent EKG-gated cardiac MRI including breath hold cine, navigator based free-breathing phase-contrast MRI and breath hold phase-contrast MRI using k-space segmentation factors 3 and 5, as well as transthoracic echocardiography within 2 days. Results: In navigator based free-breathing phase-contrast flow, mean stroke volume and cardiac output were 79.7 +/- 17.1 ml and 5071 +/- 1192 ml/min, respectively. The duration of the acquisition was 50 +/- 6 s. With k-space segmentation factor 3, the corresponding values were 77.7 ml +/- 17.5 ml and 4979 +/- 1211 ml/min (p = 0.15 vs navigator). The duration of the breath hold was 17 +/- 2 s. K-space segmentation factor 5 gave mean stroke volume 77.9 +/- 16.4 ml, cardiac output 5142 +/- 1197 ml/min (p = 0.33 vs navigator), and breath hold time 11 +/- 1 s. Anatomical segmentation of cine gave mean stroke volume and cardiac output 91.2 +/- 20.8 ml and 5963 +/- 1452 ml/min, respectively. Echocardiography was reliable in 20 of the 40 patients. The mean diameter of the left ventricular outflow tract was 20.7 +/- 1.5 mm, stroke volume 78.3 ml +/- 15.2 ml and cardiac output 5164 +/- 1249 ml/min. Conclusions: In forty consecutive patients with coronary heart disease, breath holding and segmented k-space sampling techniques for phase-contrast flow produced stroke volumes and cardiac outputs similar to those obtained with free-breathing navigator based phase-contrast MRI, using less time. The values obtained agreed fairly well with Doppler echocardiography while there was a larger difference when compared with anatomical volume determinations using SSFP (steady state free precession) cine MRI.

  • 5.
    Aneq Åström, Meriam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Evaluation of Right and Left Ventricular Function Using Speckle Tracking Echocardiography in Patients with Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy and Their First Degree RelativesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and aim: The identification of right ventricular abnormalities in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) in early stages is still difficult. The aim of this study was to investigate if longitudinal strain based on speckle tracking can detect subtle right (RV) or left ventricular (LV) dysfunction as an early sign of ARVC.

    Methods and results: Seventeen male patients, fulfilling Task force criteria for ARVC, 49 (32-70) years old, nineteen male first degree relatives 29 (19-73) y.o. and twenty-two healthy male volunteers 36 (24-66) y.o participated in the study. Twelve-lead and signal-averaged electrocardiograms were recorded. All subjects underwent echocardiography. LV and RV diameters, peak systolic velocity from tissue Doppler and longitudinal strain based on speckle tracking were measured from the basal and mid segments in both ventricles. RV longitudinal strain measurement was successful in first degree relatives and controls (95 resp. 86%) but less feasible in patients (59%). Results were not systematically different between first degree relatives and controls. Using discriminant analysis, we then developed an index based on echocardiographic parameters. All normal controls had an index <l while patients with abnormal ventricles had an index between 1-4. Some of the first degree relatives deviated from the normal pattern.

    Conclusion: Longitudinal strain of LV and RV segments was significantly lower in patients than in relatives and controls. An index was developed incorporating dimensional and functional echocardiographic parameters. In combination with genetic testing this index might help to detect early phenotype expression in mutation carriers.

  • 6.
    Aneq Åström, Meriam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Fluur, Christina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Rehnberg, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Novel plakophilin2 mutation. Three generation family with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy2012In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, Vol. 46, no 2, 72-75 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The autosomal dominant form of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC)has been linked to mutations in desmosomal proteins. Different studies have shown that amutation in plakophilin-2 (PKP 2) is a frequent genetic cause for ARVC. We describe a newmutation in the PKP2 gene, the genotype-phenotype variation in this mutation and its clinicalconsequences.

    Design: Individuals in a three generation family were investigated after the sudden cardiac death of a young male. Clinical evaluation, electrocardiography, echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, endomyocardial biopsy and genetic testing were performed.

    Results: A novel heterozygote mutation, a c.368G>A transition, located in exon 3 of the PKP2 gene was found (p.Trp123X). The phenotype was characterized by arrhythmia at an early age in some individuals, with mild abnormalities on imaging. However a relative carrying this mutation, with positive findings on endomyocardial biopsy had an otherwise normal phenotype, for 16 years, whereas a relative fulfilling the modified Task Force Criteria for ARVC turned out to be a non-carrier.

    Conclusions: This shows the variable penetrance and phenotypic expression in ARVC and highlights the need of genetic testing as well as a thorough phenotype examination as a part of the investigations in ARVC pedigrees.

  • 7.
    Aneq Åström, Meriam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Determination of right ventricular volume and function using multiple axially rotated MRI slices2011In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 31, no 3, 233-239 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pandgt;Background: The conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method for right ventricular (RV) volume and motion, using short-axis (SA) orientation, is limited by RV anatomy and shape. We suggest an orientation based on six slices rotated around the long axis of the RV, rotated long axis (RLA). Materials and methods: Three phantoms were investigated in SA and RLA using cine balanced steady-state free precession MRI. Volumes were calculated based on segmentation and checked against true volumes. In 23 healthy male volunteers, we used six long-axis planes from the middle of the tricuspid valve to the RV apex, rotated in 30 degrees increments. For comparison, short-axis slices were acquired. Imaging parameters were identical in both acquisitions. Results: Right ventricular end-diastolic (EDV), end-systolic (ESV) and stroke volumes (SV) determined in the RLA 179 center dot 1 +/- 29 center dot 3; 80 center dot 1 +/- 17 center dot 1; 99 center dot 3 +/- 16 center dot 9 ml and in the SA were 174 center dot 0 +/- 21 center dot 1; 78 center dot 8 +/- 13 center dot 6; 95 center dot 3 +/- 14 center dot 5 ml with P-values for the difference from 0 center dot 17 to 0 center dot 64 (ns). Interobserver variability ranged between 3 center dot 2% and 6 center dot 6% and intraobserver variability between 2 center dot 8% and 6 center dot 8%. In SA views, consensus for the definition of the basal slice was necessary in 39% of the volunteers for whom the average volume change was 20% in ESV and 10% in EDV. Conclusions: The RLA method results in better visualization and definition of the RV inflow, outflow and apex. Accurate measurement of RV volumes for diagnosis and follow-up of cardiac diseases are enhanced by the RLA orientation, even though additional acquisition time is required.

  • 8.
    Bergström, G
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg / Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Berglund, G
    Lund University.
    Blomberg, A
    Umeå University.
    Brandberg, J
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital / University of Gothenburg.
    Engström, G
    Lund University.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Eriksson, M
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    de Faire, U
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm / Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Flinck, A
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Stockholm / University of Gothenburg.
    Hansson, M G
    Uppsala University.
    Hedblad, B
    Lund University.
    Hjelmgren, O
    University of Gothenburg / Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Janson, C
    Uppsala University.
    Jernberg, T
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm / Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Johnsson, Å
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg / University of Gothenburg.
    Johansson, L
    Unit of Radiology.
    Lind, L
    Uppsala University.
    Löfdahl, C-G
    Lund University / Lund University Hospital.
    Melander, O
    Lund University / Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Persson, M
    Lund University / Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Sandström, A
    Umeå University.
    Schmidt, C
    University of Gothenburg.
    Söderberg, S
    Umeå University.
    Sundström, J
    Uppsala University / Uppsala Clinical Resarch Centre.
    Toren, K
    University of Gothenburg.
    Waldenström, A
    Umeå University Hospital.
    Wedel, H
    Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg.
    Vikgren, J
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg / University of Gothenburg.
    Fagerberg, B
    University of Gothenburg.
    Rosengren, A
    University of Gothenburg.
    The Swedish CArdioPulmonary BioImage Study: objectives and design2015In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 278, no 6, 645-659 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiopulmonary diseases are major causes of death worldwide, but currently recommended strategies for diagnosis and prevention may be outdated because of recent changes in risk factor patterns. The Swedish CArdioPulmonarybioImage Study (SCAPIS) combines the use of new imaging technologies, advances in large-scale 'omics' and epidemiological analyses to extensively characterize a Swedish cohort of 30 000 men and women aged between 50 and 64 years. The information obtained will be used to improve risk prediction of cardiopulmonary diseases and optimize the ability to study disease mechanisms. A comprehensive pilot study in 1111 individuals, which was completed in 2012, demonstrated the feasibility and financial and ethical consequences of SCAPIS. Recruitment to the national, multicentre study has recently started.

  • 9.
    Blomstrand, P
    et al.
    Klin fys Jönköping.
    Björklund, P-G
    Klin fys Jönköping.
    Karlsson, J-K
    Med klin Jönköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Telemedicin möjliggör bättre omhändertagande av patienter2002In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 99, 1704-1707 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Blomstrand, Peter
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Engvall, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Maret, Eva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Maret-Ouda, John
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Left ventricular diastolic function, assessed by echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging, is a strong predictor of cardiovascular events, superior to global left ventricular longitudinal strain, in patients with type 2 diabetes.2015In: European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 16, no 9, 1000-1007 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim of the study was to determine whether left ventricular systolic function, in terms of global left ventricular longitudinal strain (GLS), and diastolic function, expressed as the ratio between early diastolic transmitral flow and mitral annular motion velocities (E/e'), can predict cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: We prospectively investigated 406 consecutive patients, aged 55-65 years, with diabetes mellitus, who participated in the CARDIPP study. Echocardiography, pulse pressure (pp), and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were analysed. Twelve cases of myocardial infarction and seven cases of stroke were identified during the follow-up period of 67 ± 17 months. Univariate Cox regression analysis showed that E/e' was a strong predictor of cardiovascular events (hazards ratio 1.12; 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.18, P < 0.001). E/e' was prospectively associated with cardiovascular events independent of age, sex, GLS, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), pp, and HbA1c in multivariate analysis. Receiver operating characteristic curves showed that E/e' and HbA1c were the strongest predictors for cardiovascular events, both having an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.71 followed by LVEF with an AUC of 0.65 and GLS of 0.61. In a Kaplan-Meyer analysis, the cumulative probability of an event during the follow-up period was 8.6% for patients with an E/e' ratio >15 compared with 2.6% for patients with E/e' ≤15, P = 0.011.

    CONCLUSION: In middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes, E/e' is a strong predictor of myocardial infarction and stroke, comparable with HbA1c and superior to GLS and LVEF.

  • 11.
    Blomstrand, Peter
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jököping, Sweden.
    Maret, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ohlsson, Jan
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Scheike, Morten
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Säfström, Kåge
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pulsed tissue Doppler imaging for the detection of myocardial ischaemia, a comparison with myocardial perfusion SPECT2004In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, Vol. 24, no 5, 289-295 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to compare the diagnostic ability of pulsed tissue Doppler and myocardial perfusion Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) in patients with a history of unstable coronary artery disease, CAD, 26 patients, 22 men and four women, age 47-76 years, were investigated in a prospective study, 5-10 day after an episode of unstable angina. Tissue Doppler and two-dimensional echocardiography were performed during dobutamine stress testing and myocardial scintigraphy after bicycle exercise and at rest. Patients with a normal SPECT had higher peak systolic velocity during dobutamine infusion, 18.9 +/- 4.1 cm s(-1), than patients with ischaemia, 12.2 +/- 3.8 cm s(-1) (P<0.001) or scar, 8.8 +/- 3.0 cm s(-1) (P<0.01). In a territorial analysis the difference in peak systolic velocity between areas with a normal and abnormal SPECT was less apparent. Failure to achieve >/=13 cm s(-1) in mean-peak systolic velocity was the most accurate criterion for detection of significant CAD on SPECT. We conclude that pulsed tissue Doppler can be used for objective quantification of left ventricular wall motion during dobutamine stress testing and for identification of patients with CAD on SPECT but not for identification of regional ischaemia.

  • 12.
    Bolger, Ann F
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Heiberg, Einar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Carlsson, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Johansson, P
    Markenroth, K
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Arheden, H
    Tredimensionellt MR-blodflöde och diastolisk kinetisk energi kvantiferat med magnetisk resonanstomografi efter kirurgisk vänsterkammarrekonstruktion. Ny teknik för utvärdering av kammarfunktion.2007In: Riksstämman,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Bolger, Ann F
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Heiberg, Einar
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Transit of blood flow through thehuman left ventricle mapped by cardiovascular magnetic resonance2007In: Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, ISSN 1097-6647, E-ISSN 1532-429X, Vol. 9, no 5, 741-747 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The transit of blood through the beating heart is a basic aspect of cardiovascular physiology which remains incompletely studied. Quantification of the components of multidirectional flow in the normal left ventricle (LV) is lacking, making it difficult to put the changes observed with LV dysfunction and cardiac surgery into context.

    METHODS:

    Three dimensional, three directional, time resolved magnetic resonance phase-contrast velocity mapping was performed at 1.5 Tesla in 17 normal subjects, 6 female, aged 44+/-14 years (mean+/-SD). We visualized and measured the relative volumes of LV flow components and the diastolic changes in inflowing kinetic energy (KE). Of total diastolic inflow volume, 44+/-11% followed a direct, albeit curved route to systolic ejection (videos 1 and 2), in contrast to 11% in a subject with mildly dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), who was included for preliminary comparison (video 3). In normals, 16+/-8% of the KE of inflow was conserved to the end of diastole, compared with 5% in the DCM patient. Blood following the direct route lost or transferred less of its KE during diastole than blood that was retained until the next beat (1.6+/-1.0 millijoules vs 8.2+/-1.9 millijoules, p<0.05); whereas, in the DCM patient, the reduction in KE of retained inflow was 18-fold greater than that of the blood tracing the direct route.

    CONCLUSION:

    Multidimensional flow mapping can measure the paths, compartmentalization and kinetic energy changes of blood flowing into the LV, demonstrating differences of KE loss between compartments, and potentially between the flows in normal and dilated left ventricles.

  • 14.
    Carhall, C
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Jonatan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Bolger, A
    University of California San Francisco.
    Pre-systolic preparation for left ventricular ejection is impaired in heart failure in EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, vol 31, issue , pp 726-7272010In: EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, Oxford University Press , 2010, Vol. 31, 726-727 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 15.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Vascular surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, T
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Complications Carotid intima-media thickness and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I ratio in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes2009In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, Vol. 26, no 4, 384-390 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To explore the association between carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and the apolipoprotein B (apoB)/apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) ratio compared with conventional lipids in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes. METHODS: We analysed data from 247 patients with Type 2 diabetes, aged 55-66 years, in the Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes-a Prospective study in Primary care (CARDIPP-1) study. Primary care nurses measured blood pressure and anthropometric characteristics. Blood samples were taken for laboratory analyses. The carotid IMT was determined by ultrasonography at the University Hospital in Linköping and at the County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden. RESULTS: The ApoB/apoA-I ratio (r = 0.207, P = 0.001), apoB (r = 0.166, P = 0.009) and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-c) (r = 0.129, P = 0.046) correlated with IMT. Conventional lipids, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) and systolic blood pressure were not significantly correlated to IMT. A stepwise logistic regression analysis was conducted with IMT as the dependent variable and the apoB/apoA-I ratio, HbA(1c), hsCRP, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), total cholesterol, non-HDL-c and treatment with statins as independent variables. Following adjustment for age and gender, only the apoB/apoA-I ratio remained significantly associated with IMT (odds ratio 4.3, 95% confidence intervals 1.7-10.8, P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that there was a significant association between the apoB/apoA-I ratio and IMT in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes. The association was independent of conventional lipids, hsCRP, glycaemic control and use of statins.

  • 16.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Carotid intima-media thickness and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I ratio in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes2009In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 26, no 4, 384-390 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To explore the association between carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and the apolipoprotein B (apoB)/apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) ratio compared with conventional lipids in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes.

    Methods We analysed data from 247 patients with Type 2 diabetes, aged 55–66 years, in the Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes—a Prospective study in Primary care (CARDIPP-1) study. Primary care nurses measured blood pressure and anthropometric characteristics. Blood samples were taken for laboratory analyses. The carotid IMT was determined by ultrasonography at the University Hospital in Linköping and at the County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.

    Results The ApoB/apoA-I ratio (r = 0.207, P = 0.001), apoB (r = 0.166, P = 0.009) and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-c) (r = 0.129, P = 0.046) correlated with IMT. Conventional lipids, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and systolic blood pressure were not significantly correlated to IMT. A stepwise logistic regression analysis was conducted with IMT as the dependent variable and the apoB/apoA-I ratio, HbA1c, hsCRP, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), total cholesterol, non-HDL-c and treatment with statins as independent variables. Following adjustment for age and gender, only the apoB/apoA-I ratio remained significantly associated with IMT (odds ratio 4.3, 95% confidence intervals 1.7–10.8, P = 0.002).

    Conclusions We conclude that there was a significant association between the apoB/apoA-I ratio and IMT in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes. The association was independent of conventional lipids, hsCRP, glycaemic control and use of statins.

  • 17.
    Davidsson, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Agnetha
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Assessment of image quality for SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging with regard to reconstruction algorithms using visual grading regression.2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Davidsson, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Olsson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Agnetha
    Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Influence of reconstruction algorithms on image quality in SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging2017In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 37, no 6, 655-662 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: We investigated if image- and diagnostic quality in SPECT MPI could be maintained despite a reduced acquisition time adding Depth Dependent Resolution Recovery (DDRR) for image reconstruction. Images were compared with filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction using Ordered Subsets Expectation Maximization with (IRAC) and without (IRNC) attenuation correction (AC).

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Stress- and rest imaging for 15 min was performed on 21 subjects with a dual head gamma camera (Infinia Hawkeye; GE Healthcare), ECG-gating with 8 frames/cardiac cycle and a low-dose CT-scan. A 9 min acquisition was generated using five instead of eight gated frames and was reconstructed with DDRR, with (IRACRR) and without AC (IRNCRR) as well as with FBP. Three experienced nuclear medicine specialists visually assessed anonymized images according to eight criteria on a four point scale, three related to image quality and five to diagnostic confidence. Statistical analysis was performed using Visual Grading Regression (VGR).

    RESULTS: Observer confidence in statements on image quality was highest for the images that were reconstructed using DDRR (P<0·01 compared to FBP). Iterative reconstruction without DDRR was not superior to FBP. Interobserver variability was significant for statements on image quality (P<0·05) but lower in the diagnostic statements on ischemia and scar. The confidence in assessing ischemia and scar was not different between the reconstruction techniques (P = n.s.).

    CONCLUSION: SPECT MPI collected in 9 min, reconstructed with DDRR and AC, produced better image quality than the standard procedure. The observers expressed the highest diagnostic confidence in the DDRR reconstruction.

  • 19.
    Davidsson, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Olsson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Holmberg, Bengt
    Gustafsson, Agnetha
    Karolinska University.
    Left ventricle ejection fraction with gated myocardial perfusion SPECT: a comparison between a conventional scintillation detector gamma camera and cadmium-zinc-telluride dectector camera2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Davidsson, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Olsson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Norberg, Pernilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Myokardscintigrafi med ny hjärtkamera (D-SPECT): Hur mycket kan vi minska strålbelastningen till patienten utan att försämra diagnostisk bildkvalité?2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    De Geer, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Gjerde, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Physiology in Kalmar, Linköping University, County Council of Kalmar, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Olsson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Large variation in blood flow between left ventricular segments, as detected by adenosine stress dynamic CT perfusion.2015In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 35, no 4, 291-300 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Dynamic cardiac CT perfusion (CTP) is based on repeated imaging during the first-pass contrast agent inflow. It is a relatively new method that still needs validation.

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the variation in adenosine stress dynamic CTP blood flow as compared to (99m) Tc SPECT. Secondarily, to compare manual and automatic segmentation.

    METHODS: Seventeen patients with manifest coronary artery disease were included. Nine were excluded from evaluation for various reasons. All patients were examined with dynamic stress CTP and stress/rest SPECT. CTP blood flow was compared with SPECT on a per segment basis. Results for manual and automated AHA segmentation were compared.

    RESULTS: CTP showed a positive correlation with SPECT, with correlation coefficients of 0·38 and 0·41 for manual and automatic segmentation, respectively (P<0·0001). There was no significant difference between the correlation coefficients of the manual and automated segmentation procedures (P = 0·75). The average per individual global CTP blood flow value for normal segments varied by a factor of 1·9 (manual and automatic segmentation). For the whole patient group, the CTP blood flow value in normal segments varied by a factor of 2·9/2·7 (manual/automatic segmentation). Within each patient, the average per segment blood flow in normal segments varied by a factor of 1·3-2·0/1·2-2·1 (manual/automatic segmentation).

    CONCLUSION: A positive but rather weak correlation was found between CTP and (99m) Tc SPECT. Large variations in CTP blood flow suggest that a cut-off value for stress myocardial blood flow is inadequate to detect ischaemic segments. Dynamic CTP is hampered by a limited coverage.

  • 22.
    De Geer, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Sandstedt, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Björkholm, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Software-based on-site estimation of fractional flow reserve using standard coronary CT angiography data.2016In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 57, no 10, 1186-1192 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The significance of a coronary stenosis can be determined by measuring the fractional flow reserve (FFR) during invasive coronary angiography. Recently, methods have been developed which claim to be able to estimate FFR using image data from standard coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) exams.

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the accuracy of non-invasively computed fractional flow reserve (cFFR) from CCTA.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 23 vessels in 21 patients who had undergone both CCTA and invasive angiography with FFR measurement were evaluated using a cFFR software prototype. The cFFR results were compared to the invasively obtained FFR values. Correlation was calculated using Spearman's rank correlation, and agreement using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value for significant stenosis (defined as both FFR ≤0.80 and FFR ≤0.75) were calculated.

    RESULTS: The mean cFFR value for the whole group was 0.81 and the corresponding mean invFFR value was 0.84. The cFFR sensitivity for significant stenosis (FFR ≤0.80/0.75) on a per-lesion basis was 0.83/0.80, specificity was 0.76/0.89, and accuracy 0.78/0.87. The positive predictive value was 0.56/0.67 and the negative predictive value was 0.93/0.94. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient was ρ = 0.77 (P < 0.001) and ICC = 0.73 (P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: This particular CCTA-based cFFR software prototype allows for a rapid, non-invasive on-site evaluation of cFFR. The results are encouraging and cFFR may in the future be of help in the triage to invasive coronary angiography.

  • 23.
    de Geer, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Oscarsson Tibblin, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Strain echocardiography in septic shock - a comparison with systolic and diastolic function parameters, cardiac biomarkers and outcome2015In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 19, no 1, 122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Myocardial dysfunction is a well-known complication in septic shock but its characteristics and frequency remains elusive. Here, we evaluate global longitudinal peak strain (GLPS) of the left ventricle as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in septic shock.

    METHODS: Fifty adult patients with septic shock admitted to a general intensive care unit were included. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed on the first day, and repeated during and after ICU stay. Laboratory and clinical data and data on outcome were collected daily from admission and up to 7 days, shorter in cases of death or ICU discharge. The correlation of GLPS to left ventricular systolic and diastolic function parameters, cardiac biomarkers and clinical data were compared using Spearman's correlation test and linear regression analysis, and the ability of GLPS to predict outcome was evaluated using a logistic regression model.

    RESULTS: On the day of admission, there was a strong correlation and co-linearity of GLPS to left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), mitral annular motion velocity (é) and to amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) (Spearman's ρ -0.70, -0.53 and 0.54, and R(2) 0.49, 0.20 and 0.24, respectively). In LVEF and NT-proBNP there was a significant improvement during the study period (analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures, p = 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively), but not in GLPS, which remained unchanged over time (p = 0.10). GLPS did not correlate to the improvement in clinical characteristics over time, did not differ significantly between survivors and non-survivors (-17.4 (-20.5-(-13.7)) vs. -14.7 (-19.0 - (-10.6)), p = 0.11), and could not predict mortality.

    CONCLUSIONS: GLPS is frequently reduced in septic shock patients, alone or in combination with reduced LVEF and/or é. It correlates with LVEF, é and NT-proBNP, and remains affected over time. GLPS may provide further understanding on the character of myocardial dysfunction in septic shock.

  • 24.
    de Geer, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Oscarsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Variability in echocardiographic measurements of left ventricular function in septic shock patients2015In: Cardiovascular Ultrasound, ISSN 1476-7120, E-ISSN 1476-7120, Vol. 13, no 1, 19- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Echocardiography is increasingly used for haemodynamic evaluation and titration of therapy in intensive care, warranting reliable and reproducible measurements. The aim of this study was to evaluate the observer dependence of echocardiographic findings of left ventricular (LV) diastolic and systolic dysfunction in patients with septic shock.

    METHODS: Echocardiograms performed in 47 adult patients admitted with septic shock to a general intensive care unit (ICU) were independently evaluated by one cardiologist and one intensivist for the following signs: decreased diastolic tissue velocity of the base of the LV septum (e), increased early mitral inflow (E) to e ratio (E/e), decreased LV ejection fraction (EF) and decreased LV global longitudinal peak strain (GLPS). Diastolic dysfunction was defined as e <8.0cm/s and/or E/e [greater than or equal to]15 and systolic dysfunction as EF <50% and/or GLPS>15%. Ten randomly selected examinations were re-analysed two months later. Pearson’s r was used to test the correlation and Bland-Altman plots to assess the agreement between observers. Kappa statistics were used to test the consistency between readers and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for inter- and intraobserver variability.

    RESULTS: In 44 patients (94%), image quality was sufficient for echocardiographic measurements. The agreement between observers was moderate (k=0.60 for e, k=0.50 for E/e and k=0.60 for EF) to good (k=0.71 for GLPS). Pearson’s r was 0.76 for e, 0.85 for E/e, 0.78 for EF and 0.84 for GLPS (p<0.001 for all four). The ICC between observers for e was very good (0.85; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73-0.92), good for E/e (0.70; 95% CI 0.45 - 0.84), very good for EF (0.87; 95% CI 0.77 - 0.93), excellent for GLPS (0.91; 95% CI 0.74 - 0.95), and very good for all measures repeated by one of the observers. On Bland-Altman analysis, the mean differences and 95% limits of agreement for e, E/e, EF and GLPS were 0.01 (0.04 - 0.07), 2.0 (14.2 - 18.1), 0.86 (16 - 14.3) and 0.04 (5.04 - 5.12), respectively.

    CONCLUSIONS: Moderate observer-related differences in assessing LV dysfunction were seen. GLPS is the least user dependent and most reproducible echocardiographic measurement of LV function in septic shock.

  • 25.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Eriksson, Jonatan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Extending 4D Flow Visualization to the Human Right Ventricle2009In: Proceedings of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine: 17th Scientific Meeting 2009, International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine , 2009, 3860-3860 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The right ventricle has an important role in cardiovascular disease. However, because of the complex geometry and the sensitivity to the respiratory cycle, imaging of the right ventricle is challenging. We investigated whether 3D cine phase-contrast MRI can provide data with sufficient accuracy for visualizations of the 4D blood flow in the right ventricle. Whole-heart 4D flow measurements with optimized imaging parameters and post-processing tools were made in healthy volunteers. Pathlines emitted from the right atrium could be traced through the right ventricle to the pulmonary artery without leaving the blood pool and thereby met our criteria for sufficient accuracy.

  • 26.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Escobar Kvitting, John Peder
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Boano, G.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Hermansson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Bolger, A.F.
    University of California, San Fransisco, San Franisco, California, United States.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Turbulence Mapping Extends the Utility of Phase-Contrast MRI in Mitral Valve Regurgitation2009In: Proc. Intl. Soc. Mag. Reson. Med., 2009, 3939- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Carlhäll, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Boano, Gabriella
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Hermansson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology.
    Hemodynamic aspects of mitral regurgitation assessed by generalized phase-contrast MRI2011In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 33, no 3, 582-588 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Mitral regurgitation creates a high velocity jet into the left atrium (LA), contributing both volume andpressure; we hypothesized that the severity of regurgitation would be reflected in the degree of LA flowdistortion.

    Material and Methods: Three-dimensional cine PC-MRI was applied to determine LA flow patterns andturbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in seven subjects (five patients with posterior mitral leaflet prolapse, two normalsubjects). In addition, the regurgitant volume and the time-velocity profiles in the pulmonary veins weremeasured.

    Results: The LA flow in the mitral regurgitation patients was highly disturbed with elevated values of TKE.Peak TKE occurred consistently at late systole. The total LA TKE was closely related to the regurgitant volume.LA flow patterns were characterized by a pronounced vortex in proximity to the regurgitant jet. In some patients,pronounced discordances were observed between individual pulmonary venous inflows, but these could not berelated to the direction of the flow jet or parameters describing global LA hemodynamics.

    Conclusion: PC-MRI permits investigations of atrial and pulmonary vein flow patterns and TKE in significantmitral regurgitation, reflecting the impact of the highly disturbed blood flow that accompanies this importantvalve disease.

  • 28.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Assessment of fluctuating velocities in disturbed cardiovascular blood flow: in vivo feasibility of generalized phase-contrast MRI2008In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 28, no 3, 655-663 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To evaluate the feasibility of generalized phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) for the noninvasive assessment of fluctuating velocities in cardiovascular blood flow.

    Materials and Methods

    Multidimensional PC-MRI was used in a generalized manner to map mean flow velocities and intravoxel velocity standard deviation (IVSD) values in one healthy aorta and in three patients with different cardiovascular diseases. The acquired data were used to assess the kinetic energy of both the mean (MKE) and the fluctuating (TKE) velocity field.

    Results

    In all of the subjects, both mean and fluctuating flow data were successfully acquired. The highest TKE values in the patients were found at sites characterized by abnormal flow conditions. No regional increase in TKE was found in the normal aorta.

    Conclusion

    PC-MRI IVSD mapping is able to detect flow abnormalities in a variety of human cardiovascular conditions and shows promise for the quantitative assessment of turbulence. This approach may assist in clarifying the role of disturbed hemodynamics in cardiovascular diseases.

  • 29.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Assessment of Turbulent Flow using Magnetic Resonance Imaging2007In: IX Svenska Kardiovaskulära Vårmötet,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 30.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Improved image acquisition and processing allow accurate 4D flow investigations of the right ventricle2008In: Medicinteknikdagarna,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 31.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics .
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    In-vivo quantification of turbulent velocity fluctuations2007In: 15th Int Soc Magn Reson Med,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Non-invsive assessment of turbulent flow using magnetic resonance imaging2007In: Medicinteknikdagarna,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Mätning och visualisering av blodflödet i höger kammare med tidsupplöst tredimensionell MR2007In: Riksstämman,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

       

  • 34.
    Ebbers, Tino
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bolger, Ann
    Department of Medicine, University of California−San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Estimation of relative cardiovascular pressures using time-resolved three-dimensional phase contrast MRI2001In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISSN 0740-3194, E-ISSN 1522-2594, Vol. 45, no 5, 872-879 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accurate, easy-to-use, noninvasive cardiovascular pressure registration would be an important addition to the diagnostic armamentarium for assessment of cardiac function. A novel noninvasive and three-dimensional (3D) technique for estimation of relative cardiovascular pressures is presented. The relative pressure is calculated using the Navier-Stokes equations along user-defined lines placed within a time-resolved 3D phase contrast MRI dataset. The lines may be either straight or curved to follow an actual streamline. The technique is validated in an in vitro model and tested on in vivo cases of normal and abnormal transmitral pressure differences and intraaortic flow. The method supplements an intuitive visualization technique for cardiovascular flow, 3D particle trace visualization, with a quantifiable diagnostic parameter estimated from the same dataset.

  • 35.
    Engström, Elias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Berge, J
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Dual-energy CT of ex-vivo tissue samples.2008In: Cardiovaskulära vårmötet,2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Aortic coarctation: Physiological and model studies1993Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 22 patients, referred for the assessment of significant native- or re-coarctation, the systolic cuff blood pressure difference between arm and ankle at rest and after three different subrnaximal exercise tests and one maximal test was compared with invasive blood pressure. Reference values of cuff blood pressure were obtained from 19 healthy adult volunteers. The cuff blood pressure difference at rest correlated closely with the invasive pressure difference and the degree of constriction as assessed by angiography. The cuff blood pressure difference one minute after the different exercise tests varied with the load. A pressure difference of 50 mm Hg one minute after submaximal treadmill exercise identified all individuals with an invasive pressure difference exceeding 50 mm Hg during supine exercise. After maximal exercise, a large difference was seen between arm and ankle in healthy subjects as well as in patients.

    Theoretical analysis and pressure measurements across a constriction in a physical flow model showed a relation between mean pressure and flow that could be expressed as a power function. Pressure recovery was 0-4 mm Hg in the model and of similar magnitude in patients.

    Simulations in a computer model of the central circulation showed that the downstream pressure and flow depended strongly on the properties of the collaterals. The length and diameter of the collateral influenced the transmission of pressure and flow, while collateral wall stiffness did not. The resistance and wall stiffness in the upstream circulation exerted an important influence upon the upstream pressure.

    Twenty patients, of whom 16 had undergone coarctation surgery, were investigated with bi-plane transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) as well as with continuous wave Doppler from the suprasternal notch and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventeen healthy volunteers were investigated with MRI to obtain reference values. MRI in the axial plane showed the largest coarctation diameter, mean difference between methods 1.4±3.5 mm. Coarctation systolic velocity was 0.23 m/s higher with Doppler than with MRI. MRI peak flow ratio between the descending and ascending aorta showed a linear correlation with Doppler velocity and is proposed as a new measure of obstruction to flow.

    Twenty-four-hour non-invasive ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, performed on the 20 patients mentioned above, showed a significant negative correlation between the systolic blood pressure level and coarctation diameter, suggesting a remaining influence of the coarctation on the blood pressure even in patients who had undergone surgery.

  • 37.
    Engvall, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Coarctation of the aorta--a theoretical and experimental analysis of the effects of a centrally located arterial stenosis.1991In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 29, no 3, 291-296 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aortic coarctation is a local constriction of the aorta that may severely affect haemodynamics. It is therefore important to quantify these effects. Using Bernoulli's equation and the momentum theorem, the pressure drop is described including the pressure recovery distal to the coarctation and the effects of collateral flow; both laminar and turbulent. Assuming the coarctation and collaterals to be stiff, a quadratic relationship between flow and pressure drop is expected for flow through the coarctation and for turbulent collateral flow. For laminar collateral flow, a linear relationship is expected. The coarctation flow was studied in a model consisting of a rigid tube with local constriction, connected to a flooded-level tank, containing a 36 per cent by weight solution of sucrose, with a viscosity equivalent to that of blood at body temperature. The pressure drop across the constriction showed a quadratic relationship to flow in agreement with theoretical expectations. Pressure recovery in this model was very slight (0-4 mm Hg). Nine patients with aortic coarctation were catheterised. Cardiac output and pressure drop across the coarctation were measured at rest and during supine cycle exercise at two different workloads. The relationship between mean pressure drop and cardiac output tended to be either 'parabolic' or, in some cases, approximately linear, suggesting that the flow situation in aortic coarctation can be quantified by expressions that either linearly or quadratically relate pressure and flow.

  • 38.
    Engvall, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Gjerde, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    de Geer, Jakob
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Olsson, E.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Quick, Petter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Persson, A.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Adenosine stress myocardial perfusion detected with CT compared with attenuation-corrected SPECT2011In: EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL SUPPLEMENTS, Oxford University Press , 2011, Vol. 13, no A, A31-A31 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To asses adenosine stress myocardial perfusion by cardiac CT and compare with simultaneously performed attenuation corrected SPECT.

    Methods: 11 patients, 9 men and 2 women >2months post primary PCI, with manifest myocardial damage and remaining stenoses in the coronary circulation, were studied with myocardial perfusion CT under vasodilatory stress. The investigation started with a topogram followed by a testbolus of iodine whereafter the coronary artery study was performed in sequence mode. Adenosine was then infused for at least five minutes at the standard rate of 140ug/kg/min. After three minutes, 6 MBq/kg of 99mTc-tetrofosmin was injected immediately followed by 80ml iodine contrast. The wash-in of iodine was monitored by CT scanning of a 7cm long cardiac volume segment every other second for 22s. One hour after the CT scan, myocardial SPECT was performed. Scanning required the patients to tolerate breath holding for 22s, have a heart rate <80/min and body weight <85kg, and their kidney function should allow 140ml 370mg iodine contrast to be given.

    Results: All 11 patients tolerated the full adenosine infusion and scanning was successful. One patient could not be analyzed due to noisy images. In two patients, the limited scanning volume did not cover the entire base of the heart. Three patients had no defect on SPECT. Patients with a defect had on average myocardial blood flow 80ml/100ml tissue/min in the defect area and 142ml in the segments with the highest perfusion, while patients without defect had 98 and 141ml, respectively.

    Conclusion: Peak myocardial perfusion may be determined with CT under adenosine stress and compared with attenuation corrected SPECT. Initial experience shows that the method is sensitive to timing of bolus, to noisy images and results may diverge from those obtained with SPECT.

  • 39.
    Engvall, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Importance of collateral vessels in aortic coarctation: Computer simulation at rest and exercise using transmission line elements1994In: Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing, Vol. 32, 115-122 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Engvall, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: endomed.
    Daytime ambulatory blood pressure correlates strongly with the echocardiographic diameter of aortic coarctation2001In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, Vol. 35, no 5, 335-339 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective.-To relate the echocardiographic aortic arch-diameter to ambulatory and clinic blood pressure (BP) in patients with aortic coarctation. Design.-Eighteen adult patients (50% men) were recruited from the coarctation registry of the Linkoping Heart Centre. Biplane-trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TEE) was performed with Acuson XP 128/10, ambulatory BP was recorded with Spacelab models 90202/90205. Results.-Systolic clinic and ambulatory BP levels were higher in patients than in the 36 controls (clinic BP: 146 ▒ 25 mmHg vs 119 ▒ 10 mmHg, p = 0.0009, ambulatory BP: 140 ▒ 18 mmHg vs 124 ▒ 11 mmHg, p = 0.009). The differences in diastolic BP levels were less obvious (clinic BP: 87 ▒ 16 mmHg vs 76 ▒ 8 mmHg, p = 0.02, ambulatory BP: 84 ▒ 13 mmHg vs 77 ▒ 9 mmHg, p = 0.052). Daytime ambulatory BP was more strongly related than clinic BP to the coarctation diameter (AD) (systolic BP r = -0.73, p = 0.0006 and r = -0.61, p = 0.007, respectively). In surgically corrected patients (n = 14) only the correlations between ambulatory systolic daytime (r = -0.61, p = 0.02) and night-time (r = -0.58, p = 0.03) BP to AD was statistically significant. Conclusion.-Ambulatory BP correlates strongly with aortic coarctation measured by TEE and would thus be the preferred technique for evaluating BP in this patient category.

  • 41.
    Eriksson, Jonatan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Semi-automatic quantification of 4D left ventricular blood flow2010In: JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE, ISSN 1097-6647, Vol. 12, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The beating heart is the generator of blood flow through the cardiovascular system. Within the hearts own chambers, normal complex blood flow patterns can be disturbed by diseases. Methods for the quantification of intra-cardiac blood flow, with its 4D (3D+time) nature, are lacking. We sought to develop and validate a novel semi-automatic analysis approach that integrates flow and morphological data. Method: In six healthy subjects and three patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, three-directional, three-dimensional cine phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) velocity data and balanced steady-state free-precession long- and short-axis images were acquired. The LV endocardium was segmented from the short-axis images at the times of isovolumetric contraction (IVC) and isovolumetric relaxation (IVR). At the time of IVC, pathlines were emitted from the IVC LV blood volume and traced forwards and backwards in time until IVR, thus including the entire cardiac cycle. The IVR volume was used to determine if and where the pathlines left the LV. This information was used to automatically separate the pathlines into four different components of flow: Direct Flow, Retained Inflow, Delayed Ejection Flow and Residual Volume. Blood volumes were calculated for every component by multiplying the number of pathlines with the blood volume represented by each pathline. The accuracy and inter- and intra-observer reproducibility of the approach were evaluated by analyzing volumes of LV inflow and outflow, the four flow components, and the end-diastolic volume. Results: The volume and distribution of the LV flow components were determined in all subjects. The calculated LV outflow volumes [ml] (67 +/- 13) appeared to fall in between those obtained by through-plane phase-contrast CMR (77 +/- 16) and Doppler ultrasound (58 +/- 10), respectively. Calculated volumes of LV inflow (68 +/- 11) and outflow (67 +/- 13) were well matched (NS). Low inter- and intra-observer variability for the assessment of the volumes of the flow components was obtained. Conclusions: This semi-automatic analysis approach for the quantification of 4D blood flow resulted in accurate LV inflow and outflow volumes and a high reproducibility for the assessment of LV flow components.

  • 42.
    Eriksson, Jonatan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Improved visualization and quantification of 4D intracardiac blood flow2008In: Medicinteknikdagarna,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Eriksson, Jonatan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Quantification of presystolic blood flow organization and energetics in the human left ventricle2011In: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY-HEART AND CIRCULATORY PHYSIOLOGY, ISSN 0363-6135, Vol. 300, no 6, H2135-H2141 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intracardiac blood flow patterns are potentially important to cardiac pumping efficiency. However, these complex flow patterns remain incompletely characterized both in health and disease. We hypothesized that normal left ventricular (LV) blood flow patterns would preferentially optimize a portion of the end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) for effective and rapid systolic ejection by virtue of location near and motion towards the LV outflow tract (LVOT). Three-dimensional cine velocity and morphological data were acquired in 12 healthy persons and 1 patient with dilated cardiomyopathy using MRI. A previously validated method was used for analysis in which the LVEDV was separated into four functional flow components based on the bloods locations at the beginning and end of the cardiac cycle. Each components volume, kinetic energy (KE), site, direction, and linear momentum relative to the LVOT were calculated. Of the four components, the LV inflow that passes directly to outflow in a single cardiac cycle (Direct Flow) had the largest volume. At the time of isovolumic contraction, Direct Flow had the greatest amount of KE and the most favorable combination of distance, angle, and linear momentum relative to the LVOT. Atrial contraction boosted the late diastolic KE of the ejected components. We conclude that normal diastolic LV flow creates favorable conditions for ensuing ejection, defined by proximity and energetics, for the Direct Flow, and that atrial contraction augments the end-diastolic KE of the ejection volume. The correlation of Direct Flow characteristics with ejection efficiency might be a relevant investigative target in cardiac failure.

  • 44.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Brandt, Einar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Visualization of flow in the aorta using time-resolved 3D phase contrast MRI2001In: Proc. Intl. Soc. Mag. Reson. Med.,2001, 2001, 378-378 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Boano, G
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Multidimensional Turbulence Mapping in Mitral Insufficiency2008In: Soc Cardiovascular Magn Reson. 11th Scientific Sessions,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    F Bolger, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    MR allows a unique possibility to see how the blood flow affects the cardiovascular system [MR ger unik möjlighet se hur blodflödet inverkar på hjärtkärlsystemet.]2009In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 106, no 30-31, 1901-1904 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 47.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sutherland, George R.
    Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven, Belgium.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Three-directional myocardial motion assessed using 3D phase contrast MRI2004In: Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, ISSN 1097-6647, E-ISSN 1532-429X, Vol. 6, no 3, 627-636 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regional myocardial function is a complex entity consisting of motion in three dimensions (3D). Besides magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), no other noninvasive technique can give a true 3D description of cardiac motion. Using a time‐resolved 3D phase contrast technique, three‐dimensional image volumes containing myocardial velocity data in six normal volunteers were acquired. Coordinates and velocity information were extracted from nine points placed in different myocardial segments in the left ventricle (LV), and decomposed into longitudinal (VL), radial (VR), and circumferential (VC) velocity components. Our findings confirm a longitudinal apex‐to‐base gradient for the LV, with only a small motion of the apex. The mean velocity for VL for all the basal segments was higher compared to the midsegments during systole [3.5 ± 1.2 vs. 2.5 ± 1.7 cm/s (p < 0.01)], early filling [− 6.9 ± 1.8 vs. − 4.9 ± 1.8 cm/s (p < 0.001)], and during atrial contraction [− 2.2 ± 1.4 vs. − 1.6 ± 1.3 cm/s (p < 0.05)]. A similar pattern was observed when comparing velocities from the midsegments to the apex. Radial velocity was higher during early filling in the midportion of the lateral [− 4.9 ± 2.7 vs. − 3.2 ± 1.6 cm/s (p < 0.05)] wall compared to the basal segments, no difference was observed for the septal [− 2.0 ± 1.5 vs. − 0.3 ± 2.5 cm/s (p = 0.15)], anterior [− 5.8 ± 3.3 vs. − 4.0 ± 1.7 cm/s (p = 0.17)], and posterior [− 2.3 ± 2.1 vs. − 2.5 ± 1.0 cm/s (p = 0.78)] walls. When observing the myocardial velocity in a single point and visualizing the movement of the main direction of the velocities in this point as vectors in velocity vector plots like planes, it is clear that myocardial movement is by no means one dimensional. In conclusion, our time‐resolved 3D, phase contrast MRI technique makes it feasible to extract myocardial velocities from anywhere in the myocardium, including all three velocity components without the need for positioning any slices at the time of acquisition.

  • 48.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olin, Christian L.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, Calif, USA.
    Flow patterns in the aortic root and the aorta studied with time-resolved, 3-dimensional, phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging: implications for aortic valve–sparing surgery2004In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, ISSN 0022-5223, Vol. 127, no 6, 1602-1607 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Sparing the aortic valve has become a surgical option for patients who require repair of aortic root ectasia and have normal valve leaflets. Surgical approaches to valve sparing differ with regard to preservation of the native sinuses of Valsalva. The role of the sinuses and the importance of maintaining them remain controversial.

    Methods

    By using a time-resolved, 3-dimensional, phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging technique, aortic root and aortic blood velocity data were acquired from 2 patients with Marfan syndrome 6 months after aortic valve–sparing surgery with straight Dacron grafts and contrasted with data from 6 normal volunteers.

    Results

    In normal aortas vortical blood flow became apparent in the individual sinuses after peak systole. The vortices filled the available space behind the valve leaflets and persisted until diastole, expanding and moving inward during aortic valve closure. In contrast, no vortices were observed in the postoperative patients with Marfan syndrome with negligible sinuses.

    Conclusions

    Changes in supravalvular flow accompany loss of sinus architecture. Whether the presence, size, and velocity of supravalvular vortices affects the function or durability of the preserved aortic valve remains to be studied.

  • 49.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Broqvist, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    FranzÉn, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Andersson, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ohlsson, Ulf
    Department of Medicine Oskarshamns Hospital.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Recurrence of myxoma in the left ventricle with concurrent cerebral fusiform aneurysms after previous atrial myxoma surgery2008In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, ISSN 0022-5223, E-ISSN 1097-685X, Vol. 135, no 5, 1172-1173 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Forsberg, Lena M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Vánky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Left and right ventricular function in aortic stenosis patients 8 weeks post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation or surgical aortic valve replacement2011In: European Journal of Echocardiography, ISSN 1525-2167, E-ISSN 1532-2114, Vol. 12, no 8, 603-611 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Knowledge of longitudinal left and right ventricular (LV and RV) function after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is scarce. We hypothesized that the longitudinal systolic biventricular function in aortic stenosis (AS) patients is affected differently by TAVI and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods and results Thirty-three AS patients (all-TAVI group, age 81 +/- 9 years, 18 female), with EuroSCORE 18 +/- 9%, were accepted for TAVI. Seventeen of these patients were matched (by gender, age, and LV function) to 17 patients undergoing SAVR. Conventional echocardiographic parameters, systolic atrioventricular plane displacement (AVPD) at standard sites and peak systolic velocity (PSV) by pulsed tissue Doppler at basal RV free wall, LV lateral wall, and septum were studied before and 8 weeks after the procedure. Procedural success was 100%, and 30-day mortality 9%. In all TAVI patients, AVPD(lateral), PSV(lateral), AVPD(septal), and PSV(septal) increased (P andlt; 0.001, 0.003, 0.006 and 0.002). When studying the matched patients postoperatively, both the SAVR and TAVI patients had increased PSV(lateral) and AVPD(lateral) (SAVR: P = 0.03 and P = 0.04, TAVI: P = 0.04 and P = 0.01). The PSV(RV) increased in the all-TAVI group (P = 0.007), while the AVPD(RV) was unchanged. SAVR patients had decreased AVPD(RV) (P = 0.001) and PSV(RV) (P = 0.004), while the matched TAVI patients had unchanged RV function parameters. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion An improvement in regional longitudinal LV function in the septal and lateral wall could be seen after TAVI. Among the matched patients, both the TAVI and SAVR patients seemed to improve LV function in the lateral wall. RV systolic function increased in TAVI patients, but was impaired in the matched SAVR group at the 8-week follow-up.

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