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  • 1.
    Ferreira, Janna
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sounds of silence: Phonological awareness and written language in children with and without speech2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The general aim of this thesis was to explore phonological awareness and written language in the presence and absence of speech in children with reading impairments and children with motor speech impairments. The main findings of the present thesis were: (1) For children with reading impairments who are at an early stage of reading development, interventions targeting reading and spelling should focus on their weakness rather than their strength in word decoding. (2) For children with reading impairments, phonological as well as orthographic intervention had effects on reading and spelling. The children with the lowest reading performance also showed effects of phonological intervention. (3) For children with motor speech impairments, significant differences were shown between low level readers and high level readers in the areas of auditory phoneme discrimination skills and general language skills. (4) For children with motor speech impairments, phonological intervention had effect on word spelling skills but not on reading skills. (5) In an analysis of non-word spelling errors of a girl with anarthria, more spelling errors were found on longer words, and a higher proportion of spelling errors were found in medial letter positions, implying deficit in segmentation of spoken words and working memory.

    The findings were discussed in relation to four subfields of phonological processing: phonological representations, phonological production, phonological memory and phonological awareness. The contributions of speech to reading and spelling are complex. Even a severely distorted speech can serve as a phonological feedback and for children with anarthria, the lack of speech does seem to play a role.

    The present thesis has a disability research approach and is a contribution to the overall understanding of phonological awareness and written language. Many of the findings are directly applicable to the clinical context.

    List of papers
    1. Phonological or orthographic training for children with phonological or orthographic decoding deficits
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phonological or orthographic training for children with phonological or orthographic decoding deficits
    2007 (English)In: Dyslexia, ISSN 1076-9242, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 211-229Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In a longitudinal intervention study, Swedish reading disabled children in grades 2-3 received either a phonological (n = 41) or an orthographic (n = 39) training program. Both programs were computerized and interventions took place in ordinary school settings with trained special instruction teachers. Two comparison groups, ordinary special instruction and normal readers, were also included in the study. Results showed strong average training effects on text reading and general word decoding for both phonological and orthographic training, but not significantly higher improvements than for the comparison groups. The main research finding was a double dissociation: children with pronounced phonological problems improved their general word decoding skill more from phonological than from orthographic training, whereas the opposite was observed for children with pronounced orthographic problems. Thus, in this population of children, training should focus on children's relative weakness rather than their relative strength in word decoding.

    Keywords
    intervention, phonological training, orthographic training, reading disability, word decoding
    National Category
    Social Work
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12731 (URN)10.1002/dys.339 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-08 Created: 2007-11-08 Last updated: 2009-04-28
    2. Reading why not?: Literacy skills in children with motor and speech impairments
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reading why not?: Literacy skills in children with motor and speech impairments
    2007 (English)In: Communication Disorders Quarterly, ISSN 1525-7401, E-ISSN 1538-4837, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 236-251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, 12 participants with various levels of motor and speech deficits were tested to explore their reading skills in relation to letter knowledge, speech level, auditory discrimination, phonological awareness, language skills, digit span, and nonverbal IQ. Two subgroups, based on a median split of reading performance, are described: the low- and high-level readers, where low-level readers perform significantly lower on reading than the other subgroup. The subgroups had a general tendency to perform low versus high on most variables tested, but not on digit span. The study stresses the importance of auditory discrimination skills and general language skills as a fundamental base for literacy. The study also generates new hypotheses that will need to be investigated further. For example, further intervention studies for phonological awareness are proposed, and a hypothesis about the effect of impaired articulation usage during reading is presented.

    Keywords
    auditory discrimination, literacy, motor disability, phonological awareness, speech impairment
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12732 (URN)10.1177/1525740107311814 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-08 Created: 2007-11-08 Last updated: 2017-12-14
    3. Phonological awareness training to teach children with impairments in reading or speech
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phonological awareness training to teach children with impairments in reading or speech
    2007 (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12733 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-11-08 Created: 2007-11-08
    4. The spelling of silence: Spelling error analysis of an anarthric Bliss user
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The spelling of silence: Spelling error analysis of an anarthric Bliss user
    2007 (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12734 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-11-08 Created: 2007-11-08
  • 2.
    Ferreira, Janna
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The spelling of silence: Spelling error analysis of an anarthric Bliss user2007Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Ferreira, Janna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Gustavsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Comphot: Computerized phonological training. Manual2003Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Ferreira, Janna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Comphot-Computerized Phonological training promoting literacy among children with CP.2002In: ISAAC,2002, 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Ferreira, Janna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Reading without speaking.2004In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 39, no 5-6, p. 556-556Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 6.
    Ferreira, Janna
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wengelin, Åsa
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Phonological awareness training to teach children with impairments in reading or speech2007Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Ferreira, Janna
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wengelin, Åsa
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Reading why not?: Literacy skills in children with motor and speech impairments2007In: Communication Disorders Quarterly, ISSN 1525-7401, E-ISSN 1538-4837, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 236-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, 12 participants with various levels of motor and speech deficits were tested to explore their reading skills in relation to letter knowledge, speech level, auditory discrimination, phonological awareness, language skills, digit span, and nonverbal IQ. Two subgroups, based on a median split of reading performance, are described: the low- and high-level readers, where low-level readers perform significantly lower on reading than the other subgroup. The subgroups had a general tendency to perform low versus high on most variables tested, but not on digit span. The study stresses the importance of auditory discrimination skills and general language skills as a fundamental base for literacy. The study also generates new hypotheses that will need to be investigated further. For example, further intervention studies for phonological awareness are proposed, and a hypothesis about the effect of impaired articulation usage during reading is presented.

  • 8.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Ferreira, Janna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    DOT: Datoriserad ortografisk träning. Manual2003Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

      

  • 9.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ferreira, Janna
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Phonological or orthographic training for children with phonological or orthographic decoding deficits2007In: Dyslexia, ISSN 1076-9242, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 211-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a longitudinal intervention study, Swedish reading disabled children in grades 2-3 received either a phonological (n = 41) or an orthographic (n = 39) training program. Both programs were computerized and interventions took place in ordinary school settings with trained special instruction teachers. Two comparison groups, ordinary special instruction and normal readers, were also included in the study. Results showed strong average training effects on text reading and general word decoding for both phonological and orthographic training, but not significantly higher improvements than for the comparison groups. The main research finding was a double dissociation: children with pronounced phonological problems improved their general word decoding skill more from phonological than from orthographic training, whereas the opposite was observed for children with pronounced orthographic problems. Thus, in this population of children, training should focus on children's relative weakness rather than their relative strength in word decoding.

  • 10.
    McAllister, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Aanstoot, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundeborg Hammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johannesson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Berglind, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Learning in the tutorial group: A balance between individual freedom and institutional control2014In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 28, no 1-2, p. 47-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study investigates factors in problem-based learning tutorial groups which promote or inhibit learning. The informants were tutors and students from speech-language pathology and physiotherapy programmes. Semi-structured focus-group interviews and individual interviews were used. Results revealed three themes: Responsibility, Time and Support. Under responsibility, the delicate balance between individual and institutional responsibility and control was shown. Time included short and long-term perspectives on learning. Under support, supporting documents, activities and personnel resources were mentioned. In summary, an increased control by the program and tutors decreases students motivation to assume responsibility for learning. Support in tutorial groups needs to adapt to student progression and to be well aligned to tutorial work to have the intended effect. A lifelong learning perspective may help students develop a meta-awareness regarding learning that could make tutorial work more meaningful.

  • 11.
    McAllister, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Ferreira, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    LundeborgHammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johannesson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Berglind, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Learning in the tutorial group – a challenge between freedom and control2011In: The Third International Conference on Problem Based Learning in Speech Language Pathology and Audiology / [ed] Tara Whitehill & Susan Bridges, Hong Kong: University of Hong Kong , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In order to improve and clarify the demands within tutorial groups in the speech and language pathology (SLP) and physiotherapy (PT) programs a joint study was conducted exploring problem areas in the tutorial groups.

    The aim was to investigate and further develop the requirements for a passing grade in the tutorial group. A long term goal was that the results could form a base for future changes regarding instructions and requirements in tutorial groups.

    Methodology:  Focus-group interviews were used to collect data. Three different groups were interviewed, two consisting of tutors from the SLP and PT programs and one consisting of last year student tutors from the SLP-program.  This data was also augmented by individual interviews of four SLP-students and five PT-students on different levels in the education.  A semi structured interview guide was used.  The interviews were analyzed using content analyses.

    Results: The analyses revealed three important themes for work in tutorial groups: Responsibility, Time and Support. Within these themes, several categories were also identified. Responsibility: Within this theme the main category was the importance of balance between individual and institutional responsibility. The students, the tutorial group, the tutor and the program all need to assume their part of the responsibility in order to clarify requirements. Time: Here different aspects of time management and work in the tutorial group were identified. These categories also related to aspects of support and continuous or lifelong learning. Support: Within this theme different support functions were identified such as documents, activities and personnel resources in the tutorial groups.  No suggestions were made in the interviews regarding the requirements for a passing grade in the tutorial groups. 

    Discussion/Conclusion: The main finding was the delicate balance between institutional control and the students own responsibility for the work within the tutorial groups.  An increased control decreases the students’ motivation to assume responsibility for their own learning. Also, study programs should adapt requirements in tutorial groups depending on years in the education.  Different support functions need to be closely coupled to tutorial work in order to have the intended effect.   

  • 12.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Ferreira, Janna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sounds of silence - phonological awareness and AAC2008In: 13th biennial meeting of International Society of Augumentative and Alternative Communication,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 13.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ferreira, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Recycling in communication involving a boy with autism using picture exchange system (PECS)2013In: Aided communication in everyday interaction / [ed] Niklas Norén, Christina Samuelsson and Charlotta Plejert, Guildford: J & R Press , 2013, p. 324-Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book argues for the importance of the participants' perspective within both theory and practice on the function of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) aids in everyday talk-in-interaction. Interactional approaches such as Conversation Analysis (CA) and Topical episode analysis are used to analyze and demonstrate.

1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
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Citation style
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  • harvard1
  • ieee
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  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
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