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  • 1.
    Alfredson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Saab Aeronaut, S-58247 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Adaptive Interaction Criteria for Future Remotely Piloted Aircraft2017In: ADVANCES IN HUMAN FACTORS IN ROBOTS AND UNMANNED SYSTEMS, SPRINGER INT PUBLISHING AG , 2017, Vol. 499, p. 281-289Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are technical trends and operational needs within the aviation domain towards adaptive behavior. This study focus on adaptive interaction criteria for future remotely piloted aircraft. Criteria that could be used to guide and evaluate design as well as to create a model for adaptive interaction used by autonomous functions and decision support. A scenario and guidelines from the literature, used as example criteria, was presented in a questionnaire to participants from academia/researchers, end users, and aircraft development engineers. Several guidelines had a wide acceptance among the participants, but there was also aspects missing for the application of supporting adaptive interaction for remotely piloted aircraft. The various groups of participants contributed by different aspects supports the idea of having various stakeholders contributing with complementary views. Aspects that the participants found missing includes, predictability, aviation domain specifics, risk analysis, complexity and how people perceive autonomy and attribute intentions.

  • 2.
    Alfredson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial ergonomics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Differences in Situational Awareness and How to Manage Them in Development of Complex Systems2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What’s up, Doc? Situational awareness (SA) is about being aware of what is going on. Already when a complex system is developed there is an opportunity to help a future user of the system to form a better SA. Let us make the best out of this opportunity! When assessing SA, differences in SA will sometimes appear. This dissertation is about SA, and how to manage differences in SA in development of complex systems. This topic is highly valid for development of a variety of complex systems, although most examples in this dissertation are from the aviation domain.

    Framed by state of the art literature, suggestions are made on theoretical improvements of SA theory, with a focus on differences. The difference between what you are required to be aware of and what you are aware of is suggested as a SA-indicator. Also, the difference between what you are aware of and what you think you are aware of is suggested as another SA-indicator. Further, differences within a team such as variations in degree of agreement could be used for team SA assessment.

    Also, the term situation management (SM) is suggested, with a proposed wider meaning than SA, including SA and every part of the perception action cycle, the management of mental resources, and external means of managing the situation. SM is a suitable term when developing complex systems due to the focus on the situation and how that could be managed, instead of only focusing on what is perceived by an individual or team.

    Assessing differences in SA and to differentiate between various types of differences are recognised as important prerequisites to effectively manage differences in SA in development of complex systems. Several assessment techniques are reviewed and especially advantages and disadvantages of the use of eye movements for SA assessment are described. With reference to the literature as well as to the appended papers differences in SA due to a) design alternatives, b) roles in the design-use process, c) context, and d) level of analysis, are described. Differences in SA are suggested to be regarded as both quantitative (i.e. high or low SA) and qualitative (e.g. various aspects of a situation are regarded).

    Approaches such as, SM, on-line evaluation of SA, simulator based design, as well as measuring and analysing SA on multiple levels simultaneously, are suggested as means to manage differences in SA in the development of complex systems.

    List of papers
    1. Improvement of tactical situation awareness with colour-coded horizontal-situation displays in combat aircraft
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improvement of tactical situation awareness with colour-coded horizontal-situation displays in combat aircraft
    Show others...
    1999 (English)In: Displays (Guildford), ISSN 0141-9382, E-ISSN 1872-7387, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 171-184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In the multi-role combat aircraft Gripen, the monochrome head-down displays in the cockpit are to be upgraded in colour. In the present study, the effects of colour-coded displays on visual search and situation awareness (SA) were studied in a real-time simulation of an air-to-air mission with test pilots as subjects. Gripen's monochrome colour scheme was compared to two chromatic (dichrome, polychrome) colour schemes. A 3×2×2 factorial within subjects design was used; the three colour schemes each with two different background conditions (simple and complex) and two different symbol configurations. The pilot had two tasks during the simulation: (1) to track a manoeuvring aircraft within specified limits by using the head-up display (HUD), and (2) to detect the appearance of a priority target on the head-down horizontal-situation display (HSD). Deviations in flight path angle and reaction times for target detection were recorded. After the test runs, the pilot answered questions and ranked the colour schemes in different respects. The pilot also rated them for SA using a subjective rating technique on cognitive compatibility (CC-SART). The results show that colour is advantageous in comparison to the monochrome display: The ranks on situation awareness and preference ratings were higher for the chromatic schemes, and with the complex background, the reaction times were significantly lower for the polychrome colour code. In summary, the results indicate that colour can improve tactical SA in combat aircraft.

    Keywords
    Human factors, Aviation, Moving map cockpit displays, Horizontal-situation displays, Electronic maps, Colour coding
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12751 (URN)10.1016/S0141-9382(99)00022-0 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-09 Created: 2007-11-09 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    2. Pilots’ understanding of situational awareness
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pilots’ understanding of situational awareness
    2000 (English)In: Proceedings of the 10th European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics, 2000, p. 172-181Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12752 (URN)
    Conference
    10th European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics, Linköping, Sweden, 21-23 August 2000
    Available from: 2007-11-09 Created: 2007-11-09 Last updated: 2015-03-02Bibliographically approved
    3. Mode monitoring and call-outs: An eye-tracking study of 2-crew automated flight deck operations
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mode monitoring and call-outs: An eye-tracking study of 2-crew automated flight deck operations
    2006 (English)In: The International journal of aviation psychology, ISSN 1050-8414, E-ISSN 1532-7108, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 263-275 Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Mode awareness has been suggested as a critical factor in safe operations of automated aircraft. This study investigated mode awareness by measuring eye point of gaze of both pilots during simulated commercial flights, while recording call-outs and tracking aircraft performance. The results of this study show that the compliance to manufacturer or air carrier procedures regarding mode monitoring and call-outs was very low. However, this did not seem to have a negative effect on the flight path or safety during our observations. Crews exhibited a proliferation of strategies to keep track of status and behavior of the automation, often with little reliance on the flight mode annunciations of the primary flight display. The data confirm the limitations of current flight mode annunciator designs, and suggest that mode awareness is a more complex phenomenon than what can be captured by measuring eye point of gaze and communication alone.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis, 2006
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12753 (URN)10.1207/s15327108ijap1603_2 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-09 Created: 2007-11-09 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    4. Effect of task complexity and decision maker separation on shared situational awareness in command and control in network centric warfare
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of task complexity and decision maker separation on shared situational awareness in command and control in network centric warfare
    2007 (English)In: Military Psychology, ISSN 0899-5605, E-ISSN 1532-7876Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12754 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-11-09 Created: 2007-11-09 Last updated: 2018-08-01Bibliographically approved
    5. Individual differences in visual behaviour in simulated flight
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individual differences in visual behaviour in simulated flight
    2002 (English)In: Proceedings of IS &T/SPIE's 14th Annual Symposium: Vol. 4662. Human Vision and Electronic Imaging VII, 2002, p. 494-502Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12755 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-11-09 Created: 2007-11-09 Last updated: 2009-02-12Bibliographically approved
    6. Business process reengineering in the automotive area by simulator-based design
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Business process reengineering in the automotive area by simulator-based design
    2007 (English)In: Simulation and Modeling: Current Technologies and Applications / [ed] Asim Abdel Rahman El Sheikh, Abid Al Ajeeli, Evon M. O. Abu-Taieh, Hershey, PA, USA: IGI-Global Inc. , 2007, 1, p. 337-358Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The science of simulation and modeling (SM) strives to showcase the highest possible level of reality in order to determine the conditions necessary for optimal performance. SM is a multifaceted and complex field due to the numerous applications involved, particularly since SM applications range from nuclear reaction to supermarket queuing. Simulation and Modeling: Current Technologies and Applications includes examinations of current issues related to simulation such as: Web-based simulation, virtual reality, augmented reality, and artificial intelligence. This book combines different methods, views, theories, and applications of simulations into one volume, and offers insight into the computer science aspect of simulation and modeling while integrating the business practices of SM.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Hershey, PA, USA: IGI-Global Inc., 2007 Edition: 1
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12756 (URN)978-15-9904-198-8 (ISBN)159-90-4198-7 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2007-11-09 Created: 2007-11-09 Last updated: 2013-06-28Bibliographically approved
  • 3.
    Alfredson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Individual differences in visual behaviour in simulated flight2002In: Proceedings of IS &T/SPIE's 14th Annual Symposium: Vol. 4662. Human Vision and Electronic Imaging VII, 2002, p. 494-502Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Alfredson, Jens
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, J.
    Effect of task complexity and decision maker separation on shared situational awareness in command and control in network centric warfare2007In: Military Psychology, ISSN 0899-5605, E-ISSN 1532-7876Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Alfredson, Jens
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ohlsson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial ergonomics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pilots’ understanding of situational awareness2000In: Proceedings of the 10th European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics, 2000, p. 172-181Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Alfredson, Jens
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Saab Aeronaut, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Trabasso, Luís Gonzaga
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. ITA, Brazil.
    Blomstrand, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eckerberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klamer, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ledin, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tarander, Jasmine
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Engine Failure Induced Task Load Transient for Simulation Based Certification Aiding for Aircraft2018In: ADVANCES IN HUMAN ASPECTS OF TRANSPORTATION, SPRINGER INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING AG , 2018, Vol. 597, p. 79-86Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is one of a series of studies, researching various aspects that all aim at enhanced simulation based certification aiding for aircraft. An experimental within-group design study was performed with 10 participants ( 5 male, and 5 female). The results showed a significant difference, F(2,16) = 5.11, p = 0.019, in mental workload between an engine failure condition and an normal condition for eye blink frequency. No effect of speed at the engine failure event on mental workload was found.

  • 7.
    Alm, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial ergonomics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Alfredson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial ergonomics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ohlsson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial ergonomics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Business process reengineering in the automotive area by simulator-based design2007In: Simulation and Modeling: Current Technologies and Applications / [ed] Asim Abdel Rahman El Sheikh, Abid Al Ajeeli, Evon M. O. Abu-Taieh, Hershey, PA, USA: IGI-Global Inc. , 2007, 1, p. 337-358Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The science of simulation and modeling (SM) strives to showcase the highest possible level of reality in order to determine the conditions necessary for optimal performance. SM is a multifaceted and complex field due to the numerous applications involved, particularly since SM applications range from nuclear reaction to supermarket queuing. Simulation and Modeling: Current Technologies and Applications includes examinations of current issues related to simulation such as: Web-based simulation, virtual reality, augmented reality, and artificial intelligence. This book combines different methods, views, theories, and applications of simulations into one volume, and offers insight into the computer science aspect of simulation and modeling while integrating the business practices of SM.

  • 8.
    Björklund, Caroline M.
    et al.
    Swedish Defence Research Agency, Linköping, Sweden..
    Alfredson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dekker, Sidney
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial ergonomics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mode monitoring and call-outs: An eye-tracking study of 2-crew automated flight deck operations2006In: The International journal of aviation psychology, ISSN 1050-8414, E-ISSN 1532-7108, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 263-275 Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mode awareness has been suggested as a critical factor in safe operations of automated aircraft. This study investigated mode awareness by measuring eye point of gaze of both pilots during simulated commercial flights, while recording call-outs and tracking aircraft performance. The results of this study show that the compliance to manufacturer or air carrier procedures regarding mode monitoring and call-outs was very low. However, this did not seem to have a negative effect on the flight path or safety during our observations. Crews exhibited a proliferation of strategies to keep track of status and behavior of the automation, often with little reliance on the flight mode annunciations of the primary flight display. The data confirm the limitations of current flight mode annunciator designs, and suggest that mode awareness is a more complex phenomenon than what can be captured by measuring eye point of gaze and communication alone.

  • 9.
    Derefeldt, G.
    et al.
    National Defence Research Establishment, Division of Human Sciences, Linköping, Sweden.
    Skinnars, Ö.
    Saab Aerospace, Linköping, Sweden.
    Alfredson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, L.
    National Defence Research Establishment, Division of Human Sciences, Linköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, P.
    National Defence Research Establishment, Division of Human Sciences, Linköping, Sweden.
    Westlund, J.
    Saab Aerospace, Linköping, Sweden.
    Berggrund, U.
    National Defence Research Establishment, Division of Human Sciences, Linköping, Sweden.
    Holmberg, J.
    Saab Aerospace, Linköping, Sweden.
    Santesson, R.
    Saab Aerospace, Linköping, Sweden.
    Improvement of tactical situation awareness with colour-coded horizontal-situation displays in combat aircraft1999In: Displays (Guildford), ISSN 0141-9382, E-ISSN 1872-7387, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 171-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the multi-role combat aircraft Gripen, the monochrome head-down displays in the cockpit are to be upgraded in colour. In the present study, the effects of colour-coded displays on visual search and situation awareness (SA) were studied in a real-time simulation of an air-to-air mission with test pilots as subjects. Gripen's monochrome colour scheme was compared to two chromatic (dichrome, polychrome) colour schemes. A 3×2×2 factorial within subjects design was used; the three colour schemes each with two different background conditions (simple and complex) and two different symbol configurations. The pilot had two tasks during the simulation: (1) to track a manoeuvring aircraft within specified limits by using the head-up display (HUD), and (2) to detect the appearance of a priority target on the head-down horizontal-situation display (HSD). Deviations in flight path angle and reaction times for target detection were recorded. After the test runs, the pilot answered questions and ranked the colour schemes in different respects. The pilot also rated them for SA using a subjective rating technique on cognitive compatibility (CC-SART). The results show that colour is advantageous in comparison to the monochrome display: The ranks on situation awareness and preference ratings were higher for the chromatic schemes, and with the complex background, the reaction times were significantly lower for the polychrome colour code. In summary, the results indicate that colour can improve tactical SA in combat aircraft.

  • 10.
    Ohlander, Ulrika
    et al.
    Saab AB.
    Linger, Oscar
    Linköping University.
    Hägg, Veronica
    Linköping University.
    Nilsson, Linn
    Linköping University.
    Holmqvist, Åsa
    Linköping University.
    Durefors, Sandra
    Linköping University.
    Alfredson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Prytz, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Performance using low-cost gaze-control for simulated flight tasks2016In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Europe Chapter 2016 Annual Conference: Human Factors and User Needs in Transport, Control, and the Workplace / [ed] Dick de Waard, Antonella Toffetti, Rebecca Wiczorek, Andreas Sonderegger, Stefan Röttger, Petr Bouchner, Thomas Franke, Stephen Fairclough, Matthijs Noordzij, and Karel Brookhuis, 2016, p. 201-210Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the current study, interaction using gaze control was compared to computer mouse using the MATB-II (Multi-Attribute Task Battery) environment. The study had two aims; the first was to explore the utility of low-cost technologies in a rapid prototyping and testing environment for aviation. The second aim was to use such an environment to compare a novel interaction device (a low-cost gaze control device) to a familiar interaction device (computer mouse). Method: Thirty participants performed two scenarios with each interaction device. The software MATB-II provided simulated flight tasks and recorded performance. Mental workload was assessed by the NASA Task Load Index (TLX) questionnaire after each scenario. Results: The results showed that gaze control resulted in significantly higher overall mental workload than computer mouse. Performance was better with mouse in two of the four tasks. Conclusions: Concerning the first aim, the study demonstrated the value of low-cost technology for initial user testing before using more expensive high-fidelity environments. Concerning the second aim, the computer mouse resulted in better performance and lower mental workload. This may either be due to higher user familiarity with computer mouse interaction or to limitations of the gaze control equipment and insufficient adjustments of the interface design to optimize for gaze control.

  • 11.
    Trabasso, Luís Gonzaga
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Aeronautics Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering .
    Alfredson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. SAAB, Aeronautics Human Machine Interaction, Sweden.
    Functional Mapping as Means for Establishing a Human Factors Research Environment for Future Air Systems2016In: Proceedings of the 12th Swecog Cognition Conference, October 6-7, Göteborg, Sweden: Abstracts / [ed] Alexander Almér, Robert Lowe and Erik Billing, Skövde: Univeristy of Skövde , 2016, Vol. 1, p. 10-11Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A typical environment for human factors research has equipment and methods for performing a set of experiments such as mental workload assessment, situational awareness evaluation, human resilience measurement and so forth. The common aspect between equipment and methods is that they accomplish a function. The TLX method is part of such an environment because it evaluates the mental workload; an EEG helmet is part of the same research environment because it measures the electrical activity originated by the brain. If the functional structure of a method or equipment is yet to be known, a method for function deployment might be used to this purpose such as FAST. Although cognitive processes in many regards are very different from functions in technical systems, it is possible to describe them in terms of functions for the sake using it for design considerations. For instance, the information-processing paradigm has inspired descriptions that in some regards could be described in functional terms. The multiple resource theory that outlines different mental resources related to various modalities and stages of processing is another example of that. Then a functional mapping engine identifies the equipment and method that address the cognitive functions required for a given experiment. A very simple example of functional mapping is as follows: the cognitive module <vision> has a function X {to track objects}. The equipment *eye tracker* and the method # EPOG – Eye Point of Gaze# have the functions Y [To look at through computer vision] and Z [to track objects]. The mapping among functions X, Y and Z indicate the equipment and method are suitable for addressing the cognitive characteristic under investigation. On the one hand, if an equipment or method do exist, then the functional mapping assist the research environment designer to identify them and help choosing if several options are available. On the other hand, if an equipment or method do not exist, then the functional mapping assist the research environment designer to design and build them. Moving forward from the very simple example to a more practical and realistic situation, the functional mapping can tackle the issues of choosing the necessary functions – from both sides, cognitive and equipment and methods – to meet fidelity requirements of an experiment. This is suggested to be resolved by the cost-benefit trade-off approach detailed as follows. Based on the functional mapping, selective fidelity can be obtained for modeling and simulation considerations. Thereby advantages and disadvantages of the human factors research environment for future air systems could be balanced by the functional mapping, potentially optimizing the use of simulations. System border definition ought to be considered; the border definition practice borrowed from aircraft product/system configuration can be used to this end. Selective fidelity has been applied to transfer of training in military aviation and simulator based design has been shown to be useful for development of air systems. The proposed functional mapping approach could have the potential of adding to this tradition.

  • 12.
    Turetta, F. M. S.
    et al.
    EMBRAER, Department of Systems Modeling and Simulation, Brazil.
    Ayala, H. V. H.
    EMBRAER, Department of Systems Modeling and Simulation, Brazil.
    Trabasso, Luís Gonzaga
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. SAAB, Aeronautics Human Machine Interaction.
    Alfredson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. SAAB, Aeronautics Human Machine Interaction.
    Data-driven Pilot Behavior Modeling Applied to a VMCG Determination Flight Test Task2016In: Proceedings of the Aerospace Technology Congress / [ed] Kaj Lundahl, Roland Karlsson, Björn Jonsson and Knut Övrebö, Stockholm, 2016, Vol. 1, p. 1-10, article id 1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human models have been studied and used in engineering analysis for over 70 years to allow predictions of the pilot-vehicle system behavior. The difficulties in pilot modeling are evident due to the complexity of the brain, lack of repeatability in behavior and the great number of variables that can affect the human performance. This complexity, associated with the fact that there are no explicit laws to allow modeling based in first principles, could indicate that data-driven modeling techniques would be the most efficient way to obtain pilot models, such as black-box system identification methods that construct dynamic models according to measured input and output data, and where the parameters have no physical meaning. With this approach, it is advantageous to seek knowledge from other fields to allow a better understanding of the pilot behavior, select adequate input/output variables and define the experimental conditions and data. Criteria for evaluating the modeling approaches include adaptability as well as feasibility. Adaptability concerns coping with dynamic and uncertain conditions and feasibility refers to the models contribution to an applied context. This paper presents the results of the application of data-driven theoretical linear dynamic models in the task of representing the behavior of the pilot trying to keep the centerline of the runway after an engine failure. Real data is used, where PID with anti-windup and Hammerstein-Wiener model structures are compared. Results show that the Hammerstein-Wiener structure seems more appropriate to represent this specific behavior.

  • 13.
    Turetta, Felipe M. S.
    et al.
    EMBRAER Syst Modeling and Simulat, Brazil.
    Hultmann Ayala, Helon Vicente
    PUCPR Ind and Syst Engn Grad Program, Brazil.
    Trabasso, Luís Gonzaga
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Inst Tecnol Aeronaut, Brazil.
    Coelho, Leandro S.
    PUCPR Ind and Syst Engn Grad Program, Brazil.
    Alfredson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Saab Aeronaut, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Data-Driven Pilot Behavior Modeling Applied to an Aircraft Offset Landing Task2018In: ADVANCES IN HUMAN ASPECTS OF TRANSPORTATION, SPRINGER INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING AG , 2018, Vol. 597, p. 117-127Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper shows studies for the development of a mathematical model that adequately represents a pilot behavior in the specific task of offset landing, using data-driven modeling techniques. Flight test data was used for the identification procedure. Considerations on the pilots cognitive process and mathematical modeling possibilities were discussed to select the most appropriate inputs and outputs for the model. This data was used to identify the model using artificial neural network techniques. The models obtained were validated against the identification data and different data not used in the training process to evaluate the quality of the models. Conclusions include the difficulties of showing the generalization capabilities of those non-linear models and further studies.

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