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  • 1.
    Linninge, C.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden; BioGaia AB, Sweden.
    Xu, Jie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bahl, M. I
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Ahrne, S.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Molin, G.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus plantarum increased gut microbiota diversity and functionality, and mitigated Enterobacteriaceae, in a mouse model2019In: Beneficial Microbes, ISSN 1876-2883, E-ISSN 1876-2891, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 413-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Probiotics should bring balance to the intestinal microbiota by stimulating beneficial bacteria, whilst mitigating adverse ones. Balance can also be interpreted as high alpha-diversity. Contrary, Escherichia coli is often regarded as an adverse component of the resident intestinal microbiota. The aim of the present study was to implement a mouse model for in vivo screening of Lactobacillus-strains for ability to increase gut-microbiota diversity and to mitigate E. coli. Mice were divided into six groups, two dietary control-groups and four groups administered strains of Lactobacillus fermentum and/or Lactobacillus plantarum. All animals were pre-treated with antibiotics, and E. coli in order to equalise the microbiota from the start. After 7 weeks of Lactobacillus administration, the animals were sacrificed: DNA was extracted from caecum tissue, and the microbiota composition was analysed with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The diversity of the caecal microbiota decreased when the dietary carbohydrate source was limited to corn starch. Conversely, the diversity was restored by Lactobacillus-supplements. The tested combinations of two Lactobacillus strains exerted different influences, not only on the taxonomic level, but also on the inferred microbiome functions. The mixture of L. fermentum GOS47 and L. fermentum GOS1 showed potential for anti-inflammatory activity and short chain fatty acid production. On the other hand, co-administration of L. fermentum GOS57 and L. plantarum GOS42 significantly decreased the viable count of Enterobacteriaceae. These results warrant further investigation of the tested strains as candidates for probiotics. Furthermore, the findings demonstrated that the current experimental animal model is suitable for in vivo studies of the effect of bacterial supplements on the gut-microbiota.

  • 2.
    Xu, Jie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jonsson, Tommy
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Plaza, Merichel
    Univ Alcala De Henares, Spain; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Hakansson, Asa
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Antonsson, Martin
    ProViva AB, Sweden.
    Ahren, Irini Lazou
    Probi AB, Sweden.
    Turner, Charlotta
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Spegel, Peter
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Granfeldt, Yvonne
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Probiotic fruit beverages with different polyphenol profiles attenuated early insulin response2018In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 17, article id 34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Consumption of polyphenol-rich fruits and vegetables may improve postprandial glucose and insulin levels and hence promote well-being. Previously it has been observed that consumption of bilberry decreases the postprandial insulin demand. The intention with the present study was to compare the impact of different supplements with various polyphenol profiles, on the postprandial glucose and insulin responses in healthy young adults. Methods: In a randomized, controlled, crossover study the postprandial glycemic and insulin responses were observed in eleven healthy adults after intake of five different beverages containing bilberry (European blueberry), blackcurrant, beetroot, mango and rose hip, respectively; all drinks were enriched with the same composition of fermented oatmeal and probiotics. The control was a glucose drink. The profile and content of the polyphenols in the different beverages were determined by HPLC-DAD analysis. The antioxidative capacity of the different beverages were measured by TEAC and DPPH assays. Results: Beverages containing bilberry, blackcurrant, mango or rose hip significantly attenuated the early postprandial insulin response (0-90 min), but showed no effect on glucose response. Drinks with bilberry or rose hip reduced the insulin response from the very early phase (0-30 min), and had significantly lower insulin index compared with the control. The efficiency of the bilberry and rose hip to decrease early postprandial insulin responses correlated with higher phenolic contents. Conclusions: Supplements with bilberry, blackcurrant, mango or rose hip in the tested probiotic and oatmeal enriched beverage attenuated early-phase insulin response, but had no effect on the postprandial glycemic response. The improved ability of bilberry and rose hip to lower the very early phase of insulin response seems to be due to a higher phenolic content.

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