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  • 1.
    Alabas, Oras A.
    et al.
    University of Leeds, England.
    Gale, Chris P.
    University of Leeds, England; York Teaching Hospital NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Hall, Marlous
    University of Leeds, England.
    Rutherford, Mark J.
    University of Leicester, England.
    Szummer, Karolina
    Department Med, Sweden.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sex Differences in Treatments, Relative Survival, and Excess Mortality Following Acute Myocardial Infarction: National Cohort Study Using the SWEDEHEART Registry2017In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 6, no 12, article id e007123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-This study assessed sex differences in treatments, all-cause mortality, relative survival, and excess mortality following acute myocardial infarction. Methods and Results-A population-based cohort of all hospitals providing acute myocardial infarction care in Sweden (SWEDEHEART [Swedish Web System for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-Based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies]) from 2003 to 2013 was included in the analysis. Excess mortality rate ratios (EMRRs), adjusted for clinical characteristics and guideline-indicated treatments after matching by age, sex, and year to background mortality data, were estimated. Although there were no sex differences in all-cause mortality adjusted for age, year of hospitalization, and comorbidities for ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-STEMI at 1 year (mortality rate ratio: 1.01 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.96-1.05] and 0.97 [95% CI, 0.95-.99], respectively) and 5 years (mortality rate ratio: 1.03 [95% CI, 0.99-1.07] and 0.97 [95% CI, 0.95-.99], respectively), excess mortality was higher among women compared with men for STEMI and non-STEMI at 1 year (EMRR: 1.89 [95% CI, 1.66-2.16] and 1.20 [95% CI, 1.16-1.24], respectively) and 5 years (EMRR: 1.60 [95% CI, 1.48-1.72] and 1.26 [95% CI, 1.21-1.32], respectively). After further adjustment for the use of guideline-indicated treatments, excess mortality among women with non-STEMI was not significant at 1 year (EMRR: 1.01 [95% CI, 0.97-1.04]) and slightly higher at 5 years (EMRR: 1.07 [95% CI, 1.02-1.12]). For STEMI, adjustment for treatments attenuated the excess mortality for women at 1 year (EMRR: 1.43 [95% CI, 1.26-1.62]) and 5 years (EMRR: 1.31 [95% CI, 1.19-1.43]). Conclusions-Women with acute myocardial infarction did not have statistically different all-cause mortality, but had higher excess mortality compared with men that was attenuated after adjustment for the use of guideline-indicated treatments. This suggests that improved adherence to guideline recommendations for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction may reduce premature cardiovascular death among women.

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  • 2. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Management and Outcome in Non ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes: Similarities and Differences Between Women and Men2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Non ST-elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes are the most frequent manifestations of acute ischemic heart disease. Gender differences in treatment intensity, including differences in level of care, have been reported. Also differences in benefit from certain treatments, especially invasive treatment, have been discussed. Finally, difference in outcome between men and women, have been proposed. Results have been inconsistent, partly depending on if and how adjustment for differences in background characteristics has been made. The aims of the studies in this thesis were to assess differences between the genders in baseline characteristics, level of care, medical treatment and non-invasive and invasive cardiac procedures. The aims were also to determine gender differences in short and long-term mortality, including impact of level of care, and to determine differences between the genders in benefit from an invasive strategy, with special reference to benefit in women.

    Method: We used prospectively collected data from the RIKS-HIA registry in two studies (Paper I and IV). In one study we merged data from patients admitted to general wards in the south-east region of Sweden (The AKUT registry), with data from patients admitted to CCU´s (RIKS-HIA) at participating hospitals during the same time (Paper II). We also randomly assigned women to a routine invasive or a selective invasive treatment strategy, and performed a meta-analysis, to determine gender differences in benefit from a routine invasive strategy (Paper III).

    Results: Women were older than men and more likely to have a history of diabetes and hypertension, while men were more likely to have a history of myocardial infarction and revascularisation. Women were also more likely to have normal coronary arteries on the angiogram. After adjustment for baseline differences there were only minor, and directionally inconsistent, differences between women and men in pharmacological treatment. Men were more often referred for coronary angiography, even after adjustment. While CABG-rate was lower in women, after adjustment PCI-rate was similar or even higher compared to men. After adjustment for differences in age, longterm outcome was better in women. In our small but randomised trial there was no benefit from a routine invasive strategy in women. A meta-analysis indicated interaction between gender and treatment strategy, with lack of benefit in women, in contrast to in men. However, our large observational study indicated no gender difference with an invasive strategy. Moreover, benefit was similar in women and men with invasive treatment.

    Conclusion: There are substantial differences between women and men in baseline characteristics that affect management and outcome more than gender per se. After adjustment women have better long-term outcome than men. There appear to be a difference in benefit from a routine invasive strategy between the genders, with less benefit in women, but in routine clinical management there was no difference between women and men managed with an invasive strategy.

    List of papers
    1. Gender differences in management and outcome in non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender differences in management and outcome in non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome
    2007 (English)In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 93, no 11, p. 1357-1362Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study gender differences in management and outcome in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome. Design, setting and patients: Cohort study of 53 781 consecutive patients (37% women) from the Register of Information and Knowledge about Swedish Heart Intensive care Admissions (RIKS-HIA), with a diagnosis of either unstable angina pectoris or non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction. All patients were admitted to intensive coronary care units in Sweden, between 1998 and 2002, and followed for 1 year. Main outcome measures: Treatment intensity and in-hospital, 30-day and 1 -year mortality. Results: Women were older (73 vs 69 years, p<0.001) and more likely to have a history of hypertension and diabetes, but less likely to have a history of myocardial infarction or revascularisation. After adjustment, there were no major differences in acute pharmacological treatment or prophylactic medication at discharge. Revascularisation was, however, even after adjustment, performed more often in men (OR 1.15, 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.21). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in in-hospital (OR 1.03, 95% CI, 0.94 to 1.13) or 30-days (OR 1.07, 95% CI, 0.99 to 1.15) mortality, but at 1 year being male was associated with higher mortality (OR 1.12, 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.19). Conclusion: Although women are somewhat less intensively treated, especially regarding invasive procedures, after adjustment for differences in background characteristics, they have better long-term outcomes than men.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BMJ Publishing group Ltd, 2007
    Keywords
    acute coronary syndrome, gender
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-47844 (URN)10.1136/hrt.2006.102012 (DOI)17085528 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    2. Although women are less likely to be admitted to coronary care units, they are treated equally to men and have better outcome: A prospective cohort study in patients with non ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Although women are less likely to be admitted to coronary care units, they are treated equally to men and have better outcome: A prospective cohort study in patients with non ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes
    2009 (English)In: Acute cardiac care, ISSN 1748-295X, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 173-180Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess gender differences in admission level of care, management and outcome in patients with non ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS), initially admitted to either coronary care units (CCU) or general wards. Method: Patients admitted to CCUs were routinely registered in the RIKS-HIA registry. In addition, patients admitted to general wards with suspected ACS were also identified and registered. Multivariable regression analysis was used to adjust for baseline differences between the genders. Results: We included 570 consecutive patients with a discharge diagnosis of NSTE-ACS. Women were less likely to be admitted to coronary care units (56% versus 69%, P=0.002), even after adjustment (odds ratio (OR), 0.65; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.43-0.98). After adjustment for differences in baseline characteristics, women were treated similarly to men. We found no significant differences in crude short-, or long-term mortality between the genders. However, adjustment for background characteristics revealed lower one-year mortality in women (OR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.34-0.99). Conclusion: In this study on patients with NSTE-ACS, women were less likely to be admitted to coronary care units. However, the overall treatment was as intensive for women as for men. Moreover, after adjustment, one-year mortality was lower in women.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Informa Healthcare, 2009
    Keywords
    Myocardial infarction; NSTE-ACS; gender differences; level of care
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-53576 (URN)10.1080/17482940903215190 (DOI)19742351 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-01-25 Created: 2010-01-25 Last updated: 2013-09-11
    3.
    The record could not be found. The reason may be that the record is no longer available or you may have typed in a wrong id in the address field.
    4. Similar outcome with an invasive strategy in men and women with Non ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Similar outcome with an invasive strategy in men and women with Non ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gender differences in benefit from an early invasive strategy in patients with Non ST-elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes (NSTE ACS) have been debated and results are conflicting. Some studies have even indicated harm for women associated with a routine invasive strategy.

    Method: We included 46 455 patients ( 14 819 women (32%) and 31 636 men (68%)) from The Register of Information and Knowledge about Swedish Heart Intensive care Admissions (RIKS-HIA), with a diagnosis of either unstable angina pectoris or non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction. All patients were admitted to intensive coronary care units in Sweden, between 2000 and 2006, and followed for 1 year. Adjustment for baseline differences between the genders was made.

    Results: In the non-invasive strategy arm relative risk (RR) of death was (women vs. men) 1.02 (95% CI, 0.94-1.11) and in the invasive strategy arm 1.12 (95% CI, 0.96-1.29). After adjustment for baseline differences between the genders with propensity score and discharge medication there was a trend towards lower mortality among women, RR 0.90 (95% CI, 0.82-0.99) in the early non-invasive group but still no difference in the early invasive cohort RR 0.90 (95% CI, 0.76-1.06). Results were similar with the combined end-point death/MI. The risk reduction with an invasive strategy was similar in women (RR 0.46 (95% CI 0.38-0.55)) and men (RR 0.45 (95% CI 0.40-0.52).

    Conclusion: In this large cohort of patients with NSTE ACS, reflecting real life management, women and men had similar outcome and similar benefit with an early invasive strategy.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-53578 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-01-25 Created: 2010-01-25 Last updated: 2013-09-11
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    Management and Outcome in Non ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes : Similarities and Differences Between Women nad Men
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  • 3.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Duke University, NC 27710 USA.
    Alexander, Karen P.
    Duke University, NC 27710 USA.
    Multiple Chronic Conditions in Older Adults with Acute Coronary Syndromes2016In: Clinics in Geriatric Medicine, ISSN 0749-0690, E-ISSN 1879-8853, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 291-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older adults presenting with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) often have multiple chronic conditions (MCCs). In addition to traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors (ie, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes), common CV comorbidities include heart failure, stroke, and atrial fibrillation, whereas prevalent non-CV comorbidities include chronic kidney disease, anemia, depression, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The presence of MCCs affects the presentation (eg, increased frequency of type 2 myocardial infarctions [MIs]), clinical course, and prognosis of ACS in older adults. In general, higher comorbidity burden increases mortality following MI, reduces utilization of ACS treatments, and increases the importance of developing individualized treatment plans.

  • 4.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Clayton, Tim
    London School Hyg and Trop Med, England.
    Damman, Peter
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Fox, Keith A. A.
    Royal Infirm, Scotland.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Department of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Centre, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Department of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Centre, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    de Winter, Robbert J.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Impact of an invasive strategy on 5 years outcome in men and women with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes2014In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 168, no 4, p. 522-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background A routine invasive (RI) strategy in non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS) has been associated with better outcome compared with a selective invasive (SI) strategy in men, but results in women have yielded disparate results. The aim of this study was to assess gender differences in long-term outcome with an SI compared with an RI strategy in NSTE ACS. Methods Individual patient data were obtained from the FRISC II trial, ICTUS trial, and RITA 3 trial for a collaborative meta-analysis. Results Men treated with an RI strategy had significantly lower rate of the primary outcome 5-year cardiovascular (CV) death/myocardial infarction (MI) compared with men treated with an SI strategy (15.6% vs 19.8%, P = .001); risk-adjusted hazards ratio (HR) 0.73 (95% CI 0.63-0.86). In contrast, there was little impact of an RI compared with an SI strategy on the primary outcome among women (16.5% vs 15.1%, P = .324); risk-adjusted HR 1.13 (95% CI 0.89-1.43), interaction P = .01. For the individual components of the primary outcome, a similar pattern was seen with lower rate of MI (adjusted HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.57-0.83) and CV death (adjusted HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.56-0.89) in men but without obvious difference in women in MI (adjusted HR 1.13, 95% CI 0.85-1.50) or CV death (adjusted HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.68-1.39). Conclusions In this meta-analysis comparing an SI and RI strategy, benefit from an RI strategy during long-term follow-up was confirmed in men. Conversely, in women, there was no evidence of benefit.

  • 5.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Green, Jennifer B.
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Stevens, Susanna R.
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Reed, Shelby D.
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Armstrong, Paul W.
    Univ Alberta, Canada.
    Bethel, M. Angelyn
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Engel, Samuel S.
    Merck and Co Inc, NJ USA.
    McGuire, Darren K.
    Univ Texas Southwestern Med Ctr Dallas, TX 75390 USA.
    Van de Werf, Frans
    Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Hramiak, Irene
    Univ Western Ontario, Canada.
    White, Harvey D.
    Auckland City Hosp, New Zealand.
    Peterson, Eric D.
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Holman, Rury R.
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Sex differences in management and outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: A report from TECOS2018In: Diabetes, obesity and metabolism, ISSN 1462-8902, E-ISSN 1463-1326, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 2379-2388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To examine sex differences in baseline characteristics and outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Materials and methods: Cox models were used to analyse the association between sex and outcomes in the Trial Evaluating Cardiovascular Outcomes with Sitagliptin (TECOS), a randomized, placebo-controlled trial assessing the impact of sitagliptin on cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Results: A total of 4297 women and 10 374 men were followed for a median of 3.0 years. Women were slightly older and more often had cerebrovascular disease and peripheral arterial disease but less often coronary heart disease than men. At baseline, women were less likely to use aspirin or statins. The primary composite outcome of CV death, myocardial infarction, stroke, or hospitalization for unstable angina occurred in 418 women (9.7%) and 1272 men (12.3%; 3.48 vs 4.38 events/100 participant-years, crude hazard ratio [HR] 0.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.71-0.89, adjusted HR 0.64, 95% CI 0.55-0.74; P amp;lt; .0001). Women also had a significantly lower risk of secondary CV outcomes and all-cause death. Conclusions: In this large prospective study of people with type 2 diabetes and CV disease, women had different CV disease burden, worse CV risk factor profiles, and less use of indicated medications than men. Despite this, women had significantly lower risk of CV events, suggesting that the cardioprotective effects of female sex extend to populations with type 2 diabetes.

  • 6.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    James, Stefan K.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Herlitz, Johan
    Univ Boras, Sweden.
    Frobert, Ole
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Dworeck, Christian
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Redfors, Bjorn
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Arefalk, Gabriel
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Ostlund, Ollie
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Mars, Katarina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Haaga, Urban
    Karlstad Cent Hosp, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Hofmann, Robin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Randomized comparison of early supplemental oxygen versus ambient air in patients with confirmed myocardial infarction: Sex-related outcomes from DETO2X-AMI2021In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 237, p. 13-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of oxygen therapy on cardiovascular outcomes in relation to sex in patients with confirmed myocardial infarction (MI). Methods The DETermination of the role of Oxygen in suspected Acute Myocardial Infarction trial randomized 6,629 patients to oxygen at 6 L/min for 6-12 hours or ambient air. In the present subgroup analysis including 5,010 patients (1,388 women and 3,622 men) with confirmed MI, we report the effect of supplemental oxygen on the composite of all-cause death, rehospitalization with MI, or heart failure at long-term follow-up, stratified according to sex. Results Event rate for the composite endpoint was 18.1% in women allocated to oxygen, compared to 21.4% in women allocated to ambient air (hazard ratio [HR] 0.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65-1.05). In men, the incidence was 13.6% in patients allocated to oxygen compared to 13.3% in patients allocated to ambient air (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.86-1.23). No significant interaction in relation to sex was found ( P = .16). Irrespective of allocated treatment, the composite endpoint occurred more often in women compared to men (19.7 vs 13.4%, HR 1.51; 95% CI, 1.30-1.75). After adjustment for age alone, there was no difference between the sexes (HR 1.06, 95% CI 0.91-1.24), which remained consistent after multivariate adjustment. Conclusion Oxygen therapy in normoxemic MI patients did not significantly affect all-cause mortality or rehospitalization for MI or heart failure in women or men. The observed worse outcome in women was explained by differences in baseline characteristics, especially age. (Am Heart J 2021;237:13 & ndash;24.)

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  • 7.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Käll, Anna
    Tilander, Hanna
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Sex matters-lipid goal achievement in a population admitted to a coronary care unit2008In: X Svenska Kardiovaskulära Vårmötet,2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Number A13731

  • 8.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas L
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin M
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Large early variation of residual platelet reactivity in Acute Coronary Syndrome patients treated with clopidogrel: Results from Assessing Platelet Activity in Coronary Heart Disease (APACHE).2015In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 136, no 2, p. 335-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: There is a large inter-individual variation in response to clopidogrel treatment and previous studies have indicated higher risk of thrombotic events in patients with high residual platelet reactivity (HRPR), but the optimal time-point for testing is not established. The aim of this study was to investigate the optimal time-point for aggregometry testing and the risk of major adverse cardiac events associated with HRPR.

    METHOD AND RESULTS: We included 125 patients with ACS (73 with STEMI, and 71 received abciximab). The prevalence of HRPR varied substantially over time. The rate of HRPR in patients treated and not treated with abciximab were 43% vs 67% (p=0.01) before, 2% vs 23% (p=0.001) 6-8h after, 8% vs 9% (p=0.749) 3days after, and 23% vs 12% (p=0.138) 7-9 days after loading dose of clopidogrel. We found HRPR in 18% of the patients but only four ischemic events during 6months follow-up, with no significant difference between HRPR patients compared to the rest of the population. There were 3 TIMI major bleedings, all of which occurred in the low residual platelet reactivity (LRPR) group.

    CONCLUSION: There is a large variation in platelet reactivity over time, also depending on adjunctive therapy, which has a large impact on optimal time-point for assessment. We found HRPR in almost 1 in 5 patients, but very few MACE, and not significantly higher in HRPR patients. In a contemporary ACS population, with low risk for stent thrombosis, the predictive value of HRPR for ischemic events will probably be low.

  • 9.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Uppsala University.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Similar outcome with an invasive strategy in men and women with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes From the Swedish Web-System for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-Based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART)2011In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 32, no 24, p. 3128-3136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To assess gender differences in outcome with an early invasive or non-invasive strategy in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods and results We included 46 455 patients [14 819 women (32%) and 31 636 men (68%)] from the SWEDEHEART register, with NSTE ACS, between 2000 and 2006, and followed them for 1 year. In the non-invasive strategy arm, the relative risk (RR) of death was (women vs. men) 1.02 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.94-1.11] and in the invasive strategy arm 1.12 (95% CI, 0.96-1.29). After adjustment for baseline differences between the genders, with propensity score and discharge medication, there was a similar trend towards better outcome among women in both the early non-invasive cohort [RR 0.90 (95% CI, 0.82-0.99)] and the early invasive cohort [RR 0.90 (95% CI, 0.76-1.06)], although it did not reach statistical significance in the early invasive cohort. Results were similar with the combined endpoint death/myocardial infarction. An early invasive treatment was associated with a marked, and similar, mortality reduction in women [RR 0.46 (95% CI, 0.38-0.55)] and men [RR 0.45 (95% CI, 0.40-0.52)], without interaction with gender. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion In this large cohort of patients with NSTE ACS, reflecting real-life management, women and men had similar and better outcome associated with an invasive strategy.

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  • 10.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA.
    Neely, Benjamin
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA.
    Neely, Megan L.
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA.
    Bhatt, Deepak L.
    Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA 02115 USA; Harvard Medical Sch, MA USA.
    Goodman, Shaun G.
    St Michaels Hospital, Canada; University of Alberta, Canada; University of Alberta, Canada.
    Tricoci, Pierluigi
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA; Duke University, NC 27706 USA.
    Mahaffey, Kenneth W.
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Cornel, Jan H.
    Medical Centre Alkmaar, Netherlands.
    White, Harvey D.
    Auckland City Hospital, New Zealand.
    Fox, Keith A. A.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Prabhakaran, Dorairaj
    Centre Chron Disease Control and Public Health Fdn India, India.
    Winters, Kenneth J.
    Eli Lilly and Co, IN 46285 USA.
    Armstrong, Paul W.
    University of Alberta, Canada; University of Alberta, Canada.
    Magnus Ohman, E.
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA; Duke University, NC 27706 USA.
    Roe, Matthew T.
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC USA; Duke University, NC 27706 USA.
    Predicting the risk of bleeding during dual antiplatelet therapy after acute coronary syndromes2017In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 103, no 15, p. 1168-1176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with aspirin + a P2Y12 inhibitor is recommended for at least 12 months for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), with shorter durations considered for patients with increased bleeding risk. However, there are no decision support tools available to predict an individual patients bleeding risk during DAPT treatment in the post-ACS setting. Methods To develop a longitudinal bleeding risk prediction model, we analysed 9240 patients with unstable angina/non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) from the Targeted Platelet Inhibition to Clarify the Optimal Strategy to Medically Manage Acute Coronary Syndromes (TRILOGY ACS) trial, who were managed without revascularisation and treated with DAPT for a median of 14.8 months. Results We identified 10 significant baseline predictors of non-coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG)-related Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Arteries (GUSTO) severe/life-threatening/moderate bleeding: age, sex, weight, NSTEMI (vs unstable angina), angiography performed before randomisation, prior peptic ulcer disease, creatinine, systolic blood pressure, haemoglobin and treatment with beta-blocker. The five significant baseline predictors of Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) major or minor bleeding included age, sex, angiography performed before randomisation, creatinine and haemoglobin. The models showed good predictive accuracy with Therneaus C-indices: 0.78 (SE=0.024) for the GUSTO model and 0.67 (SE=0.023) for the TIMI model. Internal validation with bootstrapping gave similar C-indices of 0.77 and 0.65, respectively. External validation demonstrated an attenuated C-index for the GUSTO model (0.69) but not the TIMI model (0.68). Conclusions Longitudinal bleeding risks during treatment with DAPT in patients with ACS can be reliably predicted using selected baseline characteristics. The TRILOGY ACS bleeding models can inform riskbenefit considerations regarding the duration of DAPT following ACS.

  • 11.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Omar, Kime
    Vastmanland Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Csog, Jozsef
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Venetsanos, Dimitrios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Bleeding complications with clopidogrel or ticagrelor in ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients: A real life cohort study of two treatment strategies2020In: IJC Heart & Vasculature, E-ISSN 2352-9067, Vol. 27, article id 100495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), including potent P2Y12 inhibition after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is recommended in clinical guidelines. However, bleeding complications are common, and associated with worse outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess incidence of bleeding events with a clopidogrel-based compared to a ticagrelor-based DAPT strategy, in a real world population. Secondary aims were to assess ischemic complications and mortality.

    Methods and Results

    We identified 330 consecutive STEMI patients with a clopidogrel-based and 330 with a ticagrelor-based DAPT strategy. Patientś medical records were searched for bleeding and ischemic complications, over 6 months follow-up.

    The two groups were well balanced in baseline characteristics, age (69 years inboth groups), sex (31% vs 32% females), history of diabetes (19% vs 21%), hypertension (43% in both) and MI (17% vs 15%). There was no difference in CRUSADE bleeding score (28 vs 29). After discharge, there were more than twice as many bleeding events with a ticagrelor-based compared with a clopidogrel-based strategy (13.3% vs. 6.5%, p = 0.005). Bleeding events included significantly more severe bleeding complications (TIMI major/minor [5.8 vs 1.0, p = 0.001]) during the ticagrelor-based period. There was no significant difference in the composite of death, MI or stroke (7.8% vs 7.1%, p = 0.76).

    Conclusions

    In this observational study, a ticagrelor-based DAPT strategy was associated with significantly more bleeding complications, without any significant change in death, MI or stroke. Larger studies are needed to determine whether bleeding complications off-sets benefits with a more potent DAPT strategy in older and more comorbid real-life patients.

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  • 12.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, NC, USA.
    Roe, Matthew T
    Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, NC, USA.
    Balancing the risks and benefits of long-term antiplatelet therapies for cardiovascular disease: clinical, research, and regulatory implications.2015In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 4, no 3, article id e001897Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Roe, Matthew T.
    Duke University of School Med, NC USA.
    Risks and Benefits of Triple Oral Anti-Thrombotic Therapies After Acute Coronary Syndromes and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention2015In: Drug Safety, ISSN 0114-5916, E-ISSN 1179-1942, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 481-491Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The key pathophysiological process underlying symptomatic coronary artery disease, including acute coronary syndromes (ACS), is usually a rupture or an erosion of an atherosclerotic plaque, followed by platelet activation and subsequent thrombus formation. Early clinical trials showed benefit with long-term aspirin treatment, and later-based on large clinical trials-dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT), initially with clopidogrel, and more recently with prasugrel or ticagrelor, has become the established treatment in the post-ACS setting and after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Treatment with DAPT is recommended for both ST-elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST-elevation ACS, as well as after PCI with stenting, in American and European clinical guidelines. Notwithstanding the benefits observed with DAPT, including third-generation P2Y(12) receptor inhibitors plus aspirin, ACS patients remain at high risk for a recurrent cardiovascular event, suggesting that other treatment strategies, including the addition of a third oral anti-platelet agent or a novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC) to standard DAPT regimens, may provide additional benefit for post-ACS patients and for patients undergoing PCI. Adding a third anti-thrombotic agent to DAPT after an ACS event or a PCI procedure has been shown to have modest benefit in terms of ischemic event reduction, but has consistently been associated with increased bleeding complications. Therefore, the quest to optimize anti-thrombotic therapies post-ACS and post-PCI continues unabated but is tempered by the historical experiences to date that indicate that careful patient and dose selection will be critical features of future randomized trials.

  • 14.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Gender influence tretment and outcome of patients with unstable coronary artery disease.2003In: European Heart Journal,2003, 2003, p. 72-72Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Unstable coronary artery disease - a missed diagnosis.2003In: European Heart Journal,2003, 2003, p. 74-74Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Sederholm-Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Although women are less likely to be admitted to coronary care units, they are treated equally to men and have better outcome: A prospective cohort study in patients with non ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes2009In: Acute cardiac care, ISSN 1748-295X, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 173-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess gender differences in admission level of care, management and outcome in patients with non ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS), initially admitted to either coronary care units (CCU) or general wards. Method: Patients admitted to CCUs were routinely registered in the RIKS-HIA registry. In addition, patients admitted to general wards with suspected ACS were also identified and registered. Multivariable regression analysis was used to adjust for baseline differences between the genders. Results: We included 570 consecutive patients with a discharge diagnosis of NSTE-ACS. Women were less likely to be admitted to coronary care units (56% versus 69%, P=0.002), even after adjustment (odds ratio (OR), 0.65; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.43-0.98). After adjustment for differences in baseline characteristics, women were treated similarly to men. We found no significant differences in crude short-, or long-term mortality between the genders. However, adjustment for background characteristics revealed lower one-year mortality in women (OR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.34-0.99). Conclusion: In this study on patients with NSTE-ACS, women were less likely to be admitted to coronary care units. However, the overall treatment was as intensive for women as for men. Moreover, after adjustment, one-year mortality was lower in women.

  • 17.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Duke Clin Research Institute, NC 27705 USA.
    Stebbins, Amanda
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC 27705 USA.
    Brennan, J. Matthew
    Duke University, NC USA.
    Matsouaka, Roland
    Duke University, NC USA.
    Afilalo, Jonathan
    McGill University, Canada.
    Peterson, Eric D.
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC 27705 USA; Duke University, NC USA.
    Vemulapalli, Sreekanth
    Duke University, NC USA.
    Rumsfeld, John S.
    University of Colorado, CO USA.
    Shahian, David
    Massachusetts Gen Hospital, MA 02114 USA.
    Mack, Michael J.
    Baylor Scott and White Heatlh, TX USA.
    Alexander, Karen P.
    Duke Clin Research Institute, NC 27705 USA; Duke University, NC USA.
    Gait Speed Predicts 30-Day Mortality After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Results From the Society of Thoracic Surgeons/American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Therapy Registry2016In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 133, no 14, p. 1351-1359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Surgical risk scores do not include frailty assessments (eg, gait speed), which are of particular importance for patients with severe aortic stenosis considering transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Methods and Results We assessed the association of 5-m gait speed with outcomes in a cohort of 8039 patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement (November 2011-June 2014) and were included in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons/American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Therapy Registry. We evaluated the association between continuous and categorical gait speed and 30-day all-cause mortality before and after adjustment for Society of Thoracic Surgeons-predicted risk of mortality score and key variables. Secondary outcomes included in-hospital mortality, bleeding, acute kidney injury, and stroke. The overall median gait speed was 0.63 m/s (25th-75th percentile, 0.47-0.79 m/s), with the slowest walkers (&lt;0.5 m/s) constituting 28%, slow walkers (0.5-0.83 m/s) making up 48%, and normal walkers (&gt;0.83 m/s) constituting 24% of the population. Thirty-day all-cause mortality rates were 8.4%, 6.6%, and 5.4% for the slowest, slow, and normal walkers, respectively (P&lt;0.001). Each 0.2-m/s decrease in gait speed corresponded to an 11% increase in 30-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.22). The slowest walkers had 35% higher 30-day mortality than normal walkers (adjusted odds ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.80), significantly longer hospital stays, and a lower probability of being discharged to home. Conclusions Gait speed is independently associated with 30-day mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Identification of frail patients with the slowest gait speeds facilitates preprocedural evaluation and anticipation of a higher level of postprocedural care. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01737528.

  • 18.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Gender differences in level of care, management and outcome in non ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes.2008In: ESC,2008, 2008, p. 3169-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Lindback, J
    Wallentin, L
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Similar outcome in women and men with an invasive strategy2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Similar outcome with an invasive strategy in men and women with Non ST-Elevation Acute Coronary SyndromesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gender differences in benefit from an early invasive strategy in patients with Non ST-elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes (NSTE ACS) have been debated and results are conflicting. Some studies have even indicated harm for women associated with a routine invasive strategy.

    Method: We included 46 455 patients ( 14 819 women (32%) and 31 636 men (68%)) from The Register of Information and Knowledge about Swedish Heart Intensive care Admissions (RIKS-HIA), with a diagnosis of either unstable angina pectoris or non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction. All patients were admitted to intensive coronary care units in Sweden, between 2000 and 2006, and followed for 1 year. Adjustment for baseline differences between the genders was made.

    Results: In the non-invasive strategy arm relative risk (RR) of death was (women vs. men) 1.02 (95% CI, 0.94-1.11) and in the invasive strategy arm 1.12 (95% CI, 0.96-1.29). After adjustment for baseline differences between the genders with propensity score and discharge medication there was a trend towards lower mortality among women, RR 0.90 (95% CI, 0.82-0.99) in the early non-invasive group but still no difference in the early invasive cohort RR 0.90 (95% CI, 0.76-1.06). Results were similar with the combined end-point death/MI. The risk reduction with an invasive strategy was similar in women (RR 0.46 (95% CI 0.38-0.55)) and men (RR 0.45 (95% CI 0.40-0.52).

    Conclusion: In this large cohort of patients with NSTE ACS, reflecting real life management, women and men had similar outcome and similar benefit with an early invasive strategy.

  • 21.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wallentin, L
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Sex-based differences in management and outcome in unstable coronary artery disease2005In: Second International Conference on Women, Heart disease and Stroke,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Gender differences in management and outcome in non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome2007In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 93, no 11, p. 1357-1362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study gender differences in management and outcome in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome. Design, setting and patients: Cohort study of 53 781 consecutive patients (37% women) from the Register of Information and Knowledge about Swedish Heart Intensive care Admissions (RIKS-HIA), with a diagnosis of either unstable angina pectoris or non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction. All patients were admitted to intensive coronary care units in Sweden, between 1998 and 2002, and followed for 1 year. Main outcome measures: Treatment intensity and in-hospital, 30-day and 1 -year mortality. Results: Women were older (73 vs 69 years, p<0.001) and more likely to have a history of hypertension and diabetes, but less likely to have a history of myocardial infarction or revascularisation. After adjustment, there were no major differences in acute pharmacological treatment or prophylactic medication at discharge. Revascularisation was, however, even after adjustment, performed more often in men (OR 1.15, 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.21). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in in-hospital (OR 1.03, 95% CI, 0.94 to 1.13) or 30-days (OR 1.07, 95% CI, 0.99 to 1.15) mortality, but at 1 year being male was associated with higher mortality (OR 1.12, 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.19). Conclusion: Although women are somewhat less intensively treated, especially regarding invasive procedures, after adjustment for differences in background characteristics, they have better long-term outcomes than men.

  • 23.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Management of acute coronary syndromes from a gender perspective2010In: FUNDAMENTAL and CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, ISSN 0767-3981, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 719-728Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute Coronary Syndromes are the most frequent manifestations of coronary heart disease (CHD). Gender differences in treatment intensity, including differences in level of care, have been reported. Also differences in benefit from certain treatments, especially invasive treatment, have been discussed. Finally, differences in outcome between men and women have been proposed. Results have been inconsistent, partly depending on if and how adjustment for differences in background characteristics has been made.

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  • 24.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry.
    Individual long-term variation of platelet reactivity in patients with dual antiplatelet therapy after myocardial infarction.2019In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 572-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a large inter-individual variation in response to clopidogrel treatment, and previous studies have indicated higher risk of thrombotic events in those with high residual platelet reactivity (HPR). Less is known about individual variation over time. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to investigate intra-individual variation in platelet reactivity. Platelet aggregation in whole blood was assessed in 77 patients, at 3 days, 8 days and 6 months after admission for acute myocardial infarction and loading dose of clopidogrel. All patients were treated with aspirin and clopidogrel through 6-month follow-up. We found a significant increase in median ADP-stimulated aggregation from third to eighth day (195 vs. 250 AU*min, p-value = 0.001) but not from day 8 to 6 months (250 vs. 223 AU*min, p-value = 0.666). There was no significant change in the overall rate of HPR (15.6% vs 20.8%, p-value 0.503) or low platelet reactivity (LPR) (37.7% vs 33.8%, p-value = 0.609) from day 8 to 6-month follow-up. In contrast, more than one in four changed HPR status, 15.6% from non-HPR to HPR and 10.4% HPR to non-HPR. A shift in LPR status appeared even more frequent, occurring in about one of three patients. In spite of similar median aggregation and rate of HPR during 6-month follow-up, about one in four of the patients changed HPR status and one in three changed LPR status. This may be important information for a concept of risk stratification based on a single aggregation value early after an acute coronary syndromes.

  • 25.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wallentin, L
    ST-segment depression and elevated biochemical cardiac markers are highly predictive of worse outcome in both women and men.2004In: XXVI Congress of the European Soceity of Cardiology,2004, 2004, p. 1762-1762Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Bergström, Göran
    et al.
    Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden; Reg Västra Götaland, Sweden.
    Persson, Margaretha
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skåne Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Adiels, Martin
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Björnson, Elias
    Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden.
    Bonander, Carl
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Angerås, Oskar
    Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden; Reg Västra Götaland, Sweden.
    Berglund, Göran
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå Univ, Sweden.
    Brandberg, John
    Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden; Reg Västra Götaland, Sweden.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cederlund, Kerstin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    de Faire, Ulf
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Duvernoy, Olov
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    Swedish Sch Sport & Hlth Sci GIH, Sweden.
    Engström, Gunnar
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Fagman, Erika
    Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden; Reg Vastra Gotaland, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Sweden.
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skåne Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Fagerberg, Björn
    Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Flinck, Agneta
    Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden; Reg Västra Götaland, Sweden.
    Goncalves, Isabel
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Hagström, Emil
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Hjelmgren, Ola
    Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden; Reg Västra Götaland, Sweden.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Per
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Ljungberg, Johan
    Umeå Univ, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Martin
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skåne Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden; North West Univ, South Africa.
    Mannila, Maria
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Markstad, Hanna
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Mohammad, Moman A.
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skåne Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Cityhälsan Centrum.
    Ostenfeld, Ellen
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Rosengren, Annika
    Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Sandström, Anette
    Umeå Univ, Sweden.
    Själander, Anders
    Umea Univ, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Sköld, Magnus C.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp Solna, Sweden.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå Univ, Sweden.
    Torén, Kjell
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ekholmen. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Prevalence of Subclinical Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in the General Population2021In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 144, no 12, p. 916-929Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Early detection of coronary atherosclerosis using coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), in addition to coronary artery calcification (CAC) scoring, may help inform prevention strategies. We used CCTA to determine the prevalence, severity, and characteristics of coronary atherosclerosis and its association with CAC scores in a general population. Methods: We recruited 30 154 randomly invited individuals age 50 to 64 years to SCAPIS (the Swedish Cardiopulmonary Bioimage Study). The study includes individuals without known coronary heart disease (ie, no previous myocardial infarctions or cardiac procedures) and with high-quality results from CCTA and CAC imaging performed using dedicated dual-source CT scanners. Noncontrast images were scored for CAC. CCTA images were visually read and scored for coronary atherosclerosis per segment (defined as no atherosclerosis, 1% to 49% stenosis, or &gt;= 50% stenosis). External validity of prevalence estimates was evaluated using inverse probability for participation weighting and Swedish register data. Results: In total, 25 182 individuals without known coronary heart disease were included (50.6% women). Any CCTA-detected atherosclerosis was found in 42.1%; any significant stenosis (&gt;= 50%) in 5.2%; left main, proximal left anterior descending artery, or 3-vessel disease in 1.9%; and any noncalcified plaques in 8.3% of this population. Onset of atherosclerosis was delayed on average by 10 years in women. Atherosclerosis was more prevalent in older individuals and predominantly found in the proximal left anterior descending artery. Prevalence of CCTA-detected atherosclerosis increased with increasing CAC scores. Among those with a CAC score &gt;400, all had atherosclerosis and 45.7% had significant stenosis. In those with 0 CAC, 5.5% had atherosclerosis and 0.4% had significant stenosis. In participants with 0 CAC and intermediate 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease according to the pooled cohort equation, 9.2% had CCTA-verified atherosclerosis. Prevalence estimates had excellent external validity and changed marginally when adjusted to the age-matched Swedish background population. Conclusions: Using CCTA in a large, random sample of the general population without established disease, we showed that silent coronary atherosclerosis is common in this population. High CAC scores convey a significant probability of substantial stenosis, and 0 CAC does not exclude atherosclerosis, particularly in those at higher baseline risk.

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  • 27.
    Bollano, Entela
    et al.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Redfors, Björn
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rawshani, Araz
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Venetsanos, Dimitrios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Völz, Sebastian
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Angerås, Oskar
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ljungman, Charlotta
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Råmunddal, Truls
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Petursson, Petur
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Smith, J. Gustav
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden; Skåne Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Braun, Oscar
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skåne Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hagström, Henrik
    Umeå Univ, Sweden; Umeå Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro Univ, Sweden.
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skåne Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Omerovic, Elmir
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Temporal trends in characteristics and outcome of heart failure patient with and without signification coronary artery disease2022In: ESC Heart Failure, E-ISSN 2055-5822, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 1812-1822Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    Ischaemic coronary artery disease (CAD) remains the leading cause of mortality globally due to sudden death and heart failure (HF). Invasive coronary angiography (CAG) is the gold standard for evaluating the presence and severity of CAD. Our objective was to assess temporal trends in CAG utilization, patient characteristics, and prognosis in HF patients undergoing CAG at a national level.

    Methods and results

    We used data from the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry. Data on all patients undergoing CAG for HF indication in Sweden between 2000 and 2018 were collected and analysed. Long-term survival was estimated with multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression adjusted for differences in patient characteristics. In total, 22 457 patients (73% men) with mean age 64.2 ± 11.3 years were included in the study. The patients were increasingly older with more comorbidities over time. The number of CAG specifically for HF indication increased by 5.5% per calendar year (P<0.001). No such increase was seen for indications angina pectoris and ST-elevation myocardial infarction. A normal CAG or non-obstructive CAD was reported in 63.2% (HF-NCAD), and 36.8% had &gt;50% diameter stenosis in one or more coronary arteries (HF-CAD). The median follow-up time was 3.6 years in HF-CAD and 5 years in HF-NCAD. Age and sex-adjusted survival improved linearly by 1.3% per calendar year in all patients. Compared with HF-NCAD, long-term mortality was higher in HF-CAD patients. The risk of death increased with the increasing severity of CAD. Compared with HF-NCAD, the risk estimate in patients with a single-vessel disease was higher [hazard ratio (HR) 1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20-1.41; P<0.0011, a multivessel disease without the involvement of left main coronary artery (HR 1.72; 95% C11.58-1.88; P &lt; 0.001), and with left main disease (HR 2.02; 95% CI 1.88-2.18; P &lt; 0.001). The number of HF patients undergoing revascularization with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) increased by 7.5% (P &lt; 0.001) per calendar year. The majority (53.4%) of HF-CAD patients were treated medically, while a minority (46.6%) were referred for revascularization with PCI or CABG. Compared with patients treated with PCI, the proportion of patients treated medically or with CABG decreased substantially (P<0.001).

    Conclusions

    Over 18 years, the number of patients with HF undergoing CAG has increased substantially. Expanded utilization of CAG increased the number of HF patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass surgery. Long-term survival improved in all HF patients despite a steady increase of elderly patients with comorbidities.

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  • 28.
    Borg, Sabina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine.
    Soderlund, Anne
    Malardalen Univ, Sweden.
    Bäck, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Effectiveness of a behavioral medicine intervention in physical therapy on secondary psychological outcomes and health-related quality of life in exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation: a randomized, controlled trial2023In: BMC SPORTS SCIENCE MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION, ISSN 2052-1847, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundInterventions promoting adherence to exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (exCR) are important to achieve positive physical and psychological outcomes, but knowledge of the added value of behavioral medicine interventions for these measures is limited. The aim of the study was to investigate the added value of a behavioral medicine intervention in physical therapy (BMIP) in routine exCR on psychological outcomes and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) versus routine exCR alone (RC).MethodsA total of 170 patients with coronary artery disease (136 men), mean age 62.3 +/- 7.9 years, were randomized at a Swedish university hospital to a BMIP plus routine exCR or to RC for four months. The outcome assessments included HRQoL (SF-36, EQ-5D), anxiety and depression (HADS), patient enablement and self-efficacy and was performed at baseline, four and 12 months. Between-group differences were tested with an independent samples t-test and, for comparisons within groups, a paired t-test was used. An intention-to-treat and a per-protocol analysis were performed.ResultsNo significant differences in outcomes between the groups were shown between baseline and four months or between four and 12 months. Both groups improved in most SF-36 domains, EQ-VAS and HADS anxiety at the four-month follow-up and sufficient enablement remained at the 12-months follow-up.ConclusionA BMIP added to routine exCR care had no significant effect on psychological outcomes and HRQoL compared with RC, but significant improvements in several measures were shown in both groups at the four-month follow-up. Since recruited participants showed a better psychological profile than the general coronary artery disease population, further studies on BMIP in exCR, tailored to meet individual needs in broader patient groups, are needed.Trial registration number NCT02895451, 09/09/2016, retrospectively registered.

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  • 29.
    Cederstrom, Sofia
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lundman, Pia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Hagstrom, Emil
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Ravn-Fischer, Annica
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Soderberg, Stefan
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Yndigegn, Troels
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Tornvall, Per
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and coronary atherosclerosis in a general middle-aged population2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 12171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite abundant knowledge about the relationship between inflammation and coronary atherosclerosis, it is still unknown whether systemic inflammation measured as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is associated with coronary atherosclerosis in a general population. This study aimed to examine the association between hsCRP and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA)-detected coronary atherosclerosis in a population-based cohort. Out of 30,154 randomly invited men and women aged 50 to 64 years in the Swedish Cardiopulmonary Bioimage Study (SCAPIS), 25,408 had a technically acceptable CCTA and analysed hsCRP. Coronary atherosclerosis was defined as presence of plaque of any degree in any of 18 coronary segments. HsCRP values were categorised in four groups. Compared with hsCRP below the detection limit, elevated hsCRP (& GE; 2.3 mg/L) was weakly associated with any coronary atherosclerosis (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.07-1.24), coronary diameter stenosis & GE; 50% (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.09-1.47), & GE; 4 segments involved (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.01-1.26 ) and severe atherosclerosis (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.05-1.69) after adjustment for age, sex and traditional risk factors. The associations were attenuated after further adjustment for body mass index (BMI), although elevated hsCRP still associated with noncalcified plaques (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.02-1.32), proposed to be more vulnerable. In conclusion, the additional value of hsCRP to traditional risk factors in detection of coronary atherosclerosis is low. The association to high-risk noncalcified plaques, although unlikely through a causal pathway, could explain the relationship between hsCRP and clinical coronary events in numerous studies.

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  • 30.
    Charitakis, Emmanouil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Tsartsalis, Dimitrios
    Hippokrateion Hosp, Greece; Hippokrateion Hosp, Greece.
    Korela, Dafni
    Venizeleio Gen Hosp, Greece.
    Stratinaki, Maria
    Venizeleio Gen Hosp, Greece.
    Vanky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Charitos, Efstratios I
    Kerckhoff Hosp, Germany.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Foukarakis, Emmanouil
    Venizeleio Gen Hosp, Greece.
    Aggeli, Constantina
    Hippokrateion Hosp, Greece.
    Tsioufis, Costas
    Hippokrateion Hosp, Greece.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Risk and protective factors for atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery and valvular interventions: an umbrella review of meta-analyses2022In: Open heart, E-ISSN 2053-3624, Vol. 9, no 2, article id e002074Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) is a common complication affecting approximately one-third of patients after cardiac surgery and valvular interventions. This umbrella review systematically appraises the epidemiological credibility of published meta-analyses of both observational and randomised controlled trials (RCT) to assess the risk and protective factors of POAF. Methods Three databases were searched up to June 2021. According to established criteria, evidence of association was rated as convincing, highly suggestive, suggestive, weak or not significant concerning observational studies and as high, moderate, low or very low regarding RCTs. Results We identified 47 studies (reporting 61 associations), 13 referring to observational studies and 34 to RCTs. Only the transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) approach was associated with the prevention of POAF and was supported by convincing evidence from meta-analyses of observational data. Two other associations provided highly suggestive evidence, including preoperative hypertension and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio. Three associations between protective factors and POAF presented a high level of evidence in meta-analyses, including RCTs. These associations included atrial and biatrial pacing and performing a posterior pericardiotomy. Nineteen associations were supported by moderate evidence, including use of drugs such as amiodarone, b-blockers, glucocorticoids and statins and the performance of TAVR compared with surgical aortic valve replacement. Conclusions Our study provides evidence confirming the protective role of amiodarone, b-blockers, atrial pacing and posterior pericardiotomy against POAF as well as highlights the risk of untreated hypertension. Further research is needed to assess the potential role of statins, glucocorticoids and colchicine in the prevention of POAF.

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  • 31.
    De Geer, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Sandstedt, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Björkholm, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Software-based on-site estimation of fractional flow reserve using standard coronary CT angiography data.2016In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 57, no 10, p. 1186-1192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The significance of a coronary stenosis can be determined by measuring the fractional flow reserve (FFR) during invasive coronary angiography. Recently, methods have been developed which claim to be able to estimate FFR using image data from standard coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) exams.

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the accuracy of non-invasively computed fractional flow reserve (cFFR) from CCTA.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 23 vessels in 21 patients who had undergone both CCTA and invasive angiography with FFR measurement were evaluated using a cFFR software prototype. The cFFR results were compared to the invasively obtained FFR values. Correlation was calculated using Spearman's rank correlation, and agreement using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value for significant stenosis (defined as both FFR ≤0.80 and FFR ≤0.75) were calculated.

    RESULTS: The mean cFFR value for the whole group was 0.81 and the corresponding mean invFFR value was 0.84. The cFFR sensitivity for significant stenosis (FFR ≤0.80/0.75) on a per-lesion basis was 0.83/0.80, specificity was 0.76/0.89, and accuracy 0.78/0.87. The positive predictive value was 0.56/0.67 and the negative predictive value was 0.93/0.94. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient was ρ = 0.77 (P < 0.001) and ICC = 0.73 (P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: This particular CCTA-based cFFR software prototype allows for a rapid, non-invasive on-site evaluation of cFFR. The results are encouraging and cFFR may in the future be of help in the triage to invasive coronary angiography.

  • 32.
    Ehnsio, G.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Norderfeldt, J.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Berg, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Platelet Reactivity During Carciopulmonary Bypass: Marked Reduction Followed by Early Restitution2009In: in Intensive Care Medicine, vol 35, Supplement 1, Posters, Springer, 2009, Vol. 35, p. 132-132Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) affects platelets, and platelet dysfunction is considered to be an important risk factor for post-operative bleeding after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Monitoring platelet function in the peri-operative period therefore is of importance to reduce morbidity due to both bleeding and post-operative graft occlusion. Our aim was to study platelet reactivity in CABG patients in the peri-operative period.

    METHODS. Platelet function in 30 patients undergoing CABG was analyzed using an impedance aggregometry point-of-care (POC) instrument (Multiplate). Platelet reactivity was measured preoperatively at induction of anaesthesia, preoperatively immediately before CPB, after 30 minutes of CPB, after end of CPB, postoperatively at arrival to the ICU and finally at 3 and 18 h after surgery. Whole blood platelet aggregation was measured after activation with ADP (adenosin diphosphate), TRAP (thrombin receptor activating peptide), AA (arachidonic acid) and collagen. Platelet count was measured, and circulating platelet pool was assessed by correcting for hemodilution by indexing to hemoglobin. Non-parametric statistics were used, results are presented as median and 25–75%-percentiles.

    RESULTS. Reactivity to ADP, TRAP and AA agonists was significantly reduced at 30 min of CPB and at the end of CPB, followed by a rapid increase after CPB to preoperative values. Collagen showed a similar, but not significant, decrease during CPB followed by a post-CPB increase to values above baseline (p\0.001). Platelet count dropped after 30 min of CPB from 240 (204–301) preoperatively to 150 (132–189) after 30 min of CPB and further to 134 (120–151) 9 109/L at the end of CPB (p\0.001). Corrected for blood loss and hemodilution there was a reduced platelet pool at the end of CPB and at arrival at the ICU (p\0.001)

    CONCLUSION. There is an early decrease in platelet reactivity during CPB followed by a rapid post-CPB restitution of platelet function, despite low preoperative aggregometry values and lower post-CPB platelet count. The rapid preoperative changes in aggregometry points to a possible role for POC analysis of hemostatic function. The post-CPB increase in platelet reactivity simultaneously to the decrease in platelet count could imply increased aggregating tendency for remaining platelets, with possible implications for early graft failure and postoperative anti-platelet therapy.

  • 33.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    et al.
    Lunds universitet, Sverige.
    Ekerstad, Niklas
    FoU-enheten, NU-sjukvården, Sverige.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johanzon, Madelene
    Centralsjukhuset Karlstad, Sverige.
    Metzner, Carina
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Sverige.
    Strandberg, Timo
    Helsingfors universitet och universitetssjukhus, Finland; Uleåborgs universitet, Finland.
    Wilhelmson, Katarina
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Sverige.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala universitet, Sverige; Tema åldrande, Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Sverige.
    Skörhetsbegreppet viktigt för att förstå den äldre patientens behov [Frailty]2020In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 117Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Frailty is a concept that is better than multimorbidity at identifying older people in need of special multidimensional care. Frailty denotes a state of accelerated biological aging in which the body gradually loses the ability to handle physical, mental and social stress. It is a dynamic condition which can be partly prevented and treated with physical exercise, nutrition and appropriate medication.  They are many validated and simple screening tools for frailty. Some of these screening tools can assess the degree of frailty and thereby provide a risk stratification in for example a medical emergency. This can be used to support decisions to offer relevant medical intervention to chronologically old but biologically young people as well as to refrain from treatment in chronologically young but biologically older people.

  • 34.
    Ekerstad, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. FoU-enheten, NU-sjukvården, Sverige.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet, Sverige.
    Boström, Anne-Marie
    institutionen för neurobiologi, vårdvetenskap och samhälle, Karolinska institutet, Sverige; de två sista Tema inflammation och åldrande, Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Sverige.
    de Geer, Lina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    sektionen för geriatrik, Helsingborgs lasarett; institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper Helsingborg, Lunds universitet, Sverige.
    Guidetti, Susanne
    institutionen för neurobiologi, vårdvetenskap och samhälle, arbetsterapi, Karolinska institutet; Tema kvinnohälsa och hälsoprofessioner, Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Sverige.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Clinical frailty scale – skörhet ärett sätt att skatta biologisk ålder: [Clinical Frailty Scale - a proxy estimate of biological age]2022In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 119, article id 22040Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term frailty denotes a multi-dimensional syndrome characterised by reduced physiological reserves and increased vulnerability. Frailty may be used as a marker of biological age, distinct from chronological age. There are several instruments for frailty assessment. The Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) is probably the most commonly used in the acute care context. It is a 9-level scale, derived from the accumulated deficit model of frailty, which combines comorbidity, disability, and cognitive impairment. The CFS assessment is fast and easy to implement in daily clinical practice. The CFS is relevant for risk stratification, and may also be used as a screening instrument to identify frail patients suitable for further geriatric evaluation, i.e. a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA). By providing information on long-term prognosis, it may improve informed decision-making on an individual basis.

  • 35.
    Ekerstad, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. NU Hosp Grp, Sweden.
    Javadzadeh, Dariush
    NU Hosp Grp, Sweden.
    Alexander, Karen P.
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Bergström, Olle
    Växjö City Hospital, Sweden.
    Eurenius, Lars
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gudnadottir, Gudny
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Ängerud, Karin Hellström
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Jahjah, Radwan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Ewa
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Melander, Kjell
    Kalix Hosp, Sweden.
    Mellbin, Linda
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Monica
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ravn-Fischer, Annica
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svennberg, Lars
    Reg Gavleborg, Sweden.
    Yndigegn, Troels
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Clinical Frailty Scale classes are independently associated with 6-month mortality for patients after acute myocardial infarction2022In: European Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care, ISSN 2048-8726, E-ISSN 2048-8734, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 89-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Data on the prognostic value of frailty to guide clinical decision-making for patients with myocardial infarction (MI) are scarce. To analyse the association between frailty classification, treatment patterns, in-hospital outcomes, and 6-month mortality in a large population of patients with MI. Methods and results An observational, multicentre study with a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data using the SWEDEHEART registry. In total, 3381 MI patients with a level of frailty assessed using the Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS-9) were included. Of these patients, 2509 (74.2%) were classified as non-vulnerable non-frail (CFS 1-3), 446 (13.2%) were vulnerable non-frail (CFS 4), and 426 (12.6%) were frail (CFS 5-9). Frailty and non-frail vulnerability were associated with worse in-hospital outcomes compared with non-frailty, i.e. higher rates of mortality (13.4% vs. 4.0% vs. 1.8%), cardiogenic shock (4.7% vs. 2.5% vs. 1.9%), and major bleeding (4.5% vs. 2.7% vs. 1.1%) (all P &lt; 0.001), and less frequent use of evidence-based therapies. In Cox regression analyses, frailty was strongly and independently associated with 6-month mortality compared with non-frailty, after adjustment for age, sex, the GRACE risk score components, and other potential risk factors [hazard ratio (HR) 3.32, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.30-4.79]. A similar pattern was seen for vulnerable non-frail patients (fully adjusted HR 2.07, 95% CI 1.41-3.02). Conclusion Frailty assessed with the CFS was independently and strongly associated with all-cause 6-month mortality, also after comprehensive adjustment for baseline differences in other risk factors. Similarly, non-frail vulnerability was independently associated with higher mortality compared with those with preserved functional ability.

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  • 36.
    Ekerstad, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. NU NAL Uddevalla Hosp Grp, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alexander, Karen
    Duke Clin Res Inst, NC USA.
    Andersson, David
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Eriksson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Lindenberger, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Frailty as an instrument for evaluation of elderly patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: A follow-up after more than 5 years2018In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 25, no 17, p. 1813-1821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background There is a growing body of evidence on the relevance of using frailty measures also in a cardiovascular context. The estimated time to death is crucial in clinical decision-making in cardiology. However, data on the importance of frailty in long-term mortality are very scarce. The aim of the study was to assess the prognostic value of frailty on mortality at long-term follow-up of more than 5 years in patients 75 years or older hospitalised for non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. We hypothesised that frailty is independently associated with long-term mortality. Design This was a prospective, observational study conducted at three centres. Methods and results Frailty was assessed according to the Canadian Study of Health and Aging clinical frailty scale (CFS). Of 307 patients, 149 (48.5%) were considered frail according to the study instrument (degree 5-7 on the scale). The long-term all-cause mortality of more than 5 years (median 6.7 years) was significantly higher among frail patients (128, 85.9%) than non-frail patients (85, 53.8%), (P amp;lt; 0.001). In Cox regression analysis, frailty was independently associated with mortality from the index hospital admission to the end of follow-up (hazard ratio 2.06, 95% confidence interval 1.51-2.81; P amp;lt; 0.001) together with age (P amp;lt; 0.001), ejection fraction (P = 0.012) and Charlson comorbidity index (P = 0.018). Conclusions In elderly non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients, frailty was independently associated with all-cause mortality at long-term follow-up of more than 6 years. The combined use of frailty and comorbidity may be the ultimate risk prediction concept in the context of cardiovascular patients with complex needs.

  • 37.
    Ekerstad, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Löfmark, Rurik
    Stockholm Centre for Healthcare Ethics, LIME, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Lindenberger, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Andersson, David
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Frailty is independently associated with 1-year mortality for elderly patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction2014In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 21, no 10, p. 1216-1224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: For the large population of elderly patients with cardiovascular disease, it is crucial to identify clinically relevant measures of biological age and their contribution to risk. Frailty is denoting decreased physiological reserves and increased vulnerability. We analysed the manner in which the variable frailty is associated with 1-year outcomes for elderly non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients aged 75 years or older, with diagnosed NSTEMI were included at three centres, and clinical data including judgment of frailty were collected prospectively. Frailty was defined according to the Canadian Study of Health and Aging Clinical Frailty Scale. Of 307 patients, 149 (48.5%) were considered frail. By Cox regression analyses, frailty was found to be independently associated with 1-year mortality after adjusting for cardiovascular risk and comorbid conditions (hazard ratio 4.3, 95% CI 2.4-7.8). The time to the first event was significantly shorter for frail patients than for nonfrail (34 days, 95% CI 10-58, p = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Frailty is strongly and independently associated with 1-year mortality. The combined use of frailty and comorbidity may constitute an important risk prediction concept in regard to cardiovascular patients with complex needs.

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  • 38.
    Ekerstad, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Löfmark, Rurik
    Stockholm Centre for Healthcare Ethics, LIME, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Lindenberger, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Frailty as a Predictor of Short-Term Outcomes for Elderly Patients with non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (NSTEMI)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background – For the large and growing population of elderly patients with cardiovascular disease it is important to identify clinically relevant measures of biological age and their contribution to risk. Frailty is an emerging concept in medicine denoting increased vulnerability and decreased physiologic reserves. We analyzed how the variable frailty predicts short-term outcomes for elderly NSTEMI patients.

    Methods and Results – Patients, aged 75 years or older, with diagnosed NSTEMI were included at three centers, and clinical data including judgement of frailty were collected prospectively. Frailty was defined according to the Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA) Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS). Of 307 patients, 150 (48.5%) were considered frail. Frail patients were slightly older and presented with a greater burden of comorbidity. By multiple logistic regression, frailty was found to be a strong independent risk factor for inhospital mortality, one-month mortality (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.3 to 10.8) and the primary composite outcome (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.3 to 3.7). Particularly frail patients with a high comorbidity burden manifested a markedly increased risk for the primary composite outcome. By multiple linear regression, frailty was identified as a strong independent predictor for prolonged hospital care (frail 13.4 bed days, non-frail 7.5 bed days; P<0.0001).

    Conclusions - Frailty is a strong independent predictor of in-hospital mortality, one-month mortality, prolonged hospital care and the primary composite outcome. The combined use of frailty and comorbidity may constitute an ultimate risk prediction concept regarding cardiovascular patients with complex needs.

  • 39.
    Ekerstad, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Löfmark, Rurik
    LIME, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindenberger, Marcus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Frailty is independently associated with short-term outcomes for elderly patients with non-st-segment elevation myocardial infarction2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Ekerstad, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Löfmark, Rurik
    Department of Medical Ethics, LIME, Karolinska Institutet.
    Lindenberger, Marcus
    Department of Medicine, Ryhov County Hospital Jönköping.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Frailty Is Independently Associated With Short-Term Outcomes for Elderly Patients With Non-ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction2011In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 124, no 22, p. 2397-2404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: For the large and growing population of elderly patients with cardiovascular disease, it is important to identify clinically relevant measures of biological age and their contribution to risk. Frailty is an emerging concept in medicine denoting increased vulnerability and decreased physiological reserves. We analyzed the manner in which the variable frailty predicts short-term outcomes for elderly non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients.

    Methods and results: Patients aged ≥ 75 years, with diagnosed non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were included at 3 centers, and clinical data including judgment of frailty were collected prospectively. Frailty was defined according to the Canadian Study of Health and Aging Clinical Frailty Scale. The impact of the comorbid conditions on risk was quantified by the coronary artery disease-specific index. Of 307 patients, 149 (48.5%) were considered frail. By multiple logistic regression, frailty was found to be strongly and independently associated with risk for the primary composite outcome (death from any cause, myocardial reinfarction, revascularization due to ischemia, hospitalization for any cause, major bleeding, stroke/transient ischemic attack, and need for dialysis up to 1 month after inclusion) (odds ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.7) in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 4.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-16.8), and 1-month mortality (odds ratio, 4.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-13.0).

    Conclusions: Frailty is strongly and independently associated with in-hospital mortality, 1-month mortality, prolonged hospital care, and the primary composite outcome. The combined use of frailty and comorbidity may constitute an ultimate risk prediciton concept in regard to cardiovascular patients with complex needs.

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  • 41.
    El-Saadi, Walid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Martins, Marcelo
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Faisal Zaman, Shaikh
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    A head-to-head comparison of myocardial strain by fast-strain encoding and feature tracking imaging in acute myocardial infarction2022In: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine, E-ISSN 2297-055X, Vol. 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundMyocardial infarction (MI) is a major cause of heart failure. Left ventricular adverse remodeling is common post-MI. Several studies have demonstrated a correlation between reduced myocardial strain and the development of adverse remodeling. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) with fast-strain encoding (fast-SENC) or feature tracking (FT) enables rapid assessment of myocardial deformation. The aim of this study was to establish a head-to-head comparison of fast-SENC and FT in post-ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients, with clinical 2D speckle tracking echocardiography (2DEcho) as a reference. MethodsThirty patients treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention for STEMI were investigated. All participants underwent CMR examination with late gadolinium enhancement, cine-loop steady-state free precession, and fast-SENC imaging using a 1.5T scanner as well as a 2DEcho. Global longitudinal strain (GLS), segmental longitudinal strain (SLS), global circumferential strain (GCS), and segmental circumferential strain (SCS) were assessed along with the MI scar extent. ResultsThe GCS measurements from fast-SENC and FT were nearly identical: the mean difference was 0.01 (2.5)% (95% CI - 0.92 to 0.95). For GLS, fast-SENC values were higher than FT, with a mean difference of 1.8 (1.4)% (95% CI 1.31-2.35). Tests of significance for GLS did not show any differences between the MR methods and 2DEcho. Average strain in the infarct-related artery (IRA) segments compared to the remote myocardium was significantly lower for the left anterior descending artery and right coronary artery culprits but not for the left circumflex artery culprits. Fast-SENC displayed a higher area under the curve for detecting infarcted segments than FT for both SCS and SLS. ConclusionGLS and GCS did not significantly differ between fast-SENC and FT. Both showed acceptable agreement with 2DEcho for longitudinal strain. Segments perfused by the IRA showed significantly reduced strain values compared to the remote myocardium. Fast-SENC presented a higher sensitivity and specificity for detecting infarcted segments than FT.

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  • 42.
    El-Saadi, Walid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Martins, Marcelo
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Zaman, Shaikh Faisal
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Correction: A head-to-head comparison of myocardial strain by fast-strain encoding and feature tracking imaging in acute myocardial infarction (vol 9, 949440, 2022)2023In: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine, E-ISSN 2297-055X, Vol. 10, article id 1140214Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Engstroem, Gunnar
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lampa, Erik
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Dekkers, Koen
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lin, Yi-Ting
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Kaohsiung Med Univ, Taiwan.
    Ahlm, Kristin
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Ahlstroem, Hakan
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden; Antaros Med AB, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Bergstroem, Goeran
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Brandberg, John
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Caidahl, Kenneth
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Cederlund, Kerstin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Duvernoy, Olov
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Eriksson, Maria J.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Fall, Tove
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Gigante, Bruna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Gummesson, Anders
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Reg Vastra Gotaland, Sweden.
    Hagstroem, Emil
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Hamrefors, Viktor
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hedner, Jan
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Gothenburg Univ, Sweden.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Johnson, Linda
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Mannila, Maria
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulf
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Sweden.
    Persson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Persson, Margaretha
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ramnemark, Anna
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Rosengren, Annika
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Univ, Sweden.
    Schmidt, Caroline
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skoglund Larsson, Linn
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Skoeld, C. Magnus
    Karolinska Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Soederberg, Stefan
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Toren, Kjell
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Waldenstroem, Anders
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Wollmer, Per
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Zaigham, Suneela
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ekholmen. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Sundstroem, Johan
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Pulmonary function and atherosclerosis in the general population: causal associations and clinical implications2024In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reduced lung function is associated with cardiovascular mortality, but the relationships with atherosclerosis are unclear. The population-based Swedish CArdioPulmonary BioImage study measured lung function, emphysema, coronary CT angiography, coronary calcium, carotid plaques and ankle-brachial index in 29,593 men and women aged 50-64 years. The results were confirmed using 2-sample Mendelian randomization. Lower lung function and emphysema were associated with more atherosclerosis, but these relationships were attenuated after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors. Lung function was not associated with coronary atherosclerosis in 14,524 never-smokers. No potentially causal effect of lung function on atherosclerosis, or vice versa, was found in the 2-sample Mendelian randomization analysis. Here we show that reduced lung function and atherosclerosis are correlated in the population, but probably not causally related. Assessing lung function in addition to conventional cardiovascular risk factors to gauge risk of subclinical atherosclerosis is probably not meaningful, but low lung function found by chance should alert for atherosclerosis.

  • 44.
    Erhag, Hanna Falk
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Guonadottir, Gudny
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ekerstad, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. NU Hosp Grp, Sweden.
    Religa, Dorota
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Nellgard, Bengt
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wilhelmson, Katarina
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Association Between the Clinical Frailty Scale and Adverse Health Outcomes in Older Adults in Acute Clinical Settings - A Systematic Review of the Literature2023In: Clinical Interventions in Aging, ISSN 1176-9092, E-ISSN 1178-1998, Vol. 18, p. 249-261Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Frail older adults experience higher rates of adverse health outcomes. Therefore, assessing pre-hospital frailty early in the course of care is essential to identify the most vulnerable patients and determine their risk of deterioration. The Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) is a frailty assessment tool that evaluates pre-hospital mobility, energy, physical activity, and function to generate a score that ranges from very fit to terminally ill.Purpose: To synthesize the evidence of the association between the CFS degree and all-cause mortality, all-cause readmission, length of hospital stay, adverse discharge destination, and functional decline in patients &gt;65 years in acute clinical settings. Design: Systematic review with narrative synthesis.Methods: Electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus) were searched for prospective or retrospective studies reporting a relationship between pre-hospital frailty according to the CFS and the outcomes of interest from database inception to April 2020. Results: Our search yielded 756 articles, of which 29 studies were included in this review (15 were at moderate risk and 14 at low risk of bias). The included studies represented 26 cohorts from 25 countries (N = 44166) published between 2011 and 2020. All included studies showed that pre-hospital frailty according to the CFS is an independent predictor of all adverse health outcomes included in the review.Conclusion: A primary purpose of the CFS is to grade clinically increased risk (i.e. risk stratification). Our results report the accumulated knowledge on the risk-predictive performance of the CFS and highlight the importance of routinely including frailty assessments, such as the CFS, to estimate biological age, improve risk assessments, and assist clinical decision-making in older adults in acute care. Further research into the potential of the CFS and whether implementing the CFS in routine practice will improve care and patients quality of life is warranted.

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  • 45.
    Figtree, Gemma A.
    et al.
    Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia; Univ Sydney, Australia; Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia.
    Vernon, Stephen T.
    Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia; Univ Sydney, Australia; Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia.
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala Clin Res Ctr, Sweden.
    Sundstrom, Johan
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; UNSW Sydney, Australia.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Arnott, Clare
    UNSW Sydney, Australia; Royal Prince Alfred Hosp, Australia.
    Delatour, Vincent
    Lab Natl Metrol & Essais, France.
    Leosdottir, Margret
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Hagstrom, Emil
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Mortality in STEMI patients without standard modifiable risk factors: a sex-disaggregated analysis of SWEDEHEART registry data2021In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 397, no 10279, p. 1085-1094Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background In cardiovascular disease, prevention strategies targeting standard modifiable cardiovascular risk factors (SMuRFs; hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia, and smoking) are crucial; however, myocardial infarction in the absence of SMuRFs is not infrequent. The outcomes of individuals without SMuRFs are not well known. Methods We retrospectively analysed adult patients with first-presentation ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) using data from the Swedish myocardial infarction registry SWEDEHEART. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of adult patients (age &gt;= 18 years) with and without SMuRFs were examined overall and by sex. Patients with a known history of coronary artery disease were excluded. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality at 30 days after STEMI presentation. Secondary outcomes included cardiovascular mortality, heart failure, and myocardial infarction at 30 days. Endpoints were also examined up to discharge, and to the end of a 12-year follow-up. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to compare in-hospital mortality, and Cox-proportional hazard models and Kaplan-Meier analysis for long-term outcomes. Findings Between Jan 1, 2005, and May 25, 2018, 9228 (14.9%) of 62 048 patients with STEMI had no SMuRFs reaching diagnostic thresholds. Median age was similar between patients with SMuRFs and patients without SMuRFs (68 years [IQR 59-78]) vs 69 years [60-78], p&lt;0.0001). SMuRF-less patients had a similar rate of percutaneous coronary intervention to those with at least one modifiable risk factor, but were significantly less likely to receive statins, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin receptor blockade (ARB), or beta-blockers at discharge. By 30 days after presentation, all-cause mortality was significantly higher in SMuRF-less patients (hazard ratio 1.47 [95% CI 1.37-1.57], p&lt;0.0001). SMuRF-less women had the highest 30-day mortality (381 [17.6%] of 2164), followed by women with SMuRFs (2032 [11.1%] of 18 220), SMuRF-less men (660 [9.3%] of 7064), and men with SMuRFs (2117 [6.1%] of 34 600). The increased risk of 30-day all-cause mortality in SMuRF-less patients remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, left ventricular ejection fraction, creatinine, and blood pressure, but was attenuated on inclusion of pharmacotherapy prescription (ACEI or ARB, beta-blocker, or statin) at discharge. Additionally, SMuRF-less patients had a significantly higher rate of in-hospital all-cause mortality than patients with one or more SMuRF (883 [9.6%] vs 3411 [6.5%], p&lt;0.0001). Myocardial infarction and heart failure at 30 days were lower in SMuRF-less patients. All-cause mortality remained increased in the SMuRF-less group for more than 8 years in men and up to the 12-year endpoint in women. Interpretation Individuals who present with STEMI in the absence of SMuRFs have a significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality, compared with those with at least one SMuRF, which was particularly evident in women. The increased early mortality rates are attenuated after adjustment for use of guideline-indicated treatments, highlighting the need for evidence-based pharmacotherapy during the immediate post-infarct period irrespective of perceived low risk. Copyright (C) 2021 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 46.
    Figtree, Gemma A.
    et al.
    Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia; Univ Sydney, Australia; Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia.
    Vernon, Stephen T.
    Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia; Univ Sydney, Australia; Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia.
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Sundstrom, Johan
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; UNSW Sydney, Australia.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nicholls, Stephen J.
    Monash Univ, Australia.
    Chow, Clara K.
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Westmead Hosp, Australia.
    Psaltis, Peter
    Univ Adelaide, Australia; Univ Adelaide, Australia.
    Rosjo, Helge
    Akershus Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway; Uppsala Clin Res Ctr, Sweden.
    Leosdottir, Margret
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Hagström, Emil
    Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia; Uppsala Clin Res Ctr, Sweden.
    Mortality and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients Presenting With Non-ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction Despite No Standard Modifiable Risk Factors: Results From the SWEDEHEART Registry2022In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 11, no 15, article id e024818Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background A significant proportion of patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (MI) have no standard modifiable cardiovascular risk factors (SMuRFs) and have unexpected worse 30-day outcomes compared with those with SMuRFs. The aim of this article is to examine outcomes of patients with non-ST-segment-elevation MI in the absence of SMuRFs. Methods and Results Presenting features, management, and outcomes of patients with non-ST-segment-elevation MI without SmuRFs (hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, smoking) were compared with those with SmuRFs in the Swedish MI registry SWEDEHEART (Swedish Web-System for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-Based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies; 2005-2018). Cox proportional hazard models were used. Out of 99 718 patients with non-ST-segment-elevation MI, 11 131 (11.2%) had no SMuRFs. Patients without SMuRFs had higher all-cause and cardiovascular mortality at 30 days (hazard ratio [HR], 1.20 [95% CI, 1.10-1.30], P&lt;0.0001; and HR, 1.25 [95% CI, 1.13-1.38]), a difference that remained after adjustment for age and sex. SMuRF-less patients were less likely to receive secondary prevention statins (76% versus 82%); angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockade (54% versus 72%); or beta-blockers (81% versus 87%, P for all &lt;0.0001), with lowest rates observed in women without SMuRFs. In patients who survived to 30 days, rates of all-cause and cardiovascular death were lower in patients without SMuRFs compared with those with risk factors, over 12 years. Conclusions One in 10 patients presenting with non-ST-segment-elevation MI present without traditional risk factors. The excess 30-day mortality rate in this group emphasizes the need for both improved population-based strategies for prevention of MI, as well as the need for equitable evidence-based treatment at the time of an MI.

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  • 47.
    Green, Jennifer B.
    et al.
    Duke Univ, NC USA; Duke Clin Res Inst, NC 27715 USA.
    Merrill, Peter
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Lokhnygina, Yuliya
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Mentz, Robert J.
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Holman, Rury R.
    Univ Oxford, England.
    EXSCEL Study Grp,
    Sex differences in the complications, care and clinical outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes in the Exenatide Study of Cardiovascular Event Lowering (EXSCEL)2023In: Diabetes, obesity and metabolism, ISSN 1462-8902, E-ISSN 1463-1326, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 1473-1484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To examine sex differences in the characteristics and outcomes in participants with type 2 diabetes (T2D), with or without cardiovascular disease (CVD), randomized to once-weekly exenatide (EQW) or placebo in the Exenatide Study of Cardiovascular Event Lowering (EXSCEL).Materials and Methods: Baseline characteristics were summarized and compared by sex. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used for clinical outcomes, including the primary composite outcome of cardiovascular (CV) death, non-fatal myocardial infarction or non-fatal stroke (MACE3). Models including sex-by-treatment interaction were used to evaluate differences in effects of EQW.Results: Overall, 5603 women and 9149 men were followed for a median of 3.2 years. Women were younger (mean 61.4 vs. 62.2 years, P &lt; .001) and had a shorter duration of diabetes (mean 12.9 vs. 13.2 years, P = .039) and less coronary artery disease (35.2% vs. 61.0%, P &lt; .001) than men, but also a less favourable metabolic risk profile and lower use of cardioprotective medications. MACE3 occurred in 9.1% of women and 13.5% of men, corresponding to 2.82 versus 4.40 events/100 participant-years (adjusted hazard ratio 0.80, 95% CI: 0.70-0.93, P = .003). There was no difference in MACE3 with EQW compared with placebo, or evidence of heterogeneity of treatment effect by sex.Conclusions: This analysis of a large population of individuals with T2D, with or without established CVD, identified between-sex differences in clinical characteristics and care. Despite having worse management of CV risk factors, women had significantly lower rates of important CV events not attributable to the effects of study treatment.

  • 48.
    Hamilton, Eleonora
    et al.
    Danderyd Hosp, Sweden; Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Desta, Liyew
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Anna
    Novartis, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Christersson, Christina
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Kellerth, Thomas
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Krister
    Danderyd Hosp, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Omerovic, Elmir
    Acad Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Reitan, Christian
    Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Prevalence and prognostic impact of left ventricular systolic dysfunction or pulmonary congestion after acute myocardial infarction2023In: ESC Heart Failure, E-ISSN 2055-5822, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 1347-1357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimsThe aim was to describe the prevalence, characteristics, and outcome of patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) developing left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction or pulmonary congestion by applying different criteria to define the population. Methods and resultsIn patients with MI included in the Swedish web-system for enhancement and development of evidence-based care in heart disease (SWEDEHEART) registry, four different sets of criteria were applied, creating four not mutually exclusive subsets of patients: patients with MI and ejection fraction (EF) &lt; 50% and/or pulmonary congestion (subset 1); EF &lt; 40% and/or pulmonary congestion (subset 2); EF &lt; 40% and/or pulmonary congestion and at least one high-risk feature (subset 3, PARADISE-MI like); and EF &lt; 50% and no diabetes mellitus (subset 4, DAPA-MI like). Subsets 1, 2, 3, and 4 constituted 31.6%, 15.0%, 12.8%, and 22.8% of all patients with MI (n = 87 177), respectively. The age and prevalence of different co-morbidities varied between subsets. For median age, 70 to 77, for diabetes mellitus, 22 to 33%; for chronic kidney disease, 22 to 38%, for prior MI, 17 to 21%, for atrial fibrillation, 7 to 14%, and for ST-elevations, 38 to 50%. The cumulative incidence of death or heart failure hospitalization at 3 years was 17.4% (95% CI: 17.1-17.7%) in all MIs; 26.9% (26.3-27.4%) in subset 1; 37.6% (36.7-38.5%) in subset 2; 41.8% (40.7-42.8%) in subset 3; and 22.6% (22.0-23.2%) in subset 4. ConclusionsDepending on the definition, LV systolic dysfunction or pulmonary congestion is present in 13-32% of all patients with MI and is associated with a two to three times higher risk of subsequent death or HF admission. There is a need to optimize management and improve outcomes for this high-risk population.

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  • 49.
    Hammaréus, Filip
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ong, Kwok-Leung
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Enheten för folkhälsa.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Anna K.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Chung, Rosanna W. S.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Holm Nielsen, Signe
    Department of Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark; Nordic Bioscience, Herlev, Denmark.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Plasma type I collagen α1 chain in relation to coronary artery disease: findings from a prospective population-based cohort and an acute myocardial infarction prospective cohort in Sweden.2023In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 9, article id e073561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between type I collagen α1 chain (COL1α1) levels and coronary artery disease (CAD) by using absolute quantification in plasma. Also, to investigate the correlates of COL1α1 to clinical characteristics and circulating markers of collagen metabolism.

    DESIGN: Life conditions, Stress and Health (LSH) study: prospective cohort study, here with a nested case-control design.Assessing Platelet Activity in Coronary Heart Disease (APACHE) study: prospective cohort study.

    SETTING: LSH: primary care setting, southeast Sweden.APACHE: cardiology department, university hospital, southeast Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: LSH: 1007 randomly recruited individuals aged 45-69 (50% women). Exclusion criteria was serious disease. After 13 years of follow-up, 86 cases with primary endpoint were identified and sex-matched/age-matched to 184 controls.

    APACHE: 125 patients with myocardial infarction (MI), 73 with ST-elevation MI and 52 with non-ST-elevation MI.

    EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Intervention study participation, warfarin treatment and short life expectancy.

    PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome was the association between baseline COL1α1 and first-time major event of CAD, defined as fatal/non-fatal MI or coronary revascularisation after 13 years. Secondary outcomes were the association between the collagen biomarkers PRO-C1 (N-terminal pro-peptide of type I collagen)/C1M (matrix metalloproteinase-mediated degradation of type I collagen) and CAD; temporal change of COL1α1 after acute MI up to 6 months and lastly, correlates between COL1α1 and patient characteristics along with circulating markers of collagen metabolism.

    RESULTS: COL1α1 levels were associated with CAD, both unadjusted (HR=0.69, 95% CI=0.56 to 0.87) and adjusted (HR=0.55, 95% CI=0.41 to 0.75). PRO-C1 was associated with CAD, unadjusted (HR=0.62, 95% CI=0.47 to 0.82) and adjusted (HR=0.61, 95% CI=0.43 to 0.86), while C1M was not. In patients with MI, COL1α1 remained unchanged up to 6 months. COL1α1 was correlated to PRO-C1, but not to C1M.

    CONCLUSIONS: Plasma COL1α1 was independently and inversely associated with CAD. Furthermore, COL1α1 appeared to reflect collagen synthesis but not degradation. Future studies are needed to confirm whether COL1α1 is a clinically useful biomarker of CAD.

  • 50.
    Hedayati, Elham
    et al.
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute and University Hospital, Sweden; Breast Cancer Flow, Patient Area of Breast Cancer Sarcoma and Endocrine Tumours, Theme Cancer, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Papakonstantinou, Antroula
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute and University Hospital, Sweden; Breast Cancer Flow, Patient Area of Breast Cancer Sarcoma and Endocrine Tumours, Theme Cancer, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gernaat, Sofie A M
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute and University Hospital, Sweden.
    Altena, Renske
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute and University Hospital, Sweden; Breast Cancer Flow, Patient Area of Breast Cancer Sarcoma and Endocrine Tumours, Theme Cancer, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brand, Judit S.
    Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bhoo-Pathy, Nirmala
    Julius Centre University of Malaya, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Malaysia.
    Herrmann, Jeorg
    Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
    Linde, Cecilia
    Heart and Vascular Theme, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Bergh, Jonas
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute and University Hospital, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden; Breast Cancer Flow, Patient Area of Breast Cancer Sarcoma and Endocrine Tumours, Theme Cancer, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hübbert, Laila
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Transplant Institute, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Outcome and presentation of heart failure in breast cancer patients: findings from a Swedish register-based study2020In: European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes, ISSN 2058-5225, E-ISSN 2058-1742, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 147-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart failure (HF) patients diagnosed with breast cancer (BC) may have a higher risk of death, and different HFpresentation and treatment than patients without BC.

    Methods and results:A total of 14 998 women with incident HF (iHF) or prevalent HF (pHF) enrolled in the Swedish HF Registrywithin and after 1 month since HF diagnosis, respectively, between 2008 and 2013. Patients were linked withthe National Patient-, Cancer-, and Cause-of-Death Registry. Two hundred and ninety-four iHF and 338 pHFpatients with BC were age-matched to 1470 iHF and 1690 pHF patients without BC. Comorbidity and treatmentcharacteristics were compared using the v2 tests for categories. Cox proportional hazard models assessedthe hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality amongHF patients with and without BC. In the pHF group, BC patients had less often myocardial infarction (21.6% vs.28.6%, P < 0.01) and received less often aspirin (47.6% vs. 55.1%, P = 0.01), coronary revascularization (11.8% vs.16.2%, P < 0.01), or device therapy (0.9% vs. 3.0%, P = 0.03). After median follow-up of 2 years, risk of all-causemortality (iHF: HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.83–1.29 and pHF: HR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.79–1.12), cardiovascular mortality(iHF: HR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.71–1.24 and pHF: HR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.71–1.10), and HF mortality (iHF: HR = 0.80,95% CI = 0.34–1.90 and pHF: HR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.43–1.29) were similar for patients with and without BC inthe iHF and pHF groups.

    Conclusion: Risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in HF patients did not differ by BC status. Differences in pre-existingmyocardial infarction and HF treatment among pHF patients with and without BC may suggest differences in pathogenesis of HF.  

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