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  • 1.
    Eskilsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Matsuwaki, Takashi
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Shionoya, Kiseko
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mirrasekhian, Elahe
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zajdel, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schwaninger, Markus
    University of Lubeck, Germany.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Immune-Induced Fever Is Dependent on Local But Not Generalized Prostaglandin E-2 Synthesis in the Brain2017In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 37, no 19, p. 5035-5044Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fever occurs upon binding of prostaglandin E-2 (PGE(2)) to EP3 receptors in the median preoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus, but the origin of the pyrogenic PGE(2) has not been clearly determined. Here, using mice of both sexes, we examined the role of local versus generalized PGE(2) production in the brain for the febrile response. In wild-type mice and in mice with genetic deletion of the prostaglandin synthesizing enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 in the brain endothelium, generated with an inducible CreER(T2) under the Slco1c1 promoter, PGE(2) levels in the CSF were only weakly related to the magnitude of the febrile response, whereas the PGE(2) synthesizing capacity in the hypothalamus, as reflected in the levels of cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA, showed strong correlation with the immune-induced fever. Histological analysis showed that the deletion of cyclooxygenase-2 in brain endothelial cells occurred preferentially in small-and medium-sized vessels deep in the brain parenchyma, such as in the hypothalamus, whereas larger vessels, and particularly those close to the neocortical surface and in the meninges, were left unaffected, hence leaving PGE(2) synthesis largely intact in major parts of the brain while significantly reducing it in the region critical for the febrile response. Furthermore, injection of a virus vector expressing microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) into the median preoptic nucleus of fever-refractive mPGES-1 knock-out mice, resulted in a temperature elevation in response to LPS. We conclude that the febrile response is dependent on local release of PGE(2) onto its target neurons and not on the overall PGE(2) production in the brain.

  • 2.
    Fritz, Michael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Klawonn, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kumar Singh, Anand
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zajdel, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wilhelms, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Emergency Medicine.
    Lazarus, Michael
    University of Tsukuba, Japan.
    Löfberg, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarola, Maarit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Örtegren Kugelberg, Unn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Billiar, Timothy R.
    University of Pittsburgh, PA USA.
    Hackam, David J.
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA.
    Sodhi, Chhinder P.
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA.
    Breyer, Matthew D.
    Lilly Research Labs, IN USA.
    Jakobsson, Johan
    Lund University, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Schwaninger, Markus
    University of Lubeck, Germany.
    Schuetz, Gunther
    German Cancer Research Centre, Germany.
    Rodriguez Parkitna, Jan
    Polish Academic Science, Poland.
    Saper, Clifford B.
    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre, MA 02215 USA; Harvard University, MA USA.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Prostaglandin-dependent modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission elicits inflammation-induced aversion in mice2016In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0021-9738, E-ISSN 1558-8238, Vol. 126, no 2, p. 695-705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic inflammation causes malaise and general feelings of discomfort. This fundamental aspect of the sickness response reduces the quality of life for people suffering from chronic inflammatory diseases and is a nuisance during mild infections like common colds or the flu. To investigate how inflammation is perceived as unpleasant and causes negative affect, we used a behavioral test in which mice avoid an environment that they have learned to associate with inflammation-induced discomfort. Using a combination of cell-type-specific gene deletions, pharmacology, and chemogenetics, we found that systemic inflammation triggered aversion through MyD88-dependent activation of the brain endothelium followed by COX1-mediated cerebral prostaglandin E-2 (PGE(2)) synthesis. Further, we showed that inflammation-induced PGE(2) targeted EP1 receptors on striatal dopamine D1 receptor-expressing neurons and that this signaling sequence induced aversion through GABA-mediated inhibition of dopaminergic cells. Finally, we demonstrated that inflammation-induced aversion was not an indirect consequence of fever or anorexia but that it constituted an independent inflammatory symptom triggered by a unique molecular mechanism. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that PGE(2)-mediated modulation of the dopaminergic motivational circuitry is a key mechanism underlying the negative affect induced by inflammation.

  • 3.
    Sikora, Magdalena
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Neuropharmacology, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences , 31-343 Krakow, Poland.
    Tokarski, Krzysztof
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences , 31-343 Krakow, Poland..
    Bobula, Bartosz
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences , 31-343 Krakow, Poland..
    Zajdel, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jastrzębska, Kamila
    Department of Molecular Neuropharmacology, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences , 31-343 Krakow, Poland.
    Cieślak, Przemysław Eligiusz
    Department of Molecular Neuropharmacology, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences , 31-343 Krakow, Poland.
    Zygmunt, Magdalena
    Department of Molecular Neuropharmacology, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences , 31-343 Krakow, Poland.
    Sowa, Joanna
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences , 31-343 Krakow, Poland..
    Smutek, Magdalena
    Department of Molecular Neuropharmacology, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences , 31-343 Krakow, Poland.
    Kamińska, Katarzyna
    Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences , 31-343 Krakow, Poland.
    Gołembiowska, Krystyna
    Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences , 31-343 Krakow, Poland.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hess, Grzegorz
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences , 31-343 Krakow, Poland..
    Przewlocki, Ryszard
    Department of Molecular Neuropharmacology, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences, 31-343 Krakow, Poland; Department of Neurobiology and Neuropsychology, Institute of Applied Psychology, Jagiellonian University, 30-348 Krakow, Poland.
    Rodriguez Parkitna, Jan
    Department of Molecular Neuropharmacology, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences , 31-343 Krakow, Poland.
    NMDA Receptors on Dopaminoceptive Neurons Are Essential for Drug-Induced Conditioned Place Preference.2016In: eNeuro, ISSN 2373-2822, Vol. 3, no 3, article id ENEURO.0084-15.2016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasticity of the brain's dopamine system plays a crucial role in adaptive behavior by regulating appetitive motivation and the control of reinforcement learning. In this study, we investigated drug- and natural-reward conditioned behaviors in a mouse model in which the NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity of dopaminoceptive neurons was disrupted. We generated a transgenic mouse line with inducible selective inactivation of the NR1 subunit in neurons expressing dopamine D1 receptors (the NR1(D1CreERT2) mice). Whole-cell recordings of spontaneous EPSCs on neurons in the nucleus accumbens confirmed that a population of neurons lacked the NMDA receptor-dependent component of the current. This effect was accompanied by impaired long-term potentiation in the nucleus accumbens and in the CA1 area of the ventral, but not the dorsal, hippocampus. Mutant mice did not differ from control animals when tested for pavlovian or instrumental conditioning. However, NR1(D1CreERT2) mice acquired no preference for a context associated with administration of drugs of abuse. In the conditioned place preference paradigm, mutant mice did not spend more time in the context paired with cocaine, morphine, or ethanol, although these mice acquired a preference for sucrose jelly and an aversion to naloxone injections, as normal. Thus, we observed that the selective inducible ablation of the NMDA receptors specifically blocks drug-associated context memory with no effect on positive reinforcement in general.

  • 4.
    Singh, Anand Kumar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zajdel, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mirrasekhian, Elahe
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Almoosawi, Nader
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Frisch, Isabell
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Klawonn, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarola, Maarit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fritz, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Prostaglandin-mediated inhibition of serotonin signaling controls the affective component of inflammatory pain2017In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0021-9738, E-ISSN 1558-8238, Vol. 127, no 4, p. 1370-1374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pain is fundamentally unpleasant and induces a negative affective state. The affective component of pain is mediated by circuits that are distinct from those mediating the sensory-discriminative component. Here, we have investigated the role of prostaglandins in the affective dimension of pain using a rodent pain assay based on conditioned place aversion to formalin injection, an inflammatory noxious stimulus. We found that place aversion induced by inflammatory pain depends on prostaglandin E-2 that is synthesized by cyclooxygenase 2 in neural cells. Further, mice lacking the prostaglandin E-2 receptor EP3 selectively on serotonergic cells or selectively in the area of the dorsal raphe nucleus failed to form an aversion to formalininduced pain, as did mice lacking the serotonin transporter. Chemogenetic manipulations revealed that EP3 receptor activation elicited conditioned place aversion to pain via inhibition of serotonergic neurons. In contrast to their role in inflammatory pain aversion, EP3 receptors on serotonergic cells were dispensable for acute nociceptive behaviors and for aversion induced by thermal pain or a kappa opioid receptor agonist. Collectively, our findings show that prostaglandin-mediated modulation of serotonergic transmission controls the affective component of inflammatory pain.

  • 5.
    Stojakovic, Andrea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walczak, Magdalena
    Jagiellonian Univ, Poland.
    Cieslak, Przemyslaw E.
    Polish Acad Sci, Poland.
    Trenk, Aleksandra
    Jagiellonian Univ, Poland.
    Sköld, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zajdel, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mirrasekhian, Elahe
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thorsell, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Parkitna, Jan Rodriguez
    Polish Acad Sci, Poland.
    Blasiak, Tomasz
    Jagiellonian Univ, Poland.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Several behavioral traits relevant for alcoholism are controlled by gamma 2 subunit containing GABA(A) receptors on dopamine neurons in mice2018In: Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0893-133X, E-ISSN 1740-634X, Vol. 43, no 7, p. 1548-1556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The risk factors for developing alcohol addiction include impulsivity, high sensitivity to the rewarding action of ethanol, and low sensitivity to its sedative and intoxicating effects. Genetic variation in GABA(A) receptor subunits, including the gamma 2 subunit (Gabrg2), affects the risk for developing alcoholism. Alcohol directly potentiates GABA(A) receptors and activates the mesolimbic dopamine system. Here, we deleted Gabrg2 selectively in dopamine cells of adult mice. The deletion resulted in elevated firing of dopamine neurons and made them less sensitive to drugs acting at GABA(A) receptors. At the behavioral level, the deletion increased exploratory behavior and augmented both correct and incorrect responding in the go/no-go task, a test often used to assay the response inhibition component of impulsivity. In addition, conditioned place preference to alcohol, but not to cocaine or morphine, was increased. Ethanol-induced locomotor activation was enhanced in the mice lacking Gabrg2 on dopaminergic cells, whereas the sedative effect of alcohol was reduced. Finally, the alcohol drinking, but not the alcohol preference, at a high concentration was increased in the mutant mice. In summary, deletion of Gabrg2 on dopamine cells induced several behavioral traits associated with high risk of developing alcoholism. The findings suggest that mice lacking Gabrg2 on dopaminergic cells could be used as models for individuals at high risk for developing alcoholism and that GABA(A) receptors on dopamine cells are protective against the development of excessive alcohol drinking.

  • 6.
    Wilhelms, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Emergency Medicine.
    Dock, Hua
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brito, Haissa O.
    Not Found:Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin and Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Emma
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stojakovic, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zajdel, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Spetz Holm, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    CGRP Is Critical for Hot Flushes in Ovariectomized Mice2019In: Frontiers in Pharmacology, ISSN 1663-9812, E-ISSN 1663-9812, Vol. 9, article id 1452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hot flushes are common and troublesome symptoms of menopause. The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is increased in plasma during hot flushes but it has not been clear if CGRP is causally involved in the mechanism underpinning the flushes. Here, we examined the effect of interventions with CGRP in a mouse model of hot flushes based on flush-like temperature increases triggered by forced physical activity in ovariectomized mice. Compared to normal mice, ovariectomized mice reacted with an exaggerated, flush-like, temperature increase after physical exercise. This increase was completely blocked by the non-peptide CGRP-antagonist MK-8825 (-0.41 degrees Celsius, 95% CI: -0,83 to 0,012, p amp;lt; 0.0001) at a dose that had no obvious effects on locomotor activity (50 mg/kg). Further, the flush-like temperature increases were strongly attenuated in ovariectomized mice lacking alpha CGRP due to a genetic modification. Collectively, our findings suggest that CGRP is an important mediator of experimentally induced hot flushes and they identify CGRP antagonists as promising treatment candidates for women and possibly also men with hot flushes.

  • 7.
    Wilhelms, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Emergency Medicine.
    Mirrasekhian, Elahe
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zajdel, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Singh, Anand Kumar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cyclooxygenase Isoform Exchange Blocks Brain-Mediated Inflammatory Symptoms2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 11, article id e0166153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is the main source of inducible prostaglandin E-2 production and mediates inflammatory symptoms including fever, loss of appetite and hyperalgesia. COX-1 is dispensable for fever, anorexia and hyperalgesia but is important for several other functions both under basal conditions and during inflammation. The differential functionality of the COX isoforms could be due to differences in the regulatory regions of the genes, leading to different expression patterns, or to differences in the coding sequence, resulting in distinct functional properties of the proteins. To study the molecular underpinnings of the functional differences between the two isoforms in the context of inflammatory symptoms, we used mice in which the coding sequence of COX-2 was replaced by the corresponding sequence of COX-1. In these mice, COX-1 mRNA was induced by inflammation but COX-1 protein expression did not fully mimic inflammation-induced COX-2 expression. Just like mice globally lacking COX-2, these mice showed a complete lack of fever and inflammation-induced anorexia as well as an impaired response to inflammatory pain. However, as previously reported, they displayed close to normal survival rates, which contrasts to the high fetal mortality in COX-2 knockout mice. This shows that the COX activity generated from the hybrid gene was strong enough to allow survival but not strong enough to mediate the inflammatory symptoms studied, making the line an interesting alternative to COX-2 knockouts for the study of inflammation. Our results also show that the functional differences between COX-1 and COX-2 in the context of inflammatory symptoms are not only dependent on the features of the promoter regions. Instead they indicate that there are fundamental differences between the isoforms at translational or posttranslational levels.

  • 8.
    Zajdel, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Interactions between the brain and the immune system in pain and inflammation2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Reciprocal interactions between the nervous and immune systems have gained a lot of attention in the last two decades, especially after demonstrating that cytokine immunotherapies can induce depression and after describing the inflammatory reflex. A lot of effort has been dedicated to understanding how the signals from the immune system reach the brain and vice versa, and on their role in health and disease. However, it is not well-known which of the brain circuits, receptors and signalling molecules give rise to behavioural and affective changes induced by inflammation, such as reduced food intake and induction of negative mood. Moreover, although it is well established that early life stress leads to an increased risk of developing inflammatory diseases in adulthood, the acute effects of stress on the inflammatory response in childhood are not well described. Using mouse models of systemic and local inflammation, I studied (1) how inflammatory pain elicits negative affect, (2) if CGRPα is necessary for parabrachial-amygdaloid pathway-mediated behaviours associated with pain and inflammation, and finally, (3) what are the effects of stress on the inflammatory process during early life. The results indicate that (1) the negative affect of inflammatory pain is triggered by inhibition of serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus, as a result of prostaglandin E2 binding to EP3 receptors; (2) CGRPα is dispensable for most pain- and inflammation-related protective behaviours; (3) acute stress potentiates the pro-inflammatory cytokine expression after an inflammatory challenge in mouse pups. The phenomena studied here can contribute to understanding how immune system activation induces changes in mood and behaviour common for inflammation and depression.

    List of papers
    1. Prostaglandin-mediated inhibition of serotonin signaling controls the affective component of inflammatory pain
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prostaglandin-mediated inhibition of serotonin signaling controls the affective component of inflammatory pain
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0021-9738, E-ISSN 1558-8238, Vol. 127, no 4, p. 1370-1374Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Pain is fundamentally unpleasant and induces a negative affective state. The affective component of pain is mediated by circuits that are distinct from those mediating the sensory-discriminative component. Here, we have investigated the role of prostaglandins in the affective dimension of pain using a rodent pain assay based on conditioned place aversion to formalin injection, an inflammatory noxious stimulus. We found that place aversion induced by inflammatory pain depends on prostaglandin E-2 that is synthesized by cyclooxygenase 2 in neural cells. Further, mice lacking the prostaglandin E-2 receptor EP3 selectively on serotonergic cells or selectively in the area of the dorsal raphe nucleus failed to form an aversion to formalininduced pain, as did mice lacking the serotonin transporter. Chemogenetic manipulations revealed that EP3 receptor activation elicited conditioned place aversion to pain via inhibition of serotonergic neurons. In contrast to their role in inflammatory pain aversion, EP3 receptors on serotonergic cells were dispensable for acute nociceptive behaviors and for aversion induced by thermal pain or a kappa opioid receptor agonist. Collectively, our findings show that prostaglandin-mediated modulation of serotonergic transmission controls the affective component of inflammatory pain.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER SOC CLINICAL INVESTIGATION INC, 2017
    National Category
    Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136568 (URN)10.1172/JCI90678 (DOI)000398183300026 ()28287401 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|European Research Council; Swedish Medical Research Council; Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation; Swedish Brain Foundation; County Council of Ostergotland; National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

    Available from: 2017-04-24 Created: 2017-04-24 Last updated: 2019-04-08
    2. Acute maternal separation potentiates the gene expression and corticosterone response induced by inflammation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute maternal separation potentiates the gene expression and corticosterone response induced by inflammation
    Show others...
    2019 (English)In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 77, p. 141-149Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Maternal care is crucial for infants and profoundly affects their responses to different kinds of stressors. Here, we examined how maternal separation affects inflammatory gene expression and the corticosterone response to an acute immune challenge induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 40 µg/kg ip) in mouse pups, 8–9 days old. Maternal separation initially attenuated LPS-induced hypothalamic pro-inflammatory gene expression, but later, at 3 h after immune challenge, robustly augmented such gene expression and increased serum corticosterone levels. Providing the pups with a warm and soft object prevented the separation-induced augmented hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis response. It also prevented the potentiated induction of some, but not all, inflammatory genes to a similar extent as did the dam. Our results show that maternal separation potentiates the inflammatory response and the resulting HPA-axis activation, which may have detrimental effects if separation is prolonged or repeated.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2019
    Keywords
    Lipopolysaccharide, Hypothalamus, Cytokines, Inflammation, Maternal separation, Corticosterone
    National Category
    Pharmacology and Toxicology Developmental Biology Medical Biotechnology Immunology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154886 (URN)10.1016/j.bbi.2018.12.016 (DOI)30590109 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059128986 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-04-08Bibliographically approved
  • 9.
    Zajdel, Joanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zager, Adriano
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Shionoya, Kiseko
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Acute maternal separation potentiates the gene expression and corticosterone response induced by inflammation2019In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 77, p. 141-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Maternal care is crucial for infants and profoundly affects their responses to different kinds of stressors. Here, we examined how maternal separation affects inflammatory gene expression and the corticosterone response to an acute immune challenge induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 40 µg/kg ip) in mouse pups, 8–9 days old. Maternal separation initially attenuated LPS-induced hypothalamic pro-inflammatory gene expression, but later, at 3 h after immune challenge, robustly augmented such gene expression and increased serum corticosterone levels. Providing the pups with a warm and soft object prevented the separation-induced augmented hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis response. It also prevented the potentiated induction of some, but not all, inflammatory genes to a similar extent as did the dam. Our results show that maternal separation potentiates the inflammatory response and the resulting HPA-axis activation, which may have detrimental effects if separation is prolonged or repeated.

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