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  • 1.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindblom, Gunnar
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Skoog, Susann
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    PET/CT versus conventional CT for detection of lymph node metastases in patients with locally advanced bladder cancer.2015In: BMC urology, ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 87-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: We studied patients treated with radical cystectomy for locally advanced bladder cancer to compare the results of both preoperative positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and conventional CT with the findings of postoperative histopathological evaluation of lymph nodes.

    METHODS: Patients who had bladder cancer and were candidates for cystectomy underwent preoperative PET/CT using 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and conventional CT. The results regarding lymph node involvement were independently evaluated by two experienced radiologists and were subsequently compared with histopathology results, the latter of which were reassessed by an experienced uropathologist (HO).

    RESULTS: There were 54 evaluable patients (mean age 68 years, 47 [85 %] males and 7 [15 %] females) with pT and pN status as follows: < pT2-14 (26 %), pT2-10 (18 %), and > pT2-30 (56 %); pN0 37 (69 %) and pN+ 17 (31 %). PET/CT showed positive lymph nodes in 12 patients (22 %), and 7 of those cases were confirmed by histopathology; the corresponding results for conventional CT were 11 (20 %) and 7 patients (13 %), respectively. PET/CT had 41 % sensitivity, 86 % specificity, 58 % PPV, and 76 % NPV, whereas the corresponding figures for conventional CT were 41 %, 89 %, 64 %, and 77 %. Additional analyses of the right and left side of the body or in specified anatomical regions gave similar results.

    CONCLUSIONS: In this study, PET/CT and conventional CT had similar low sensitivity in detecting and localizing regional lymph node metastasis in bladder cancer.

  • 2.
    Aus, Gunnar
    et al.
    Department of Urology, Sahlgrens University Hospital, 413 45, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Robinson, David
    Department of Surgery, Höglandssjukhuset, Eksjö, Sweden.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Department of Urology and Surgery, Vrinnevisjukhuset, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Prognostic Factors and Survival in Node-Positive (N1) Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Study Based on Data from a Swedish Population-Based Cohort2003In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 627-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: At presentation of prostate cancer, patients with proven lymph node metastasis (N1) are comparatively rare. It is difficult to give prognostic information based on the present literature. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of known risk factors in patients with pelvic node involvement and without distant metastasis.

    Methods: From the population-based, prospective prostate cancer tumour registry of the South–East Region in Sweden, we collected data on all 181 patients with N1, M0 prostate cancer diagnosed from January 1987 to October 2000 with a follow-up to December 2001. Mean follow-up was 62 months. Pre-operative risk factors as age, T-category, serum PSA, tumour grade and also primary treatment given was correlated to the outcome.

    Results: Median age at diagnosis was 65 years. Cancer-specific survival was highly variable with 5-year survival of 72%, a median of 8 years and the projected 13-year figure was 31%. T-category, age, PSA or treatment did not affect the outcome while poorly differentiated tumours had a tendency towards lower cancer-specific survival (p=0.0523) when compared to well and moderately differentiated tumours.

    Conclusions: This population-based cohort of prostate cancer patients with pelvic node involvement treated principally with non-curative intent had a median cancer-specific survival of 8 years. Preoperatively known risk factors seem to have but a modest impact on the prognosis for patients in this stage of the disease.

  • 3.
    Aus, Gunnar
    et al.
    Department of Urology, Sahlgrens University Hospital, Go¨ teborg, Sweden.
    Robinson, David
    Section of Urology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    Department of Surgery, Akademiska Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Department of Surgery and Urology, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden..
    Survival in prostate carcinoma - Outcomes from a prospective, population-based cohort of 8887 men with up to 15 years of follow-up: Results from three counties in the population-based National Prostate Cancer Registry of Sweden2005In: Cancer, ISSN 0008-543X, E-ISSN 1097-0142, Vol. 103, no 5, p. 943- 951Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND To decide on screening strategies and curative treatments for prostate carcinoma, it is necessary to determine the incidence and survival in a population that is not screened.

    METHODS The 15-year projected survival data were analyzed from a prospective, complete, population-based registry of 8887 patients with newly diagnosed prostate carcinoma from 1987 to 1999.

    RESULTS The median patient age at diagnosis was 75 years (range, 40-96 years), and 12% of patients were diagnosed before the age 65 years. The median follow-up was 80 months for patients who remained alive. In total, 5873 of 8887 patients (66.1%) had died, and 2595 of those patients (44.2%) died directly due to prostate carcinoma. The overall median age at death was 80 years (range, 41-100 years). The projected 15-year disease-specific survival rate was 44% for the whole population. In total, 18% of patients had metastases at diagnosis (M1), and their median survival was 2.5 years. Patients with nonmetastatic T1-T3 prostate carcinoma (age < 75 years at diagnosis; n = 2098 patients) had a 15-year projected disease-specific survival rate of 66%. Patients who underwent radical prostatectomy had a significantly lower risk of dying from prostate carcinoma (relative risk, 0.40) compared with patients who were treated with noncurative therapies or radiotherapy.

    CONCLUSIONS The disease-specific mortality was comparatively high, but it took 15 years to reach a disease-specific mortality rate of 56%. These data form a truly population-based baseline on how prostate carcinoma will affect a population when screening is not applied and can be used for comparison with other health care strategies. Cancer 2005. © 2005 American Cancer Society.

  • 4.
    Dahlrot, R. H.
    et al.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Dowsett, J.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Fosmark, S.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Malmström, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Henriksson, R.
    Umea Univ, Sweden; Reg Canc Ctr Stockholm Gotland, Sweden.
    Boldt, H.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    de Stricker, K.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Sorensen, M. D.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark; Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Poulsen, H. S.
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Lysiak, Malgorzata
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Hansen, S.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark; Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Kristensen, B. W.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark; Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Prognostic value of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) protein expression in glioblastoma excluding nontumour cells from the analysis2018In: Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology, ISSN 0305-1846, E-ISSN 1365-2990, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 172-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: It is important to predict response to treatment with temozolomide (TMZ) in glioblastoma (GBM) patients. Both MGMT protein expression and MGMT promoter methylation status have been reported to predict the response to TMZ. We investigated the prognostic value of quantified MGMT protein levels in tumour cells and the prognostic importance of combining information of MGMT protein level and MGMT promoter methylation status. Methods: MGMT protein expression was quantified in tumour cells in 171 GBMs from the population-based Region of Southern Denmark (RSD)cohort using a double immunofluorescence approach. Pyrosequencing was performed in 157 patients. For validation we used GBM-patients from a Nordic Study (NS) investigating the effect of radiotherapy and different TMZ schedules. Results: When divided at the median, patients with low expression of MGMT protein (AF-low) had the best prognosis (HR = 1.5, P = 0.01). Similar results were observed in the subgroup of patients receiving the Stupp regimen (HR = 2.0, P = 0.001). In the NS-cohort a trend towards superior survival (HR = 1.6, P = 0.08) was seen in patients with AF-low. Including MGMT promoter methylation status, we found for both cohorts that patients with methylated MGMT promoter and AF-low had the best outcome; median OS 23.1 and 20.0 months, respectively. Conclusion: Our data indicate that MGMT protein expression in tumour cells has an independent prognostic significance. Exclusion of nontumour cells contributed to a more exact analysis of tumour-specific MGMT protein expression. This should be incorporated in future studies evaluating MGMT status before potential integration into clinical practice.

  • 5. Fall, Katja
    et al.
    Strömberg, Fredrik
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Reliability of death certificates in prostate cancer patients2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 352-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate the reliability of cause-of-death diagnoses among prostate cancer patients. Material and methods. Information from death certificates obtained from the Swedish Death Register was compared with systematically reviewed medical records from the population-based Swedish Regional Prostate Cancer Register, South-East Region. In total, 5675 patients were included who had been diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1987 and 1999 and who had died before 1 January 2003. Results. The proportion of prostate cancer cases classified as having died from prostate cancer was 3% higher in the official death certificates than in the reviewed records [0.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02 to 0.04]. Overall agreement between the official cause of death and the reviewed data was 86% (95% CI 85 to 87%). A higher accuracy was observed among men with localized disease (88%, 95% CI 87 to 89%), aged 60 years or younger at death (96%, 95% CI 93 to 100%), or who had undergone curative treatment (91%, 95% CI 88 to 95%). This study indicates a relatively high reliability of official cause-of-death statistics of prostate cancer patients in Sweden. Conclusion. Mortality data obtained from death certificates may be useful in the evaluation of large-scale prostate cancer intervention programmes, especially among younger patients with localized disease. © 2008 Informa UK Ltd. (Informa Healthcare, Taylor & Francis AS).

  • 6.
    Gao, Jingfang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology .
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    He, L..
    Zhang, Zhiyong
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology .
    Zhao, Z.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    MANBA polymorphism was related to increased risk of colorectal cancer in Swedish but not in Chinese populations2008In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 372-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    β-mannosidase, encoded by MANBA, has been suggested to be implicated in cancers, while genetic variations in the MANBA in relation to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk has not been examined. In this study, we investigated the relationship of a polymorphic CA repeat in MANBA gene with CRC risk in 152 Swedish CRC patients and 441 Swedish controls, and 196 Chinese CRC patients and 577 Chinese controls, as well as the clinicopathologic significance of this polymorphism on CRC patients, by using capillary electrophoresis. The MANBA genotypes were related to CRC risk in the Swedish population (p=0.03), but not in the Chinese population. In the Swedish population, individuals with < 22 CAs/> 22 CAs had significantly increased risk for CRC compared with those with ≥22 CAs/≥ 22 CAs (gender-age-adjusted analysis: OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.06-3.51). There was no relationship between the polymorphism and clinicopathologic variables. These findings suggest the different susceptibilities of this polymorphism to CRC development in the two populations. © 2008 Taylor & Francis.

  • 7.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Damm, Ole
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Hellsten, Sverker
    Malmö University Hospital.
    Holmang, Sten
    Gothenburg University Hospital.
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Vaxjö County Hospital.
    Ljungberg, Borje
    Umeå University Hospital.
    Malmstrom, Per-Uno
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    Mansson, Wiking
    Lund University Hospital.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Wijkstom, Hans
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Urinary diversion after cystectomy for bladder cancer: A population-based study in Sweden2010In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF UROLOGY AND NEPHROLOGY, ISSN 0036-5599, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 69-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To investigate the type of urinary diversion performed after cystectomy in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer in Sweden, using data from a population-based national register. Material and methods. Since 1997, the Swedish Bladder Cancer Register has included more than 90% of all patients with newly diagnosed bladder cancer. The different types of urinary diversion performed in 1997-2003 were analysed, comparing non-continent diversion (ileal conduit) with continent reconstruction (bladder substitution or continent cutaneous diversion). Results. During the study period, 3463 patients were registered with clinical T2-T4 non-metastatic bladder cancer. Cystectomy was performed in 1141 patients with ileal conduit in 732 (64%) and continent reconstruction in 409 (36%). Ileal conduit was used more frequently in females than males (p = 0.019), in patients older than 75 years (p andlt; 0.00001), and in those with less favourable TNM classification. Continent reconstruction was done more often at university hospitals than at county hospitals (p andlt; 0.00001), but rarely in the northern and western healthcare regions compared with other regions (p andlt; 0.00001). Nationwide, the proportion of registered continent reconstructions decreased, although the absolute number was relatively stable (50-60 per year). Conclusions. Continent reconstruction after cystectomy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer is performed more often in some healthcare regions and in patients at university hospitals than in county hospitals, indicating a substantial provider influence on the choice of urinary diversion. Over time, the proportion of these procedures has decreased, while the absolute number has remained low and stable; therefore, concentration in high-volume hospitals specialized in bladder cancer and continent reconstruction seems appropriate.

  • 8.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Gardmark, Truls
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hosseini, Abolfazl
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Jedstrom, Tomas
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Per-Uno
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Sherif, Amir
    Umea Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Strock, Viveka
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Haggstrom, Christel
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Kings Coll London, England.
    Aljabery, Firas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Management and outcome of TaG3 tumours of the urinary bladder in the nationwide, population-based bladder cancer database Sweden (BladderBaSe)In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the management of TaG3 tumours of the urinary bladder using nationwide population-based data in relation to the prevailing guidelines, patients characteristics, and outcome. Materials and methods: The Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe), including data from the Swedish National Register for Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC), was used to study all patients with TaG3 bladder cancer diagnosed from 2008 to 2014. Patients were divided into the following management groups: (1) transurethral resection (TUR) only, (2) TUR and intravesical instillation therapy (IVIT), (3) TUR and second-look resection (SLR), and (4) TUR with both SLR and IVIT. Patient and tumour characteristics and outcome were studied. Results: There were 831 patients (83% males) with a median age of 74 years. SLR was performed more often on younger patients, on men, and less often in the Western and Uppsala/orebro Healthcare regions. IVIT was performed more often with younger patients, with men, in the Western Healthcare region, and less often in the Uppsala/orebro Healthcare region. Death from bladder cancer occurred in 6% of cases within a median of 29 months (0-84 months) and was lower in the TUR/IVIT and TUR/SLR/IVIT groups compared to the other two groups. Conclusion: In the present study, there was, according to the prevailing treatment guidelines, an under-treatment with SLR for older patients, women, and in some healthcare regions and, similarly, there was an under-treatment with IVIT for older patients. Cancer-specific survival and relative survival were lower in the TUR only group compared to the TUR/IVIT and TUR/SLR/IVIT groups.

  • 9.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Hosseini Aliabad, Abolfazl
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Holmang, Sten
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Jancke, Georg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ljungberg, Borje
    Northern University Hospital, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Per-Uno
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Swedish National Registry of Urinary Bladder Cancer: No difference in relative survival over time despite more aggressive treatment2016In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 14-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The aim of this study was to use the Swedish National Registry of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) to investigate changes in patient and tumour characteristics, management and survival in bladder cancer cases over a period of 15 years. Materials and methods. All patients with newly detected bladder cancer reported to the SNRUBC during 1997-2011 were included in the study. The cohort was divided into three groups, each representing 5 years of the 15 year study period. Results. The study included 31,266 patients (74% men, 26% women) with a mean age of 72 years. Mean age was 71.7 years in the first subperiod (1997-2001) and 72.5 years in the last subperiod (2007-2011). Clinical T categorization changed from the first to the last subperiod: Ta from 45% to 48%, T1 from 21.6% to 22.4%, and T2-T4 from 27% to 25%. Also from the first to the last subperiod, intravesical treatment after transurethral resection for T1G2 and T1G3 tumours increased from 15% to 40% and from 30% to 50%, respectively, and cystectomy for T2-T4 tumours increased from 30% to 40%. No differences between the analysed subperiods were found regarding relative survival in patients with T1 or T2-T4 tumours, or in the whole cohort. Conclusions. This investigation based on a national bladder cancer registry showed that the age of the patients at diagnosis increased, and the proportion of muscle-invasive tumours decreased. The treatment of all tumour stages became more aggressive but relative survival showed no statistically significant change over time.

  • 10.
    Jancke, Georg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Damm, Ole
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Risk factors for local recurrence in patients with pTa/pT1 urinary bladder cancer2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 417-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. This study evaluated risk factors for local tumour recurrence, defined as recurrence at the same location in the bladder within 18 months after primary resection in patients with newly diagnosed pTa or pT1 bladder cancer. Patients and methods. The study included 472 patients with newly diagnosed pTa/T1 bladder cancer between 1992 and 2001. The patients were followed prospectively in accordance with a control programme and possible risk factors for tumour recurrence were registered. Results. Local tumour recurrence was observed in 164 (35%) patients, another 117 (25%) patients had recurrence at other locations in the bladder (non-local recurrence) and 191 (40%) had no recurrence at all. Tumour size and multiple tumours were significantly associated with a higher risk for developing local recurrence as opposed to non-local recurrence. Tumour category was of borderline statistical significance. Gender and tumour grade were not found to be risk factors for developing local recurrence. Conclusion. Tumour size and multiplicity are risk factors for development of recurrence at the same location in the bladder as the primary tumour. Local tumour recurrence may be a result of non-radical primary transurethral resection. One may consider recommending standard re-resection within 6-8 weeks in patients with tumours >3 cm or those with multiple primary tumours. © 2008 Informa UK Ltd. (Informa Healthcare, Taylor & Francis AS).

  • 11.
    Jancke, Georg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Centre.
    Chebil, Gunilla
    County Hospital, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Bladder Wash Cytology at Diagnosis of Ta-T1 Bladder Cancer Is Predictive for Recurrence and Progression2012In: Urology, ISSN 0090-4295, E-ISSN 1527-9995, Vol. 80, no 3, p. 625-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of the bladder wash cytology finding at the primary diagnosis of Stage Ta-T1 urinary bladder cancer on recurrence and progression. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS The clinical and pathologic characteristics of all patients with primary Stage Ta-T1 urinary bladder cancer were prospectively registered. The data were divided according to the bladder wash cytology results at diagnosis. Multivariate analyses were performed to determine the influence of bladder wash cytology on recurrence and progression. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS The analysis included 768 evaluable patients with a mean follow-up of 60 months. Recurrence was observed in 478 patients (62%) and progression in 71 (9%). High-grade malignant bladder wash cytology was predictive for recurrence and progression (P andlt; .001 and P = .036, respectively). Other factors affecting recurrence were missing bladder wash cytology data, tumors size 16-30 mm and andgt;30 mm, Stage T1 tumor category, and multiplicity (P = .008, P = .006, P andlt; .001, P = .002, and P andlt; .001, respectively). Progression was also associated with T1 tumor category, local recurrence, and primary concomitant carcinoma in situ (P andlt; .001, P andlt; .001, and P = .024, respectively). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSION High-grade malignant bladder wash cytology at the primary diagnosis was predictive for recurrence and progression. This could be taken into account in designing future follow-up schedules.

  • 12.
    Jancke, Georg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Impact of surgical experience on recurrence and progression after transurethral resection of bladder tumour in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer2014In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF UROLOGY, ISSN 2168-1805, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 276-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: To evaluate the impact of experience in transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-BT) on recurrence and progression in primary Ta/T1 urinary bladder cancer.

    Methods: Clinical and pathological characteristics of patients with primary Ta/T1 urinary bladder cancer were recorded prospectively from 1992 to 2007 inclusive. Data on surgeons’ experience were categorized as follows: (a) experience by training status (residents or specialists); (b) number of TUR-BTs performed by each surgeon during the registration period, with cut-off levels at > 100, > 150, > 200, > median, and > third quartile of surgical volume; (c) lifetime high-volume surgeons (> 100 TUR-BTs). Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox regression with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in both univariate and multivariate analysis.

    Results: The analysis included 768 evaluable patients with a median follow-up of 60 months. Recurrence was observed in 478 patients (62%) and progression in 71 (9%). Surgery was performed by residents in 100 cases and specialists in 668, with recurrence in 75 (75%) and 403 (60%) patients, and progression in 9 (9%) and 62 (9%), respectively. Surgery performed by residents was statistically associated with recurrence (HR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.54-0.89) but not progression (HR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.35-1.48). Surgical volume (b and c) was not found to have a significant impact on recurrence or progression in any of the analyses at the chosen cut-offs.

    Conclusions: Surgical experience (specialist/resident) was a predictive factor for recurrence after TUR-BT for Ta/T1 bladder cancer. However, surgeon volume was not associated with recurrence at the chosen cut-off levels. Training programs, checklist

  • 13.
    Jancke, Georg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Impact of tumour size on recurrence and progression in Ta/T1 carcinoma of the urinary bladder2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 388-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of tumour size on recurrence and progression in a population-based series of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancers. Material and methods. Clinical and pathological characteristics of patients with primary Ta/bladder cancer were registered. The patients tumours were categorized by size into five size groups (1-10, 11-20, 21-30, 31-40 and andgt;40 mm) or three size groups (1-15, 16-30 and andgt;30 mm). Results. The analysis included 768 evaluable patients with a mean follow-up of 60 months. Recurrence was observed in 478 patients (62%) and progression in 71 (9%). Tumour size was associated with recurrence for tumours sized 21-30, 31-40 and andgt;40 mm (p = 0.03, p andlt; 0.001, p andlt; 0.001, respectively) in the five size group and for tumours sized 16-30 and andgt;30 mm (p = 0.003 and p andlt; 0.001) in the three size group. Other factors affecting recurrence were T1 tumour category, multiplicity and surgery performed by residents (p andlt; 0.001, p andlt; 0.001, p = 0.002, respectively). Considering progression, there was no significant association with tumour size, and T1 category and local recurrence were the only significant risk factors (both p andlt; 0.001). Conclusion. Tumour size andlt;= 15 mm is associated with a lower risk of recurrence but not progression. Dividing tumour size into three size groups gives additional information compared with two size groups with cut-off at 30 mm.

  • 14.
    Jancke, Georg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Centre.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Residual tumour in the marginal resection after a complete transurethral resection is associated with local recurrence in Ta/T1 urinary bladder cancer2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 343-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. This study investigated the presence of residual tumour in the marginal resection (MR) after a complete transurethral resection (TURB) of Ta/T1 transitional urinary bladder cancer. The association between positive MR and recurrence was analysed. Material and methods. After macroscopically complete TURB, a marginal resection of 7 mm (corresponding to the diameter of the resection loop) was removed around the entire resection area. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of residual disease on recurrence. Results. In all, 94 patients with a median follow-up time of 36 months were included, and residual tumour in the MR was present in 24 (26%). The recurrence rates for all cases, for those with a tumour-positive and a tumour-free MR were 60 (64%), 20 (83%) and 40 (57%), respectively. Local recurrence was found in 14 (58%) of the patients with tumour presence in the MR compared to 13 (19%) of those with a tumour-free margin. A positive MR was significantly associated with overall recurrence (p andlt; 0.001) and local recurrence (p = 0.001). Conclusion. Incomplete transurethral resection of bladder cancer is common, as demonstrated in 26% patients with positive MR. The presence of tumour in the MR may be a risk factor for recurrence, and particularly local recurrence.

  • 15.
    Jancke, Georg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Tumour location adjacent to the ureteric orifice in primary Ta/T1 bladder cancer is predictive of recurrence2016In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 33-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate tumour growth located around the ureteric orifice (LUO) at primary diagnosis of Ta/T1 urinary bladder cancer in relation to effects on recurrence and progression. Materials and methods: Clinical and pathological characteristics of patients diagnosed with primary Ta/T1 urinary bladder cancer from 1992 to 2007 were recorded prospectively. Location of the primary tumour and growth around the ureteric orifice (within 1 cm) were recorded and correlated with recurrence and progression during further follow-up. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox regression with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in both univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: The study included 768 evaluable patients with a median follow-up of 60 months. Recurrence was observed in 478 patients (62%) and progression in 71 (9%). Growth of a primary tumour adjacent to the ureteric orifice was associated with recurrence (HR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.07-1.54) but not progression (HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.65-1.67). The most common location of the first recurrence was the posterior bladder wall (29%). Other locations in the bladder did not predict recurrence or progression. Additional factors affecting recurrence were tumour size greater than 15mm, T1 tumour category, multiplicity, malignant or missing/not representative bladder wash cytology and surgery performed by residents. Conclusions: A primary tumour located around the ureteric orifice was predictive of recurrence, which could be taken into account in future follow-up schedules.

  • 16.
    Klaff, Rami
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.
    The Long-term Disease-specific Mortality of Low-risk Localized Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Population-based Register Study Over Two Decades2016In: Urology, ISSN 0090-4295, E-ISSN 1527-9995, Vol. 91, p. 77-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE To identify prognostic factors, and to estimate the long-term disease-specific and annual disease-specific mortality rates of low-risk prostate cancer patients from the early prostate-specific antigen (PSA) era. PATIENTS AND METHODS We studied data extracted from the Southeast Region Prostate Cancer Register in Sweden, on 1300 patients with clinically localized low-risk tumors, T1-2, PSA level amp;lt;= 10 mu g/L and Gleason scores 2-6 or World Health Organization Grade 1, diagnosed 1992-2003. The Cox multivariate regression model was used to evaluate factors predicting survival. Prostate cancer death rates per 1000 person-years were estimated for 4 consecutive follow-up time periods: 0-5, 5-10, 10-15, and 15+ years after diagnosis. RESULTS During the follow-up of overall survivors (mean 10.6 years; maximum 21.8 years), 93 patients (7%) died of prostate cancer. Cancer-specific survival was 0.98 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.97-0.99), 0.95 (95% CI 0.93-0.96), 0.89 (95% CI 0.86-0.91), and 0.84 (95% CI 0.80-0.88), 5, 10, 15, and 20 years after diagnosis. The 5-year increases in cancer-specific mortality were statistically significant (P amp;lt;. 001). Patients with PSA amp;gt;= 4 mu g/L managed initially with watchful waiting and those aged 70 years or older had a significantly higher risk of dying from their prostate cancer. CONCLUSION The long-term disease-specific mortality of low-risk localized prostate cancer is low, but the annual mortality rate from prostate cancer gradually increases. This indicates that some tumors slowly develop into lethal cancer, particularly in patients 70 years or older with a PSA level amp;gt;= 4 mu g/L. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc.

  • 17.
    Loof, Jasmine
    et al.
    University of Skovde.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Bratthall, Charlotte
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Doré, Siv
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Zhang, Hong
    University of Skovde.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Impact of PINCH expression on survival in colorectal cancer patients2011In: BMC CANCER, ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 11, no 103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The adaptor protein PINCH is overexpressed in the stroma of several types of cancer, and is an independent prognostic marker in colorectal cancer. In this study we further investigate the relationship of PINCH and survival regarding the response to chemotherapy in colorectal cancer. Results: Paraffin-embedded tissue sections from 251 primary adenocarcinomas, 149 samples of adjacent normal mucosa, 57 samples of distant normal mucosa and 75 lymph node metastases were used for immunohistochemical staining. Stromal staining for PINCH increased from normal mucosa to primary tumour to metastasis. Strong staining in adjacent normal mucosa was related to worse survival independently of sex, age, tumour location, differentiation and stage (p = 0.044, HR, 1.60, 95% Cl, 1.01-2.52). PINCH staining at the invasive margin tended to be related to survival (p = 0.051). In poorly differentiated tumours PINCH staining at the invasive margin was related to survival independently of sex, age and stage (p = 0.013, HR, 1.90, 95% Cl, 1.14-3.16), while in better differentiated tumours it was not. In patients with weak staining, adjuvant chemotherapy was related to survival (p = 0.010, 0.013 and 0.013 in entire tumour area, invasive margin and inner tumour area, respectively), but not in patients with strong staining. However, in the multivariate analysis no such relationship was seen. Conclusions: PINCH staining in normal adjacent mucosa was related to survival. Further, PINCH staining at the tumour invasive margin was related to survival in poorly differentiated tumours but not in better differentiated tumours, indicating that the impact of PINCH on prognosis was dependent on differentiation status.

  • 18.
    Loorents, Vera
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Karlsson, Charlott
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lidback, Maria
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hultman, Kristina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Prophylactic training for the prevention of radiotherapy-induced trismus - a randomised study2014In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 530-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Radiotherapy-induced trismus (RTIT) is a debilitating condition without any proven effective treatment. This study investigates the effectiveness of prophylactic training to prevent RTIT during and up to 12 months after completed RT in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), also investigating the incidence of RTIT.

    METHODS:

    Sixty-six consecutive patients from two RT clinics in Sweden were randomised into one of two groups: training with TheraBite(®) Jaw Motion Rehabilitation System(™) or a control group. Maximum interincisal openings (MIO) were recorded at baseline and once a week during treatment, three, six and 12 months after completed RT. Training frequency was recorded by patients in a log book.

    RESULTS:

    There were no significant differences in MIO between the intervention and control groups at any of the measurement points. Patients in both groups maintained their normal variation in MIO at 12 months after completed RT. A small group of patients in the control group had a 17% mean decrease in MIO by week 6 compared to baseline and improved their MIO by using the training programme. There was a significant mean difference in MIO from baseline to week 6 (3 mm, p = 0.018), and month 6 (2.7 mm, p = 0.040), for patients receiving 3D conformal radiotherapy. There was a significant difference in MIO between patients treated with RT and concurrent chemotherapy compared to patients with RT only at 12 months (p = 0.033).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Patients with HNC undergoing high dose RT do not need to be burdened with an intense prophylactic training programme during RT and up to 12 months after completed RT. MIO measurements during RT and up to 12 months after completed RT are recommended to identify a small risk group who are an exception and may need a training programme.

  • 19.
    Loorents, Vera
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences.
    Salgado Willner, Helen
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Health-related quality of life up to 1 year after radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC)2016In: SpringerPlus, E-ISSN 2193-1801, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 669Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Detailed symptom specific descriptions of health-related quality of life (HRQOL), using validated questionnaires in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) are sparse. The aim of the present study was to investigate HRQOL in patients with HNC up to 1 year after radiotherapy (RT), using two standardised questionnaires.

    Methods

    The data for the present study was originally collected in a randomised, prospective study. Forty-seven patients from two RT clinics in Sweden were included to investigate the secondary aim: HRQOL. Data was recorded at baseline, completion of RT, and 3, 6, 12 months after completed RT, using the questionnaire EORTC QLQ-C30-version 3 and the disease-specific module EORTC QLQ-H&N35.

    Results

    Most symptoms and functions deteriorated significantly by the end of RT, improved gradually by 3 and 6 months and reached baseline levels at 12 months after completed RT. However, 1 year after completed RT there were remaining significant problems in senses, dry mouth and sticky saliva.

    Conclusions

    Radiation therapy affects health-related quality of life in patients with head and neck cancer, both in the short and long term. Caregivers need management strategies for early detection and treatment of specific problems throughout the treatment period to help in the prevention of long-term symptoms.

  • 20.
    Malmström, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, LAH Linköping.
    Henning Gronberg, Bjorn
    St Olav's Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Marosi, Christine
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria .
    Stupp, Roger
    Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland.
    Frappaz, Didier
    Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon, France.
    Schultz, Henrik
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark .
    Abacioglu, Ufuk
    Marmara University Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Tavelin, Bjorn
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Lhermitte, Benoit
    Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland .
    Hegi, Monika E
    Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland .
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Centre.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Sweden Regional Cancer Centre Stockholm and Gotland, Sweden .
    Temozolomide versus standard 6-week radiotherapy versus hypofractionated radiotherapy in patients older than 60 years with glioblastoma: the Nordic randomised, phase 3 trial2012In: The Lancet Oncology, ISSN 1470-2045, E-ISSN 1474-5488, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 916-926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Most patients with glioblastoma are older than 60 years, but treatment guidelines are based on trials in patients aged only up to 70 years. We did a randomised trial to assess the optimum palliative treatment in patients aged 60 years and older with glioblastoma. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods Patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were recruited from Austria, Denmark, France, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey. They were assigned by a computer-generated randomisation schedule, stratified by centre, to receive temozolomide (200 mg/m(2) on days 1-5 of every 28 days for up to six cycles), hypofractionated radiotherapy (34.0 Gy administered in 3.4 Gy fractions over 2 weeks), or standard radiotherapy (60.0 Gy administered in 2.0 Gy fractions over 6 weeks). Patients and study staff were aware of treatment assignment. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Analyses were done by intention to treat. This trial is registered, number ISRCTN81470623. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanFindings 342 patients were enrolled, of whom 291 were randomised across three treatment groups (temozolomide n=93, hypofractionated radiotherapy n=98, standard radiotherapy n=100) and 51 of whom were randomised across only two groups (temozolomide n=26, hypofractionated radiotherapy n=25). In the three-group randomisation, in comparison with standard radiotherapy, median overall survival was significantly longer with temozolomide (8.3 months [95% CI 7.1-9.5; n=93] vs 6.0 months [95% CI 5.1-6.8; n=100], hazard ratio [HR] 0.70; 95% CI 0.52-0.93, p=0.01), but not with hypofractionated radiotherapy (7.5 months [6.5-8.6; n=98], HR 0.85 [0.64-1.12], p=0.24). For all patients who received temozolomide or hypofractionated radiotherapy (n=242) overall survival was similar (8.4 months [7.3-9.4; n=119] vs 7.4 months [6.4-8.4; n=123]; HR 0.82, 95% CI 0.63-1.06; p=0.12). For age older than 70 years, survival was better with temozolomide and with hypofractionated radiotherapy than with standard radiotherapy (HR for temozolomide vs standard radiotherapy 0.35 [0.21-0.56], pandlt;0.0001; HR for hypofractionated vs standard radiotherapy 0.59 [95% CI 0.37-0.93], p=0.02). Patients treated with temozolomide who had tumour MGMT promoter methylation had significantly longer survival than those without MGMT promoter methylation (9.7 months [95% CI 8.0-11.4] vs 6.8 months [5.9-7.7]; HR 0.56 [95% CI 0.34-0.93], p=0.02), but no difference was noted between those with methylated and unmethylated MGMT promoter treated with radiotherapy (HR 0.97 [95% CI 0.69-1.38]; p=0.81). As expected, the most common grade 3-4 adverse events in the temozolomide group were neutropenia (n=12) and thrombocytopenia (n=18). Grade 3-5 infections in all randomisation groups were reported in 18 patients. Two patients had fatal infections (one in the temozolomide group and one in the standard radiotherapy group) and one in the temozolomide group with grade 2 thrombocytopenia died from complications after surgery for a gastrointestinal bleed. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanInterpretation Standard radiotherapy was associated with poor outcomes, especially in patients older than 70 years. Both temozolomide and hypofractionated radiotherapy should be considered as standard treatment options in elderly patients with glioblastoma. MGMT promoter methylation status might be a useful predictive marker for benefit from temozolomide.

  • 21.
    Malmström, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Skovgaard Poulsen, Hans
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Henning Gronberg, Bjorn
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; Trondheim Regional and University Hospital, Norway.
    Stragliotto, Giuseppe
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hansen, Steinbjorn
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Asklund, Thomas
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Umeå University, Sweden.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Lysiak, Malgorzata
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dowsett, Joseph
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Winther Kristensen, Bjarne
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Sweden; Regional Cancer Centre Stockholm Gotland, Sweden.
    Postoperative neoadjuvant temozolomide before radiotherapy versus standard radiotherapy in patients 60 years or younger with anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma: a randomized trial2017In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 56, no 12, p. 1776-1785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: A pilot study of temozolomide (TMZ) given before radiotherapy (RT) for anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) and glioblastoma (GBM) resulted in prolonged survival compared to historical controls receiving RT alone. We therefore investigated neoadjuvant TMZ (NeoTMZ) in a randomized trial. During enrollment, concomitant and adjuvant radio-chemotherapy with TMZ became standard treatment. The trial was amended to include concurrent TMZ.Patients and methods: Patients, after surgery for GBM or AA, age 60 years and performance status (PS) 0-2, were randomized to either 2-3 cycles of TMZ, 200mg/m(2) days 1-5 every 28 days, followed by RT 60Gy in 30 fractions or RT only. Patients without progressive disease after two TMZ cycles, received the third cycle. From March 2005, TMZ 75mg/m(2) was administered daily concomitant with RT. TMZ was recommended first-line treatment at progression. Primary endpoint was overall survival and secondary safety.Results: The study closed prematurely after enrolling 144 patients, 103 with GBM and 41 with AA. Median age was 53 years (range 24-60) and 89 (62%) were male. PS was 0-1 for 133 (92%) patients, 53 (37%) had complete surgical resection and 18 (12%) biopsy. Ninety-two (64%) received TMZ concomitant with RT. Seventy-two (50%) were randomized to neoadjuvant treatment. For the overall study population survival was 20.3 months for RT and 17.7 months for NeoTMZ (p=.76), this not reaching the primary objective. For the preplanned subgroup analysis, we found that NeoTMZ AA patients had a median survival of 95.1 months compared to 35.2 months for RT (p=.022). For patients with GBM, no difference in survival was observed (p=.10). MGMT and IDH status affected outcome.Conclusions: No advantage of NeoTMZ was noted for the overall study population or subgroup of GBM, while NeoTMZ resulted in 5 years longer median survival for patients diagnosed as AA.

  • 22.
    Malmström, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, LAH Linköping.
    Stupp, Roger
    Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland.
    Hegi, Monika
    Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Centre.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Sweden Regional Cancer Centre Stockholm and Gotland, Sweden .
    Treatment options in elderly patients with glioblastoma - Authors' reply2012In: The Lancet Oncology, ISSN 1470-2045, E-ISSN 1474-5488, Vol. 13, no 11, p. E461-E462Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Rutqvist, Lars-Erik
    Department of Oncology, Södersjukhuset Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Malmström, Per-Olof
    Department of Oncology, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Bergh, Jonas
    Department of Oncology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Nils-Olof
    Department of Oncology, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hatschek, Thomas
    Department of Oncology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wallgren, Arne
    Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Coronary heart disease mortality after 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy: Results from a randomized trial2005In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, ISSN 0027-8874, E-ISSN 1460-2105, Vol. 97, no 21, p. 1609-1610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From January 1, 1983, through December 31, 1992, a total of 4610 patients entered a randomized trial that compared mortality among patients receiving 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy with that in patients receiving 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy, 4175 of whom were recurrence free after 2 years of tamoxifen therapy. Among the 2046 patients randomly assigned to the 5-year group all-cause mortality, breast cancer-specific mortality, and the incidence of contralateral breast cancer were reduced, compared with those among 2129 patients randomized in the 2-year group, but the incidence of endometrial cancer was increased. In addition, mortality from coronary heart disease was statistically significantly reduced in the 5-year group, compared with that in the 2-year group (hazard ratio = 0.67, 95% confidence interval = 0.47 to 0.94, P = .022 [two-sided Wald test]). Ten years after surgery, 2.1% of the patients in the 5-year group and 3.5% of those in the 2-year group had died from coronary heart disease. No statistically significant increases in mortality from other heart diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, or other vascular diseases were observed. © The Author 2005. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  • 24.
    Olsson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Monsef, Nastaran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Johanson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Cell Cycle Regulators: Impact on Predicting Prognosis in Stage T1 Urinary Bladder Cancer2012In: ISRN Urology, ISSN 2090-5807, E-ISSN 2090-5815, Vol. 2012, article id 379081Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objective. The cell cycle is regulated by proteins at different checkpoints, and dysregulation of this cycle plays a role in carcinogenesis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are enzymes that degrade collagen and promote tumour infiltration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of various cell cycle regulators and MMPs, and to correlate such expression with progression and recurrence in patients with stage T1 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB).

    Patients and Methods. This population-based cohort study comprised 201 well-characterized patients with primary stage T1 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. Immunohistochemistry was performed on formalin-fixed material to quantify expression of cell cycle regulators and two MMPs.

    Results. Normal expression of p53 and abnormal expression of MMP9 were associated with greater risk of tumour recurrence. Also, normal p16 expression was related to a lower risk of tumour progression. MMP2, p21, cyclin D1, and pRb showed no significant results that could estimate progression or recurrence.

    Conclusions. Normal p16 expression is associated with a lower risk of tumour progression, but immunohistochemistry on cell cycle regulators and MMPs has little value in predicting the prognosis in stage T1 UCB.

  • 25.
    Olsson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Population-based study on prognostic factors for recurrence and progression in primary stage T1 bladder tumours2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 188-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Stage T1 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) exhibits heterogeneous clinical behaviour, and the treatment is controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate prognostic factors for UCB in a defined, population-based cohort comprising patients with a first time diagnosis of primary stage T1 UCB.

    Material and methods. The study population initially consisted of 285 patients with primary stage T1 UCB reported to the regional Bladder Cancer Registry in the Southeast Healthcare Region of Sweden from 1992 to 2001. The histological specimens were re-evaluated concerning stage, substaging of T1, World Health Organization (WHO) grade, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), tumour volume and total resected volume. Hospital records provided data on tumour size and multiplicity, occurrence of possible relapse and/or progression, death from UCB and whether treatment was given.

    Results. After re-evaluation, the study population comprised 211 patients. The median follow-up time was 60 months. LVI was a prognostic factor for UCB progression and recurrence. Tumour size larger than 30 mm and multiplicity increased the risk of recurrence. T1 substaging, tumour volume and total resected volume were not associated with recurrence or tumour progression.

    Conclusions. LVI is significantly correlated with progression and recurrence in patients with primary stage T1 UCB. Therefore, the presence of LVI should be evaluated in every new case of T1 UCB.

  • 26.
    Olsson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Centre.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    MDM2 SNP309 promoter polymorphism and p53 mutations in urinary bladder carcinoma stage T12013In: BMC Urology, ISSN 1471-2490, E-ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 13, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Urinary bladder carcinoma stage T1 is an unpredictable disease that in some cases has a good prognosis with only local or no recurrence, but in others can appear as a more aggressive tumor with progression to more advanced stages. The aim here was to investigate stage T1 tumors regarding MDM2 promoter SNP309 polymorphism, mutations in the p53 gene, and expression of p53 and p16 measured by immunohistochemistry, and subsequently relate these changes to tumor recurrence and progression. We examined a cohort of patients with primary stage T1 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder and their tumors.

    Methods: After re-evaluation of the original slides and exclusions, the study population comprised 141 patients, all with primary stage T1 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. The hospital records were screened for clinical parameters and information concerning presence of histologically proven recurrence and progression. The paraffin-embedded tumor material was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Any mutations found in the p53 gene were studied by single-strand conformation analysis and Sanger sequencing. The MDM2 SNP309 polymorphism was investigated by pyrosequencing. Multivariate analyses concerning association with prognosis were performed, and Kaplan-Meier analysis was conducted for a combination of changes and time to progression.

    Results: Of the 141 patients, 82 had at least one MDM2 SNP309 G allele, and 53 had a mutation in the p53 gene, but neither of those anomalies was associated with a worse prognosis. A mutation in the p53 gene was associated with immunohistochemically visualized p53 protein expression at a cut-off value of 50%. In the group with p53 mutation Kaplan-Meier analysis showed higher rate of progression and shorter time to progression in patients with immunohistochemically abnormal p16 expression compared to them with normal p16 expression (p = 0.038).

    Conclusions: MDM2 SNP309 promoter polymorphism and mutations in p53 were not associated with worse prognosis in this cohort of patients with primary stage T1 urinary bladder carcinoma. However, patients with abnormal p16 expression and a mutated p53 gene had a higher rate of and a shorter time to progression, and p53 gene mutation was associated with an abnormal immunohistochemistry for p53 at a cut-off of 50%.

  • 27.
    Patschan, Oliver
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Holmang, Sten
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hosseini, Abolfazl
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Jancke, Georg
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ljungberg, Borje
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Per-Uno
    Akad University Hospital, Sweden.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Second-look resection for primary stage T1 bladder cancer: a population-based study2017In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 301-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the use of second-look resection (SLR) in stage T1 bladder cancer (BC) in a population-based Swedish cohort. Materials and methods: All patients diagnosed with stage T1 BC in 2008-2009 were identified in the Swedish National Registry for Urinary Bladder Cancer. Registry data on TNM stage, grade, primary treatment and pathological reports from the SLR performed within 8weeks of the primary transurethral resection were validated against patient charts. The endpoint was cancer-specific survival (CSS). Results: In total, 903 patients with a mean age of 74years (range 28-99 years) were included. SLR was performed in 501 patients (55%), who had the following stages at SLR: 172 (35%) T0, 83 (17%) Ta/Tis, 210 (43%) T1 and 26 (5%) T2-4. The use of SLR varied from 18% to 77% in the six healthcare regions. Multiple adjuvant intravesical instillations were given to 420 patients (47%). SLR was associated with intravesical instillations, age younger than 74 years, discussion at multidisciplinary tumour conference, G3 tumour and treatment at high-volume hospitals. Patients undergoing SLR had a lower risk of dying from BC (hazard ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.45-0.84, pamp;lt;.0022). Five-year CSS rates were as follows, in patients with the indicated tumours at SLR (p=.001): 82% in those with T1, 90% in T0, 90% in Ta/Tis and 56% in T2-4. Conclusions: There are large geographical differences in the use of SLR in stage T1 BC in Sweden, which are presumably related to local treatment traditions. Patients treated with SLR have a high rate of residual tumour but lower age, which suggests that a selection bias affects CSS.

  • 28.
    Patschan, Oliver
    et al.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Holmang, Sten
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hosseini, Abolfazl
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ljungberg, Borje
    Northern University Hospital, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Per-Uno
    Akad University Hospital, Sweden.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Use of bacillus Calmette-Guerin in stage T1 bladder cancer: Long-term observation of a population-based cohort2015In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 127-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The aim of this study was to analyse the rate of use of bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) at a population-based level, and the overall mortality and bladder cancer mortality due to stage T1 bladder cancer in a national, population-based register. Materials and methods. In total, 3758 patients with primary stage T1 bladder cancer, registered in the Swedish Bladder Cancer Register between 1997 and 2006, were included. Age, gender, tumour grade and primary treatment in the first 3-6 months were registered. High-volume hospitals registered 10 or more T1 tumours per year. Date and cause of death were obtained from the National Board of Health and Welfare Cause of Death Register. Results. BCG was given to 896 patients (24%). The use of BCG increased from 18% between 1997 and 2000, to 24% between 2001 and 2003, and to 31% between 2004 and 2006. BCG was given more often to patients with G3 tumours, patients younger than 75 years and patients attending high-volume hospitals. BCG treatment, grade 2 tumours and patient age younger than 75 years were associated with lower mortality due to bladder cancer. Hospital volume, gender and year of diagnosis were not related to bladder cancer mortality. However, selection factors might have affected the results since comorbidity, number of tumours and tumour size were unknown. Conclusions. Intravesical BCG is underused at a population-based level in stage T1 bladder cancer in Sweden, particularly in patients 75 years or older, and in those treated at low-volume hospitals. BCG should be offered more frequently to patients with stage T1 bladder cancer in Sweden.

  • 29.
    Robinson, David
    et al.
    Section of Urology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Aus, Gunnar
    Department of Urology, Sahlgrens University Hospital, Goumlteborg, Sweden.
    Bak, Julia
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gorecki, Tomasz
    County Hospital of Kalmar, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Herder, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Long-term follow-up of conservatively managed incidental carcinoma of the prostate A multivariate analysis of prognostic factors2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 103-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the disease-specific mortality of conservatively managed incidental carcinoma of the prostate (T1a and T1b) in relation to prognostic factors.

    Material and methods: Since 1987 all patients with prostate cancer have been recorded and followed in the population-based Prostate Cancer Register of the South-East Healthcare Region in Sweden, which is covered by four departments of pathology. At two of these departments, tissue was obtained from 197 consecutive, previously untreated patients (aged <80 years) with incidental carcinoma who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate between 1987 and 1991. The amount of tumour, Gleason score and levels of Ki-67, p53, chromogranin A and serotonin were determined. Univariate analysis and multiple Cox regression hazard analysis were used for analysis.

    Results: During follow-up (mean 7.8 years; maximum 17.5 years), 158 patients (80%) had died, 33 of them of prostate cancer, corresponding to 17% of the entire cohort. Of 86 patients with Gleason score ≤5, three died of prostate cancer. Independent predictors of disease-specific mortality in multivariate analysis were category T1b prostate cancer, Gleason score >5 and high immunoreactivity of Ki-67.

    Conclusions: Elderly men with category T1a and/or Gleason score 4-5 prostate cancer have a favourable prognosis with conservative management. Immunohistochemical staining with Ki-67 may be of help in situations where further prognostic information is required.

  • 30.
    Roodakker, Kenney R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Elsir, Tamador
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Edqvist, Per-Henrik D.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hagerstrand, Daniel
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Carison, Joseph
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lysiak, Malgorzata
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Sweden; Regional Cancer Centre, Sweden.
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Stupp, Roger
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Tchougounova, Elena
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nister, Monica
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Malmström, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Smits, Anja
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    PROX1 is a novel pathway-specific prognostic biomarker for high-grade astrocytomas; results from independent glioblastoma cohorts stratified by age and IDH mutation status2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 45, p. 72431-72442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PROX1 is a transcription factor with an essential role in embryonic development and determination of cell fate. In addition, PROX1 has been ascribed suppressive as well as oncogenic roles in several human cancers, including brain tumors. In this study we explored the correlation between PROX1 expression and patient survival in high-grade astrocytomas. For this purpose, we analyzed protein expression in tissue microarrays of tumor samples stratified by patient age and IDH mutation status. We initially screened 86 unselected high-grade astrocytomas, followed by 174 IDH1-R132H1 immunonegative glioblastomas derived from patients aged 60 years and older enrolled in the Nordic phase III trial of elderly patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Representing the younger population of glioblastomas, we studied 80 IDH-wildtype glioblastomas from patients aged 18-60 years. There was no correlation between PROX1 protein and survival for patients with primary glioblastomas included in these cohorts. In contrast, high expression of PROX1 protein predicted shorter survival in the group of patients with IDH-mutant anaplastic astrocytomas and secondary glioblastomas. The prognostic impact of PROX1 in IDH-mutant 1p19q non-codeleted high-grade astrocytomas, as well as the negative findings in primary glioblastomas, was corroborated by gene expression data extracted from the Cancer Genome Atlas. We conclude that PROX1 is a new prognostic biomarker for 1p19q non-codeleted high-grade astrocytomas that have progressed from pre-existing lowgrade tumors and harbor IDH mutations.

  • 31.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Long-term effects of adjuvant tamoxifen treatment on cardiovascular disease and cancer2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this thesis were to investigate the long-term effects of adjuvant tamoxifen treatment on breast cancer recurrence and mortality, cardiovascular disease, and the incidence of secondary cancer.

    Between 1982 and 1992, postmenopausal patients with early stage breast cancer were included in a randomized clinical study of 2 or 5 years of postoperative tamoxifen therapy. The trial was planned by the Swedish Breast Cancer Group, and it included 4610 patients. Follow-up on causes of death, hospitalizations and secondary cancers were obtained from national population-based registries. 

    All-cause mortality, breast cancer-specific mortality and mortality from coronary heart disease were decreased in the 5-year group, but the incidence of endometrial cancer was increased (Paper I). The incidence and mortality of cerebrovascular diseases were increased during the active treatment phase, and reduced after the active treatment (Paper II). Similar results were seen for subgroups of cerebrovascular diseases such as stroke and ischemic stroke. In the 5-year group, the morbidity from coronary heart disease was reduced during treatment but not after treatment was stopped (Paper III). This was the case also for heart failure and for atrial fibrillation/flutter. For secondary cancers the lung cancer risk was reduced, as well as the lung cancer mortality (Paper IV). An increased risk was observed for endometrial cancer, but appeared to decrease over time. The risk of contralateral breast cancer was reduced, with most of the reduction after treatment was stopped. For distance recurrences the risk was reduced both during treatment and a few years after treatment was stopped. The breast cancer mortality was also reduced, especially during the post-treatment phase.

    List of papers
    1. Coronary heart disease mortality after 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy: Results from a randomized trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coronary heart disease mortality after 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy: Results from a randomized trial
    Show others...
    2005 (English)In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, ISSN 0027-8874, E-ISSN 1460-2105, Vol. 97, no 21, p. 1609-1610Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    From January 1, 1983, through December 31, 1992, a total of 4610 patients entered a randomized trial that compared mortality among patients receiving 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy with that in patients receiving 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy, 4175 of whom were recurrence free after 2 years of tamoxifen therapy. Among the 2046 patients randomly assigned to the 5-year group all-cause mortality, breast cancer-specific mortality, and the incidence of contralateral breast cancer were reduced, compared with those among 2129 patients randomized in the 2-year group, but the incidence of endometrial cancer was increased. In addition, mortality from coronary heart disease was statistically significantly reduced in the 5-year group, compared with that in the 2-year group (hazard ratio = 0.67, 95% confidence interval = 0.47 to 0.94, P = .022 [two-sided Wald test]). Ten years after surgery, 2.1% of the patients in the 5-year group and 3.5% of those in the 2-year group had died from coronary heart disease. No statistically significant increases in mortality from other heart diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, or other vascular diseases were observed. © The Author 2005. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-31657 (URN)10.1093/jnci/dji342 (DOI)17468 (Local ID)17468 (Archive number)17468 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Time dependent effects of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy on cerebrovascular disease: results from a randomised trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Time dependent effects of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy on cerebrovascular disease: results from a randomised trial
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 104, no 6, p. 899-902Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Tamoxifen has been associated with an increased risk of stroke. There is, however, little information on the effect in the post-treatment period. Using data from the Swedish Breast Cancer Group adjuvant trial of 5 vs 2 years of tamoxifen treatment, we now report both short-term and long-term effects on morbidity as well as mortality because of cerebrovascular disease. METHODS: Data from the Swedish National Hospital Discharge Registry combined with information from the Swedish Cause of Death Registry was used to define events of disease. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox regression. RESULTS: Comparing patients randomised to 5 years of tamoxifen with patients randomised to 2 years of tamoxifen, the incidence of cerebrovascular diseases was increased (HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.05-2.75) during the active treatment phase and reduced after the active treatment period (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.63-0.96), and the difference in HR between the two time-periods was significant (P 0.0033). The mortality from cerebrovascular diseases was increased during the treatment period (HR 3.18, 95% CI 1.03-9.87) and decreased during the post-treatment period (HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.40-0.90) with a significant difference in HR between the two periods of follow-up (P=0.0066). Similar results were seen for subgroups of cerebrovascular diseases, such as stroke and ischaemic stroke. CONCLUSION: In an adjuvant setting, tamoxifen was associated with an increased risk of cerebrovascular disease during treatment, but a decreased risk in the post-treatment period.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Nature Publishing Group, 2011
    Keywords
    breast cancer, tamoxifen, adjuvant treatment, adverse events, cerebrovascular disease
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67321 (URN)10.1038/bjc.2011.45 (DOI)000288437500002 ()
    Available from: 2011-04-08 Created: 2011-04-08 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    3. Effects of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy on cardiac disease: results from a randomized trial with long-term follow-up
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy on cardiac disease: results from a randomized trial with long-term follow-up
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 138, no 2, p. 467-473Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Tamoxifen is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, there are few reports on long-term effects. Using data from a large Swedish randomized trial of 5 and 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen in women with early breast cancer, we here present results on morbidity and mortality from cardiac diseases during treatment and long-term after treatment. A total of 4,150 patients were breast cancer recurrence-free after 2 years. Data from the Swedish National Hospital Discharge Registry combined with information from the Swedish Cause of Death Registry were used to define events of disease. Hazard ratios were estimated using Cox regression. Patients assigned to 5 years in comparison with 2 years of postoperative tamoxifen experienced a reduced incidence of CHD [hazard ratio (HR), 0.83; 95 % CI 0.70-1.00], especially apparent during the active treatment period (HR 0.65; 95 % CI 0.43-1.00). The mortality from CHD was significantly reduced (HR 0.72; 95 % CI 0.53-0.97). During the active treatment, the morbidity of other heart diseases was also significantly reduced (HR 0.40; 95 % CI 0.25-0.64) but not after treatment stopped (HR 1.06; 95 % CI 0.87-1.30). Similar results were seen for both heart failure and atrial fibrillation/flutter. As compared to 2 years of therapy, 5 years of postoperative tamoxifen therapy prevents CHD as well as other heart diseases. The risk reduction is most apparent during the active treatment period, and later tends to diminish.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    SPRINGER, 233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA, 2013
    Keywords
    Breast cancer, Tamoxifen, Adjuvant treatment, Adverse events, Heart failure, Coronary heart disease
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91931 (URN)10.1007/s10549-013-2457-6 (DOI)000316821300012 ()
    Available from: 2013-05-06 Created: 2013-05-06 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    4. Effects of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy on the incidence of secondary cancer: results from a randomized trial with long term follow-up
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy on the incidence of secondary cancer: results from a randomized trial with long term follow-up
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    2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    Tamoxifen is a well-established endocrine treatment for breast cancer. We here present results with respect to second primary cancer from a large randomized trial of 5 and 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen. Breast cancer distant recurrence and mortality are also reported.

    METHODS

    Our study included 4128 postmenopausal patients with early stage breast cancer who were alive and free of breast cancer recurrence after 2 years of tamoxifen therapy. They were randomized to receive three more years of therapy or stop tamoxifen. In the comparison of 5 years versus 2 years of postoperative tamoxifen treatment hazard ratios were estimated using Cox regression for different follow-up periods defined as: During treatment (2-5 years) and after treatment (5-10 years, 10-15 years, > 5 years, > 10 years and > 15 years).

    RESULTS

    In the five years group the incidence of lung cancer was halved (hazard ratio [HR], 0.45, 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.27-0.77 [P = .0038]), and lung cancer mortality was decreased. An increased risk was observed for endometrial cancer (HR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.19-2.81 [P = .0059]), but this risk appeared to decrease over time. The risk of contralateral breast cancer was decreased (HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.56-0.96 [P = .022]), also in the period after treatment stopped. In the five years group, the risk of distant recurrence was decreased, and statistically significant reductions were observed both during treatment and in the five year period after treatment stopped. The breast cancer mortality was reduced, especially during the post-treatment phase.

    CONCLUSIONS

    In this randomized study, tamoxifen substantially reduces the risk of new cancer both in contralateral breast and in lung up to 10 years after treatment stopped.

    Keywords
    breast cancer, tamoxifen, adjuvant treatment, second primary cancer, lung cancer
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112285 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-11-21 Created: 2014-11-21 Last updated: 2015-03-31Bibliographically approved
  • 32.
    Rosell, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Bengtsson, Nils-Olof
    Umeå University Hospital, Sweden .
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Hatschek, Thomas
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Lindman, Henrik
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Malmstrom, Per-Olof
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Wallgren, Arne
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy on cardiac disease: results from a randomized trial with long-term follow-up2013In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 138, no 2, p. 467-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tamoxifen is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, there are few reports on long-term effects. Using data from a large Swedish randomized trial of 5 and 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen in women with early breast cancer, we here present results on morbidity and mortality from cardiac diseases during treatment and long-term after treatment. A total of 4,150 patients were breast cancer recurrence-free after 2 years. Data from the Swedish National Hospital Discharge Registry combined with information from the Swedish Cause of Death Registry were used to define events of disease. Hazard ratios were estimated using Cox regression. Patients assigned to 5 years in comparison with 2 years of postoperative tamoxifen experienced a reduced incidence of CHD [hazard ratio (HR), 0.83; 95 % CI 0.70-1.00], especially apparent during the active treatment period (HR 0.65; 95 % CI 0.43-1.00). The mortality from CHD was significantly reduced (HR 0.72; 95 % CI 0.53-0.97). During the active treatment, the morbidity of other heart diseases was also significantly reduced (HR 0.40; 95 % CI 0.25-0.64) but not after treatment stopped (HR 1.06; 95 % CI 0.87-1.30). Similar results were seen for both heart failure and atrial fibrillation/flutter. As compared to 2 years of therapy, 5 years of postoperative tamoxifen therapy prevents CHD as well as other heart diseases. The risk reduction is most apparent during the active treatment period, and later tends to diminish.

  • 33.
    Rosell, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Bengtsson, Nils-Olof
    Umeå University Hospital, Sweden .
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Hatschek, Thomas
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Lindman, Henrik
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Malmstrom, Per-Olof
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Wallgren, Arne
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy on the incidence of secondary cancer: results from a randomized trial with long term follow-up2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    Tamoxifen is a well-established endocrine treatment for breast cancer. We here present results with respect to second primary cancer from a large randomized trial of 5 and 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen. Breast cancer distant recurrence and mortality are also reported.

    METHODS

    Our study included 4128 postmenopausal patients with early stage breast cancer who were alive and free of breast cancer recurrence after 2 years of tamoxifen therapy. They were randomized to receive three more years of therapy or stop tamoxifen. In the comparison of 5 years versus 2 years of postoperative tamoxifen treatment hazard ratios were estimated using Cox regression for different follow-up periods defined as: During treatment (2-5 years) and after treatment (5-10 years, 10-15 years, > 5 years, > 10 years and > 15 years).

    RESULTS

    In the five years group the incidence of lung cancer was halved (hazard ratio [HR], 0.45, 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.27-0.77 [P = .0038]), and lung cancer mortality was decreased. An increased risk was observed for endometrial cancer (HR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.19-2.81 [P = .0059]), but this risk appeared to decrease over time. The risk of contralateral breast cancer was decreased (HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.56-0.96 [P = .022]), also in the period after treatment stopped. In the five years group, the risk of distant recurrence was decreased, and statistically significant reductions were observed both during treatment and in the five year period after treatment stopped. The breast cancer mortality was reduced, especially during the post-treatment phase.

    CONCLUSIONS

    In this randomized study, tamoxifen substantially reduces the risk of new cancer both in contralateral breast and in lung up to 10 years after treatment stopped.

  • 34.
    Rosell, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Bengtsson, Nils-Olof
    Umeå University Hospital, Sweden.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hatschek, Thomas
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lindman, Henrik
    Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Per-Olof
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Wallgren, Arne
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Long-term effects on the incidence of second primary cancers in a randomized trial of two and five years of adjuvant tamoxifen2017In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 614-617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Tamoxifen is a well established treatment for breast cancer, but its long-term effects on the incidence of secondary cancers are not fully evaluated.Material and methods: We have studied 4128 postmenopausal patients with early stage breast cancer who were alive and free of breast cancer recurrence after two years of tamoxifen, and who were randomized to receive totally two or five years of therapy.Results: Compared to patients randomized to two years of tamoxifen the incidence of contralateral breast cancer [hazard ratio (HR) 0.73; 95% CI 0.56-0.96] and of lung cancer (HR 0.45; 95% CI 0.27-0.77), especially squamous cell and small cell lung cancer, were reduced in the five-year group, and similar results were seen when restricting the analysis to the 10-year period after treatment stopped. An increased incidence of endometrial cancer was observed in the five-year group, but the excess risk decreased over time.Conclusion: Further studies of the effects of tamoxifen on the risk of different histological types of lung cancer are needed.

  • 35.
    Rosell, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Bengtsson, N-O
    Department of Oncolog, Umea University Hospital, Sweden.
    Fornander, T
    Department of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hatschek, T
    Department of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindman, H
    Department of Oncology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, P-O
    Department of Oncology, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Wallgren, A
    Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Time dependent effects of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy on cerebrovascular disease: results from a randomised trial2011In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 104, no 6, p. 899-902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Tamoxifen has been associated with an increased risk of stroke. There is, however, little information on the effect in the post-treatment period. Using data from the Swedish Breast Cancer Group adjuvant trial of 5 vs 2 years of tamoxifen treatment, we now report both short-term and long-term effects on morbidity as well as mortality because of cerebrovascular disease. METHODS: Data from the Swedish National Hospital Discharge Registry combined with information from the Swedish Cause of Death Registry was used to define events of disease. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox regression. RESULTS: Comparing patients randomised to 5 years of tamoxifen with patients randomised to 2 years of tamoxifen, the incidence of cerebrovascular diseases was increased (HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.05-2.75) during the active treatment phase and reduced after the active treatment period (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.63-0.96), and the difference in HR between the two time-periods was significant (P 0.0033). The mortality from cerebrovascular diseases was increased during the treatment period (HR 3.18, 95% CI 1.03-9.87) and decreased during the post-treatment period (HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.40-0.90) with a significant difference in HR between the two periods of follow-up (P=0.0066). Similar results were seen for subgroups of cerebrovascular diseases, such as stroke and ischaemic stroke. CONCLUSION: In an adjuvant setting, tamoxifen was associated with an increased risk of cerebrovascular disease during treatment, but a decreased risk in the post-treatment period.

  • 36.
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Uppsala Akademiska Hospital, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Urology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Löfman, Owe
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Clinical consequences of screening for prostate cancer: 15 Years follow-up of a randomised controlled trial in Sweden2004In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 717-723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    To test the feasibility of a population-based prostate cancer screening programme in general practice and explore the outcome after a 15-year follow-up period.

    Methods:

    From the total population of men aged 50–69 years in Norrköping (n = 9026) every sixth man (n = 1494) was randomly selected to be screened for prostate cancer every third year over a 12-year period. The remaining 7532 men were treated as controls. In 1987 and 1990 only digital rectal examination (DRE) was performed, in1993 and 1996 DRE was combined with a test for Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA). TNM categories, grade of malignancy, management and cause of death were recorded in the South-East Region Prostate Cancer Register.

    Results:

    There were 85 (5.7%) cancers detected in the screened group (SG), 42 of these in the interval between screenings, and 292 (3.8%) in the unscreened group (UG). In the SG 48 (56.5%) of the tumours and in the UG 78 (26.7%) were localised at diagnosis (p < 0.001). In the SG 21 (25%) and in the UG 41 (14%) received curative treatment. There was no significant difference in total or prostate cancer-specific survival between the groups.

    Conclusions:

    Although PSA had not been introduced in the clinical practice at the start of the study, we were still able to show that it is possible to perform a long-term population-based randomised controlled study with standardised management and that screening in general practice is an efficient way of detecting prostate cancer whilst it is localised. Complete data on stage, treatment and mortality for both groups was obtained from a validated cancer register, which is a fundamental prerequisite when assessing screening programmes.

  • 37.
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Lofman, Owe
    Norwegian University Life Science.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Letter: PROSTATE CANCER SCREENING Authors reply2011In: BMJ. British Medical Journal, E-ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 342Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 38.
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Urology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Lofman, Owe
    Norwegian University of Life Science.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Randomised prostate cancer screening trial: 20 year follow-up2011In: BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, ISSN 0959-535X, Vol. 342, no d1539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To assess whether screening for prostate cancer reduces prostate cancer specific mortality. Design Population based randomised controlled trial. Setting Department of Urology, Norrkoping, and the South-East Region Prostate Cancer Register. Participants All men aged 50-69 in the city of Norrkoping, Sweden, identified in 1987 in the National Population Register (n=9026). Intervention From the study population, 1494 men were randomly allocated to be screened by including every sixth man from a list of dates of birth. These men were invited to be screened every third year from 1987 to 1996. On the first two occasions screening was done by digital rectal examination only. From 1993, this was combined with prostate specific antigen testing, with 4 mu g/L as cut off. On the fourth occasion (1996), only men aged 69 or under at the time of the investigation were invited. Main outcome measures Data on tumour stage, grade, and treatment from the South East Region Prostate Cancer Register. Prostate cancer specific mortality up to 31 December 2008. Results In the four screenings from 1987 to 1996 attendance was 1161/1492 (78%), 957/1363 (70%), 895/1210 (74%), and 446/606 (74%), respectively. There were 85 cases (5.7%) of prostate cancer diagnosed in the screened group and 292 (3.9%) in the control group. The risk ratio for death from prostate cancer in the screening group was 1.16 (95% confidence interval 0.78 to 1.73). In a Cox proportional hazard analysis comparing prostate cancer specific survival in the control group with that in the screened group, the hazard ratio for death from prostate cancer was 1.23 (0.94 to 1.62; P=0.13). After adjustment for age at start of the study, the hazard ratio was 1.58 (1.06 to 2.36; P=0.024). Conclusions After 20 years of follow-up the rate of death from prostate cancer did not differ significantly between men in the screening group and those in the control group.

  • 39.
    Shen, Yang-mei
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Gullstrand, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wei, Yu-Quan
    Sichuan University.
    Zhang, Hong
    University of Skövde.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Olsson, Birgit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Peng, Feng
    Sichuan University.
    Yang, Han-Shuo
    Sichuan University.
    Wang, Chun-Ting
    Sichuan University.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Novel gene hBiot2 is an independent prognostic factor in colorectal cancer patients2012In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 376-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated the expression of the novel gene hBiot2 in colorectal cancer (CRC) and its relationships with clinicopathological variables in CRC patients. The expression of hBiot2 in 163 primary CRCs together with the corresponding normal mucosa, 36 liver metastases and 5 colon cancer cell lines was examined using real-time PCR. In situ hybridization (ISH) was performed to evaluate the localization of hBiot2 expression in CRC and normal mucosa. hBiot2 expression at the RNA level was localized in the nucleus of tumor cells and normal epithelial cells. The mean expression of hBiot2 in the CRCs (243.571 +/- 564.569) was higher compared to the normal mucosa (107.252 +/- 413.635, Pandlt;0.0001) and liver metastasis samples (42.002 +/- 40.809, P=0.0002). hBiot2 expression was increased from stages I + II to III (P=0.047), and no difference in the expression was found in stages III and IV (P=0.452). A high value of hBiot2 was associated with a poorer prognosis compared with a low value independently of gender, age, tumor site, stage and differentiation (P=0.007, RR 7.519, 95% Cl 1.729-32.704). Liver metastasis, smaller tumors, non-local recurrence and primary liver surgery alone were associated with a higher value of hBiot2 compared to larger tumors, local recurrence and repeated liver surgery (P=0.003, 0.044 and 0.026, respectively). An inverse relationship was found between hBiot2 expression and the metastatic potential of the colon cancer cell lines. Thus, increased expression of hBiot2 may be an early and interim event in the development of CRC. A higher expression of hBiot2 in primary CRC patients independently indicates a poorer prognosis.

  • 40.
    Sjostrom, Carin
    et al.
    Capio St Gorans Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Thorstenson, Andreas
    Capio St Gorans Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Strock, Viveka
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hosseini-Aliabad, Abolfazl
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Aljabery, Firas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Sherif, Amir
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Malmstrom, Per-Uno
    Akad Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Regional Cancer Center.
    Gardmark, Truls
    Danderyd Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Treatment according to guidelines may bridge the gender gap in outcome for patients with stage T1 urinary bladder cancer2018In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 186-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this investigation was to study differences between male and female patients with stage T1 urinary bladder cancer (UBC) regarding intravesical instillation therapy, second resection and survival. Materials and methods: This study included all patients with non-metastatic primary T1 UBC reported to the Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) from 1997 to 2014, excluding those treated with primary cystectomy. Differences between groups were evaluated using chi-squared tests and logistic regression, and survival was investigated using Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazards analysis. Results: In all, 7681 patients with T1 UBC (77% male, 23% female) were included. Females were older than males at the time of diagnosis (median age at presentation 76 and 74 years, respectively; p amp;lt; .001). A larger proportion of males than females underwent intravesical instillation therapy (39% vs 33%, pamp;lt;.001). Relative survival was lower in women aged amp;gt;= 75 years and women with G3 tumours compared to men. However, women aged amp;gt;= 75 years who had T1G3 tumours and underwent second resection followed by intravesical instillation therapy showed a relative survival equal to that observed in men. Conclusions: This population-based study demonstrates that women of all ages with T1 UBC undergo intravesical instillation therapy less frequently than men, and that relative survival is poorer in women aged amp;gt;= 75 years than in men of the same age when intravesical instillation therapy and second resection are not used. However, these disparities may disappear with treatment according to guidelines.

  • 41.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Causes of death after surgery for colon cancer-impact of other diseases, urgent admittance, and gender2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 48, no 10, p. 1160-1165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. In patients with colon cancer, high age and comorbidity is common. In this population-based retrospective study we have investigated causes of death and the influence of urgent operation, and gender on survival. Material and methods. Medical records of 413 patients with verified colon cancer were reviewed. The diagnosis was made during 2000-2006 and operation was performed in 385 patients (93%). Results. The overall 5-year survival after surgery was 48.3%. At the end of the follow-up, 128 patients (54.9%) had verified colon cancer when they died but 105 patients (45.1%) had no signs of colon cancer. Their 5-year survival was 5.5% and 41.9%, respectively (p andlt; 0.0001). Median survival time was significantly shorter after urgent compared with elective admittance, 20.7 months versus 77.9 months, and the 5-year survival 32.4% versus 57.9% (p = 0.0001). The tumor stage at operation was more favorable in patients dying with no signs of colon cancer than in those dying with cancer regarding stage I-II (66.7% versus 16.4%), and stage IV (1.0% versus 53.1%), but not regarding stage III (30.5% versus 29.7%). The overall survival in women who were operated was longer than in men (p = 0.045) as well as survival after elective admittance (p = 0.013). Conclusion. After a median follow-up of 56.1 months almost half of the patients who were dead had died from other causes than colon cancer. Ten percent of those patients had an incorrectly reported diagnosis of colon cancer as cause of death. Urgent admittance was associated with reduced survival time. The median survival time was longer in women than in men.

  • 42.
    Tabar, Laszlo
    et al.
    Falun Central Hospital, Falun.
    Vitak, Bedrich
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Hsiu-Hsi Chen, Tony
    National Taiwan University,Taipei, Taiwan.
    Ming-Fang Yen, Amy
    Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Cohen, Anders
    Falun Central Hospital, Falun.
    Tot, Tibor
    Falun Central Hospital, Falun.
    Yueh-Hsia Chiu, Sherry
    Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
    Li-Sheng Chen, Sam
    Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Ching-Yuan Fann, Jean
    Kainan University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Fohlin, Helena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology.
    Smith, Robert A
    American Cancer Society, Atlanta, USA.
    Duffy, Stephen W
    Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.
    Swedish Two-County Trial: Impact of Mammographic Screening on Breast Cancer Mortality during 3 Decades2011In: Radiology, ISSN 0033-8419, E-ISSN 1527-1315, Vol. 260, no 3, p. 658-663Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To estimate the long-term (29-year) effect of mammographic screening on breast cancer mortality in terms of both relative and absolute effects. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMaterials and Methods: This study was carried out under the auspices of the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. The board determined that, because randomization was at a community level and was to invitation to screening, informed verbal consent could be given by the participants when they attended the screening examination. A total of 133 065 women aged 40-74 years residing in two Swedish counties were randomized into a group invited to mammographic screening and a control group receiving usual care. Case status and cause of death were determined by the local trial end point committees and, independently, by an external committee. Mortality analysis was performed by using negative binomial regression. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: There was a highly significant reduction in breast cancer mortality in women invited to screening according to both local end point committee data (relative risk [RR] = 0.69; 95% confi dence interval: 0.56, 0.84; P andlt;.0001) and consensus data (RR = 0.73; 95% confi dence interval: 0.59, 0.89; P =.002). At 29 years of follow-up, the number of women needed to undergo screening for 7 years to prevent one breast cancer death was 414 according to local data and 519 according to consensus data. Most prevented breast cancer deaths would have occurred (in the absence of screening) after the first 10 years of follow-up. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Invitation to mammographic screening results in a highly significant decrease in breast cancer-specific mortality. Evaluation of the full impact of screening, in particular estimates of absolute benefit and number needed to screen, requires follow-up times exceeding 20 years because the observed number of breast cancer deaths prevented increases with increasing time of follow-up.

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