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  • 1.
    Enthoven, Paul
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    VALIDITY, INTERNAL CONSISTENCY AND SELF-RATED CHANGE OF THE PATIENT ENABLEMENT INSTRUMENT IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN2019In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 51, no 8, p. 587-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Patient enablement reflects patients understanding of and coping with illness. The aim of this study was to investigate the content validity, construct validity, internal consistency and selfrated change (SRC) of the Patient Enablement Instrument (PEI) in patients with whiplash-associated disorders, cervical radiculopathy and mixed chronic pain treated in different settings. Design: Psychometric analyses. Participants: Patients with disabling non-malignant chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods: Participants answered questionnaires on disability (Neck Disability Index (NDI) or Functional Rating Index (FRI)), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; HADS) and general health (EuroQol; EQ-5D). Content validity, construct validity (confirmatory factor analysis), internal consistency and cut-off for SRC were investigated for the PEI after treatment. The SRC value was the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve optimal cut-off point. Results: After treatment all items were completed by 516 patients (mean standard deviation (SD) age 45.1 years (SD 10.1), women 75% (n=385)). The 1-factor PEI model had approximate fit to the data. The internal consistency Cronbachs alpha was between 0.878 and 0.929 for the 3 groups. Correlations between the PEI and the NDI/FRI, HADS and EQ-5D were fair to good. The SRCROC for whiplash-associated disorders, cervical radiculopathy and mixed chronic pain groups was 5, 6 and 4 points in the PEI, respectively. Conclusion: The PEI showed fair content validity, construct validity and internal consistency. However, the scale needs further development to improve measurement of change.

  • 2.
    Ng, Eunice
    et al.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Johnston, Venerina
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lofgren, Hakan
    Ryhov Hospital, Sweden.
    Dedering, Asa
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Queensland, Australia.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Queensland, Australia.
    Factors Associated With Work Ability in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Cervical Radiculopathy2015In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 40, no 16, p. 1270-1276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design. Cross-sectional study. Objective. To investigate the factors associated with work ability in patients undergoing surgery for cervical radiculopathy. Summary of Background Data. Surgery is a common treatment of cervical radiculopathy in people of working age. However, few studies have investigated the impact on the work ability of these patients. Methods. Patients undergoing surgery for cervical radiculopathy (n = 201) were recruited from spine centers in Sweden to complete a battery of questionnaires and physical measures the day before surgery. The associations between various individual, psychological, and work-related factors and self-reported work ability were investigated by Spearman rank correlation coefficient, multivariate linear regression, and forward stepwise regression analyses. Factors that were significant (P < 0.05) in each statistical analysis were entered into the successive analysis to reveal the factors most related to work ability. Work ability was assessed using the Work Ability Index. Results. The mean Work Ability Index score was 28 (SD, 9.0). The forward stepwise regression analysis revealed 6 factors significantly associated with work ability, which explained 62% of the variance in the Work Ability Index. Factors highly correlated with greater work ability included greater self-efficacy in performing self-cares, lower physical load on the neck at work, greater self-reported chance of being able to work in 6 months time, greater use of active coping strategies, lower frequency of hand weakness, and higher health-related quality of life. Conclusion. Psychological, work-related and individual factors were significantly associated with work ability in patients undergoing surgery for cervical radiculopathy. High self-efficacy was most associated with greater work ability. Consideration of these factors by surgeons preoperatively may provide optimal return to work outcomes after surgery.

  • 3.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Function in Patients With Cervical Radiculopathy or Chronic Whiplash-Associated Disorders Compared With Healthy Volunteers2014In: Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, ISSN 0161-4754, E-ISSN 1532-6586, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 211-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The purposes of this study were to examine whether any differences in function and health exist between patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR) due to disk disease scheduled for surgery and patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WADs) and to compare measures of patients' physical function with those obtained from healthy volunteers.

    Methods

    This is a cross-sectional study of patients with CR (n = 198) and patients with chronic WAD (n = 215). Patient data were compared with raw data previously obtained from healthy people. Physical measures included cervical active range of motion, neck muscle endurance, and hand grip strength. Self-rated measures included pain intensity (visual analog scale), neck disability (Neck Disability Index), self-efficacy (Self-Efficacy Scale), and health-related quality of life (EuroQol 5-dimensional self-classifier).

    Results

    Patient groups exhibited significantly lower performance than the healthy group in all physical measures (P < .0005) except for neck muscle endurance in flexion for women (P > .09). There was a general trend toward worse results in the CR group than the WAD group, with significant differences in neck active range of motion, left hand strength for women, pain intensity, Neck Disability Index, EuroQol 5-dimensional self-classifier, and Self-Efficacy Scale (P < .0001).

    Conclusions

    Patients had worse values than healthy individuals in almost all physical measures. There was a trend toward worse results for CR than WAD patients.

  • 4.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Dedering, Asa
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Hedevik, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Postoperative structured rehabilitation in patients undergoing surgery for cervical radiculopathy: a 2-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial2019In: Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, ISSN 1547-5654, E-ISSN 1547-5646, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 60-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE Information about postoperative rehabilitation for cervical radiculopathy (CR) is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate the additional benefits of structured postoperative rehabilitation (SPT), which was performed in all patients, compared with a pragmatic standard postoperative approach (SA), in which rehabilitation was used as needed and patients sought physiotherapy on their own without a referral, in patients with MRI evidence of disc herniation and concomitant clinical signs who underwent surgery for CR. METHODS Patients (n = 202) were randomized to receive SPT or SA. Included key variables in the present study were primary and selected secondary outcomes of a prospective randomized controlled multicenter study. The main outcome was the Neck Disability Index (NDI) score. The NDI score, pain variables, self-efficacy, and health-related quality of life were investigated at baseline and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. RESULTS SPT provided no additional benefits over SA (p = 0.08 to p = 0.99) at the postoperative 2-year follow-up. Both groups improved over time (p amp;lt; 0.0001), with no reported adverse effects. CONCLUSIONS One can conclude that SPT offered no additional benefits over SA; however, patients tolerated postoperative neck exercises without any negative side effects. These findings are important for the development of future active and neck-specific post-operative rehabilitation interventions for patients with CR.

  • 5.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Futurum, County Council Jönköping, Sweden .
    Persson, Liselott
    Lunds University, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Outcome of physiotherapy after surgery for cervical disc disease: a prospective randomised multi-centre trial2014In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 15, no 34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Many patients with cervical disc disease require leave from work, due to long-lasting, complex symptoms, including chronic pain and reduced levels of physical and psychological function. Surgery on a few segmental levels might be expected to resolve disc-specific pain and reduce neurological deficits, but not the non-specific neck pain and the frequent illness. No study has investigated whether post-surgery physiotherapy might improve the outcome of surgery. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a well-structured rehabilitation programme might add benefit to the customary post-surgical treatment for cervical disc disease, with respect to function, disability, work capability, and cost effectiveness.

    METHODS/DESIGN:

    This study was designed as a prospective, randomised, controlled, multi-centre study. An independent, blinded investigator will compare two alternatives of rehabilitation. We will include 200 patients of working age, with cervical disc disease confirmed by clinical findings and symptoms of cervical nerve root compression. After providing informed consent, study participants will be randomised to one of two alternative physiotherapy regimes; (A) customary treatment (information and advice on a specialist clinic); or (B) customary treatment plus active physiotherapy. Physiotherapy will follow a standardised, structured programme of neck-specific exercises combined with a behavioural approach. All patients will be evaluated both clinically and subjectively (with questionnaires) before surgery and at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months after surgery. The main outcome variable will be neck-specific disability. Cost-effectiveness will also be calculated.

    DISCUSSION:

    We anticipate that the results of this study will provide evidence to support physiotherapeutic rehabilitation applied after surgery for cervical radiculopathy due to cervical disc disease.

  • 6.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Neck disability in patients with cervical radiculopathy and evaluation of structured postoperative physiotherapy2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-surgical and surgical approaches to treatment are used in patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR) due to disc disease. Overall, good effects of surgery have been reported on arm pain and neurological symptoms. However, the effects on neck functioning are more uncertain. Studies have shown persistent activity limitations; participation restrictions; and impairments in neck-related body functions after surgery. Structured physiotherapy combining neck-specific exercises with a behavioural approach has been suggested as treatment before as well as after surgery to improve clinical outcomes in patients with CR. Randomized clinical trials of postoperative physiotherapy to inform evidence-based clinical guidelines for the treatment of patients with CR are lacking.

    The overall aim of the thesis was to investigate the additional benefit of structured postoperative physiotherapy combining neck-specific exercises with a behavioural approach compared to standard postoperative approach in patients with CR. A further aim was to evaluate the  contribution of different aspects of neck-related body functions and mental functions on preoperative neck disability in these patients.

    A total of 202 patients with CR who were scheduled for surgery were recruited, and randomized preoperatively to either structured postoperative physiotherapy, or standard postoperative approach. Standard postoperative approach was in accordance with Swedish postoperative care, and may have included pragmatic physiotherapy after surgery when needed. Patients were evaluated with a set of questionnaires and clinical examinations before surgery and at 3 and 6 months after surgery. Outcomes included patient-reported measures of pain, neck functioning, global outcome, clinical evaluation of neckrelated body functions, self-efficacy and coping strategies, as well as expectation fulfilment and enablement. Differences between treatment groups were investigated in complete case and per-protocol approaches (Paper III & IV). A sub-sample of patients with CR who were scheduled for surgery were also compared with neck-healthy individuals for assessment of head repositioning accuracy with a cervical range of motion device (Paper I). In patients with CR who were scheduled for surgery, associations between preoperative measures of neck-related body functions, mental functions, and other contextual factors with patientreported neck disability were studied (Paper II).

    With the exception of greater expectation fulfilment in patients who received structured postoperative physiotherapy (p = 0.01), there were no differences between the treatment groups in outcomes at 6 months after surgery. There were no differences reported for changes in  outcomes from before surgery to 6 months after surgery between the groups, but all outcomes significantly improved from baseline in both groups (p<0.001) (Paper III & IV). However, global outcome and frequency of neck pain improved during the postoperative period only in patients who received structured postoperative physiotherapy (p< 0.01) (Paper III). Six months after surgery, patients with at least 50% attendance to treatment sessions in the structured postoperative physiotherapy group reported less neck pain frequency (p = 0.05), and greater expectation fulfilment (p = 0.001), and enablement (p = 0.04) than those who received standard postoperative approach. These patients also had larger improvements in neck functioning, arm pain and catastrophizing during the rehabilitation period from 3 to 6 months after surgery (p< 0.03). Sixty-one percent of the patients who received standard postoperative approach reported additional use ofpostoperative physiotherapy. These patients had a worse surgical outcome compared with patients who reported no additional use of postoperative physiotherapy. In patients with CR who were scheduled for surgery, larger errors in head repositioning accuracy were found compared to neck-healthy individuals (Paper I). Preoperative measures of neck-related body functions, mental functions and other contextual factors explained 73% of the variance in Neck Disability Index scores in patients with CR who were scheduled for surgery (Paper II).

    The results may suggest a benefit from combining surgery with structured postoperative physiotherapy in patients with CR. Moreover, the results confirm that neck-specific exercises are tolerated by patients with CR after surgery. However, CR is a heterogeneous condition and specific subgroups of patients are likely to benefit from different interventions. More studies are needed to inform evidence-based clinical guidelines for the treatment of patients with CR. A broader preoperative assessment in patients with CR improved the description of patient-reported neck disability.

    List of papers
    1. Using the cervical range of motion (CROM) device to assess head repositioning accuracy in individuals with cervical radiculopathy in comparison to neck- healthy individuals
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using the cervical range of motion (CROM) device to assess head repositioning accuracy in individuals with cervical radiculopathy in comparison to neck- healthy individuals
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    2013 (English)In: Manual Therapy, ISSN 1356-689X, E-ISSN 1532-2769, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 403-409Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study had two purposes: to compare head repositioning accuracy (HRA) using the cervical range of motion (CROM) device between individuals with cervical radiculopathy caused by disc disease (CDD; n = 71) and neck- healthy individuals (n = 173); and to evaluate the test–retest reliability of the CROM device in individuals with CDD, and criterion validity between the CROM device and a laser in neck-healthy individuals, with quantification of measurement errors. Parameters of reliability and validity were expressed with intra- class- correlation coefficients (ICCs), and measurement errors with standard error of measurement (SEM) and Bland Altman limits of agreement. HRA (Mdn, IQR) differed significantly between individuals with CDD and neck- healthy individuals after rotation right 2.7° (6.0), 1.7° (2.7); and rotation left 2.7° (3.3), 1.3° (2.7) (p < = 0.021); 31% of individuals with CDD were classified as having impairment in HRA. The test–retest reliability of the CROM device in individuals with CDD showed ICCs of 0.79- 0.85, and SEMs of 1.4°- 2°. The criterion validity between the CROM device and the laser in neck-healthy individuals showed ICCs of 0.43- 0.91 and SEMs of 0.8°- 1.3°. The results support the use of the CROM device for quantifying HRA impairment in individuals with CDD in clinical practice; however, criterion validity between the CROM device and a laser in neck-healthy individuals was questionable. HRA impairment in individuals with CDD may be important to consider during rehabilitation and evaluated with the criterion established with the CROM device in neck-healthy individuals.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2013
    Keywords
    Neck pain, Radiculopathy, Head repositioning accuracy, Measurement
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-98660 (URN)10.1016/j.math.2013.02.004 (DOI)000324341300009 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council||Swedish Society of Medicine||Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden||

    Available from: 2013-10-10 Created: 2013-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    2. Individual factors associated with neck disability in patients with cervical radiculopathy scheduled for surgery: a study on physical impairments, psychosocial factors, and life style habits
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individual factors associated with neck disability in patients with cervical radiculopathy scheduled for surgery: a study on physical impairments, psychosocial factors, and life style habits
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    2014 (English)In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 599-605Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The influence of individual factors on patient-reported outcomes is important in the interpretation of disability and treatment effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to assess how physical impairments, psychosocial factors, and life style habits were associated with neck disability based on the Neck Disability Index (NDI), in patients with cervical radiculopathy scheduled for surgery.

    METHODS:

    This cross-sectional study included 201 patients (105 men, 96 women; mean age 50 years). Data included self-reported measures and a clinical examination. Multiple linear regressions were performed to identify significant influencing factors.

    RESULTS:

    Pain, physical impairments in the cervical active range of motion, low self-efficacy, depression, and sickness-related absences explained 73 % of the variance in NDI scores (p < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION:

    Assessments of physical impairments and psychosocial factors in patients with cervical radiculopathy could improve the description of neck disability and the interpretation of treatment outcomes in longitudinal studies.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2014
    Keywords
    Cervical spine, Radiculopathy, Neck Disability Index, Individual factors, Multiple regression analysis
    National Category
    Neurology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105506 (URN)10.1007/s00586-013-3066-0 (DOI)000332604600018 ()24154827 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-03-28 Created: 2014-03-25 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    3. Structured postoperative physiotherapy in patients with cervical radiculopathy: 6-month outcomes of a randomized clinical trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Structured postoperative physiotherapy in patients with cervical radiculopathy: 6-month outcomes of a randomized clinical trial
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, ISSN 1547-5654, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the additional benefit of structured postoperative physiotherapy combining neck-specific exercises with a behavioral approach to standard postoperative approach in patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR) at 6 months after surgery.

    Design: A prospective multi-center randomized clinical trial.

    Subjects: Patients with CR (n=202, mean age 50.0, SD 8.4) who were scheduled for surgery.

    Methods: Patients were randomized pre-operatively to structured postoperative physiotherapy (n=101) or standard approach (n=101) which in accordance with Swedish usual care may have included pragmatic physiotherapy after surgery when needed. Outcome measures at baseline and at 3 and 6 months follow-up included the Neck Disability Index (NDI), pain intensity in the neck and arm measured with a visual analogue scale (VAS) and global outcome of treatment. Between-group differences were investigated using complete case and per-protocol approaches.

    Results: No between-group difference was found in NDI, VAS, or global outcome at 6 months after surgery (p> 0.18). The NDI and VAS neck and arm pain were improved in both groups from before surgery to 6 months after surgery (p< 0.001). Sixty-one percent of the patients who received SA reported additional use of postoperative physiotherapy. Global outcome improved during the postoperative period in patients who received structured postoperative physiotherapy only (p< 0.01).

    Conclusions: No additional benefit of structured postoperative physiotherapy compared to standard postoperative approach was found at 6 months of follow-up based on patientreported measures of pain, neck disability and global outcome. However, many patients with CR perceived a need for additional treatments after surgery; and the results may suggest a benefit from combining surgery with structured postoperative physiotherapy in patients with CR. Moreover, the results confirm that neck-specific exercises are tolerated by patients with CR after surgery.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Association of Neurological Surgeons, 2018
    Keywords
    Cervical radiculopathy; Postoperative physiotherapy; Neck Disability Index; Global outcome
    National Category
    Neurology Physiotherapy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122692 (URN)10.3171/2017.5.SPINE16736 (DOI)000418927300001 ()29087809 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-11-16 Created: 2015-11-16 Last updated: 2019-05-02Bibliographically approved
    4. Neck-related physical function, self-efficacy and coping strategies in patients with cervical radiculopathy: a randomized clinical trial of postoperative physiotherapy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neck-related physical function, self-efficacy and coping strategies in patients with cervical radiculopathy: a randomized clinical trial of postoperative physiotherapy
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, ISSN 0161-4754, E-ISSN 1532-6586, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 330-339Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare postoperative rehabilitation with structured physiotherapy to standard approach in patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR) based on measures of neck-related physical function, self-efficacy and coping strategies at 6 months follow-up.

    Design: A randomized clinical trial of postoperative physiotherapy in patients with CR.

    Subjects: Patients (n= 202) with persistent CR who were scheduled for surgery.

    Methods: Patients were preoperatively randomized to receive structured postoperative physiotherapy (SPT, n=101) or standard postoperative approach (SA, n=101). SPT combined neck-specific exercises with a behavioral approach. Baseline, 3-month, and 6-month evaluations included questionnaires and clinical examinations. Neck muscle endurance, active cervical range of motion, self-efficacy, pain catastrophizing (CSQ_CAT), perceived control over pain, and ability to decrease pain were analyzed for between-group differences using complete case and per-protocol approaches.

    Results: No between-group difference was reported at the 6-month follow-up (p = 0.05 to 0.99), but all outcomes had improved from baseline (p<0.001). Patients in the SPT group with ≥50% attendance to treatment sessions showed larger improvements in CSQ_CAT (p= 0.04) during the rehabilitation period from 3 to 6 months after surgery compared to the patients who received SA.

    Conclusion: No between-group difference in outcomes was found at 6 months after surgery based on measures of neck-related physical function, self-efficacy and coping strategies. However, the results confirm that neck-specific exercises are tolerated by patients with CR after surgery, and that there may be a benefit from combining surgery with structured postoperative physiotherapy in patients with CR.

    Keywords
    Cervical radiculopathy, Postoperative physiotherapy, Randomized clinical trial, Physical function, Coping strategies
    National Category
    Neurology Physiotherapy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122694 (URN)10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.02.012 (DOI)000404024700003 ()
    Note

    Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council; Swedish Society of Medicine; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Region Ostergotland; Lions; Futurum (Academy of Health and Care, Region Jonkoping County)

    Available from: 2015-11-16 Created: 2015-11-16 Last updated: 2017-08-21Bibliographically approved
  • 7.
    Wibault, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vaillant, Jacques
    Centre Hospital University of Grenoble, France.
    Vuillerme, Nicolas
    CNRS UJF UPMF EPHE, France.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Using the cervical range of motion (CROM) device to assess head repositioning accuracy in individuals with cervical radiculopathy in comparison to neck- healthy individuals2013In: Manual Therapy, ISSN 1356-689X, E-ISSN 1532-2769, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 403-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study had two purposes: to compare head repositioning accuracy (HRA) using the cervical range of motion (CROM) device between individuals with cervical radiculopathy caused by disc disease (CDD; n = 71) and neck- healthy individuals (n = 173); and to evaluate the test–retest reliability of the CROM device in individuals with CDD, and criterion validity between the CROM device and a laser in neck-healthy individuals, with quantification of measurement errors. Parameters of reliability and validity were expressed with intra- class- correlation coefficients (ICCs), and measurement errors with standard error of measurement (SEM) and Bland Altman limits of agreement. HRA (Mdn, IQR) differed significantly between individuals with CDD and neck- healthy individuals after rotation right 2.7° (6.0), 1.7° (2.7); and rotation left 2.7° (3.3), 1.3° (2.7) (p < = 0.021); 31% of individuals with CDD were classified as having impairment in HRA. The test–retest reliability of the CROM device in individuals with CDD showed ICCs of 0.79- 0.85, and SEMs of 1.4°- 2°. The criterion validity between the CROM device and the laser in neck-healthy individuals showed ICCs of 0.43- 0.91 and SEMs of 0.8°- 1.3°. The results support the use of the CROM device for quantifying HRA impairment in individuals with CDD in clinical practice; however, criterion validity between the CROM device and a laser in neck-healthy individuals was questionable. HRA impairment in individuals with CDD may be important to consider during rehabilitation and evaluated with the criterion established with the CROM device in neck-healthy individuals.

  • 8.
    Wibault, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dedring, Åsa
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Neuro-Orthopedic Center, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Structured postoperative physiotherapy in patients with cervical radiculopathy: 6-month outcomes of a randomized clinical trial2018In: Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, ISSN 1547-5654, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the additional benefit of structured postoperative physiotherapy combining neck-specific exercises with a behavioral approach to standard postoperative approach in patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR) at 6 months after surgery.

    Design: A prospective multi-center randomized clinical trial.

    Subjects: Patients with CR (n=202, mean age 50.0, SD 8.4) who were scheduled for surgery.

    Methods: Patients were randomized pre-operatively to structured postoperative physiotherapy (n=101) or standard approach (n=101) which in accordance with Swedish usual care may have included pragmatic physiotherapy after surgery when needed. Outcome measures at baseline and at 3 and 6 months follow-up included the Neck Disability Index (NDI), pain intensity in the neck and arm measured with a visual analogue scale (VAS) and global outcome of treatment. Between-group differences were investigated using complete case and per-protocol approaches.

    Results: No between-group difference was found in NDI, VAS, or global outcome at 6 months after surgery (p> 0.18). The NDI and VAS neck and arm pain were improved in both groups from before surgery to 6 months after surgery (p< 0.001). Sixty-one percent of the patients who received SA reported additional use of postoperative physiotherapy. Global outcome improved during the postoperative period in patients who received structured postoperative physiotherapy only (p< 0.01).

    Conclusions: No additional benefit of structured postoperative physiotherapy compared to standard postoperative approach was found at 6 months of follow-up based on patientreported measures of pain, neck disability and global outcome. However, many patients with CR perceived a need for additional treatments after surgery; and the results may suggest a benefit from combining surgery with structured postoperative physiotherapy in patients with CR. Moreover, the results confirm that neck-specific exercises are tolerated by patients with CR after surgery.

  • 9.
    Wibault, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dedring, Åsa
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Neuro-Orthopedic Center, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Persson, Liselott
    Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Margareta R.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andell, Maria
    Norrahammar Primary Health Care, Norrahammar, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Neck-related physical function, self-efficacy and coping strategies in patients with cervical radiculopathy: a randomized clinical trial of postoperative physiotherapy2017In: Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, ISSN 0161-4754, E-ISSN 1532-6586, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 330-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare postoperative rehabilitation with structured physiotherapy to standard approach in patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR) based on measures of neck-related physical function, self-efficacy and coping strategies at 6 months follow-up.

    Design: A randomized clinical trial of postoperative physiotherapy in patients with CR.

    Subjects: Patients (n= 202) with persistent CR who were scheduled for surgery.

    Methods: Patients were preoperatively randomized to receive structured postoperative physiotherapy (SPT, n=101) or standard postoperative approach (SA, n=101). SPT combined neck-specific exercises with a behavioral approach. Baseline, 3-month, and 6-month evaluations included questionnaires and clinical examinations. Neck muscle endurance, active cervical range of motion, self-efficacy, pain catastrophizing (CSQ_CAT), perceived control over pain, and ability to decrease pain were analyzed for between-group differences using complete case and per-protocol approaches.

    Results: No between-group difference was reported at the 6-month follow-up (p = 0.05 to 0.99), but all outcomes had improved from baseline (p<0.001). Patients in the SPT group with ≥50% attendance to treatment sessions showed larger improvements in CSQ_CAT (p= 0.04) during the rehabilitation period from 3 to 6 months after surgery compared to the patients who received SA.

    Conclusion: No between-group difference in outcomes was found at 6 months after surgery based on measures of neck-related physical function, self-efficacy and coping strategies. However, the results confirm that neck-specific exercises are tolerated by patients with CR after surgery, and that there may be a benefit from combining surgery with structured postoperative physiotherapy in patients with CR.

  • 10.
    Wibault, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dedring, Åsa
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Persson, Liselotte
    Lunds University, Sweden .
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Individual factors associated with neck disability in patients with cervical radiculopathy scheduled for surgery: a study on physical impairments, psychosocial factors, and life style habits2014In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 599-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The influence of individual factors on patient-reported outcomes is important in the interpretation of disability and treatment effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to assess how physical impairments, psychosocial factors, and life style habits were associated with neck disability based on the Neck Disability Index (NDI), in patients with cervical radiculopathy scheduled for surgery.

    METHODS:

    This cross-sectional study included 201 patients (105 men, 96 women; mean age 50 years). Data included self-reported measures and a clinical examination. Multiple linear regressions were performed to identify significant influencing factors.

    RESULTS:

    Pain, physical impairments in the cervical active range of motion, low self-efficacy, depression, and sickness-related absences explained 73 % of the variance in NDI scores (p < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION:

    Assessments of physical impairments and psychosocial factors in patients with cervical radiculopathy could improve the description of neck disability and the interpretation of treatment outcomes in longitudinal studies.

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