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  • 1.
    Ahlstrom, Christina A.
    et al.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Bonnedahl, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Woksepp, Hanna
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Hernandez, Jorge
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Olsen, Bjorn
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Ramey, Andrew M.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Acquisition and dissemination of cephalosporin-resistant E.coli in migratory birds sampled at an Alaska landfill as inferred through genomic analysis2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 7361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in bacterial pathogens threatens global health, though the spread of AMR bacteria and AMR genes between humans, animals, and the environment is still largely unknown. Here, we investigated the role of wild birds in the epidemiology of AMR Escherichia coli. Using next-generation sequencing, we characterized cephalosporin-resistant E. coli cultured from sympatric gulls and bald eagles inhabiting a landfill habitat in Alaska to identify genetic determinants conferring AMR, explore potential transmission pathways of AMR bacteria and genes at this site, and investigate how their genetic diversity compares to isolates reported in other taxa. We found genetically diverse E. coli isolates with sequence types previously associated with human infections and resistance genes of clinical importance, including blaCTX-M and blaCMY. Identical resistance profiles were observed in genetically unrelated E. coli isolates from both gulls and bald eagles. Conversely, isolates with indistinguishable core-genomes were found to have different resistance profiles. Our findings support complex epidemiological interactions including bacterial strain sharing between gulls and bald eagles and horizontal gene transfer among E. coli harboured by birds. Results suggest that landfills may serve as a source for AMR acquisition and/or maintenance, including bacterial sequence types and AMR genes relevant to human health.

  • 2.
    Ahlstrom, Christina A.
    et al.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Bonnedahl, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Cty Council, Sweden.
    Woksepp, Hanna
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Hernandez, Jorge
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Reed, John A.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Tibbitts, Lee
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Olsen, Bjoern
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Douglas, David C.
    US Geol Survey, AK USA.
    Ramey, Andrew M.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Satellite tracking of gulls and genomic characterization of faecal bacteria reveals environmentally mediated acquisition and dispersal of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska2019In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 28, no 10, p. 2531-2545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gulls (Larus spp.) have frequently been reported to carry Escherichia coli exhibiting antimicrobial resistance (AMR E. coli); however, the pathways governing the acquisition and dispersal of such bacteria are not well described. We equipped 17 landfill-foraging gulls with satellite transmitters and collected gull faecal samples longitudinally from four locations on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska to assess: (a) gull attendance and transitions between sites, (b) spatiotemporal prevalence of faecally shed AMR E. coli, and (c) genomic relatedness of AMR E. coli isolates among sites. We also sampled Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) harvested as part of personal-use dipnet fisheries at two sites to assess potential contamination with AMR E. coli. Among our study sites, marked gulls most commonly occupied the lower Kenai River (61% of site locations) followed by the Soldotna landfill (11%), lower Kasilof River (5%) and upper Kenai River (amp;lt;1%). Gulls primarily moved between the Soldotna landfill and the lower Kenai River (94% of transitions among sites), which were also the two locations with the highest prevalence of AMR E. coli. There was relatively high spatial and temporal variability in AMR E. coli prevalence in gull faeces and there was no evidence of contamination on salmon harvested in personal-use fisheries. We identified E. coli sequence types and AMR genes of clinical importance, with some isolates possessing genes associated with resistance to as many as eight antibiotic classes. Our findings suggest that gulls acquire AMR E. coli at habitats with anthropogenic inputs and subsequent movements may represent pathways through which AMR is dispersed.

  • 3.
    Ahlstrom, Christina A.
    et al.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Ramey, Andrew M.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Woksepp, Hanna
    Kalmar Council, Sweden.
    Bonnedahl, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Council, Sweden.
    Early emergence of mcr-1-positive Enterobacteriaceae in gulls from Spain and Portugal2019In: Environmental Microbiology Reports, ISSN 1758-2229, E-ISSN 1758-2229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We tested extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing bacteria from wild gulls (Larus spp.) sampled in 2009 for the presence of mcr-1. We report the detection of mcr-1 and describe genome characteristics of four Escherichia coli and one Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate from Spain and Portugal that also exhibited colistin resistance. Results represent the earliest evidence for colistin-resistant bacteria in European wildlife.

  • 4.
    Ahlstrom, Christina A.
    et al.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Ramey, Andrew M.
    US Geol Survey, AK 99508 USA.
    Woksepp, Hanna
    Dept Dev and Publ and Hlth, Sweden.
    Bonnedahl, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Dept Infect Dis, Sweden.
    Repeated Detection of Carbapenemase-Producing Escherichia coil in Gulls Inhabiting Alaska2019In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, ISSN 0066-4804, E-ISSN 1098-6596, Vol. 63, no 8, article id e00758-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we report the first detection of carbapenemase-producing Escherichia coli in Alaska and in wildlife in the United States. Wild bird (gull) feces sampled at three locations in Southcentral Alaska yielded isolates that harbored plasmidencoded bla(kpc-2), or chromosomally encoded bla(OXA-48) and genes associated with antimicrobial resistance to up to eight antibiotic classes.

  • 5.
    Atterby, Clara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Borjesson, Stefan
    National Vet Institute SVA, Sweden.
    Ny, Sofia
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Jarhult, Josef D.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Byfors, Sara
    Public Health Agency Sweden, Sweden.
    Bonnedahl, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden; Kalmar County Council, Sweden.
    ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in Swedish gulls: A case of environmental pollution from humans?2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 12, article id e0190380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ESBL-producing bacteria are present in wildlife and the environment might serve as a resistance reservoir. Wild gulls have been described as frequent carriers of ESBL-producing E. coli strains with genotypic characteristics similar to strains found in humans. Therefore, potential dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and bacteria between the human population and wildlife need to be further investigated. Occurrence and characterization of ESBL-producing E. coli in Swedish wild gulls were assessed and compared to isolates from humans, livestock and surface water collected in the same country and similar time-period. Occurrence of ESBL-producing E. coli in Swedish gulls is about three times higher in gulls compared to Swedish community carriers (17% versus 5%) and the genetic characteristics of the ESBL-producing E. coli population in Swedish wild gulls and Swedish human are similar. ESBL-plasmids IncF-and IncI1-type carrying ESBL-genes blaCTX-M-15 or blaCTX-M-14 were most common in isolates from both gulls and humans, but there was limited evidence of clonal transmission. Isolates from Swedish surface water harbored similar genetic characteristics, which highlights surface waters as potential dissemination routes between wildlife and the human population. Even in a low-prevalence country such as Sweden, the occurrence of ESBL producing E. coli in wild gulls and the human population appears to be connected and the occurrence of ESBL-producing E. coli in Swedish gulls is likely a case of environmental pollution.

  • 6.
    Atterby, Clara
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Osbjer, Kristina
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Sweden; Food and Agr Org United Nations, Cambodia.
    Tepper, Viktoria
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland.
    Rajala, Elisabeth
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Sweden.
    Hernandez, Jorge
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Cty Council, Dept Infect Dis, Sweden; Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Seng, Sokerya
    Food and Agr Org United Nations, Cambodia.
    Holl, Davun
    Minist Agr Forestry and Fisheries, Cambodia.
    Bonnedahl, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Börjesson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Natl Vet Inst SVA, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Ulf
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Sweden.
    Jarhult, Josef D.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Carriage of carbapenemase- and extended-spectrum cephalosporinase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in humans and livestock in rural Cambodia; gender and age differences and detection of bla(OXA-48 )in humans2019In: Zoonoses and Public Health, ISSN 1863-1959, E-ISSN 1863-2378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives This study investigates the frequency and characteristics of carbapenemase-producing Escherichia coli/Klebsiella pneumoniae (CPE/K) and extended-spectrum cephalosporinase-producing E. coli/K. pneumoniae (ESCE/K) in healthy humans and livestock in rural Cambodia. Additionally, household practices as risk factors for faecal carriage of ESCE/K are identified. Methods Faecal samples were obtained from 307 humans and 285 livestock including large ruminants, pigs and poultry living in 100 households in rural Cambodia in 2011. Each household was interviewed, and multilevel logistic model determined associations between household practices/meat consumption and faecal carriage of ESCE/K. CPE and ESCE/K were detected and further screened for colistin resistance genes. Results CPE/K isolates harbouring bla(OXA-48 )were identified in two humans. The community carriage of ESCE/K was 20% in humans and 23% in livestock. The same ESBL genes: bla(CTX-M-15), bla(CTX-M-14), bla(CTX-M-27), bla(CTX-M-55), bla(SHV-2), bla(SHV-12), bla(SHV-28); AmpC genes: bla(CMY-2), bla(CMY-42,) bla(DHA-1); and colistin resistance genes: mcr-1-like and mcr-3-like were detected in humans and livestock. ESCE/K was frequently detected in women, young children, pigs and poultry, which are groups in close contact. The practice of burning or burying meat waste and not collecting animal manure indoors and outdoors daily were identified as risk factors for faecal carriage of ESCE/K. Conclusions Faecal carriage of E. coli and K. pneumoniae harbouring extended-spectrum cephalosporinase genes are common in the Cambodian community, especially in women and young children. Exposure to animal manure and slaughter products are risk factors for intestinal colonization of ESCE/K in humans.

  • 7.
    Schaufler, Katharina
    et al.
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Germany; Free Univ Berlin, Germany.
    Semmler, Torsten
    Robert Koch Inst, Germany.
    Wieler, Lothar H.
    Robert Koch Inst, Germany.
    Trott, Darren J.
    Univ Adelaide, Australia.
    Pitout, Johann
    Calgary Lab Serv, Canada; Univ Calgary, Canada.
    Peirano, Gisele
    Calgary Lab Serv, Canada; Univ Calgary, Canada.
    Bonnedahl, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Cty Council, Sweden.
    Dolejska, Monika
    Univ Vet and Pharmaceut Sci Brno, Czech Republic; Univ Vet and Pharmaceut Sci Brno, Czech Republic.
    Literak, Ivan
    Univ Vet and Pharmaceut Sci Brno, Czech Republic; Univ Vet and Pharmaceut Sci Brno, Czech Republic.
    Fuchs, Stephan
    Robert Koch Inst, Germany.
    Ahmed, Niyaz
    Int Ctr Diarrheal Dis Res Bangladesh, Bangladesh.
    Grobbel, Mirjam
    German Fed Inst Risk Assessment, Germany.
    Torres, Carmen
    Univ La Rioja, Spain.
    McNally, Alan
    Univ Birmingham, England.
    Pickard, Derek
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, England.
    Ewers, Christa
    Justus Liebig Univ Giessen, Germany.
    Croucher, Nicholas J.
    Imperial Coll, England.
    Corander, Jukka
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, England; Univ Helsinki, Finland; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Guenther, Sebastian
    Free Univ Berlin, Germany; Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Germany.
    Genomic and Functional Analysis of Emerging Virulent and Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli Lineage Sequence Type 6482019In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, ISSN 0066-4804, E-ISSN 1098-6596, Vol. 63, no 6, article id e00243-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pathogenic extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli lineage ST648 is increasingly reported from multiple origins. Our study of a large and global ST648 collection from various hosts (87 whole-genome sequences) combining core and accessory genomics with functional analyses and in vivo experiments suggests that ST648 is a nascent and generalist lineage, lacking clear phylogeographic and host association signals. By including large numbers of ST131 (n = 107) and ST10 (n = 96) strains for comparative genomics and phenotypic analysis, we demonstrate that the combination of multidrug resistance and high-level virulence are the hallmarks of ST648, similar to international high-risk clonal lineage ST131. Specifically, our in silico, in vitro, and in vivo results demonstrate that ST648 is well equipped with biofilm-associated features, while ST131 shows sophisticated signatures indicative of adaption to urinary tract infection, potentially conveying individual ecological niche adaptation. In addition, we used a recently developed NFDS (negative frequency-dependent selection) population model suggesting that ST648 will increase significantly in frequency as a cause of bacteremia within the next few years. Also, ESBL plasmids impacting biofilm formation aided in shaping and maintaining ST648 strains to successfully emerge worldwide across different ecologies. Our study contributes to understanding what factors drive the evolution and spread of emerging international high-risk clonal lineages.

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