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  • 1.
    Fornander, Louise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Graff, Pål
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Wåhlén, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ydreborg, Kjell
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Flodin, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Airway symptoms and biological markers in nasal lavage fluid in subjects exposed to metalworking fluids2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 12, p. e83089-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUNDS: Occurrence of airway irritation among industrial metal workers was investigated. The aims were to study the association between exposures from water-based metal working fluids (MWF) and the health outcome among the personnel, to assess potential effects on the proteome in nasal mucous membranes, and evaluate preventive actions.

    METHODS: The prevalence of airway symptoms related to work were examined among 271 metalworkers exposed to MWF and 24 metal workers not exposed to MWF at the same factory. At the same time, air levels of potentially harmful substances (oil mist, morpholine, monoethanolamine, formaldehyde) generated from MWF was measured. Nasal lavage fluid was collected from 13 workers and 15 controls and protein profiles were determined by a proteomic approach.

    RESULTS: Airway symptoms were reported in 39% of the workers exposed to MWF although the measured levels of MWF substances in the work place air were low. Highest prevalence was found among workers handling the MWF machines but also those working in the same hall were affected. Improvement of the ventilation to reduce MWF exposure lowered the prevalence of airway problems. Protein profiling showed significantly higher levels of S100-A9 and lower levels of SPLUNC1, cystatin SN, Ig J and β2-microglobulin among workers with airway symptoms.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that upper airway symptoms among metal workers are a common problem and despite low levels of MWF-generated substances, effects on airway immune proteins are found. Further studies to clarify the role of specific MWF components in connection to airway inflammation and the identified biological markers are warranted.

  • 2.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Jönsson, Margaretha
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Herrgardets Vardcentral, Sweden.
    Wåhlén, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Kristjansson, Eythor
    Univ Iceland, Iceland.
    Bahat, Hilla Sarig
    Univ Haifa, Israel.
    German, Dmitry
    Univ Haifa, Israel.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Pathophysiology behind prolonged whiplash associated disorders: study protocol for an experimental study2019In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 20, article id 51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThere is insufficient knowledge of pathophysiological parameters to understand the mechanism behind prolonged whiplash associated disorders (WAD), and it is not known whether or not changes can be restored by rehabilitation. The aims of the projects are to investigate imaging and molecular biomarkers, cervical kinaesthesia, postural sway and the association with pain, disability and other outcomes in individuals with longstanding WAD, before and after a neck-specific exercise intervention. Another aim is to compare individuals with WAD with healthy controls.MethodsParticipants are a sub-group (n=30) of individuals recruited from an ongoing randomized controlled study (RCT). Measurements in this experimental prospective study will be carried out at baseline (before intervention) and at a three month follow-up (end of physiotherapy intervention), and will include muscle structure and inflammation using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), brain structure and function related to pain using functional MRI (fMRI), muscle function using ultrasonography, biomarkers using samples of blood and saliva, cervical kinaesthesia using the butterfly test and static balance test using an iPhone app. Association with other measures (self-reported and clinical measures) obtained in the RCT (e.g. background data, pain, disability, satisfaction with care, work ability, quality of life) may be investigated. Healthy volunteers matched for age and gender will be recruited as controls (n=30).DiscussionThe study results may contribute to the development of improved diagnostics and improved rehabilitation methods for WAD.Trial registrationClinicaltrial.gov Protocol ID: NCT03664934, initial release 09/11/2018.

  • 3.
    Shimada, A.
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark; SCON, Denmark.
    Castrillon, E. E.
    Aarhus University, Denmark; SCON, Denmark.
    Baad-Hansen, L.
    Aarhus University, Denmark; SCON, Denmark.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Wåhlén, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ernberg, M.
    SCON, Denmark; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Cairns, B. E.
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Svensson, P.
    Aarhus University, Denmark; SCON, Denmark.
    Increased pain and muscle glutamate concentration after single ingestion of monosodium glutamate by myofascial temporomandibular disorders patients2016In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 1502-1512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundA randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study was conducted to investigate if single monosodium glutamate (MSG) administration would elevate muscle/serum glutamate concentrations and affect muscle pain sensitivity in myofascial temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients more than in healthy individuals. MethodsTwelve myofascial TMD patients and 12 sex- and age-matched healthy controls participated in two sessions. Participants drank MSG (150mg/kg) or NaCl (24mg/kg; control) diluted in 400mL of soda. The concentration of glutamate in the masseter muscle, blood plasma and saliva was determined before and after the ingestion of MSG or control. At baseline and every 15min after the ingestion, pain intensity was scored on a 0-10 numeric rating scale. Pressure pain threshold, pressure pain tolerance (PPTol) and autonomic parameters were measured. All participants were asked to report adverse effects after the ingestion. ResultsIn TMD, interstitial glutamate concentration was significantly greater after the MSG ingestion when compared with healthy controls. TMD reported a mean pain intensity of 2.8/10 at baseline, which significantly increased by 40% 30min post MSG ingestion. At baseline, TMD showed lower PPTols in the masseter and trapezius, and higher diastolic blood pressure and heart rate than healthy controls. The MSG ingestion resulted in reports of headache by half of the TMD and healthy controls, respectively. ConclusionThese findings suggest that myofascial TMD patients may be particularly sensitive to the effects of ingested MSG. What does this study add? Elevation of interstitial glutamate concentration in the masseter muscle caused by monosodium glutamate (MSG) ingestion was significantly greater in myofascial myofascial temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients than healthy individuals. This elevation of interstitial glutamate concentration in the masseter muscle significantly increased the intensity of spontaneous pain in myofascial TMD patients.

  • 4.
    Sorensen, Line Bay
    et al.
    Aalborg Univ, Denmark.
    Gazerani, Parisa
    Aalborg Univ, Denmark.
    Wåhlén, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Nazdar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Investigation of biomarkers alterations after an acute tissue trauma in human trapezius muscle, using microdialysis2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 3034Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alterations in muscle milieu are suggested as important activity of peripheral drive in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP). Microdialysis (MD) has been used in monitoring altered metabolic response pattern in muscles. However, the insertion of MD probe causes a local tissue trauma. Whether and how metabolites in trapezius muscle are affected by acute tissue trauma is unknown. Hence, this study investigated the metabolic response and nociceptive reaction of the tissue following MD probe insertion in patients with CMP and healthy individuals. Fifty-nine patients and forty pain-free volunteers were recruited. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were obtained at the trapezius and tibialis muscles. Pain questionnaires determined the levels of pain related aspects. MD (20 kDa cut-off) was performed in the trapezius and samples were collected within 40 min. Interstitial concentration of the metabolites was analyzed by a two-way-mixed-ANOVA. The metabolic response pattern changed over time and alterations in the level of metabolites could be seen in both CMP and healthy controls. Pain questionnaires and pain intensities manifested clinical aspects of pain closely to what CMP patients describe. Analyzing metabolites due to acute tissue trauma by aid of MD may be a useful model to investigate altered metabolic response effect in CMP.

  • 5.
    Wåhlén, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Fornander, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olausson, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ydreborg, Kjell
    Clinic of Otorhinolaryngology, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Flodin, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Graff, Pål
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Protein profiles of nasal lavage fluid from individuals with work-related upper airway symptoms associated to moldy and damp buildings2016In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 743-754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Upper airway irritation is common among individuals working in moldy and damp buildings. The aim was to investigate effects on the protein composition of the nasal lining fluid. The prevalence of symptoms in relation to work was examined in 37 individuals working in two damp buildings. Microbial growth was confirmed in one of the buildings. Nasal lavage fluid was collected from 29 exposed subjects and 13 controls. Protein profiles were investigated with a proteomic approach and evaluated by multivariate statistical models. Subjects from both workplaces reported upper airway and ocular symptoms. Based on protein profiles, symptomatic subjects in the two workplaces were discriminated from each other and separated from healthy controls. The groups differed in proteins involved in inflammation and host defense. Measurements of innate immunity proteins showed a significant increa e of protein S100-A8 and decrease of SPLUNC1 in subjects from one workplace while alpha-1-antitrypsin was elevated in subjects from the other workplace, compared to healthy controls. The results show that protein profiles in nasal lavage fluid can be used to monitor airway mucosal effects in personnel working in damp buildings and indicate that the profile may be separate when the dampness is associated with the presence of molds.

  • 6.
    Wåhlén, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Nazdar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Plasma Protein Pattern Correlates With Pain Intensity and Psychological Distress in Women With Chronic Widespread Pain2018In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, article id 2400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Although generalized muscle pain, tiredness, anxiety, and depression are commonly present among chronic widespread pain (CWP) patients, the molecular mechanisms behind CWP are not fully elucidated. Moreover, the lack of biomarkers often makes diagnosis and treatment problematic. In this study, we investigated the correlation between pain intensity, psychological distress, and plasma proteins among CWP patients and controls (CON). Methods: The plasma proteome of CWP (n = 15) and CON (n = 23) was analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Orthogonal Partial Least Square analysis (OPLS) was used to determine proteins associated with pain intensity (numeric rating scale) in CWP and psychological distress (Hospital and Depression Scale, HADS) in CWP and CON. Significant proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF and tandem MS. Results: In CWP, pain intensity was associated with plasma proteins mostly involved in metabolic and immunity processes (e.g., kininogen-1, fibrinogen gamma chain, and ceruloplasmin), and psychological distress was associated with plasma proteins related to immunity response, iron ion, and lipid metabolism (e.g., complement factor B, complement C1r subcomponent, hemopexin, and clusterin). Discussion: This study suggests that different plasma protein patterns are associated with different pain intensity and psychological distress in CWP. Proteins belonging to the coagulation cascade and immunity processes showed strong associations to each clinical outcome. Using the plasma proteome profile of CWP to study potential biomarker candidates provides a snapshot of ongoing systemic mechanisms in CWP.

  • 7.
    Wåhlén, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Olausson, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Carlsson, Anders K
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Nazdar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Systemic alterations in plasma proteins from women with chronic widespread pain compared to healthy controls: a proteomic study2017In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 10, p. 797-809Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic widespread pain (CWP) is a complex pain condition that is difficult to treat. The prevalence of CWP approximates similar to 10% of the general population, with higher prevalence in women. Lack of understanding of molecular mechanisms has been a challenge for diagnosis and treatment of chronic pain. The aim of this study was to explore the systemic protein changes in CWP compared to those in healthy controls (CON). By applying 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we analyzed the protein pattern of plasma samples from women with CWP (n=16) and healthy women (n=23). The proteomic data were analyzed using multivariate statistical models, and altered proteins were identified using mass spectrometry. The proteome analysis was further validated by gel-free Western blot. Multivariate statistical data analysis of quantified proteins revealed 22 altered proteins in women with CWP, compared to CON group. Many of the identified proteins are previously known to be involved in different parts of the complement system and metabolic and inflammatory processes, e.g., complement factor B, vitamin D-binding protein, ceruloplasmin, transthyretin and alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein. These results indicate that important systemic protein differences exist between women with CWP and healthy women. Further, this study illustrates the potential use of proteomics to detect biomarkers that may provide new insights into the molecular mechanism(s) of chronic pain. However, further larger investigations are required in order to confirm these findings before it will be possible to identify proteins as potential pain biomarkers for clinical use.

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