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  • 1.
    Aho, Anna Carin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    Psychiat Clin, Sweden; Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Experiences of being parents of young adults living with recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy from a salutogenic perspective2017In: Neuromuscular Disorders, ISSN 0960-8966, E-ISSN 1873-2364, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 585-595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD2) involve progressive muscle weakness. Parental support is important for young adults living with LGMD2, but no study has been identified focusing on the parents experiences. The salutogenic perspective concentrates on how daily life is comprehended, managed and found meaningful, i.e. the persons sense of coherence. The aim of this study was to describe, from a salutogenic perspective, experiences of being parents of young adults living with LGMD2. Nineteen participants were included. Data were collected by semi-structured interviews and the self-administrated 13-item sense of coherence questionnaire. Interview data were analysed with content analysis and related to self-rated sense of coherence. The result shows experiences of being influenced, not only by thoughts and emotions connected to the disease but also by caregiving duties and the young adults well-being. Simultaneously, difficulty in fully grasping the disease was expressed and uncertainty about progression created worries about future management. Trying their best to support their young adults to experience well-being and to live fulfilled lives, the importance of having a social network, support from concerned professionals and eventually access to personal assistance was emphasized. The need to have meaningful pursuits of ones own was also described. The median sense of coherence score was 68 (range 53-86). Those who scored high (amp;gt;= 68) described satisfaction with social network, external support provided, work and leisure activities to a greater extent than those who scored low (amp;lt;68). The result shows that the young adults disease has a major impact on the parents lives. Assessment of how the parents comprehend, manage and find meaning in everyday life may highlight support needed to promote their health. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Aho, Anna Carin
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, Dept Hlth & Caring Sci, Vaxjo, Sweden.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    Cty Hosp, Psychiat Clin, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Young adults' experiences of living with recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy from a salutogenic orientation: an interview study.2015In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 22, p. 2083-2091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To describe young adults' experiences of living with recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2) from a salutogenic orientation. Methods: A qualitative explorative interview study, including 14 participants aged 20-30 years, was performed focusing on comprehensibility, manageability and meaningfulness in daily life. Content analysis was used for data analysis. Result: Living with LGMD2 not only implies learning to live with the disease and the variations between good and bad periods but also means trying to make sense of a progressive disease that brings uncertainty about future health, by striving to make the best of the situation. Disease progression involves practical and mental struggle, trying to maintain control over one's life despite vanished physical functions that require continual adjustments to the body. Restrictions in a double sense were described, not only due to the disease but also due to poor comprehension of the disease in society. Lack of knowledge about LGMD2 among professionals often results in having to fight for the support needed. Conclusion: In order to manage daily life, it is important to be seen and understood as an individual in contacts with professionals and in society in general, to have informal social support and meaningful activities as well as access to personal assistance if necessary. Implications for Rehabilitation Recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2) is a group of progressive disorders, which manifest in physical and psychological consequences for the individual. According to the salutogenic orientation, people need to find life comprehensible, manageable and meaningful, i.e. to achieve a sense of coherence (SOC), but living with LGMD2 may recurrently challenge the individual's SOC. Through the holistic view of the individual's situation that the salutogenic orientation provides, professionals may support the individual to strengthen SOC and thereby facilitate the movement towards health.

  • 3.
    Aho, Anna-Carin
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, Sweden.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    Ryhovs sjukhus, Landstinget i Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Health perceptions of young adults living with recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 8, p. 1915-1925Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    The aim of this study was to describe health perceptions related to sense of coherence among young adults living with recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

    BACKGROUND:

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy refers to a group of progressive muscular disorders that may manifest in physical disability. The focus in health care is to optimize health, which requires knowledge about the content of health as described by the individual.

    DESIGN:

    A descriptive study design with qualitative and quantitative data were used.

    METHOD:

    Interviews were conducted between June 2012-November 2013 with 14 participants aged 20-30 years. The participants also answered the 13-item sense of coherence questionnaire. Qualitative data were analysed with content analysis and related to self-rated sense of coherence.

    FINDINGS:

    Health was viewed as intertwined physical and mental well-being. As the disease progressed, well-being was perceived to be influenced not only by physical impairment and mental strain caused by the disease but also by external factors, such as accessibility to support and attitudes in society. Factors perceived to promote health were having a balanced lifestyle, social relations and meaningful daily activities. Self-rated sense of coherence varied. The median score was 56 (range 37-77). Those who scored ≥56 described to a greater extent satisfaction regarding support received, daily pursuits and social life compared with those who scored <56.

    CONCLUSION:

    Care should be person-centred. Caregivers, with their knowledge, should strive to assess how the person comprehends, manages and finds meaning in daily life. Through dialogue, not only physical, psychological and social needs but also health-promoting solutions can be highlighted.

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  • 4.
    Albertsson, Marie
    et al.
    Växjö universitet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Albin, Björn
    Växjö universitet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Siwertsson, C
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Växjö universitet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Jämförelse mellan utrikes födda och svenskfödda äldres användning av kommunal vård- och äldreomsorg2005In: Årsbok AMER, Växjö: Växjö University Press , 2005Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Albin, Björn
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Albertsson, Marie
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Jan
    School of Management and Economics, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Department of Community Medicine, University of Lund and School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Health and consumption of health care and social service among old migrants in Sweden2005In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 37-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to migration, an increasing number of the elderly in Sweden will be foreign-born, ‘old migrants’. Old migrants will need help from society with health care and social service. Migration may influence people's health and thus also their consumption of health care and social service. The aim of the present study was to discuss migration and health with the focus on old migrants by a review of literature, and to describe the pattern of health care and social service consumption among old migrants living in Sweden, studying whether there were any differences compared with old people born in Sweden. The results showed that there is a lack of data describing old migrants' health. Available data indicate poorer self-rated health, more chronic illness and impaired mobility capacity. There are some Swedish studies describing morbidity and mortality among migrants in Sweden. These are consistent: migrants have more health problems in general and migrants from the Nordic countries have a higher mortality rate. There are no public statistics about old migrants' consumption of health care and social service in Sweden. Some studies show that old migrants consume less than native Swedes. Other studies indicate the same or higher consumption of health care, but lower consumption of social service among migrants. In conclusion, few studies concern health and consumption of health care and social care among old migrants; the results are divergent and there could be several different explanations for dissimilarities, such as migrational background, cultural distance, time of residence, socioeconomic position and adaptation in the new society. Thus, further studies are needed.

  • 6.
    Albin, Björn
    et al.
    Växjö universitet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Växjö universitet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Äldre invandrares användning av hälso-och sjukvård2008In: Efterfrågad arbetskraft?: årsbok 2008 från forskningsprofilen Arbetsmarknad, migration och etniska relationer (AMER) vid Växjö universitet / [ed] Svante Lundberg och Ellinor Platzer, Växjö University press , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Albin, Björn
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, and Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, and Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Chang Zhang, Wen
    School of Public Health, Fujian Medical University, PR China.
    Health care systems in Sweden and China: Legal and formal organisational aspects2010In: Health Research Policy and Systems, ISSN 1478-4505, E-ISSN 1478-4505, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 20-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Sharing knowledge and experience internationally can provide valuable information, and comparative research can make an important contribution to knowledge about health care and cost-effective use of resources. Descriptions of the organisation of health care in different countries can be found, but no studies have specifically compared the legal and formal organisational systems in Sweden and China.

    AIM: To describe and compare health care in Sweden and China with regard to legislation, organisation, and finance.

    METHODS: Literature reviews were carried out in Sweden and China to identify literature published from 1985 to 2008 using the same keywords. References in recent studies were scrutinized, national legislation and regulations and government reports were searched, and textbooks were searched manually.

    RESULTS: The health care systems in Sweden and China show dissimilarities in legislation, organisation, and finance. In Sweden there is one national law concerning health care while in China the law includes the "Hygienic Common Law" and the "Fundamental Health Law" which is under development. There is a tendency towards market-orientated solutions in both countries. Sweden has a well-developed primary health care system while the primary health care system in China is still under development and relies predominantly on hospital-based care concentrated in cities.

    CONCLUSION: Despite dissimilarities in health care systems, Sweden and China have similar basic assumptions, i.e. to combine managerial-organisational efficiency with the humanitarian-egalitarian goals of health care, and both strive to provide better care for all.

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  • 8.
    Albin, Björn
    et al.
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Jan
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Elmståhl, Sölve
    Centre of Labour Market Policy Research (CAFO), School of Business and Economics, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    County Differences in Mortality among Foreign-Born Compared to Native Swedes 1970-19992012In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, Vol. 2012, p. art.id 136581-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Regional variations in mortality and morbidity have been shown in Europe and USA. Longitudinal studies have found increased mortality, dissimilarities in mortality pattern, and differences in utilization of healthcare between foreign- and native-born Swedes. No study has been found comparing mortality among foreign-born and native-born Swedes in relation to catchment areas/counties. Methods. The aim was to describe and compare mortality among foreign-born persons and native Swedes during 1970-1999 in 24 counties in Sweden. Data from the Statistics Sweden and the National Board of Health and Welfare was used, and the database consisted of 723,948 persons, 361,974 foreign-born living in Sweden in 1970 and aged 16 years and above and 361,974 matched Swedish controls. Results. Latest county of residence independently explained higher mortality among foreign-born persons in all but four counties; OR varied from 1.01 to 1.29. Counties with a more rural structure showed the highest differences between foreign-born persons and native controls. Foreign-born persons had a lower mean age (1.0-4.3 years) at time of death. Conclusion. County of residence influences mortality; higher mortality is indicated among migrants than native Swedes in counties with a more rural structure. Further studies are needed to explore possible explanations.

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  • 9.
    Albin, Björn
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden .
    Hjelm, Katarina
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden .
    Ekberg, Jan
    School of Management and Economics, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Elmståhl, Sölve
    Department of Community Medicine, Division of Geriatrie Mediecine, University of Lund, Sweden.
    Higher mortality and different pattern of causes of death among foreign-born compared to native Swedes 1970-19992006In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, ISSN 1557-1912, E-ISSN 1557-1920, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 101-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a previous Swedish longitudinal study of mortality among 723,948 foreign born and native-born Swedes, 1970-1999, increased mortality was found among foreign-born persons. This study describes and analyses the differences in mortality between 361,974 foreign-born persons and 361,974 native Swedes during the period 1970-1999, based on data from Statistics Sweden and the National Board of Health and Welfare. The mortality pattern showed dissimilarities; with a significantly higher number of deaths among foreign-born persons in six diagnose groups and a significantly lower mean age at time of death. A high number of deaths were found for migrants from Denmark in Neoplasm, for migrants from Finland and Poland in Diseases of the circulatory system and for migrants from Yugoslavia in Symptoms, signs and ill-defined conditions. There is a tendency to a more similar pattern between foreign- and Swedish-born persons over time. Migration may be a risk factor for health, and therefore seems to be an important factor to consider when studying morbidity and health and when planning preventive work.

  • 10.
    Albin, Björn
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Department of Community Medicine, University of Lund and School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden .
    Ekberg, Jan
    School of Management and Economics, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Elmståhl, Sölve
    Department of Community Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, University of Lund, Sweden.
    Mortality among 723,948 foreign- and native-born Swedes 1970-19992005In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 511-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Mortality in a population is regarded as an accurate and valid measure of the population's health. There are a few international studies, predominantly cross-sectional, of mortality among all foreign-born compared with an indigenous population, and the results have varied. No Swedish longitudinal study describing and analysing mortality data was found in a literature review.

    METHODS: This study describes and analyses the differences in mortality between foreign-born persons and native Swedes during the period 1970-1999, based on data from Statistics Sweden and the National Board of Health and Welfare. The database consisted of 723,948 persons, 361 974 foreign-born living in Sweden in 1970, aged > or = 16 years, and 361 974 Swedish controls matched for age, sex, occupation and type of employment, living in the same county in 1970.

    RESULTS: The results showed increased mortality for foreign-born persons compared with the Swedish controls [odds ratio (OR) 1.08; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-1.08]. Persons who had migrated 'late' (1941-1970) to Sweden were 2.5 years younger at time of death than controls. In relation to country of birth, the highest risk odds were for men born in Finland (OR 1.21), Denmark (OR 1.11) and Norway/Iceland (OR 1.074). Age cohorts of foreign-born persons born between 1901 and 1920 had higher mortality at age 55-69 years than cohorts born between 1921 and 1944.

    CONCLUSIONS: Migrants had higher mortality than the native population, and migration may be a risk factor for health; therefore, this seems to be an important factor to consider when studying mortality and health.

  • 11.
    Albin, Björn
    et al.
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö and Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö and Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Jan
    Centre of Labour Market Policy Research (CAFO), School of Management and Economics, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Elmståhl, Sölve
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Residential mobility among foreign-born persons living in Sweden is associated with lower mortality2010In: Clinical Epidemiology, ISSN 1179-1349, E-ISSN 1179-1349, Vol. 2010, no 2, p. 187-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There have been few longitudinal studies on the effect of within-country mobility on patterns of mortality in deceased foreign-born individuals. The results have varied; some studies have found that individuals who move around within the same country have better health status than those who do not change their place of residence. Other studies have shown that changing one's place of residence leads to more self-reported health problems and diseases. Our aim was to analyze the pattern of mortality in deceased foreign-born persons living in Sweden during the years 1970-1999 in relation to distance mobility. Data from Statistics Sweden and the National Board of Health and Welfare was used, and the study population consisted of 281,412 foreign-born persons aged 16 years and over who were registered as living in Sweden in 1970. Distance mobility did not have a negative effect on health. Total mortality was lower (OR 0.71; 95% CI 0.69-0.73) in foreign-born persons in Sweden who had changed their county of residence during the period 1970-1990. Higher death rates were observed, after adjustment for age, in three ICD diagnosis groups "Injury and poisoning", "External causes of injury and poisoning", and "Diseases of the digestive system" among persons who had changed county of residence.

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  • 12.
    Albin, Björn
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Jan
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Elmståhl, Sölve
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Utilization of In-Hospital Care among Foreign-Born Compared to Native Swedes 1987-19992012In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, Vol. 2012, p. 713249-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In previous longitudinal studies of mortality and morbidity among foreign-born and native-born Swedes, increased mortality and dissimilarities in mortality pattern were found. The aim of this study is to describe, compare, and analyse the utilization of in-hospital care among deceased foreign- and Swedish-born persons during the years 1987-1999 with focus on four diagnostic categories. The study population consisted of 361,974 foreign-born persons aged 16 years and upward who were registered as living in Sweden in 1970, together with 361,974 matched Swedish controls for each person. Data from Statistics Sweden (SCB) and the National Board of Health and Welfare Centre for Epidemiology, covering the period 1970-1999, was used. Persons were selected if they were admitted to hospital during 1987-1999 and the cause of death was in one of four ICD groups. The results indicate a tendency towards less health care utilization among migrants, especially men, as regards Symptoms, signs, and ill-defined conditions and Injury and poisoning. Further studies are needed to explore the possible explanations and the pattern of other diseases to see whether migrants, and especially migrant men, are a risk group with less utilization of health care.

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  • 13.
    Albin, Björn
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden; Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden; Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Elmståhl, Sölve
    Lund University, Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmö, Sweden.
    Comparison of Stroke Mortality in Finnish-Born Migrants Living in Sweden 1970-1999 and in Swedish-Born Individuals2014In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, ISSN 1557-1912, E-ISSN 1557-1920, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 18-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A limited number of studies have been found on stroke mortality in migrants showing higher mortality for some groups. Influence of time of residence has been studied by a previous  research group. A previous study showed a significantly higher number of deaths in Diseases of the circulatory system in Finnish migrants compared to native Swedes. The aim was to test the hypothesis of a higher mortality in and a decrease in mortality over time in stroke among Finnish migrants in Sweden. The study was based on National Population registry data. The study population included 321,407 Swedish and 307,174 foreign born persons living in Sweden 1987-1999. Mean age was lower at time for death for Finnish migrants than native Swedes, men 5.1 years difference and women 2.3 years. The dissimilarity decreased over time. The risk of death by stroke was higher for migrants with short time of residence in Sweden than with long time (≤10 years, OR 1.61-1.36 vs ≥11 year, OR 1.18). Migrants with short time of residence in Sweden died 9.8-5.3 years earlier than native Swedes. The hypothesis was confirmed and an indication of adjustment to life in the new host country was found. International studies show similar results for other migrant groups but further studies are needed to verify if a similar pattern can be found in other migrant groups living in Sweden and to be able to generalise the findings.

  • 14.
    Albin, Björn
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, and Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, and Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Elmståhl, Sölve
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Lower prevalence of hip fractures in foreign-born individuals than in Swedish-born individuals during the period 1987-19992010In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 11, p. 203-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: This is the first longitudinal study with a 22-year follow-up, based on a national and complete sample, to determine whether the prevalence of hip fracture and the age when it occurs are influenced by migration and by being foreign-born. Cultural background and environmental factors such as UV-radiation and lifestyle during childhood and adolescence may influence the risk of a hip fracture event later in life. Differences in prevalence might occur between the indigenous population and those who have migrated to a country.

    METHODS: The study was based on national population data. The study population consisted of 321,407 Swedish-born and 307,174 foreign-born persons living in Sweden during the period 1987-1999.

    RESULTS: Foreign-born individuals had a reduced risk of hip fracture, with odds ratios (ORs) of 0.47-0.77 for men and 0.42-0.88 for women. Foreign-born women had the hip fracture event at a higher age on average, but a longer time spent in Sweden was associated with a small but significant increase in risk.

    CONCLUSIONS: We found that there was a reduced risk of hip fracture in all foreign-born individuals, and that the hip fracture event generally happened at a higher age in foreign-born women. Migration must therefore be considered in relation to the prevalence and risk of hip fracture. Migration can therefore have a positive effect on one aspect of the health of a population, and can influence and lower the total cost of healthcare due to reduced risk and prevalence of hip fracture.

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  • 15.
    Andersson, Frieda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patient safety in nursing homes in Sweden: nurses´views on safety and their role2017In: Journal of Health Services Research and Policy, ISSN 1355-8196, E-ISSN 1758-1060, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 204-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Knowledge about patient safety in nursing homes is limited. The aim of this study was to describe what patient safety means to nurses working in nursing homes for the elderly and how these nurses address patient safety. Method: Qualitative study of semi-structured interviews with 15 nurses aged 27-62 years. Qualitative content analysis was applied. Results: Nurses describe the meaning of patient safety in terms of proper care and treatment, and a sense of security. Based on nurses' description of patient safety, several factors were identified as prerequisites to achieve safe health care: competence; clear information transfer between health care organizations; continuity of care and appropriate environment. Barriers to patient safety were described as lack of sufficient resources; lack of communication and negative attitudes to incident reporting. To a great extent, nurses' work for patient safety consists of efforts to compensate for defects and ensure good health care in their daily work, since work with patient safety is not a management priority. Conclusion: Patient safety needs to be clarified and prioritized in nursing homes, and there is a need to understand nurses' role among other care givers and the need for shared routines among care givers

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  • 16.
    Atwine, Fortunate
    et al.
    School of Health and Caring Science, Linnaeus University, Vaxjo, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST), Mbarara, Uganda.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Health professionals’ knowledge and attitudes to healthcare-seeking practices and complementary alternative medicine usage in ugandans with diabetes: A cross-sectional survey2017In: Pan African Medical Journal, E-ISSN 1937-8688, Vol. 28, article id 256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Healthcare-seeking behaviour among persons with diabetes has been investigated to a limited extent, and not from professionals’ perspective. The aim of the study was to describe healthcare professionals’ knowledge, attitudes and practice concerning healthcare-seeking behaviour and the use of complementary and alternative medicine among persons with diabetes. Methods: A cross-sectional, self-administered questionnaire was conducted in western Uganda. Nurses, midwives or nurse assistants 72.2%, physicians 12% and clinical officers 10% volunteered to participate in the study with a total 108 (93% response rate) response rate. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse data with frequencies, percentages and summarized in tables. Results: Most of the healthcare providers perceived more uneducated people to be at risk of developing complications related to diabetes (66.7%) and that most of the patients with diabetes were not knowledgeable about signs and symptoms of diabetes before being diagnosed (75.9%). The main reasons inducing persons with diabetes to seek care outside the health care sector were reported to be seeking a cure for the condition, influence from the popular sector, the accessibility of the place and signs of complications of diabetes related to poor glycaemic control. Healthcare providers had relatively positive attitudes towards using complementary and alternative medicine. Conclusion: Insufficient knowledge about diabetes, compromised healthcare-seeking practices including drug procurement for diabetes seem to be barriers to diabetes management. Patients were thus reported to be burdened with co-morbidities of complications of diabetes related to poor glycaemic control. © Fortunate Atwine et al.

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  • 17.
    Atwine, Fortunate
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden; Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST). Mbarara, Uganda.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Healthcare-seeking behaviour and management of type 2 diabetes: from Ugandan traditional healers’ perspective2016In: International Journal of Africa Nursing Sciences, E-ISSN 2214-1391, Vol. 5, p. 17-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [Background] Healthcare-seeking behaviour has been investigated to a limited extent in persons with diabetes, and the way traditional healers manage diabetes still needs exploration. [Aim] To explore healthcare-seeking behaviour and management of type 2 diabetes from the perspective of traditional healers in the folk sector to understand how traditional medicine is integrated into the professional health sector. [Design] A qualitative descriptive study. [Method] A purposeful sample of 16 traditional healers known in the area. Data were collected by individual semi-structured interviews. [Findings] Healthcare was sought from the professional health sector, mainly from the public hospitals, before the patients switched to the traditional healers. Reasons for seeking help from traditional healers were mainly chronic conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure and the perceived failure of western medicine to manage diabetes. The cost at the healers’ facilities also influenced healthcare seeking because it was perceived to be affordable as it was negotiable and accessible because it was always available. Traditional medicine therapies of patients with diabetes were herbal medicine, nutritional products and counselling, but many patients whose conditions were difficult to manage were told to return to the public hospitals in the professional health sector. [Conclusion] Healthcare seeking was inconsistent in character, with a switch between different healthcare providers. Living conditions including treatment costs, healthcare organization, patients’ health beliefs and general condition seemed to influence healthcare seeking practice.

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  • 18.
    Atwine, Fortunate
    et al.
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST), Mbarara, Uganda.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Albin, Björn
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Health-care seeking behaviour and the use of traditional medicine among persons with type 2 diabetes in south-western Uganda: a study of focus group interviews2015In: Pan African Medical Journal, E-ISSN 1937-8688, Vol. 20, no 76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: health-care seeking behaviour is important as it determines acceptance of health care and outcomes of chronic conditions but it has been investigated to a limited extent among persons with diabetes in developing countries. The purpose of the study was to describe health-care seeking behaviour and understand reasons for using therapies offered by traditional healers.

    Methods: descriptive study using focus-group interviews. Three purposive focus-groups were conducted in 2011 of 10 women and 7 men aged 39–72 years in Uganda. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and qualitatively analysed according to a method described for focus-groups.

    Results: reasons for seeking help from traditional healers were symptoms related to diabetes such as polydipsia, fatigue and decreased sensitivity in lower limbs. Failure of effect from western medicine was also reported. Treatment was described to be unknown extracts, of locally made products taken as herbs or food, and participants had sought help from different health facilities with the help of relatives and friends.

    Conclusion: the pattern of seeking care was inconsistent, with a switch between different health care providers under the influence of the popular and folk sectors. Despite beliefs in using different healthcare providers seeking complementary and alternative medicine, participants still experienced many physical health problems related to diabetes complications. Health professionals need to be aware of the risk of switches between different health care providers, and develop strategies to initiate health promotion interventions to include in the care actors of significance to the patient from the popular, folk and professional sectors, to maintain continuity of effective diabetes care.

  • 19.
    Berterö, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Institutionen för hälso och vårdvetenskap, Linnéuniversitetet Växjö, Växjö, Sverige.
    Social support as described by foreign-born persons diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and living in Sweden.2010In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 507-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore and describe the meaning of support and its impact on the life situation of foreign-born persons diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and living in Sweden in relation to gender, age, and the duration of the disease. Mixed methods were used on a purposive sample of 34 foreign-born adults who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Qualitative data were collected by semi-structured interviews and quantitative data were collected by the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire (NSSQ). The meaning of “support” was described by the participants as medical support, information support, and aiding support to learn to manage diabetes. Support influenced the participants' entire life and their need for it was related to the severity of the diabetes and differences regarding age and gender. The participants scored low on the NSSQ regarding total emotional support, total aid, and total function and 42% had lost an important relationship during the last year. Their marital status had no impact on emotional support but aid was significant. Medical support, with regular follow-up and information, is important in obtaining affirmation and aids in learning to manage diabetes mellitus.

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  • 20.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Allvin, Renée
    Universitetssjukhuset Örebro, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hjelmqvist, Hans
    Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brandt, Jonathan
    Aleris specialistvård Motala, Sweden.
    Tamás, Éva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Interprofessionell simulering är engagerande och relevant [Interprofessional simulation: an engaging and relevant technique for teamwork practice]2019In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stakeholders in healthcare and education find interprofessional teamwork to be crucial for todays complex healthcare. Consequently, the students need to prepare for future collaboration with other professions. Interprofessional simulation (IPS) is a technique in which several professions can engage together in clinical scenarios. Using a survey we studied the perceived relevance of two IPS settings in which last-year medical and nursing students participated in acute care scenarios. The findings showed that students perceive IPS as being highly relevant and that students from the other profession contributed to their learning. IPS holds promise as a pedagogical tool towards future interprofessional competence. However, pedagogical improvements can be made, and the professional perspectives can be better balanced. Furthermore, in order to equip students with broader interprofessional competence, scenarios should include several professions and a variety of clinical contexts.

  • 21.
    Eriksson, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Norrköping, Sweden.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    End of Life Care for Patients Dying of Stroke: A Comparative Registry Study of Stroke and Cancer2016In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 2, p. e0147694-, article id 26845149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Although stroke is a significant public health challenge and the need for palliative care has been emphasized for these patients, there is limited data on end-of-life care for patients dying from stroke.

    Objective

    To study the end-of-life care during the last week of life for patients who had died of stroke in terms of registered symptom, symptom management, and communication, in comparison with patients who had died of cancer.

    Design

    This study is a retrospective, comparative registry study.

    Methods

    A retrospective comparative registry study was performed using data from a Swedish national quality register for end-of-life care based on WHO`s definition of Palliative care. Data from 1626 patients who had died of stroke were compared with data from 1626 patients who had died of cancer. Binary logistic analyses were used to calculate odds ratios, with 95% CI.

    Results

    Compared to patients who was dying of cancer, the patients who was dying of stroke had a significantly higher prevalence of having death rattles registered, but a significantly lower prevalence of, nausea, confusion, dyspnea, anxiety, and pain. In addition, the stroke group had significantly lower odds ratios for health care staff not to know whether all these six symptoms were present or not. Patients who was dying of stroke had significantly lower odds ratio of having informative communication from a physician about the transition to end-of-life care and of their family members being offered bereavement follow-up.

    Conclusions

    The results indicate on differences in end-of-life care between patients dying of stroke and those dying from cancer. To improve the end-of-life care in clinical practice and ensure it has consistent quality, irrespective of diagnosis, education and implementation of palliative care principles are necessary.

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  • 22.
    Ge, Li
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden; Nursing College of Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou, China.
    Albin, Björn
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden..
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden..
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Rask, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden..
    Beliefs about health and illness and health-related behavior among urban women with gestational diabetes mellitus in the south east of China.2016In: Journal of Transcultural Nursing, ISSN 1043-6596, E-ISSN 1552-7832, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 593-602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The incidence of gestational diabetes among Chinese women is 4.3%. No study has previously been conducted about beliefs and health-related behavior among urban Chinese women with this disease. This article aims to explore beliefs about health and illness and health-related behavior among women in this group in a Chinese sociocultural context.

    DESIGN:

    A qualitative exploratory study was conducted and semistructured individual interviews (n = 15) were processed by content analysis.

    RESULTS:

    Beliefs about health and illness among these women were foremost attributed to the individual, social, and natural worlds. They feared the negative influence of gestational diabetes, but some of them believed in "letting nature take its course" and "living in the present." Their care-seeking behavior varied between the professional, popular, and folk sectors. They sought a balance between following professionals' advice and avoiding practical difficulties.

    CONCLUSION:

    The beliefs and health-related behavior among them were influenced by Chinese culture, which can sometimes but not always reduce the effect of the disease.

  • 23.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden .
    Albin, Björn
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden .
    Heikkilä, Kristiina
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden .
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden .
    Family members' experiences of the use of interpreters in healthcare2013In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 156-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim was to explore adults’ experiences of their family members’ use of interpreters in health-care encounters.

    Background

    Language barriers are a major hindrance for migrants to receive appropriate healthcare. In a foreign country, family members often need support in care of migrant patients. No previous studies focusing on adult family members’ experiences of the use of interpreters in healthcare have been found.

    Method

    A purposive sample of 10 adult family members with experiences of the use of interpreters in health-care encounters. Data were collected between May and September 2009 by focus-group interviews and analysed with qualitative analysis according to a method described for focus groups.

    Findings

    Three categories emerged from the analysis: (1) Experiences of the use of professional interpreters, (2) Experiences of being used as an interpreter and (3) Experiences of what needs to be improved when using interpreters. The main findings showed no agreement in family members’ experiences; interpretation should be individually and situationally adapted. However, when family members acted as interpreters, their role was to give both practical and emotional support, and this led to both positive and negative emotions. Use of simple language, better collaboration in the health-care organization and developing the interpreters’ professional attitude could improve the use of professional interpreters. The type of interpreter, mode of interpretation and patient's preferences should be considered in the interpretation situation. In order to achieve high-quality healthcare, health-care professionals need to organize a good interpretation situation case-by-case, choose the appropriate interpreters with the patient in focus and cooperate with members of the patient's social network.

     

     

  • 24.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    et al.
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Albin, Björn
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Heikkilä, Kristiina
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Healthcare staffs perceptions of using interpreters: a qualitative study2010In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 11, no 03, p. 260-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to describe how healthcare professionals experience and perceive the use of interpreters in their contacts with patients with whom they do not share a common language.

    Background Language barriers lead to poor-quality care and fewer medical contacts. To avoid language barriers and their consequences, interpreters are recommended. However, communicating through an interpreter can be difficult. To develop effective interpreter service it is important to study healthcare staff’s perceptions of using an interpreter.

    Methods

    An explorative descriptive study design was used. The study was conducted in different healthcare settings in Sweden and included 24 healthcare staff, of whom 11 were physicians, 9 nurses, 2 physiotherapists and 2 assistant nurses. Data were generated through written descriptions of the use of interpreters in healthcare service and were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Findings

    Two main categories emerged from the data: 1) aspects related to the interpreter and 2) organizational aspects. The study showed that having a face-to-face, professional, trained interpreter, with a good knowledge of both languages and of medical terminology, translating literally and objectively, was perceived positively. The organizational aspects that affected the perception were functioning or non-functioning technical equipment, calm in the interpretation environment, documentation of the patients’ language ability, respect for the appointed time, and the level of availability and service provided by the interpreter agency. It is important to develop a well-functioning interpreter organization that offers trained interpreters with a professional attitude to improve and ensure cost-effective and high-quality encounters and care.

  • 25.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden .
    Albin, Björn
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden .
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arabic-speaking migrants' attitudes, opinions, preferences and past experiences concerning the use of interpreters in healthcare: a postal cross-sectional survey2014In: BMC Research Notes, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 7, no 71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Good communication is an important prerequisite for equal treatment in a healthcare encounter. One way to overcome language barriers when patients and healthcare staff do not share the same language is to use a professional interpreter. Few previous studies have been found investigating the use of interpreters, and just one previous study from the perspective of European migrants, which showed that they perceived interpreters as a communication aid and a guide in the healthcare system as regards information and practical matters. No previous study has gathered quantitative information to focus on non-European migrants' attitudes to the use of interpreters in healthcare encounters. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate Arabic-speaking individuals' attitudes, opinions, preferences and past experiences concerning the use of interpreters in healthcare in order to: (i) understand how persons' expectations and concerns regarding interpreters may vary, both within and across cultural/linguistic populations; (ii) understand the consequences of diverse opinions/expectations for planning responsive services; and (iii) confirm findings from previous qualitative studies.

    METHOD: A postal cross-sectional study using a structured self-administered 51-item questionnaire was used to describe and document aspects of Arabic-speaking individuals' attitudes to the use of interpreters in healthcare. The sample of 53 Arabic-speaking migrants was recruited from three different places. Participants were mostly born in Iraq and had a high level of education and were almost equally divided between genders. Data were analysed with descriptive statistics.

    RESULTS: The main findings were that most of the participants perceived the interpreter's role as being a communication aid and a practical aid, interpreting literally and objectively. Trust in the professional interpreter was related to qualification as an interpreter and personal contact with face-to-face interaction. The qualities of the desired professional interpreter were: a good knowledge of languages and medical terminology, translation ability, and sharing the same origin, dialect and gender as the patient.

    CONCLUSION: This study confirmed previous qualitative findings from European migrant groups with a different cultural and linguistic background. The study supports the importance of planning a good interpretation situation in accordance with individuals' desire, irrespective of the migrant's linguistic and cultural background, and using interpreters who interpret literally and objectively, who are highly trained with language skills in medical terminology, and with a professional attitude to promote communication, thus increasing cost-effective, high-quality individualized healthcare.

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  • 26.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    et al.
    School of Health Science and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Heikkilä, K
    School of Health Science and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Albin, B
    School of Health Science and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    School of Health Science and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Migrants' perceptions of using interpreters in health care2009In: International Nursing Review, ISSN 0020-8132, E-ISSN 1466-7657, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 461-469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The number of foreign-born people who do not share a common language has increased due to extensive international migration, which will increase in the future. There is limited knowledge about the users' perceptions of interpreters in health care. Aim: To describe how individuals from former Yugoslavia, living in Sweden, perceived the use of interpreters in Swedish healthcare services.

    METHOD: A phenomenographic approach was employed. Data were collected by semi-structured interviews during 2006-2007 with 17 people, aged 29-75 years, from former Yugoslavia, living in Sweden.

    FINDINGS: Three descriptive categories were identified: (1) prerequisites for good interpretation situations; (2) the interpretation situation - aspects of satisfaction or dissatisfaction; and (3) measures to facilitate and improve the interpreter situation. The interpreter's competence, attitude, appearance and an appropriate environment are important prerequisites for interpretation. The interpreter was perceived as being a communication aid and a guide in the healthcare system in terms of information and practical issues, but also as a hindrance. A desirable professional interpreter was perceived as highly skilled in medical terminology and language, working in face-to-face interaction.

    CONCLUSION: Using an interpreter was perceived as a hindrance, though also needed in communication with healthcare staff and as a guide in the healthcare system. Face-to-face interaction was preferred, with the interpreter as an aid to communication. As part of individual care planning it is important to use interpreters according to the patients' desires. Healthcare organizations and guidelines for interpreters need to be developed in order for patients to have easy access to highly skilled professional interpreters.

  • 27.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    et al.
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Heikkilä, Kristiina
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Albin, Björn
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Problems and consequences in the use of professional interpreters: qualitative analysis of incidents from primary healthcare2011In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 253-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore what problems are reported by healthcare professionals in primary healthcare concerning the use of interpreters and what the problems lead to. The study involved a single case in a real-life situation with qualitative content analysis of 60 incident reports written by different healthcare professionals. The main problems documented were related to language, such as lack of the interpreters with proficiency in a particular language, and to organisational routines, with difficulties in the availability of interpreters and access to the interpreter agency. The problems reported led to incorrect use of time and resources, which increased the workload and thus delayed treatment. Other consequences were limited possibilities to communicate and thus consultation was carried out without a professional interpreter, using family members instead. The results highlight the importance of developing good co-operation between the interpreter agency and the primary healthcare centre in order to fulfil the existing policy of using professional interpreters to provide the right interpreter at the right time and guarantee high-quality care.

  • 28.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    et al.
    Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden .
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden .
    Arabic-speaking migrants' experiences of the use of interpreters in healthcare: a qualitative explorative study2014In: International Journal for Equity in Health, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 13, no 49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Arabic-speaking migrants have constituted a growing population in recent years. This entails major challenges to ensure good communication in the healthcare encounter in order to provide individual and holistic healthcare. One of the solutions to ensure good communication between patient and healthcare staff who do not share the same language is to use a professional interpreter. To our knowledge, no previous qualitative studies have been found concerning Arabic-speaking migrants and the use of interpreters. This study aims to ascertain their individual experiences which can help extend our understanding of the studied area.

    METHOD: A purposive sample of 13 Arabic-speaking persons with experience of using interpreters in healthcare encounters. Data were collected between November 2012 and March 2013 by four focus-group interviews and analysed with qualitative analysis according to a method described for focus groups.

    RESULTS: Four categories appeared from the analysis: 1) The professional interpreter as spokesperson; 2) Different types of interpreters and modes of interpretation adapting to the healthcare encounter; 3) The professional interpreter's task and personal properties affected the use of professional interpreters in a healthcare encounter; 4) Future planning of the use of professional interpreters in a healthcare encounter. The main findings were that the use of interpreters was experienced both as a possibility and as a problem. The preferred type of interpreters depended on the interpreter's dialect and ability to interpret correctly. Besides the professional interpreter's qualities of good skill in language and medical terminology, translation ability, neutrality and objectivity, Arabic-speaking participants stated that professional interpreters need to share the same origin, religion, dialect, gender and political views as the patient in order to facilitate the interpreter use and avoid inappropriate treatment.

    CONCLUSION: The study showed that the personal qualities of a good interpreter not only cover language ability but also origin, religion, dialect, gender and political views. Thus, there is need to develop strategies for personalized healthcare in order to avoid inappropriate communication, to satisfy the preferences of the person in need of interpreters and improve the impact of interpretation on the quality of healthcare.

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  • 29.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    et al.
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences Department of Health and Caring Sciences Linnaeus University Växjö Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences Uppsala University Uppsala Sweden.
    Establishing a culturally specific nursing home for Finnish-speaking older persons in Sweden: A case study2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 210-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aims to describe the establishment of a culturally specific nursing home for Finnish-speaking older persons in Sweden.

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  • 30.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    et al.
    Department of Health and caring sciences, Faculty of Health and Life sciences, Linnaeus University, s weden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Perspectives of Professional Interpreters Regarding their Role and Attitude in the Healthcare Encounter2016In: Diversity and equality in health and care, ISSN 2049-5471, E-ISSN 2049-548X, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 221-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to explore how professional interpreters experience their role in a healthcare encounter. An explorative study with semi-structured individual interviews and written descriptions was conducted with a purposeful sample of nine professional interpreters who represented the migrant population in Sweden. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse data. The findings showed that the professional interpreters viewed their role as to transfer information accurately, to keep confidentiality, to remain impartial and to perform the duties related to their work assignments. However, the study also found a number of factors and challenges that influenced this role. These were: 1) the form of interpretation, 2) the interpretation environment, 3) the employment conditions and personal characteristics of the interpreters, and 4) the behaviour of the patient and healthcare staff during the interpretation session. The study found that professional interpreters experienced their role as aligning with the existing guidelines regarding an interpreter’s role and ethical attitude. Healthcare service providers, policymakers and interpreter agencies should focus on improving training and support and development opportunities in order to increase the impact of interpretation on equality and quality of healthcare.

  • 31.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Working with interpreters: practical advice for use of an interpreter in healthcare2013In: International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare, ISSN 1744-1595, E-ISSN 1744-1609, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 69-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim is to improve communication in healthcare when an interpreter is used by providing practical advice to healthcare professionals when considering using interpreters. This descriptive commentary considered the issues of planning, preparation and implementation of interpretation sessions to reveal the complexities and dilemmas of an effective healthcare encounter when using interpreters. Using the design of a discursive paper, this work seeks to explore and position of what is published in the literature on the topic and based on previous studies to provide practical advice on the use of interpreters. The results  showed that the interpreter should be used not only as a communication aid but also as a practical and informative guide through the healthcare system. In planning and preparing the interpretation session, it is important to consider the type (trained professional interpreter, family member or bilingual healthcare staff as interpreters) and mode (face to face and telephone) of interpreting. Furthermore, it is important to consider the interpreter's ethnic and religious background, gender, language or dialect, social group, appearance, clothes and attitude. During the healthcare encounter, the interpreter should follow the recommendations given in guidelines for interpreters. Healthcare professionals should choose an appropriate room and be aware of their own attitude, behaviour and appearance during the healthcare encounter. Good planning is needed, with careful consideration of choices regarding the right kind of interpreter, mode of interpretation and individual preferences for the interpretation in order to deliver high-quality and cost-effective healthcare. Depending on the nature of the healthcare encounter, healthcare professionals need to plan interpretation carefully and in accordance with the individuals' wishes and choose the type of interpreter and mode of interpreting that best suits the present need in the healthcare situation in order to deliver healthcare high in quality.

  • 32.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Lundin, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Boundaries and conditions of interpretation in multilingual and multicultural elderly healthcare2015In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 15, no 458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Elderly migrants who do not speak the official language of their host country have increased due to extensive international migration, and will further increase in the future. This entails major challenges to ensure good communication and avoid communication barriers that can be overcome by the use of adequate interpreter services. To our knowledge, there are no previous investigations on interpreting practices in multilingual elderly healthcare from different healthcare professionals perspectives. This study examines issues concerning communication and healthcare through a particular focus on interpretation between health professionals and patients of different ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. The central aim of the project is to explore interpretation practices in multilingual elderly healthcare. Methods: A purposive sample of 33 healthcare professionals with experience of using interpreters in community multilingual elderly healthcare. Data were collected between October 2013 and March 2014 by 18 individual and four focus group interviews and analysed with qualitative content analysis. Results: The main results showed that interpreting practice in multilingual elderly healthcare was closely linked to institutional, interpersonal and individual levels. On the organizational level, however, guidelines for arranging the use of interpreters at workplaces were lacking. Professional interpreters were used on predictable occasions planned long in advance, and bilingual healthcare staff and family members acting as interpreters were used at short notice in everyday caring situations on unpredictable occasions. The professional interpreter was perceived as a person who should interpret spoken language word-for-word and who should translate written information. Furthermore, the use of a professional interpreter was not adapted to the context of multilingual elderly healthcare. Conclusion: This study found that interpreter practice in multilingual elderly healthcare is embedded in the organizational environment and closely related to the individuals language skills, cultural beliefs and socio-economic factors. In order to formulate interpreter practice in the context of multilingual elderly healthcare it is important to consider organizational framework and cultural competence, cultural health knowledge, beliefs and customs.

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  • 33.
    Hermansen, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Futurum Region Jönköping County.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Women’s experiences of daily life after anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery: A qualitative interview study2016In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 352-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Subjects: Fourteen women aged 39-62 years (median 52 years), were included 1.5 to 3 years after ACDF for cervical degenerative disc disease.

    Methods: Individual semi-structured interviews were analyzed by qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach.

    Results: The women described their experiences of daily life in five different ways; Experiences of recovery; Experiences of symptoms in daily life influence feelings and thoughts; Making daily life work; Importance of social  and occupational networks; Experiences of the influence of healthcare professionals and interventions on daily life.

    Conclusion: This interview study provides insight into women’s daily life after ACDF. While improved after surgery, informants also experienced remaining symptoms and limitations in daily life. A variety of mostly active coping strategies were used to manage daily life. Social support from family, friends, occupational networks and healthcare professionals positively influenced daily life. These findings provide knowledge on aspects of daily life that should be considered in individualized postoperative care and rehabilitation in an attempt to provide better outcomes in women after ACDF.

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  • 34.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Växjö University, Sweden.
    Beliefs about health and illness in men with diabetes mellitus of different ethnic origin living in Sweden2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Växjö University, Sweden.
    Beliefs about health and illness in men with diabetes of different origin in Sweden2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Växjö University, Sweden.
    Beliefs about health and illness in women with gestational diabetes born in Africa and Sweden2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Institutionen för Hälso- och vårdvetenskap, Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö.
    Bemötande i vård och omsorg, transkulturellt perspektiv2015Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Utgångspunkten för allt hälso- och sjukvårdsarbete är Hälso- och sjukvårdslagen som anger att vården ska vara individualiserad, genomföras i samråd med den enskilde, bygga på respekt för individens självbestämmande och integritet och meddelas på lika villkor oavsett ras, religion eller politisk åsikt. Tydligt framgår att alla individer är unika och därmed inte nödvändigtvis ska meddelas samma vård.

    Inom transkulturell omvårdnad studeras individens förutsättningar för hälsa, reaktioner på och upplevelser av sjukdom eller ohälsa samt effekter av vård och behandling hos individer med olika kulturell bakgrund. Man studerar skillnader och likheter, både mellan och inom olika kulturer, men också mellan olika generationer. Avsikten är att kunna vårda människan som döljs bakom kulturen. Både individens och vårdarens kultur påverkar vårdandet. Eftersom varje människa är unik blir mötet mellan två personer alltid transkulturellt i någon mån.

    Exemplen i Vårdhandboken belyser i huvudsak hur personer med olika ursprung uppfattar sjukdomen diabetes och dess hantering.

    Bemötande i vården ur transkulturellt perspektiv ska med utgångspunkt i Hälso- och sjukvårdslagen inriktas på att undvika etnocentrism där majoritetskulturens värderingar styr planeringen av insatser. Istället bör man sträva efter kulturrelativism med en transkulturell medvetenhet, vilket innebär att varje unika individs behov och önskemål fokuseras. Kulturellt kompetent vård är skräddarsydd vård.

  • 38.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö.
    Bemötande i vård och omsorg, transkulturellt perspektiv2011In: Vårdhandboken, Inera AB , 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Växjö universitet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Diabetespandemi2006In: Omvårdnad vid diabetes / [ed] Karin Wikblad, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2006, p. 313-322Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Växjö universitet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Flervetenskapliga perspektiv i migrationsforskning: Årsbok 2006 från forskningsprofilen Arbetsmarknad, Migration och Etniska relationer (AMER) vid Växjö universitet2006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. University of Växjö, Sweden.
    Holism in community leg ulcer management: a comparison of nurses in Sweden and the UK2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Växjö University, Sweden.
    Holism in community legulcer management: a comparison of nurses in Sweden and the UK2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Växjö universitet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Hälso-och sjukdomsuppfattningar – kulturell bakgrund och kön2006In: Omvårdnad vid diabetes / [ed] Karin Wikblad, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2006, p. 75-90Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Växjö universitet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Migration och hälsa: ett studentprojekt i samverkan mellan Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och socialt arbete och Svenska emigrantinstitutet2002In: Hembygden & världen: festskrift till Ulf Beijbom / [ed] Lars Olsson & Sune Åkerman, Växjö: Svenska emigrantinstitutet , 2002, p. 291-297Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Växjö , Sweden.
    Social support as described by Foreign-and Swedish-born persons with diabetes living in Sweden2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Växjö University, Sweden.
    Social support as perceived by Swedish persons with type 2 diabetes2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, Sweden .
    Social support described by foreign-and Swedish-born persons with diabetes2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care.
    Social support described by Swedish-born persons with diabetes.Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Växjö University, Sweden .
    Social support described by Swedish-born persons with diabetes2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Växjö universitet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Vetenskapligt forum – vad är nyheter i behandlingen av svårläkta sår? En utblick och inblick i det senaste som hänt i avhandlingar, studier och forskningsrapporter: Uppfattningar om hälsa och sjukdom samt vård bland svenska –och utlandsfödda personer med diabetiska fotsår2004Conference paper (Other academic)
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