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  • 1.
    Abednazari, Hossin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. PEAS Institute, Linköping.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Nilsson, Ingela
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Nayeri, Fariba
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Hepatocyte growth factor is a reliable marker for efficient anti-bacterial therapy within the first day of treatment2014In: Advances in Bioscience and Biotechnology, ISSN 2156-8456, E-ISSN 2156-8502, Vol. 5, no 10, p. 823-830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid diagnosis and choice of appropriate antibiotic treatment might be life-saving in serious infectious diseases. Still the available markers that can evaluate and monitor the diagnosis and treatment are few. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has been studied as a potent regenerative factor produced and released during injuries such as infectious diseases. Monitoring of HGF levels might predict therapy results better than C-reactive protein (CRP) within the first day of treatment in pneumonia. For further investigation of previous observations we aimed to study HGF as a first-day marker in over-representing infectious diseases in comparison to procalcitonin (PCT), CRP and body temperature. Fifty-one patients with community acquired infectious diseases were included consequently at admittance and the serum samples were collected before and within 18 - 24 hours of treatment. HGF levels decreased significantly in case of efficient antibiotic therapy and HGF was shown to be better than PCT, CRP and body temperature to evaluate treatment. In patients with pneumonia, monitoring of HGF was most reasonable. HGF might be used as a therapeutic marker within the first day of empiric antibiotic treatment during infection.

  • 2.
    Afrell, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Samrehab, Kalmar County Council, Västervik Hospital, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Physiology, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Rudebeck, Carl Edvard
    Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsö, Norway / The Research Unit, Kalmar County Council, Sweden.
    Improving the interaction between the physiotherapist and the patient with long-lasting pain2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate whether it would be possible to improve the understanding and communication between physiotherapists and patients with long-lasting pain by, in a systematic way, approaching their condition from a bodily existential perspective.

    Method: 31 physiotherapists answered written open questions about what happened when they in 90 encounters used key questions about living with pain together with a tentative frame for interpreting the answers - typologies of approaches to living with long-lasting pain. In the analysis, we combined qualitative content analysis with the counting of the numbers of codes.

    Results: According to the physiotherapists, patients were positive to answering the key questions, which also evoked emotional responses and reflection. The relation between the physiotherapists and their patients improved. The typologies helped the physiotherapists understand their patients better, as well as in assessing the patients’ problems and choosing treatment. In all, positive experience clearly dominated. Conclusion: When used by physiotherapists with an interest in patients with longlasting pain, the key questions and typologies seem to enrich the clinical interaction in many cases. To try the generalisability of our findings, we regard it an interesting possibility to conduct a larger, quantitative questionnaire study based on the experiences and results of the present one.

  • 3.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Lonn, J
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Uhlin, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Nayeri, Fariba
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, B
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Hahn-Zoric, M
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Fibroblast Growth Factor 23, Hepatocyte Growth Factor, Interleukin-6, High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor. Inflammation Markers in Chronic Haemodialysis Patients?2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 285-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sera from 84 haemodialysis (HD) patients and 68 healthy blood donors were analysed with commercially available ELISA techniques for fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), interleukin-6 (Il-6), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), to find a possible correlation of FGF-23 and HGF with the earlier recognized inflammatory markers Il-6 and hs-CRP or suPAR. All patients studied had significantly elevated levels of FGF-23, HGF, hs-CRP and suPAR as compared to the controls. Il-6 and hs-CRP correlated for patients (R=0.6) as well as for patients and controls altogether. Ln (natural logarithm) of HGF correlated weakly with Ln Il-6 and Ln CRP (R 0.28-0.37). Ln FGF-23 correlated only with Ln HGF (r=-0.25) in controls. Ln HGF correlated with ln suPAR (r=0.6) in both patients and controls. Although elevated as compared to controls, we found no correlation of FGF-23 with the recognized inflammatory markers Il-6, hs-CRP, nor HGF or the new marker suPAR in HD patients. Ln HGF correlated with Ln Il-6, Ln CRP and Ln suPAR. Although probably involved in vessel disease, FGF-23 and HGF may play other roles than acting in inflammatory vessel disease in HD patients. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the role of these immunological markers in chronic haemodialysis patients with atherosclerosis.

  • 4.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Lönn, J
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro, Sweden.
    Uhlin, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Nayeri, Fariba
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, B
    Hahn-Zoric, M
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tillväxtfaktorer och inflammationsmarkörer vid kronisk njursvikt2013In: Njurmedicinskt vårmöte Jönköping 12-14 maj 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Lönn, Johanna
    Örebro Universitet, Sweden.
    Uhlin, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Physiology, County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Andersson, Bengt Andersson
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hahn-Zoric, Mirjana
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Sclerostin, TNF-alpha and Interleukin-18 Correlate and are Together with Klotho Related to Other Growth Factors and Cytokines in Haemodialysis Patients2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 58-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with chronic renal failure are known to have renal osteodystrophy (bone disease) and increased calcification of vessels. A new marker of bone disease, sclerostin, the two pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-18 (IL-18), and the fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) receptor-associated marker Klotho were tested in 84 haemodialysis (HD) patients and in healthy controls. The patients had significantly higher levels of the three former markers than of the controls while Klotho was significantly higher in the controls. Low level, but significant, correlations were observed in the patient group when the levels of these four markers were compared to each other and to those of 5 cytokines and growth factors tested earlier; high-sensitive CRP (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator (suPAR). Ln sclerostin correlated positively to Ln hsTNF-alpha, Ln HGF and Ln suPAR. Ln hsTNF-alpha correlated positively to Ln sclerostin, Ln hsCRP, Ln IL-6, Ln FGF-23, Ln suPAR and Ln IL-18. Ln IL-18 correlated positively to Ln suPAR and Ln TNF-alpha. Ln Klotho correlated negatively to Ln hsCRP but did not correlate to Ln FGF-23. The markers studied here may be involved in the calcification of vessels seen in HD patients due to a combination of inflammation and bone disease. The mechanisms are still not fully known but may be of importance for future therapeutic possibilities in this group of patients.

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  • 6.
    Axelsson-Olsson, Diana
    et al.
    Kalmar.
    Ellström, Patrik
    Kalmar.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Lund.
    Haemig, Paul D
    Kalmar.
    Brudin, Lars
    Kalmar County Hospital.
    Olsen, Björn
    Kalmar.
    Acanthamoeba-campylobacter coculture as a novel method for enrichment of campylobacter species2007In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 73, no 21, p. 6864-6869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we present a novel method to isolate and enrich low concentrations of Campylobacter pathogens. This method, Acanthamoeba-Campylobacter coculture (ACC), is based on the intracellular survival and multiplication of Campylobacter species in the free-living protozoan Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Four of the Campylobacter species relevant to humans and livestock, Campylobacter jejuni, C. coli, C. lari, and C. hyointestinalis, were effectively enriched by the coculture method, with growth rates comparable to those observed in other Campylobacter enrichment media. Studying six strains of C. jejuni isolated from different sources, we found that all of the strains could be enriched from an inoculum of fewer than 10 bacteria. The sensitivity of the ACC method was not negatively affected by the use of Campylobacter-selective antibiotics in the culture medium, but these were effective in suppressing the growth of seven different bacterial species added at a concentration of 104 CFU/ml of each species as deliberate contamination. The ACC method has advantages over other enrichment methods as it is not dependent on a microaerobic milieu and does not require the use of blood or other oxygen-quenching agents. Our study found the ACC method to be a promising tool for the enrichment of Campylobacter species, particularly from water samples with low bacterial concentrations.

  • 7.
    Brudin, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jorfeldt, L.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Pahlm, O.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Comparison of two commonly used reference materials for exercise bicycle tests with a Swedish clinical database of patients with normal outcome2014In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 297-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Reference values for working capacity, blood pressure, heart rate, perceived exertion, etc. during bicycle exercise tests have been sought after for many years. This is because earlier commonly used reference values for physical work capacity have been either too low or too high when compared to the clinical experience of several Swedish departments of clinical physiology. The aim of the study was to compare two commonly used reference materials with normal outcomes from a clinical database. Methods: Data from a clinical database of standardized exercise tests in Kalmar, Sweden, between 2004 and 2012, and having been judged as normal, were divided into 5-year categories of 5-10 to 75-80 years of age covering people from 7 to 80 years of age. Results: Maximal working capacity (W-max), maximal heart rate, maximal systolic blood pressure and maximal perceived exertion are presented for each of the 15 age categories. Regression equations are also presented for each sex with age and height as independent predictors. Quantitative comparisons of W-max are calculated for the three materials and possible explanations discussed. Conclusions: Values of W-max lie between the two reference materials most commonly used in Sweden. In addition, the present material covers subjects aged 7-19 years.

  • 8.
    Carlsson, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jonsson Henningsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Tjernberg, Ivar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Subclinical Lyme borreliosis is common in south-eastern Sweden and may be distinguished from Lyme neuroborreliosis by sex, age and specific immune marker patterns2018In: Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases, ISSN 1877-959X, E-ISSN 1877-9603, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 742-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Determinants of a subclinical course of Lyme borreliosis (LB) remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the extent, sex and age profiles of subclinical Borrelia seroconversion in a LB endemic area in Sweden and to map blood cellular Borrelia-specific immune marker patterns in individuals with a previous subclinical LB course compared with patients previously diagnosed with Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB). Methods: A large group of 1113 healthy blood donors was screened for multiple IgG anti-Borrelia antibodies and asked to complete a health inquiry regarding previous LB. A group of subjects with anti-Borrelia-specific IgG antibodies but no previous history of LB (subclinical LB, n = 60) was identified together with 22 cases of previous LNB. Whole Borrelia spirochetes, strains B. afzelii ACA1 and B. garinii Ip90, were used for ex vivo whole blood stimulations, whereas outer surface protein enriched fractions of the same strains were used for stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). An extensive panel of immune markers was analysed in the supernatants after stimulation using multiplex bead arrays, and Borrelia-specific secretion was determined by subtracting the spontaneous secretion. Results: A total of 125/1113 blood donors reported previous clinical LB. In contrast, 66 donors denied previous LB but showed multiple IgG anti-Borrelia antibodies; these were defined as subclinical subjects, of whom 60 were available for further studies. The subclinical subjects consisted of significantly more men and had a younger age compared with the LNB patients (p amp;lt;= 0.01). Discriminant analysis revealed a distinct pattern of sex, age and PBMC B. garinii-specific levels of IL-10, IL-17A and CCL20 discriminating subclinical subjects from LNB patients. Conclusions: This study confirms that subclinical Borrelia seroconversion is common in south-eastern Sweden. The findings further suggest that male sex, younger age together with B. gariniii induced levels of IL-10, IL-17A and CCL20 may be associated with a subclinical course.

  • 9.
    Carlsson, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Reg Kalmar Cty, Sweden.
    Sandholm, Kerstin
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Haddish, Haben Woldu
    Reg Kalmar Cty, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Reg Kalmar Cty, Sweden.
    Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Tjernberg, Ivar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Reg Kalmar Cty, Sweden.
    Complement activation in individuals with previous subclinical Lyme borreliosis and patients with previous Lyme neuroborreliosis2020In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 855-862Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and infection may lead to not only a large variety of clinical manifestations but also a subclinical outcome. The aim of the present study was to investigate if there is a constitutional difference in complement activation between individuals with previous subclinical Lyme borreliosis (SB) and patients previously diagnosed with Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB). Lepirudin plasma for activation studies was collected from 60 SB individuals and from 22 patients pre-diagnosed with LNB. The plasma was incubated with live Borrelia spirochetes of two strains (complement sensitive B. garinii Lu59 and complement resistant B. afzelii ACA1). Complement factor C3 was measured in non-activated lepirudin plasma with immune-nephelometry and C3a and sC5b-9 generated during complement activation were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We found that the complement sensitive Lu59 induced higher complement activation than the complement resistant ACA1 when measuring activation products C3a and sC5b-9 in SB and LNB patients, p < 0.0001. No significant difference was found between SB and LNB patients in systemic levels of C3. Furthermore, SB individuals generated a higher activation of C3 cleavage to C3a (C3a/C3 ratio) than LNB patients after activation with ACA1, p < 0.001, but no significant differences were found in response to Lu59. In conclusion, Lu59 induced higher complement activation than ACA1 and individuals with previous SB showed increased generation of C3a compared with patients with previous LNB. In our study population, this mechanism could lead to less elimination of spirochetes in LNB patients and thereby be a factor contributing to the clinical outcome.

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  • 10.
    Carlsson, Martin
    et al.
    Cty Hosp Kalmar, Sweden; Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Kalmar, Sweden.
    Wanby, Par
    Cty Hosp Kalmar, Sweden.
    Directly measured free 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels show no evidence of vitamin D deficiency in young Swedish women with anorexia nervosa2018In: Eating and Weight Disorders, ISSN 1124-4909, E-ISSN 1590-1262, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 247-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Anorexia nervosa (AN) is an eating disorder characterized by low fat mass complicated by osteoporosis. The role of circulating vitamin D in the development of bone loss in AN is unclear. Fat mass is known to be inversely associated with vitamin D levels measured as serum levels of total, protein-bound 25-hydroxyvitamin D, but the importance of directly measured, free levels of 25(OH)D has not been determined in AN. The aim of this study was to investigate vitamin D status, as assessed by serum concentrations of total and free serum 25(OH)D in patients with AN and healthy controls. Methods In female AN patients (n = 20), and healthy female controls (n = 78), total 25(OH)D was measured by LC-MS/MS, and free 25(OH)D with ELISA. In patients with AN bone mineral density (BMD) was determined with DEXA. Results There were no differences between patients and controls in total or free S-25(OH)D levels (80 +/- 31 vs 72 +/- 18 nmol/L, and 6.5 +/- 2.5 vs 5.6 +/- 1.8 pg/ml, respectively), and no association to BMD was found. In the entire group of patients and controls, both vitamin D parameters correlated with BMI, leptin, and PTH. Conclusions The current study did not demonstrate a vitamin D deficiency in patients with AN and our data does not support vitamin D deficiency as a contributing factor to bone loss in AN. Instead, we observed a trend toward higher vitamin D levels in AN subjects compared to controls. Measurement of free vitamin D levels did not contribute to additional information.

  • 11.
    Carlsson, Martin
    et al.
    County Hospital Kalmar, Sweden; Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ingela
    County Hospital Kalmar, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Kalmar, Sweden.
    Von, Siv-Ping
    County Hospital Kalmar, Sweden.
    Wanby, Par
    County Hospital Kalmar, Sweden.
    Erythrocyte fatty acid composition does not influence levels of free, bioavailable, and total 25-hydroxy vitamin D2017In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL and LABORATORY INVESTIGATION, ISSN 0036-5513, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 45-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In vitro, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs) may decrease the binding affinity of vitamin D metabolites for vitamin D-binding protein, which in turn may influence their bioavailability. FAs incorporated as phospholipids in erythrocyte (ery-) cell membranes reflect dietary intake. The purpose of this study was to investigate ery-FA composition in relation to markers for vitamin D. In healthy females (age 22.6 +/- 2.0 years) total 25(OH)D was measured by LC-MS/MS (n=78), free 25(OH)D with ELISA (n=64 of 78), and bioavailable 25(OH)D was calculated. Analysis of ery-FA composition was by gas chromatography (n=56 of 78). A strong correlation between total 25(OH)D and free 25(OH)D was seen (r=.66, pamp;lt;.001), and between total-25(OH)D and bioavailable 25(OH)D (r=.68, pamp;lt;.001). No correlations between 25(OH)D fractions and specific fatty acids were found, and in particular, no associations with mono- and poly-unsaturated FA compositions. All 25(OH)D fractions were correlated with leptin (total 25(OH)D (r=-.33, pamp;lt;.003); bioavailable 25(OH)D (r=-.47, pamp;lt;.001); free 25(OH)D (r=-.44, pamp;lt;.001). Associations were found between PTH and total 25(OH)D (r=-.35, p=.002) and weaker between bioavailable 25(OH)D (r=-.35, p=.040) and free 25(OH)D (r=-.28, p=.079). All fractions of 25(OH)D appear to correlate in a similar way to PTH, BMI and body fat (leptin). No association was found between ery-FA composition and free/bioavailable 25(OH)D. It is unlikely that FAs are a strong uncoupling factor of DBP-bound 25(OH)D.

  • 12.
    Carlsson, Martin
    et al.
    County Hospital Kalmar, Sweden; Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Wanby, Pär
    County Hospital Kalmar, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital, Sweden.
    Lexne, Erik
    County Hospital Kalmar, Sweden.
    Mathold, Karin
    County Hospital Kalmar, Sweden.
    Nobin, Rebecca
    County Hospital Kalmar, Sweden.
    Ericson, Lisa
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Nordqvist, Ola
    Kalmar County Council, Sweden.
    Petersson, Goran
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Older Swedish Adults with High Self-Perceived Health Show Optimal 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels Whereas Vitamin D Status Is Low in Patients with High Disease Burden2016In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 8, no 11, article id 717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Controversy pervades the definition of adequate and optimal vitamin D status. The Institutes of Medicine have recommended serum 25(OH) D levels above 50 nmol/L based upon evidence related to bone health, but some experts, including the Endocrine Society and International Osteoporosis Foundation, suggest a minimum serum 25(OH) D level of 75 nmol/L to reduce the risk of falls and fractures in older adults. In a cross-sectional study, we compared vitamin D status in people amp;gt;= 75 years selected from four groups with a frailty phenotype, combined with a control group free from serious illness, and who considered themselves completely healthy. Only 13% of the 169 controls were vitamin D deficient (S-25(OH) D) amp;lt; 50 nmol/L), in contrast with 49% of orthopedic patients with hip fractures (n = 133), 31% of stroke patients (n = 122), 39% of patients visiting the hospitals emergency department amp;gt;= 4 times a year (n = 81), and 75% of homebound adult residents in long-term care nursing homes (n = 51). The mean vitamin D concentration of the healthy control group (74 nmol/L) was similar to a suggested optimal level based on physiological data and mortality studies, and much higher than that of many officially recommended cut-off levels for vitamin D deficiency (amp;lt; 50 nmol/L). The present study provides a basis for planning and implementing public guidelines for the screening of vitamin D deficiency and vitamin D treatment for frail elderly patients.

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  • 13.
    Coster, Maria C.
    et al.
    SUS Malmö, Sweden.
    Nilsdotter, Anna
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Hospital, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Lund University, Sweden; Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Minimally important change, measurement error, and responsiveness for the Self-Reported Foot and Ankle Score2017In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 88, no 3, p. 300-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are increasingly used to evaluate results in orthopedic surgery. To enhance good responsiveness with a PROM, the minimally important change (MIC) should be established. MIC reflects the smallest measured change in score that is perceived as being relevant by the patients. We assessed MIC for the Self-reported Foot and Ankle Score (SEFAS) used in Swedish national registries. Patients and methods - Patients with forefoot disorders (n = 83) or hindfoot/ankle disorders (n = 80) completed the SEFAS before surgery and 6 months after surgery. At 6 months also, a patient global assessment (PGA) scaleas external criterionwas completed. Measurement error was expressed as the standard error of a single determination. MIC was calculated by (1) median change scores in improved patients on the PGA scale, and (2) the best cutoff point (BCP) and area under the curve (AUC) using analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves (ROCs). Results - The change in mean summary score was the same, 9 (SD 9), in patients with forefoot disorders and in patients with hindfoot/ankle disorders. MIC for SEFAS in the total sample was 5 score points (IQR: 2-8) and the measurement error was 2.4. BCP was 5 and AUC was 0.8 (95% CI: 0.7-0.9). Interpretation - As previously shown, SEFAS has good responsiveness. The score change in SEFAS 6 months after surgery should exceed 5 score points in both forefoot patients and hindfoot/ankle patients to be considered as being clinically relevant.

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  • 14.
    Coster, Maria C.
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden; Hand Foot Surg Centre, Sweden.
    Rosengren, Bjorn E.
    Lund University, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Lund University, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Magnus K.
    Lund University, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Comparison of the Self-Reported Foot and Ankle Score (SEFAS) and the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society Score (AOFAS)2014In: Foot & ankle international, ISSN 1071-1007, E-ISSN 1944-7876, Vol. 35, no 10, p. 1031-1036Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Self-reported Foot and Ankle Score (SEFAS) is a patient-reported outcome measure, while the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society Score (AOFAS) is a clinician-based score, both used for evaluation of foot and ankle disorders. The purpose of this study was to compare the psychometric properties of these 2 scoring systems. Methods: A total of 95 patients with great toe disorders and 111 patients with ankle or hindfoot disorders completed the 2 scores before and after surgery. We evaluated time to complete the scores in seconds, correlations between scores with Spearmans correlation coefficient (r(s)), floor and ceiling effects by proportion of individuals who reached the minimum or maximum values, test-retest reliability and interobserver reliability by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), internal consistency by Cronbachs coefficient alpha (CA), and responsiveness by effect size (ES). Data are provided as correlation coefficients, means, and standard deviations. Results: SEFAS was completed 3 times faster than AOFAS. The scores correlated with an r(s) of .49 for great toe disorders and .67 for ankle/hindfoot disorders (both P less than .001). None of the scores had any floor or ceiling effect. SEFAS test-retest ICC values measured 1 week apart were .89 for great toe and .92 for ankle/hindfoot disorders, while the corresponding ICC values for AOFAS were .57 and .75. AOFAS interobserver reliability ICC values were .70 for great toe and .81 for ankle/hindfoot disorders. SEFAS CA values were .85 for great toe and .86 for ankle/hindfoot disorders, while the corresponding CA values for AOFAS were .15 and .42. SEFAS ES values were 1.15 for great toe and 1.39 for ankle/hindfoot disorders, while the corresponding ES values for AOFAS were 1.05 and 1.73. Conclusion: As SEFAS showed similar or better outcome in our tests and was completed 3 times faster than AOFAS, we recommend SEFAS for evaluation of patients with foot and ankle disorders.

  • 15.
    De Geer, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Gjerde, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Physiology in Kalmar, Linköping University, County Council of Kalmar, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Olsson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Large variation in blood flow between left ventricular segments, as detected by adenosine stress dynamic CT perfusion.2015In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 291-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Dynamic cardiac CT perfusion (CTP) is based on repeated imaging during the first-pass contrast agent inflow. It is a relatively new method that still needs validation.

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the variation in adenosine stress dynamic CTP blood flow as compared to (99m) Tc SPECT. Secondarily, to compare manual and automatic segmentation.

    METHODS: Seventeen patients with manifest coronary artery disease were included. Nine were excluded from evaluation for various reasons. All patients were examined with dynamic stress CTP and stress/rest SPECT. CTP blood flow was compared with SPECT on a per segment basis. Results for manual and automated AHA segmentation were compared.

    RESULTS: CTP showed a positive correlation with SPECT, with correlation coefficients of 0·38 and 0·41 for manual and automatic segmentation, respectively (P<0·0001). There was no significant difference between the correlation coefficients of the manual and automated segmentation procedures (P = 0·75). The average per individual global CTP blood flow value for normal segments varied by a factor of 1·9 (manual and automatic segmentation). For the whole patient group, the CTP blood flow value in normal segments varied by a factor of 2·9/2·7 (manual/automatic segmentation). Within each patient, the average per segment blood flow in normal segments varied by a factor of 1·3-2·0/1·2-2·1 (manual/automatic segmentation).

    CONCLUSION: A positive but rather weak correlation was found between CTP and (99m) Tc SPECT. Large variations in CTP blood flow suggest that a cut-off value for stress myocardial blood flow is inadequate to detect ischaemic segments. Dynamic CTP is hampered by a limited coverage.

  • 16.
    Ekman, A
    et al.
    Kalmar.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Sandin, R
    Kalmar.
    A comparison of bispectral index and rapidly extracted auditory evoke potentials index responses to noxious stimulation during sevoflurane anesthesia2004In: Anesthesia and Analgesia, ISSN 0003-2999, E-ISSN 1526-7598, Vol. 99, p. 1141-1146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 17.
    Ekman, A.
    et al.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Section for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden, Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Regional Hospital, S-391 85, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Stalberg, E.
    Stålberg, E., Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundman, E.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Section for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, L.I.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Section for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology .
    Sandin, R.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Section for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The effect of neuromuscular block and noxious stimulation on hypnosis monitoring during sevoflurane anesthesia2007In: Anesthesia and Analgesia, ISSN 0003-2999, E-ISSN 1526-7598, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 688-695Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There are conflicting results on the influence of neuromuscular block (NMB) on the bispectral index (BIS). We investigated the influence of two degrees of NMB on BIS, Alaris auditory-evoked potential index (AAI), and the electromyogram (EMG) obtained with needle electrodes from the frontal and temporal muscles, immediately adjacent to the BIS-sensor. METHODS: Twenty patients were anesthetized with sevoflurane, titrated for 30 min to an end-tidal concentration of 1.2% (baseline). Rocuronium was infused to 50% (partial) and 95% (profound) depression of the first twitch in a train-of-four response, the order being randomly chosen. Noxious tetanic electrical stimulation was applied at four occasions: 1) at baseline (control measurement), 2 and 3) at each degree of NMB, and 4) after neostigmine reversal. BIS, AAI, and EMG were obtained 2 min before and 2 min after each noxious stimulation. RESULTS: Median BIS and AAI at baseline were 44 (39-50) and 15 (14-16), respectively. The two degrees of NMB did not affect BIS, AAI, and EMG before noxious stimulation. In contrast, profound NMB altered the BIS and AAI responses to noxious stimulation when compared with partial NMB, (BIS P = 0.01, AAI P < 0.01), after neostigmine reversal (BIS P < 0.01, AAI P = 0.01) and compared with baseline (BIS P = 0.08, AAI P = 0.02). No significant increase in EMG was found. CONCLUSION: BIS and AAI responses to noxious tetanic electrical stimulation are affected by the degree of NMB during sevoflurane anesthesia whereas NMB does not affect BIS or AAI in the absence of noxious stimulation. © 2007 by International Anesthesia Research Society.

  • 18.
    Ekman, Andreas
    et al.
    KI Stockholm.
    Flink, Roland
    Uppsala.
    Sundman, Eva
    KI Stockholm.
    Eriksson, Lars I
    KI Stockholm.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology .
    Sandin, Rolf
    KI Stockholm.
    Neuromuscular block and the electroencephalogram during sevoflurane anaesthesia2007In: NeuroReport, ISSN 0959-4965, E-ISSN 1473-558X, Vol. 18, no 17, p. 1817-1820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of neuromuscular block on the anaesthetic depth of hypnosis is an elusive question. We simultaneously investigated the influence of neuromuscular block on the bispectral index, a measure of hypnosis during general anaesthesia, and on the electroencephalogram. Patients were anaesthetized with sevoflurane. Noxious tetanic electrical stimulation was applied on two occasions: before and after profound neuromuscular block achieved with rocuronium. Neuromuscular block significantly attenuated the effect from noxious stimulation on electroencephalogram power and synchrony in the γ band (P<0.05), and the corresponding effect on bispectral index (P<0.02). These findings are probably due to the reduced arousing afferent input from paralysed muscles, and not to changes in the frontal electromyogram. © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  • 19.
    Gunningberg, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Malmö University.
    Nurse Managers prerequisite for nursing development: a survey on pressure ulcers and contextual factors in hospital organizations2010In: JOURNAL OF NURSING MANAGEMENT, ISSN 0966-0429, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 757-766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To describe and compare pressure ulcer prevalence in two county councils and concurrently explore Nurse Managers perspective of contextual factors in a hospital organization. Background Despite good knowledge about risk factors and prevention of pressure ulcers, the prevalence of pressure ulcers remains high. Nurse Managers have a key role in implementing evidence-based practice. Methods The present study included five hospitals in two Swedish county councils: county council A (non-university setting) and county council B (university setting). A pressure ulcer prevalence study was conducted according to the methodology developed by the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel. The Nurse Managers answered a (27-item) questionnaire on contextual factors. Results County council B had significantly less pressure ulcers grade (2-4) (7.7%) than county council A (11.3%). The Nurse Managers assessed only two out of the 27 general contextual items significantly differently. Some significant differences were observed in ward organization. Conclusions In county council B, the Nurse Managers seemed more aware of prevention strategies compared with Nurse Managers in county council A. The Nurse Managers should take more responsibility to develop the prerequisite for quality improvement in nursing. Implication for nursing management Nursing outcomes (e. g. pressure ulcers) should be incorporated into national quality registries for benchmarking and Nurse Managers competence in evidence-based practice and research methodology increased.

  • 20.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Lindow, Thomas
    Vaxjo Cent Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Elmberg, Viktor
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Blekinge Hosp, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Ekstrom, Magnus
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Age- and gender-specific upper limits and reference equations for workload-indexed systolic blood pressure response during bicycle ergometry2020In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, article id UNSP 2047487320909667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Guidelines recommend considering workload in interpretation of the systolic blood pressure (SBP) response to exercise, but reference values are lacking. Design This was a retrospective, consecutive cohort study. Methods From 12,976 subjects aged 18-85 years who performed a bicycle ergometer exercise test at one centre in Sweden during the years 2005-2016, we excluded those with prevalent cardiovascular disease, comorbidities, cardiac risk factors or medications. We extracted SBP, heart rate and workload (watt) from &gt;= 3 time points from each test. The SBP/watt-slope and the SBP/watt-ratio at peak exercise were calculated. Age- and sex-specific mean values, standard deviations and 90th and 95th percentiles were determined. Reference equations for workload-indexed and peak SBP were derived using multiple linear regression analysis, including sex, age, workload, SBP at rest and anthropometric variables as predictors. Results A final sample of 3839 healthy subjects (n = 1620 female) were included. While females had lower mean peak SBP than males (188 +/- 24 vs 202 +/- 22 mmHg, p &lt; 0.001), workload-indexed SBP measures were markedly higher in females; SBP/watt-slope: 0.52 +/- 0.21 versus 0.41 +/- 0.15 mmHg/watt (p &lt; 0.001); peak SBP/watt-ratio: 1.35 +/- 0.34 versus 0.90 +/- 0.21 mmHg/watt (p &lt; 0.001). Age, sex, exercise capacity, resting SBP and height were significant predictors of the workload-indexed SBP parameters and were included in the reference equations. Conclusions These novel reference values can aid clinicians and exercise physiologists in interpreting the SBP response to exercise and may provide a basis for future research on the prognostic impact of exercise SBP. In females, a markedly higher SBP in relation to workload could imply a greater peripheral vascular resistance during exercise than in males.

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  • 21.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Henriksson, Jan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bjarnegård, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital, Sweden.
    Tamas, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE INFERIOR VENA CAVA IN TRAINED AND UNTRAINED FEMALES2016In: Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0301-5629, E-ISSN 1879-291X, Vol. 42, no 12, p. 2794-2802Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to explore the long-and short-axis dimensions, shape and collapsibility of the inferior vena cava in 46 trained and 48 untrained females (mean age: 21 +/- 2 y). Echocardiography in the subcostal view revealed a larger expiratory long-axis diameter (mean: 24 +/- 3 vs. 20 +/- 3 mm, p amp;lt; 0.001) and short-axis area (mean: 5.5 +/- 1.5 vs. 4.7 +/- 1.4 cm(2), p = 0.014) in trained females. IVC shape (the ratio of short-axis major to minor diameters) and the relative decrease in IVC dimension with inspiration were similar for the two groups. The IVC long-axis diameter reflected short-axis minor diameter and was correlated to maximal oxygen uptake (r = 0.52, p amp;lt; 0.01). In summary, the results indicate that trained females have a larger IVC similar in shape and respiratory decrease in dimensions to that of untrained females. The long-axis diameter corresponded closely to short-axis minor diameter and, thus, underestimates maximal IVC diameter. (E-mail: kristofer.hedman@liu.se) (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine amp; Biology.

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  • 22.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Henriksson, Jan
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjarnegård, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Physiology, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Physiology, County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Tamás, Éva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    The size and shape of the inferior vena cava in trained and untrained females in relation to maximal oxygen uptake2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The increase in cardiac dimensions following endurance training is well acknowledged. A few studies report a larger inferior vena cava (IVC) in trained, predominatly male subjects while athlete-control studies upon females are lacking. Previous studies were constrained to long-axis measurements, and there are no reports in the literature on IVC short-axis dimensions and shape in athletes.

    Methods and Results. Forty-eight sedentary and 46 endurance trained females (mean age 21±2 years, VO2max 39±5 vs. 52±5 mL×kg-1×min-1, p<0.001) underwent echocardiographic examination including IVC diameter and cross-sectional area measured in the subcostal view. IVC shape was calculated as the ratio of short-axis major-to-minor diameter.

    Five out of eight IVC dimensions were larger in trained females, including maximal long-axis diameter (mean 24±3 vs. 20±3 mm, p<0.001) and maximal short-axis area (mean 5.5±1.5 vs. 4.7±1.4 cm2, p=0.022). Both groups presented with a slightly oval IVC with no differences between the groups in IVC shape or inspiratory decrease in any IVC dimension. The IVC long-axis diameter reflected the minor-axis diameter obtained in the short-axis view, during both expiration and inspiration. Positive correlations were seen between maximal IVC long-axis diameter and maximal oxygen uptake (r=0.52, p<0.01), left ventricular end-diastolic volume (r=0.46, p<0.01) and right atrial area (r=0.49, p<0.01).

    Conclusion. The IVC was larger in endurance trained than in untrained females but showed similar shape and inspiratory decrease in dimensions. The long-axis IVC diameter was related to maximal oxygen uptake.

  • 23.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Tamás, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Henriksson, J
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Bjarnegård, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. County Hospital Kalmar.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Female athlete's heart: Systolic and diastolic function related to circulatory dimensions2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 372-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are relatively few studies on female athletes examining cardiac size and function and how these measures relate to maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max ). When determining sports eligibility, it is important to know what physiological adaptations and characteristics may be expected in female athletes, taking body and cardiac size into account. The purposes of this study were (a) to compare right and left heart dimensions and function in female endurance athletes (ATH) and in non-athletic female controls of similar age (CON); and (b) to explore how these measures related to VO2max . Forty-six ATH and 48 CON underwent a maximal bicycle exercise test and an echocardiographic examination at rest, including standard and color tissue Doppler investigation. All heart dimensions indexed for body size were larger in ATH (all P < 0.01). The diastolic mitral E/A ratio was 27% higher in ATH (P < 0.001) while systolic left and right atrio-ventricular longitudinal displacement was 7% (P = 0.002) and 15% (P < 0.001) larger in ATH, respectively. Half (50.3%) of the variability in VO2max could be explained by left ventricular end-diastolic volume. Our results could be useful in evaluating female endurance athletes with suspected cardiac disease and contribute to understanding differences between female athletes and non-athletes.

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  • 24.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Tamás, Éva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Bjarnegård, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Physiology, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Physiology, County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Cardiac systolic regional function and synchrony in endurance trained and untrained females2015In: BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine, ISSN 2055-7647, Vol. 25, no 1, article id :e000015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Most studies on cardiac function in athletes describe overall heart function in predominately male participants. We aimed to compare segmental, regional and overall myocardial function and synchrony in female endurance athletes (ATH) and in age-matched sedentary females (CON).

    Methods In 46 ATH and 48 CON, echocardiography was used to measure peak longitudinal systolic strain and myocardial velocities in 12 left ventricular (LV) and 2 right ventricular (RV) segments. Regional and overall systolic function were calculated together with four indices of dyssynchrony.

    Results There were no differences in regional or overall LV systolic function between groups, or in any of the four dyssynchrony indices. Peak systolic velocity (s′) was higher in the RV of ATH than in CON (9.7±1.5 vs 8.7±1.5 cm/s, p=0.004), but not after indexing by cardiac length (p=0.331). Strain was similar in ATH and CON in 8 of 12 LV myocardial segments. In septum and anteroseptum, basal and mid-ventricular s′ was 6–7% and 17–19% higher in ATH than in CON (p<0.05), respectively, while s′ was 12% higher in CON in the basal LV lateral wall (p=0.013). After indexing by cardiac length, s′ was only higher in ATH in the mid-ventricular septum (p=0.041).

    Conclusions We found differences between trained and untrained females in segmental systolic myocardial function, but not in global measures of systolic function, including cardiac synchrony. These findings give new insights into cardiac adaptation to endurance training and could also be of use for sports cardiologists evaluating female athletes.

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  • 25.
    Idvall, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Berg, Katarina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Differences between nurse and patient assessments on postoperative pain management in two hospitals2005In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 444-451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale: Differences between patient and professional assessments on pain and pain management have been reported, but no further analysis has described the statistical problems of pseudocorrelation concerning the nature of these differences. Aim: The aim of the present study was: (1) to investigate the differences between nurse and patient assessments of post-operative pain management in two hospitals, and (2) to discuss the nature and scope of these differences. Method: The subjects were 209 inpatients and 63 nurses from a central county hospital and 77 inpatients and 34 nurses from a university hospital. The 'Strategic and Clinical Quality Indicators in Postoperative Pain Management' questionnaire was used, comprising 14 items in four sub-scales (communication, action, trust and environment) and two questions concerning the worst pain experienced during the past 24 hours and general satisfaction. Result: Except for the trust sub-scale in one hospital, the correlations between patient and nurse ratings concerning all assessments were significant in both hospitals (r = 0.22 - 0.59). Both groups of patients had significantly higher (better) scores than judged by the nurses on the environment sub-scale and general satisfaction. In contrast, nurses from both hospitals tended to significantly underestimate patients' worst pain during the past 24 hours. Other differences between patient and nurse assessments were either non-significant or inconsistent between hospitals. Using so-called Oldham plots nurses tended to under-estimate severe pain more often than mild pain, as judged by the patients, but this association was weak and statistically significant in one hospital only. Conclusion: Although the effects of pseudocorrelation are minimized by using Oldham plots, they are not cancelled. This issue is discussed, and we conclude that this study does not support the notion that the nurses tend to underestimate severe pain more often than mild pain. © 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 26.
    Idvall, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berg, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson , U
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Assessment of recovery after day surgery using a modified version of quality of recovery-402009In: ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, ISSN 0001-5172 , Vol. 53, no 5, p. 673-677Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Idvall, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Do health care professionals underestimate severe pain more often than mild pain? Statistical pitfalls using a data simulation model2005In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 438-443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale: When comparing patients' pain ratings with the health care professional's conception of pain assessed by Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) ratings, statistical problems arise. Method and Result: In this data simulation study we have shown that the tendency for health care professionals to underestimate severe pain compared with mild pain is probably not attributed to difficulties in judging severe pain more often than mild but the result of professionals having a different and often narrower distribution of their ratings compared with patients. © 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 28.
    Jansson, Inger
    et al.
    School Health Science, Sweden; Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Birgitta Gunnarsson, A.
    Kronoberg County Council, Sweden.
    Bjorklund, Anita
    School Health Science, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Perseius, Kent-Inge
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Problem-Based Self-care Groups Versus Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Persons on Sick Leave Due to Common Mental Disorders: A Randomised Controlled Study2015In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 127-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To evaluate the interventional capacity of problem based method groups (PBM) regarding mental health and work ability compared to cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for persons on sick leave due to common mental disorders. Methods In a randomised controlled design the experimental group received PBM and the control group received CBT. Outcomes were measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Stress and Crisis Inventory 93 (SCI-93) and the Dialogue about Working Ability instrument (DOA). Results Twenty-two participants in the PBM group and 28 in the CBT group completed intervention. Both groups showed significant lower scores on the two HADS subscales. Regarding stress the PBM group showed significant decrease in one (out of three) subscales of SCI-93. The CBT group showed significant decrease on all subscales of SCI-93. Regarding work ability the PBM group showed significant higher scores on one of five subscales of DOA. The CBT group showed significant higher scores on four of five subscales of DOA. Between groups there were significant differences to the favour of CBT on one of two subscales of HADS, all three subscales of SCI-93 and on two of the five subscales of DOA. Conclusion PBM seem to be able to reduce anxiety- and depression symptoms. CBT showed to be superior to PBM in reducing symptoms in all aspects of mental health, except for anxiety, in which they seem equally effective. Regarding work ability CBT showed to be superior, with significant effect on more aspects compared to PBM.

  • 29.
    Johansson, K.
    et al.
    n/a.
    Ahn, Henrik Casimir
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Berg, Sören
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mellblom, L.
    n/a.
    Soderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Tholin, M.
    n/a.
    INTESTINAL MICROCIRCULATION, BARRIER FUNCTION AND MORPHOLOGY DURING LOW GRADE IAH/EXPERIMENTAL LAPAROSCOPY IN PIGS2009In: in ACTA CLINICA BELGICA, vol 64, issue 3, 2009, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 261-261Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 30.
    Jönsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ahlner, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hedenmalm, Karin
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Anders
    Umeå, University, Sweden.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Antipsychotics associated with pulmonary embolism in a Swedish medicolegal autopsy series2008In: International Clinical Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0268-1315, E-ISSN 1473-5857, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 263-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To determine the association between fatal pulmonary embolism and use of antipsychotic drugs in a Swedish medicolegal autopsy series. Persons aged 18-65 years and subjected to a medicolegal autopsy in 1992-2005 were selected. On the basis of external cause of death, determined by the forensic pathologist, unnatural deaths (including fatal intoxications) were excluded and participants in whom pulmonary embolism was the cause of death were identified. Use of antipsychotics was based on the results of the postmortem analyses and categorized as use of high-potency first-generation antipsychotics, low-potency first-generation antipsychotics, second-generation antipsychotics or no use of antipsychotics. Logistic regression analyses were performed. Use of antipsychotics was verified in 538 of the 14,439 included participants. Pulmonary embolism was recorded as the cause of death in 279 participants and 33 of these used antipsychotics. Use of low-potency first-generation antipsychotics and second-generation antipsychotics was significantly associated with fatal pulmonary embolism (adjusted odds ratio: 2.39, 95% confidence interval: 1.46-3.92 and 6.91, 95% confidence interval: 3.95-12.10, respectively). Out of 26 participants classified as high-potency first-generation antipsychotic drug users, none had pulmonary embolism as the cause of death. Pulmonary embolism was overrepresented among medicolegal autopsy cases identified as users of low-potency first-generation and second-generation antipsychotics.

  • 31.
    Jönsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ahlner, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hedenmalm, Karin
    Dpt of Clinical Pharmacology, Uppsala universitet. Clinical Trial Unit, Medical Products Agency, Uppsala.
    Eriksson, Anders
    Section of Forensic Medicine, Umeå universitet.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Antispychotics Associated with Pulmonary Emboi in a Swedish Medico-Legal Autopsy Series2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Lans, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Physiotherapy, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Cider, Åsa
    Department of Health and Rehabilitation/Physiotherapy, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Physiology, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Peripheral muscle training with resistance exercise bands in patients with chronic heart failure. Long-term effects on walking distance and quality of life; a pilot study2018In: ESC Heart Failure, E-ISSN 2055-5822, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 241-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to describe a method of peripheral muscle training with resistance bands in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and to evaluate its effects on the 6 min walk test and quality of life up to 12 months using a home-based programme.

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  • 33.
    Latorre-Margalef, N
    et al.
    Länssjukhuset Kalmar.
    Gunnarsson, G
    Länssjukhuset Kalmar.
    Munster, V J
    Länssjukhuset Kalmar.
    Fouchier, R A
    Länssjukhuset Kalmar.
    Osterhaus, A D
    Länssjukhuset Kalmar.
    Elmberg, J
    Länssjukhuset Kalmar.
    Olsen, B
    Länssjukhuset Kalmar.
    Wallensten, A
    Länssjukhuset Kalmar.
    Haemig, P D
    Länssjukhuset Kalmar.
    Fransson, t
    Länssjukhuset Kalmar.
    Brudin, Lars
    University of Kalmar .
    Waldenström, J
    Länssjukhuset Kalmar.
    Effects of influenza A virus infection on migrating mallard ducks.2009In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 22, p. 1029-1036Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The natural reservoir of influenza A virus is waterfowl, particularly dabbling ducks (genus Anas). Although it has long been assumed that waterfowl are asymptomatic carriers of the virus, a recent study found that low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) infection in Bewick's swans (Cygnus columbianus bewickii) negatively affected stopover time, body mass and feeding behaviour. In the present study, we investigated whether LPAI infection incurred ecological or physiological costs to migratory mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) in terms of body mass loss and staging time, and whether such costs could influence the likelihood for long-distance dispersal of the avian influenza virus by individual ducks. During the autumn migrations of 2002–2007, we collected faecal samples (n=10 918) and biometric data from mallards captured and banded at Ottenby, a major staging site in a flyway connecting breeding and wintering areas of European waterfowl. Body mass was significantly lower in infected ducks than in uninfected ducks (mean difference almost 20 g over all groups), and the amount of virus shed by infected juveniles was negatively correlated with body mass. There was no general effect of infection on staging time, except for juveniles in September, in which birds that shed fewer viruses stayed shorter than birds that shed more viruses. LPAI infection did not affect speed or distance of subsequent migration. The data from recaptured individuals showed that the maximum duration of infection was on average 8.3 days (s.e. 0.5), with a mean minimum duration of virus shedding of only 3.1 days (s.e. 0.1). Shedding time decreased during the season, suggesting that mallards acquire transient immunity for LPAI infection. In conclusion, deteriorated body mass following infection was detected, but it remains to be seen whether this has more long-term fitness effects. The short virus shedding time suggests that individual mallards are less likely to spread the virus at continental or intercontinental scales.

  • 34.
    Lexne, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strain, James J.
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, USA.
    Nylander, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Temperament and character in patients with acute abdominal pain2018In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, ISSN 0010-440X, E-ISSN 1532-8384, Vol. 87, p. 128-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Several conditions presenting with abdominal pain are associated with specific personality factors although it is unclear if this is true also in emergency clinic settings.

    Objective

    To study personality factors among patients with acute abdominal pain in an emergency ward.

    Methods

    Consecutive patients (N = 165) with abdominal symptoms at an emergency clinic were administrated the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Three main groups were identified; specific abdominal diagnoses, (N = 77), non-specific abdominal pain, (N = 67) and organic dyspepsia (N = 21). TCI results were compared between clinical groups and a control group (N = 122).

    Results

    As compared to individuals with specific abdominal diagnoses and controls, those with organic dyspepsia were significantly more anxious (harm avoidance), (p = 0.003), and had lower ability to cooperate (cooperativeness) (p = 0.048 and p = 0.004 respectively). They were also significantly more unpretentious (self-transcendence) compared to individuals with specific abdominal diagnoses (p = 0.048), non-specific abdominal pain (p = 0.012) and controls (p = 0.004) and evidenced less mature character (sum of self-directedness and cooperativeness) compared to those with specific abdominal diagnoses and controls (p = 0.003).

    Conclusion

    Individuals seeking care at an emergency clinic with organic dyspepsia showed a distinguishable pattern of personality features that distinguished them from the other comparison groups. Therefore an evaluation of personality factors may add a new dimension to the diagnostic investigation in the emergency care of abdominal pain and contribute to the optimization of the treatment of organic dyspepsia.

  • 35.
    Lindholm, M L
    et al.
    KI Stockholm.
    Brudin, Lars
    Kalmar County Hospital.
    Sandin, R H
    KI Stockholm.
    Bispectral index monitoring: appreciated but does not affect drug dosing and hypnotic levels2008In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 88-94Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Lindholm, Maj-Lis
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandin, Rolf H.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Cumulated Time With Low Bispectral Index Values Is Not Related to the Risk of New Cancer or Death Within 5 Years After Surgery in Patients With Previous or Prevailing Malignancy2014In: Anesthesia and Analgesia, ISSN 0003-2999, E-ISSN 1526-7598, Vol. 118, no 4, p. 782-787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Preclinical data indicate that anesthesia and surgery may promote cancer growth. We previously found no increased risk of malignant disease within 5 years regarding duration of general anesthesia (T-ANESTH) and time with Bispectral Index (BIS) under 45 (T-BIS less than 45) in patients without any diagnosis or history of malignancy before or within 1 month after surgery. Because immunocompetence may be different in patients with previous malignant disease, we investigated the corresponding risk in patients with earlier or existing malignant disease at the time of surgery. METHODS: In a prospective cohort of 766 BIS-monitored patients anesthetized with sevoflurane, new malignant diagnoses and death within 5 years after surgery were retrieved. Cox regression was used to assess the risk of new cancer and all-cause death during follow-up in relation to (T-ANESTH) and (T-BIS less than45). RESULT: Fifty-one patients (6.7%) were assigned 54 new malignant diagnoses within 5 years after surgery. Cancer surgery comprised 387 (51%) of the index operations. Two hundred ninety-three (38 %) of the patients died during follow-up. No relation between T-ANESTH or T-BIS less than45 and new malignant disease (hazard ratio [HR] 0.64-1.11 and 0.76-1.30, respectively) or death was found (HR 0.85-1.05 and 0.94-1.16, respectively). Nor were any corresponding significant relations obtained when other thresholds for BIS (i.e., less than 30, 40, and 50, respectively) were investigated. CONCLUSION: In patients with previous or existing malignant disease, neither duration of anesthesia nor increased cumulative time with profound sevoflurane anesthesia was associated with an increased risk for new cancer or death within 5 years after surgery. Monitoring depth of anesthesia is not expected to alter the risk of cancer proliferation after surgery.

  • 37.
    Lundgren, Cecilia
    et al.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Physiology , Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Wanby, Anna-Stina
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology , Kalmar County Hospital , Kalmar , Sweden.
    Cedergren, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ante- and intrapartum risk factors for neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy2018In: The Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine, ISSN 1476-7058, E-ISSN 1476-4954, Vol. 31, no 12, p. 1595-1601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To identify obstetrical risk factors for the diagnosis of neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). A secondary aim was to determine the incidence of HIE.

  • 38.
    Lönn, J.
    et al.
    Division of Clinical Medicine, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Starkhammar Johansson, Carin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kälvegren, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skoglund, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Garvin, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Särndahl, E.
    Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ravald, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Richter, Arina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Bengtsson, T.
    Division of Clinical Medicine, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nayeri, Fariba
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Hepatocyte growth factor in patients with coronary artery disease and its relation to periodontal condition2012In: Results in Immunology, ISSN 2211-2839, Vol. 2, p. 7-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is an angiogenic, cardioprotective factor important for tissue and vascular repair. High levels of HGF are associated with chronic inflammatory diseases, such as coronary artery disease (CAD) and periodontitis, and are suggested as a marker of the ongoing atherosclerotic event in patients with CAD. Periodontal disease is more prevalent among patients with CAD than among healthy people. Recent studies indicate a reduced biological activity of HGF in different chronic inflammatory conditions. Biologically active HGF has high affinity to heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) on cell-membrane and extracellular matrix. The aim of the study was to investigate the serum concentration and the biological activity of HGF with ELISA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), respectively, before and at various time points after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with CAD, and to examine the relationship with periodontal condition. The periodontal status of the CAD patients was examined, and the presence of P. gingivalis in periodontal pockets was analyzed with PCR. The HGF concentration was significantly higher, at all time-points, in patients with CAD compared to the age-matched controls (P< 0.001), but was independent of periodontal status. The HGF concentration and the affinity to HSPG adversely fluctuated over time, and the biological activity increased one month after intervention in patients without periodontitis. We conclude that elevated concentration of HGF but with reduced biological activity might indicate a chronic inflammatory profile in patients with CAD and periodontitis.

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  • 39.
    Lönn, Johanna
    et al.
    PEAS Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nayeri, Fariba
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    An antithrombin III product containing biologically active hepatocyte growth factor may be beneficial in depp ulcer infections2012In: Cytokine, ISSN 1043-4666, E-ISSN 1096-0023, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 478-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Widely studied for the past 20 years, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has been identified as a regenerative marker and an important factor in the development and healing of injuries. Antithrombin III (AT III) is a protein in the blood stream with anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory properties and has been used as an adjuvant treatment along with antibiotics in severe sepsis.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To study the content and properties of HGF in plasma-derived AT III products, and the regenerative effect in severe deep ulcer infections.

    METHODS:

    Commercial AT III products were analyzed for the presence and biological activity of HGF. One AT III product containing biologically active HGF was used to treat 18 cases of critical, deep ulcer infections scheduled for major invasive intervention. The patients were followed up for 6-60 months.

    RESULTS:

    The AT III products contained HGF with different biological activity. No adverse reactions were observed after local administration of AT III during the study or follow-up period. In 16 of 18 cases no surgical intervention was needed within the first 6 month of inclusion.

    CONCLUSION:

    AT III products containing biologically active HGF may contribute to regeneration and healing in severe deep ulcer infections which do not respond adequately to different combinations of antibiotics alone.

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  • 40.
    Lööf-Johansson, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Sundquist, Marie
    County Hospital, Sweden.
    Edvard Rudebeck, Carl
    University of Tromso, Norway.
    Breastfeeding Associated with Reduced Mortality in Women with Breast Cancer2016In: Breastfeeding medicine : the official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, ISSN 1556-8253, E-ISSN 1556-8342, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 321-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study whether breastfeeding affects survival from breast cancer. Background: There are few studies on the relationship between breastfeeding, reproductive health, and breast cancer survival. This study is a follow-up of an earlier study showing no convincing associations between breastfeeding and breast cancer prognostic parameters. Methods: From a cohort of 629 women with primary breast cancer having undergone surgery between 1988 and 1992, 341 were traced and consequently studied 20 years later regarding breastfeeding and reproductive variables, as well as for prognostic parameters such as the Nottingham histological grade, tumor size, lymph node status, and vascular invasion (VI). Multivariate Cox regression analyses were used. Results: Increased breast cancer mortality was associated with the Nottingham prognostic index (hazard rate ratio (HR) 4.47; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.04-9.79), VI (HR 3.44; CI 2.03-5.82), fewer pregnancies (three categories; amp;gt;2, 1-2, 0) (HR per category 2.04; CI 1.34-3.11), and breastfeeding amp;lt;= 6 months (HR 2.74; CI 1.41-5.35). The HRs for overall mortality were, as expected, lower for the Nottingham prognostic index (HR 1.28; CI 0.89-1.85) and VI (HR 2.09; CI 1.38-3.17), and they were slightly lower for the number of pregnancies (HR 1.61; CI 1.48-4.59), but notably similar for breastfeeding (HR 3.01; CI 1.92-4.73). Conclusion: A total breastfeeding history amp;gt;6 months and pregnancy are associated with both greater overall and breast cancer-specific survival for women diagnosed with breast cancer, having lived long enough for other causes of death to contribute substantially to mortality.

  • 41.
    Lööf-Johansson, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sundquist, Marie
    County Hospital, Kalmar.
    Thorstenson, Sten
    County Hospital, Kalmar.
    Edvard Rudebeck, Carl
    University of Tromso.
    Breastfeeding and prognostic markers in breast cancer2011In: BREAST, ISSN 0960-9776, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 170-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several studies suggest that total breastfeeding time reduces breast cancer risk. The underlying mechanisms are unclear. Whether breastfeeding also affects the prognosis is not yet investigated. A number of tumour characteristics, i.e. histological type of cancer, grade, tumour size, Nottingham prognostic index, vascular invasion and DNA-ploidy, have been demonstrated to be of prognostic value. Methods: We have searched for a possible link between these prognostic markers and breastfeeding time, age at first child and number of children. 250 women treated for breast cancer have answered a questionnaire. Results: No significant interactions were found possibly with one exception, LVI vs. age at first child. We found, significant correlations between lobular cancer, and thereby also DNA-ploidy, and age at first childbirth. Conclusions: We have found that lobular cancer (and thereby also diploid tumours) are connected, independently, to age at first childbirth and possibly also to number of children but no other correlations between reproductive data, breastfeeding included, and prognostic markers used in this study were found.

  • 42.
    Maret, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Ohlsson, J
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    High sensitivity and specificity for detecting transmural infarction with a feature tracking software on cine MRI.2009In: ESC Barcelona 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Maret, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ohlsson, Jan L
    Ryhov City Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Computer-assisted determination of left ventricular endocardial borders reduces variability in the echocardiographic assessment of ejection fraction2008In: Cardiovascular Ultrasound, ISSN 1476-7120, E-ISSN 1476-7120, Vol. 6, no 55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Left ventricular size and function are important prognostic factors in heart disease. Their measurement is the most frequent reason for sending patients to the echo lab. These measurements have important implications for therapy but are sensitive to the skill of the operator. Earlier automated echo-based methods have not become widely used. The aim of our study was to evaluate an automatic echocardiographic method (with manual correction if needed) for determining left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) based on an active appearance model of the left ventricle (syngo (R) AutoEF, Siemens Medical Solutions). Comparisons were made with manual planimetry (manual Simpson), visual assessment and automatically determined LVEF from quantitative myocardial gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).

    Methods: 60 consecutive patients referred for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) were included in the study. Two-dimensional echocardiography was performed within one hour of MPI at rest. Image quality did not constitute an exclusion criterion. Analysis was performed by five experienced observers and by two novices.

    Results: LVEF (%), end-diastolic and end-systolic volume/BSA (ml/m(2)) were for uncorrected AutoEF 54 +/- 10, 51 +/- 16, 24 +/- 13, for corrected AutoEF 53 +/- 10, 53 +/- 18, 26 +/- 14, for manual Simpson 51 +/- 11, 56 +/- 20, 28 +/- 15, and for MPI 52 +/- 12, 67 +/- 26, 35 +/- 23. The required time for analysis was significantly different for all four echocardiographic methods and was for uncorrected AutoEF 79 +/- 5 s, for corrected AutoEF 159 +/- 46 s, for manual Simpson 177 +/- 66 s, and for visual assessment 33 +/- 14 s. Compared with the expert manual Simpson, limits of agreement for novice corrected AutoEF was lower than for novice manual Simpson (0.8 +/- 10.5 vs. -3.2 +/- 11.4 LVEF percentage points). Calculated for experts and with LVEF (%) categorized into < 30, 30-44, 45-54 and >= 55, kappa measure of agreement was moderate (0.44-0.53) for all method comparisons (uncorrected AutoEF not evaluated).

    Conclusion: Corrected AutoEF reduces the variation in measurements compared with manual planimetry, without increasing the time required. The method seems especially suited for unexperienced readers.

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  • 44.
    Maret, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Ryhov University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Liehl, Monika
    Ryhov University Hospital, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Kalmar University Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Tödt, Tim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Edvardsen, Thor
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Phase analysis detects heterogeneity of myocardial deformation on cine MRI2015In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 149-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Objectives. Myocardial scar will lead to heterogeneous left ventricular deformation. We hypothesized that a myocardial scar will display an elevated standard deviation of phase and that this effect could be compared with mechanical dispersion. Design. Thirty patients (3 women and 27 men) were investigated 4-8 weeks after ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Seventeen had a scar area >75% in at least one antero- or inferoseptal segment (scar) and 13 had scar <1% (non-scar). The phase delays of velocity, displacement and strain were measured in the longitudinal direction, tangential to the endocardial outline, and in the radial direction, perpendicular to the tangent. Results. The standard deviation of phase in radial measurements differentiated scar patients from those without scar (p<0.01), while longitudinal measurements did so only for longitudinal strain. Likewise, the standard deviation for radial measurements of time to peak for segmental velocity, displacement and strain performed better than longitudinal measurements and equal to the results of phase. Conclusion. Phase dispersion in deformation imaging may be used for detecting heterogeneous left ventricular contraction.

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  • 45.
    Maret, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tödt, Tim
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Ohlsson, Jan
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Ryhov County Hospital, SE-55185 Jönköping, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Feature tracking of cine-MRI identifies left ventricular segments with myocardial scarManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of the study was to apply a new feature tracking software (Diogenes MRI, Tomtec GmbH, Unterschliessheim, Germany) on cine-MR images to evaluate its utility and ability to detect infarcted myocardium and to assess the transmural extent of scar without the need for administering intravenous gadolinium-based contrast agents.

    Methods: Thirty patients (3 women and 27 men) were selected based on the presence or absence of extensive myocardial scar in the perfusion area of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) but not in remote areas. Seventeen had a scar transmurality >75% in at least one segment belonging to the LAD area (scar patients) and thirteen had scar <1% in this area or in other parts of the myocardium (non-scar patients). The software tracked the motion of the wall through the entire cardiac cycle using two different techniques. Velocity, displacement and strain were calculated in 48 points in the longitudinal direction, tangential to the endocardial outline, and in the radial direction, perpendicular to the tangent.

    Results: In the scar patients, LAD segments showed lower functional measures than remote segments. The remote segments in the scar group showed, in turn, lower functional measures than the remote segments in the non-scar group. Receiver-operatorcharacteristic (ROC) curves were constructed for all measurements. Best area-undercurve was for radial strain, 0.89, where a cut-off value of 38.8% had 80% sensitivity and 86% specificity for the detection of a segment with scar transmurality >50% in the LAD distribution. As a percentage of the mean, intraobserver variability was for radial measures 16-14-26% for displacement-velocity-strain and for the corresponding interobserver measurements 13-12-18%.

    Conclusions: With the presented method, we show for the first time its ability to detect scar segments with various transmurality already from an analysis of cine-MRI, without the need for the administration of gadolinium-based contrast. The accuracy and repeatability of the radial functional measurements is satisfactory and global measures agree with other aspects of global left ventricular function.

  • 46.
    Maret, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tödt, Tim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ohlsson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Functional measurements based on feature tracking of cine magnetic resonance images identify left ventricular segments with myocardial scar.2009In: Cardiovascular Ultrasound, ISSN 1476-7120, E-ISSN 1476-7120, Vol. 7, no 53, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The aim of the study was to perform a feature tracking analysis on cine magnetic resonance (MR) images to elucidate if functional measurements of the motion of the left ventricular wall may detect scar defined with gadolinium enhanced MR.

    Myocardial contraction can be measured in terms of the velocity, displacement and local deformation (strain) of a particular myocardial segment. Contraction of the myocardial wall will be reduced in the presence of scar and as a consequence of reduced myocardial blood flow.

    Methods

    Thirty patients (3 women and 27 men) were selected based on the presence or absence of extensive scar in the anteroseptal area of the left ventricle. The patients were investigated in stable clinical condition, 4-8 weeks post ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Seventeen had a scar area >75% in at least one anteroseptal segment (scar) and thirteen had scar area <1% (non-scar). Velocity, displacement and strain were calculated in the longitudinal direction, tangential to the endocardial outline, and in the radial direction, perpendicular to the tangent.

    Results

    In the scar patients, segments with scar showed lower functional measurements than remote segments. Radial measurements of velocity, displacement and strain performed better in terms of receiver-operator-characteristic curves (ROC) than the corresponding longitudinal measurements. The best area-under-curve was for radial strain, 0.89, where a cut-off value of 38.8% had 80% sensitivity and 86% specificity for the detection of a segment with scar area >50%. As a percentage of the mean, intraobserver variability was 16-14-26% for radial measurements of displacement-velocity-strain and corresponding interobserver variability was 13-12-18%.

    Conclusion

    Feature tracking analysis of cine-MR displays velocity, displacement and strain in the radial and longitudinal direction and may be used for the detection of transmural scar. The accuracy and repeatability of the radial functional measurements is satisfactory and global measures agree.

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  • 47.
    Moen, V
    et al.
    Kalmar City Hospital.
    Brudin , Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hyponatremia complicating labour-rare or unrecognised? A prospective observational study2009In: BJOG-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, ISSN 1470-0328 , Vol. 116, no 4, p. 552-561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of hyponatraemia following delivery, with a hypothesis that hyponatraemia has a high prevalence in labouring women.

    Prospective observational study.

    Consultant-led delivery suite in County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.

    A total of 287 pregnant women at term (37 full gestational weeks).

    Oral fluids were allowed during labour. Blood samples were collected on admission, after delivery, and from the umbilical artery and vein.

    Hyponatraemia defined as plasma sodium &lt;= 130 mmol/l after delivery.

    Hyponatraemia was found in 16 (26%) of the 61 mothers who received more than 2500 ml of fluid during labour. Two-thirds of fluids were orally ingested. Decrease in plasma sodium concentration during labour correlated with duration of labour and the total fluid volume administered. Analysis by multivariate logistic regression showed that hyponatraemia was significantly correlated with fluid volume (P &lt; 0.001) but not with oxytocin administration or epidural analgesia. Hyponatraemia correlated significantly with prolonged second stage of labour, instrumental delivery, and emergency caesarean section for failure to progress (P = 0.002).

    Hyponatraemia is not uncommon following labour. Tolerance to a water load is diminished during labour; therefore, even moderate fluid volumes may cause hyponatraemia. Women should not be encouraged to drink excessively during labour. Oral fluids, when permitted, should be recorded, and intravenous administration of hypotonic fluids should be avoided. When abundant drinking is unrecognised or intravenous fluid administration liberal, life-threatening hyponatraemia may develop. The possibility that hyponatraemia may influence uterine contractility merits further investigation.

  • 48.
    Moen, V.
    et al.
    Countty Hospital, Kalmar.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rundgren, M.
    n/a.
    Irestedt, L.
    n/a.
    Hyponatremia Complicating Labor-Rare or Unrecognised? A Prospective Observational Study EDITORIAL COMMENT: in OBSTETRICAL & GYNECOLOGICAL SURVEY, vol 64, issue 7, pp 431-4322009In: Obstetrical and Gynecological Survey, ISSN 0029-7828, E-ISSN 1533-9866, Vol. 64, no 7, p. 431-432Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 49.
    Moen, Vibeke
    et al.
    Kalmar Cty Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tjernberg, Ivar
    Kalmar Cty Council, Sweden.
    Rundgren, Mats
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Irestedt, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Feto-maternal osmotic balance at term. A prospective observational study2018In: Journal of Perinatal Medicine, ISSN 0300-5577, E-ISSN 1619-3997, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 183-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: We performed the present study to investigate the feto-maternal osmotic relationship at term with the hypothesis that, in contrast to the literature, maternal plasma osmolality is lower than fetal levels. In a previous study, we found that maternal plasma sodium at delivery was consistently lower than the sodium in the umbilical artery. Our aim was to corroborate these results with analysis of osmolality. Methods: Blood was sampled from 30 women immediately before cesarean section and from the umbilical artery and vein before cord clamping and osmolality, sodium and albumin were analyzed. Results: Maternal osmolality was (mean; 95% confidence interval) 287.0 (285.8-288.2) mOsmkg/kg, arterial cord osmolality was 289.4 (287.9-291.0) mOsm/kg and venous cord osmolality was 287.3 (286.0-288.5) mOsm/kg. The paired difference between maternal and umbilical arterial osmolality was mean (SD) -2.4 (3.3) mOsm/kg (P amp;lt; 0.001), between maternal and umbilical vein -0.3 (3.0) mOsm/kg (P = 0.63) and between umbilical artery and vein -2.1 (2.8) mOsm/kg (P amp;lt; 0.001). Conclusion: Maternal osmolality was significantly lower than arterial cord osmolality confirming our previous results. The feto-maternal osmotic gradient favors water transport from the mother to the fetus and may increase the fetal risk of water intoxication when the mother ingests or is administered large volumes of electrolyte free solutions.

  • 50.
    Nayeri, Fariba
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brudin, Lars
    Department of Clinical Physiology, County Hospital, Kalmar.
    Darelid, Johan
    Department of Infectious Diseases, County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Nilsson, Ingela
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Frydén, Aril
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderström, Claes
    Department of Infectious Diseases, County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hepatocyte growth factor may act as an early therapeutic predictor in pneumonia2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 500-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High serum levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) may reflect the regenerative effect and enhanced local and systemic production of this cytokine after organ injuries. The possibility of using serial serum HGF values in order to predict the results of therapy for pneumonia was investigated in this study. In a prospective multicenter study we investigated the serum levels of HGF and CRP before and within 48 h after treatment in 70 patients with pneumonia. Serum levels of HGF before treatment were significantly higher than the HGF levels of a normal population (p < 0.0001). Within 48 h serum HGF levels had decreased significantly in those patients who ultimately responded to the initial antibiotic therapy (p < 0.0001). Serum HGF levels at 48 h were unchanged or increased in cases in whom the initial therapy was ineffective and had to be changed. CRP and HGF levels were significantly correlated. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis it was found that individual changes in acute serum HGF levels and serum HGF levels obtained within 48 h could predict the results of therapy at least as significantly (p < 0.003) as CRP (p = 0.05), although CRP levels were known and used by the physician to decide whether or not to change the initial therapy. We conclude that serial control of serum HGF levels can be used as an early indicator to predict the results of therapy during treatment of pneumonia.

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