liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Sohl, Lena
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Feel-bad moments: Unpacking the complexity of class, gender and whiteness when studying ‘up’2018In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intimacy, shared experiences and evening out the power relations between researcher and the participants play an important role in feminist methodology. However, as highlighted in previous research on studying ‘up’, such methods might not be appropriate when studying privileged groups. Therefore, studying privileged women challenges fundamental assumptions in feminist methodology. When researching privileged women, the assumption that the researcher is almost always in a superior position within the research process becomes more complicated. The article seeks to contribute to the feminist methodological literature on how to study privileged groups by exploring how class, gender and whiteness are produced in three fieldwork situations with women who hold privileges in a postcolonial and capitalist landscape. Drawing on interviews and participant observations with white Swedish migrant women, the article argues that researchers need to turn the problems, fears and feelings of being uncomfortable into important data, in order to study privileged groups of women.

  • 2.
    Sohl, Lena
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Sodertorn Univ, Sweden.
    It Is So Swedish That You Have to Work2019In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 80-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Notions of gender equality are strongly linked to the Swedish self-image. This article explores returning Swedish migrant womens negotiations of heterosexual gender equality ideals based on their experiences of being housewives to middle- and upper-class men with work contracts abroad. From fieldwork conducted within two networks for returning Swedes, the article provides an analysis of the ways in which the women talk about work, gender equality, and domestic workers.The analysis of the womens accounts of gender relations shows that different ways of doing femininity are central in their narratives. By using the concepts emphasized femininity and gender-equal femininity the article highlights the different forms of femininity that can be traced in the womens narratives. Drawing from the empirical examples, it is shown that the women are troubled by Swedish gender equality ideals and express a feeling of not fitting in after returning to Sweden. I suggest that the womens articulations of not fitting in to (imagined) gender-equal Sweden tend to downplay the fact that they still have advantages that assist with fitting in from social positions such as class, whiteness, and (hetero)sexuality: positions which may create space for negotiating social norms in Sweden.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Sohl, Lena
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Living with Privileges.: The Politics of Belonging among returning Swedish migrant women2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What are the gendered aspects of Swedish return migration? About 15.000 – 20.000 Swedes emigrate every year. Presently, up to 550 000 Swedes live abroad and most Swedes chose to return to Sweden after having lived a period abroad.

    This makes Swedes the largest immigrant group to Sweden. This paper investigates re-constructions of national identity and gender among Swedish migrant women returning to Sweden after living abroad. Drawing from participant observations and individual interviews with women who can be described as an economically privileged group, gendered and class hierarchies in contemporary migration are discussed.

    The aim of this paper is to develop an intersectional understanding of Swedish women’s narratives of return migration. What kinds of connections are made between return migration and notions of gender and Swedishness? How do Swedish women experience re-integratation, in relation to norms and values of gender equality in the Swedish society?

    The paper explores the gendered dimensions of return migration and develops theoretical discussions on belonging. In order to understand these questions, I argue that the analysis of women’s narratives about return migration can be developed using feminist and postcolonial theory in general and the concept of belonging in particular.

    This involves linking the individual narratives with larger societal processes; the lived experiences contextualized through structural processes are in focus.

  • 4.
    Sohl, Lena
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Privileged Movements.: The Politics of Belonging among returning Swedish migrant women2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Sohl, Lena
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    To become upwardly mobile you have to be a Swede: Women’s Upward Class Mobility in the neo-liberal Swedish Welfare State Context2018In: Social Mobility for the 21st Century: Everyone a Winner? / [ed] Steph Lawler and Geoff Payne, Routledge, 2018, p. 93-104Chapter in book (Refereed)
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf