liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 37 of 37
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nylander, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Bernhard, Dörte
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Folkhögskolor, funktionsnedsättningar och specialpedagogik2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta paper presenterar kvantitativa resultat från en kartläggning av folkhögskolans deltagargrupper över tid 1997-2013 vad gäller deltagare som kategoriserats i olika funktionshinderområden, och från en enkät till landets folkhögskolor kring hur de arbetar med och ser på lärmiljön i relation till olika funktionsnedsättningar hos deltagarna.

  • 2.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Olson, Maria
    Högskolan Dalarna, Sweden.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Sandberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Longing to belong: Stories of (non)belonging in mjlti-ethnic Sweden2017In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, ISSN 1799-649X, E-ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 197-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to contribute to an understanding of contemporary processes of negotiations concerning belonging and non-belonging to the Swedish social community. Taking on a theoretical approach on belonging inspired by Yuval-Davis and Jacobsen, the article analyses three individual stories of women who have migrated to Sweden. Out of this analysis, focusing on how these women claim their belonging to a Swedish social community at the same time as they in different ways are denied such belonging by others, we may conclude that although each of the stories told is unique and articulates an individual experience, there are striking similarities in how their claims of belonging, with its related implications for belonging, are not acknowledged by others. In a way, these individual stories tell us something about some of the crucial challenges regarding belonging in contemporary multi-ethnic Sweden, as well as Europe. 

  • 3.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Olson, Maria
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Sandberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Medborgarskapandets paradoxer [Paradoxes of citizen formation]: Medborgarskapspositioneringar i berättelser om tillhörighet i migrationens tid. [Citizenship positioning in stories about belonging in an era of migration]2017In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 54, no 1-2, p. 31-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     This article analyzes the formation of citizenship in today’s multi-ethnic Sweden with a particular focus on how migration renders visible existing citizenship ideals, defined in terms of similarity and difference on the basis of ethno-cultural background. Analysing three individual stories of women who have migrated to Sweden, with different biographies and stories of how they ended up in Sweden, the article focuses on negotiations of the boundaries and contents of citizenship in multi-ethnic Sweden. The point of departure for the analysis is a post-structuralist and discursive approach. In all, the stories address the crucial question of who should be included into the social community and on what conditions – and who should be left out? This particular question is also at the very centre of the political debate in today’s Europe. On the one hand, there are strong arguments about the ’death of multiculturalism’ and demands for new forms of ethno-culturally graduated citizenship – also in Sweden. On the other hand, in Sweden as well as in other European countries, claims for the development of a new and more inclusive societal community have been raised, expanding the rights of citizens to accommodating also those who have been excluded from them.

  • 4.
    Fejes, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Olson, Maria
    Högskolan Dalarna, Sweden.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sandberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Individualisation in Swedish adult education and the shaping of neo-liberal subjectivities2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 461-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we have analysed the ways a discourse on individualisation is taking shape within adult education in Sweden, how it operates, and what effects it has in terms of shaping student subjectivity. Drawing on a poststructural theorisation we analyse interviews with teachers and students in municipal adult education and folk high schools (FHS). The analysis illustrates how both institutions contribute to the shaping of individualised subjectivities, although differently. At the end, a general question is raised about what happens with the democratic function of adult education in general when a discourse on individualisation operates in the ways described and, more specifically, asks what is happening to FHS as an educational practice that upholds its self-image as a last bastion of a collective notion of learning and subjectivity and nurturing an educational practice of learning democracy?

  • 5.
    Fejes, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Olson, Maria
    Stockholm University, Skövde University, Dalarna University.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sandberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Individualisering genom det kollektiva i svensk folkhögskola2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Forsell, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Tenglet, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Wessbo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Literature. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The “Bashing” of Education Research2018In: Confero: Essays on Education, Philosophy and Politics, ISSN 2001-4562, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 5-12Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue of Confero presents six essays with different aims and scope, which relate to the criticism or “bashing” of educational research. Starting with Martin Malmström’s essay How do you think it feels? On Being the Epitome of Pseudoscience that clearly connects to the bashing theme, the other essays elucidate and question related aspects of the universities, of pedagogy, teacher education and educational research. Together the essays form a dialogue on the underpinning perspectives on science and learning, not only in the field on education but academia at large. To clarify, the intention of this issue is not to constrain the critics, but an ambition to deepen the conversation and open up for different perspectives and voices.

  • 7.
    Nylander, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Bernhard, Dörte
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Andersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    oLika TillSAMmanS: En kartläggning av folkhögskolors lärmiljöer för deltagare med funktionsnedsättningar2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I Sverige finns det sedan en lång tid tillbaka flera utbildningsinstitutioner utanför det formella skolväsendet vilka erbjuder utbildningsmöjligheter för ungdomar och vuxna. En central plats i detta utbildningslandskap har Sveriges 150 folkhögskolor. Den här rapporten handlar om folkhögskolornas arbete med deltagare med funktions--‐ nedsättningar eller, mer precist, om de lärmiljöer i vilka folkhögskolornas pedagogiska arbete sker och hur dessa är utformade och anpassade för deltagare med funktions--‐ nedsättningar. Frågor om skolors lärmiljöer kan anses vara särskilt relevanta för deltagare med funktionsnedsättningar. En vanlig distinktion inom detta forskningsfält gör gällande att en funktionsnedsättning blir ett funktionshinder först i mötet med en hindrande omgivning.

    I rapporten visar vi att folkhögskolorna har fått en alltmer framträdande specialpedagogisk funktion i det svenska utbildningssystemet. Exempelvis har andelen deltagare med funktionsnedsättningar på de allmänna kurserna gått från att utgöra var femte deltagare 1997, till var tredje 2013. Ökningen i andel deltagare som kategoriseras som funktionsnedsatta är således väldigt kraftig på senare år. Bland dessa personer är grupperna med neuropsykiatriska diagnoser (särskilt ADHD), med svår psykisk ohälsa och med grava läs- och skrivsvårigheter de största till antalet. Men även deltagare med medicinska, fysiska och kliniska funktionsnedsättningar visar sig särskilt benägna att söka sig till, och använda sig av, folkhögskolornas utbildningsalternativ. Denna ökning av andelen deltagare med funktionsnedsättning verkar också återspegla sig i hur lärarna på folkhögskolorna upplever sitt arbete och sina kompetensbehov. En nyligen genomförd enkätstudie visar att utveckling av kompetensen för att upptäcka och stödja deltagare i behov av särskilt stöd är det som folkhögskollärarna efterfrågar i störst utsträckning – ett kompetensbehov som torde ha uppstått ur de nya villkor som förändringar av deltagargrupperna innebär.

    Dessa utvecklingstendenser är samtidigt svåra att frikoppla från andra samhällsförändringar, såsom det stora antal elever som lämnar gymnasieskolan med ofullständiga betyg varje år eller ett ökat bruk av neuropsykiatriska diagnoser. Mot bakgrund av den livfulla debatt som på senare tid har förts om den svenska gymnasieskolans kris och de många elever som slås ut från denna skolform, är det förvånande att vi inte vet mer om de utbildningsinstitutioner som ”tar vid” och hur de arbetar med grupper som står relativt långt ifrån arbetsmarknaden.

    Mot bakgrund av dessa förändringar menar vi att det är särskilt motiverat att ta ett samlat grepp om frågan hur folkhögskolorna arbetar och anpassar sina verksamheter till deltagare med funktionsnedsättningar. I denna kartläggning tar vi hjälp av officiell statistik för att visa hur antalet och andelen deltagare med funktionsnedsättningar förändrats i skolformen över tid, men frågar även folkhögskolornas representanter hur de anser att folkhögskolornas lärmiljöer är tillgängliggjorda och anpassade för deltagare med olika funktionsnedsättningar. Innan vi ger oss i kast med dessa frågeställningar ska vi säga någonting om vårt övergripande syfte och bakgrunden till rapporten.

    Rapporten är strukturerad enligt följande: först introduceras folkhögskolorna som skolform genom att deras politiska syften, finansiering samt kursverksamhet beskrivs. Därefter kommer ett avsnitt som redogör för studiens metod och design. Resultatavsnittet inleds med övergripande kartbilder över antalet deltagare på folkhögskolorna indelade efter breda funktionshinderområden. Därefter följer en analys över de motiv och påverkansfaktorer som folkhögskolornas lärare och verksamhetsledare tillerkänner betydelse i enkätsvaren. Sedan kommer en mer detaljerad analys över skolmiljöernas utformning med avseende på (i) multiprofessionalitet, (ii) pedagogiska strategier samt (iii) tekniskt och fysiskt stöd. Till sist diskuterar vi vad folkhögskoleföreträdarna själva framhåller som framgångsfaktorer respektive utvecklingsområden i skolornas arbete med att anpassa och tillgängliggöra deras lärmiljöer för deltagare med funktionsnedsättningar. På basis av dessa svar resonerar vi om det arbete som görs inom ramen för folkhögskolorna redan idag och om vad som eventuellt kan behöva förbättras.

  • 8.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Arbetarrörelsen och datorn2019In: Fronesis, ISSN 1404-2614, Vol. 6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Data Politics and Popular Education: Sweden in the 1970s2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Den digitala medborgarens genealogi: En historia om folkbildningsförhoppningar2019In: Vägval i skolans historia, ISSN 2002-0147, Vol. 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Diskussioner kring utbildning om datorn hänger förstås samman med vad den specifika maskinen vid en viss tid kan, eller inte kan, göra. Men kanske ännu högre utsträckning och särskilt i relation till utbildning, handlar den om vad en fiktiv föreställd framtida dator kan, eller inte kan, och vad denna framtidsbild i sin tur genererar för beskrivningar av hot och möjligheter. Utbildning är ett av de främsta verktygen staten förfogar över för att skapa önskad framtid. Vilken framtid som ska skapas hänger nära samman med hur man tänker sig den tekniska utvecklingen. Datorer handlar således om mycket mer än kiselplattor, minnen och algoritmer – de handlar också i hög grad om samhället och hur dess medborgare ska organiseras och styras. Därför behöver vi undersöka hur vi pratar, och har pratat, om datorer – vilka idéer eller föreställningar om framtiden som ligger bakom de olika, ofta tidsförankrade, beskrivningarna av dessa maskiner, och inte minst, vilka utbildningssatsningar som följt i dess spår.

  • 11.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Digitizing Sweden: discourses on computerization and citizenship2016In: Politics of Education and Education Policy StudiesCitizenship education, democracy and the market, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dystopia for the Unprepared, Utopia for the Prepared: Why zombies are no promise of monsters2014In: ImmediacyArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Educational imaginaries: a genealogy of the digital citizen2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis makes use of a genealogical approach to map out and explainhow and why computers and citizenship have become so closely connected.It examines the historical continuities and disruptions, and the role thatpopular education has played in this interrelation. Drawing on previousresearch in the overlap between Swedish popular education history andhistorical computer politics, this thesis adds knowledge about howimaginaries of popular education, operating as silver bullet solutions toproblems with computerization, have had important functions as governingtools for at least 70 years. That is, Swedish popular education has since the1950s been imagined as a central solution to problems with computerization,but also to realize the societal potentials associated with computers.

    Specifically, this thesis makes two contributions: 1) Empirically, the thesisunearths archived, and in many ways forgotten, discourses around thehistorical enactment of the digital citizen, and the role of popular education,questioning assumptions that are taken for granted in current times; 2)Theoretically, the thesis proposes a conceptual model of educationalimaginaries, and specifically introduces the notion (and method) of‘problematizations’ into these imaginaries.

    List of papers
    1. Ubiquitous computing, digital failure and citizenship learning in Swedish popular education
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ubiquitous computing, digital failure and citizenship learning in Swedish popular education
    2015 (English)In: Citizenship Teaching and Learning, ISSN 1751-1917, E-ISSN 1751-1925, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 127-141Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    How do adult students enact citizenship, and what discursive and material conditions make certain enactments more or less possible? This article draws on 37 interviews with adult students at Swedish Folk High Schools and focuses on the everyday material-discursive enactments of interactive media in adult students’ statements about citizenship. Drawing on a post-constructional perspective, the analysis illustrates how students’ statements about citizenship are made possible by ever-present media technologies and the associated practices of ‘living in media’. Students’ statements continuously reiterate how notions of citizenship are entangled with the Internet (and other new media). However, while new media are deeply embedded in the everyday lives of citizens and enables important citizenship enactments, they are also a source of discomfort, giving rise to ambiguous statements. These double-edged statements refer on the one hand to negative implications on physical health, distraction from important tasks and an over-reliance on the Internet as an everyday need, and on the other hand to improved access to information, convivial communities and empowered citizenship.

    Keywords
    citizenship, citizenship education, adult learning, new media, folk high schools, popular education
    National Category
    Educational Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115923 (URN)10.1386/ctl.10.2.123_1 (DOI)
    Projects
    Adult students citizenship discourses within and beyond the curriculum
    Available from: 2015-03-24 Created: 2015-03-24 Last updated: 2019-09-16Bibliographically approved
    2. Popular education and the digital citizen: a genealogical analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Popular education and the digital citizen: a genealogical analysis
    2017 (English)In: European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults, ISSN 2000-7426, E-ISSN 2000-7426, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 21-36, article id rela9113Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper historicises and problematises the concept of the digital citizen and how it is constructed in Sweden today. Specifically, it examines the role of popular education in such an entanglement. It makes use of a genealogical analysis to produce a critical ‘history of the present’ by mapping out the debates and controversies around the emergence of the digital citizen in the 1970s and 1980s, and following to its manifestations in contemporary debates. This article argues that free and voluntary adult education (popular education) is and has been fundamental in efforts to construe the digital citizen. A central argument of the paper is that popular education aiming for digital inclusion is not a 21st century phenomenon; it actually commenced in the 1970s. However, this digitisation of citizens has also changed focus dramatically since the 1970s. During the 1970s, computers and computerisation were described as disconcerting, and as requiring popular education in order to counter the risk of the technology “running wild”. In current discourses, digitalisation is constructed in a non-ideological and post-political way. These post-political tendencies of today can be referred to as a post-digital present where computers have become so ordinary, domesticized and ubiquitous in everyday life that they are thereby also beyond criticism

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2017
    Keywords
    digitalisation; computerisation; adult education; popular education; genealogy; data politics; algorithmic politics
    National Category
    Pedagogy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136289 (URN)10.3384/rela.2000-7426.rela9113 (DOI)
    Available from: 2017-04-06 Created: 2017-04-06 Last updated: 2019-09-16Bibliographically approved
    3. The Ironies of Digital Citizenship: Educational Imaginaries and Digital Losers AcrossThree Decades
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Ironies of Digital Citizenship: Educational Imaginaries and Digital Losers AcrossThree Decades
    2018 (English)In: Digital Culture & Society, ISSN 2364-2122, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 39-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Our everyday use of digital technologies, platforms and infrastructures is often portrayed as an autonomous technical development, guided by clever and independent innovations, rather than broad sociotechnical imaginaries that inspire parliamentary support and governance. This article will consequently shed the light on the often-overlooked structural and societal efforts that have historically shaped the digital citizen of today. For the past 70 years or so, non-formal adult education about computers and computing has been a key part of political ambitions to create a desirable future. Over time, digital technologies have also become a precondition for the enactment of citizenship. That is, ‘digital citizenship’ is increasingly positioned as a fundamental requirement for democratic participation. The purpose of this paper is to trace how the digital citizen, and its accompanying problems, has been construed over time, particularly through educational imaginaries. What problems is the digital citizen a solution to? Who has been presented as problematic, and who, subsequently, has become the primary target for educational solutions? What skills have been described as indispensable for the digital citizen during different periods in history? By using Sweden as a vantage point this paper provides both concrete examples as well as perspectives on transnational discourses. In focus for the study are discourses concerning non-formal adult education, in the form of awareness campaigns, social programmes and adult liberal education about computers aimed at the general citizenry, during three periods in time: the 1950s, the 1980s, and today. The contribution is a critical take on how the citizen has increasingly become connected to digital technologies, and how this convergence has at the same time created digital exclusion.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Transcript Verlag, 2018
    Keywords
    digital citizenship; popular education; participatory engagement; algorithmic governance; computer history; computer policies; educational imaginaries.
    National Category
    Social Sciences Media Studies Educational Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160740 (URN)10.14361/dcs-2018-0204 (DOI)
    Available from: 2019-10-04 Created: 2019-10-04 Last updated: 2019-10-09Bibliographically approved
  • 14.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Educational Imaginaries of Technology2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    From fear of ‘Computer Force’ to ‘Digital Inclusion’2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Popular education is often described as particularly suitable for various projects related to digital inclusion. For example, the popular education guiding principle: "free and voluntary” has been described as an important prerequisite for effectively digitizing Sweden. From this we can be (mis)led to understand that the mission of public education to promote the digital citizen is a new quest (or at least beginning in the early 2000s). However, popular education has played a central role in the digitization of citizens for over 40 years now. This genealogy aims to shed light on the role of popular education in the history of digitalization.

  • 16.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Föreställningar om folkbildning: En genealogi över den digitala medborgaren2019In: Presentation av tre nya doktorsavhandlingar, Linköping, 2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Learning to compute: A genealogy of the digitally literate2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Mot kyliga apparater tar man inte till knytnävarna: En historia om arbetarrörelsen och datorn2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    ”One wouldn't use ones fists against cold machines”.2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Popular education and the digital citizen2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Preparing for the future: Governance by educational films2017In: Worker's Education, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The Educational Imaginaries of Digital Citizenship2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The Ironies of Digital Citizenship: Educational Imaginaries and Digital Losers AcrossThree Decades2018In: Digital Culture & Society, ISSN 2364-2122, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 39-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our everyday use of digital technologies, platforms and infrastructures is often portrayed as an autonomous technical development, guided by clever and independent innovations, rather than broad sociotechnical imaginaries that inspire parliamentary support and governance. This article will consequently shed the light on the often-overlooked structural and societal efforts that have historically shaped the digital citizen of today. For the past 70 years or so, non-formal adult education about computers and computing has been a key part of political ambitions to create a desirable future. Over time, digital technologies have also become a precondition for the enactment of citizenship. That is, ‘digital citizenship’ is increasingly positioned as a fundamental requirement for democratic participation. The purpose of this paper is to trace how the digital citizen, and its accompanying problems, has been construed over time, particularly through educational imaginaries. What problems is the digital citizen a solution to? Who has been presented as problematic, and who, subsequently, has become the primary target for educational solutions? What skills have been described as indispensable for the digital citizen during different periods in history? By using Sweden as a vantage point this paper provides both concrete examples as well as perspectives on transnational discourses. In focus for the study are discourses concerning non-formal adult education, in the form of awareness campaigns, social programmes and adult liberal education about computers aimed at the general citizenry, during three periods in time: the 1950s, the 1980s, and today. The contribution is a critical take on how the citizen has increasingly become connected to digital technologies, and how this convergence has at the same time created digital exclusion.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-08-28 15:29
  • 24.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Utbildning som universalmedel mot teknologins faror och förhoppningar2019In: Skola & Samhälle [S.O.S], ISSN 2001-6727Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Who needs computerknowledge?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Who Will Survive?: On Bodies and Boundaries after the Apocalypse2013In: Gender Forum, ISSN 1613-1878, Vol. 45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preppers and Survivalists are commonly described as people who believe in abrupt, imposing and near-in-time disasters and who are actively and practically preparing to survive this imminent apocalypse. This paper examines how the body, and the closely connected analytical categories of gender and sexuality, are used to define survivalism. In other words, how does corporeality structure survivalism – who gets to be a survivalist and who does not? In an attempt to answer these questions the paper turns to a theoretical framework that combines the notion of trans-corporeality with the performance of gender, sexuality and embodiment in virtual digital space. To bring focus the paper specifically concentrates on a recent online discussion about “if, how, and to what extent one, as a survivalist, should or would help a woman with small children alone in a forest with no survival equipment after TEOTWAWKI (The End Of The World As We Know It)” (Swedish Survivalist Forum, 2013). This particular discussion is relevant since it, as we shall see, puts analytical categories, such as gender and sexuality up front, pointing to their retained importance as objects of study. The results show a desire to protect the body from change – change that often emanates from other bodies. As such, the desire to remain bodily untouched or unaffected emerges as a foundation for survivalism

  • 27.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Workers to conquer the new technology: The Swedish labour movement, popular education and the computer2016In: Workers’ Education: Importance and Implications for the Labour Movement / [ed] Jenny Jansson, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early on, the unions, and their respective study associations, became important actors in passing on knowledge about computers. The 1975 Social Democratic Party congress made a decision to work with the Swedish blue-collar union in order to draw up an action program for computer education. The congress did express a fear in that stakeholders who control capital as well as means of production will safeguard technology to primarily cater to their interests. That is, under the current conservative regime there was a risk that the computer would instead become an oppressive force. As such, the labour movement was described as an important force to counter this fear and to, instead, "democratically" control the use of computers as tools in the service of the people. Through common struggle and education, citizens would become a driving force in the practical design of this potentially liberating technology. Thus, computers, as they were conceptualized in the labour movement in the 1970s, held a promise to become a liberating technology with a subsequent promotion of equality and solidarity, but importantly, its potential positive impacts could only be realized in an economic democracy.

  • 28.
    Rahm, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Digital media and citizenship in adult education2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on an on-going case study, drawing on interviews with adult students. The research question is: what narratives of citizenship are actualized in the everyday practices of adult students and how is citizenship enacted (or prevented from being enacted)? More specifically, this paper addresses the importance of interactive media in narratives of citizenship in the everyday practises of adult students. The study builds on 37 interviews with students enrolled at Folk high schools in Sweden. The students have, based on their own definition of the terms, been asked to participate in interviews about (and photo-document) their notions of citizenship and citizenship activities. The results of interest to this paper are statements about what we may refer to as ubiquitous computing (i.e. ever-present media technologies). It would seem that an important basis for students’ notions of citizenship is the practice of ‘living in media’. That is, students’ narratives continuously return to the entanglement of the Internet (and other new media) and notions of citizenship.

  • 29.
    Rahm, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Educating the digital citizen: a genealogy of computer skills in Swedish popular education2015In: Citizenship in the Making – Adult and Popular Education as Bunkers of failures, computers and recognition, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Rahm, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Popular education and the digital citizen: a genealogical analysis2017In: European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults, ISSN 2000-7426, E-ISSN 2000-7426, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 21-36, article id rela9113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper historicises and problematises the concept of the digital citizen and how it is constructed in Sweden today. Specifically, it examines the role of popular education in such an entanglement. It makes use of a genealogical analysis to produce a critical ‘history of the present’ by mapping out the debates and controversies around the emergence of the digital citizen in the 1970s and 1980s, and following to its manifestations in contemporary debates. This article argues that free and voluntary adult education (popular education) is and has been fundamental in efforts to construe the digital citizen. A central argument of the paper is that popular education aiming for digital inclusion is not a 21st century phenomenon; it actually commenced in the 1970s. However, this digitisation of citizens has also changed focus dramatically since the 1970s. During the 1970s, computers and computerisation were described as disconcerting, and as requiring popular education in order to counter the risk of the technology “running wild”. In current discourses, digitalisation is constructed in a non-ideological and post-political way. These post-political tendencies of today can be referred to as a post-digital present where computers have become so ordinary, domesticized and ubiquitous in everyday life that they are thereby also beyond criticism

  • 31.
    Rahm, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Ubiquitous computing, digital failure and citizenship learning in Swedish popular education2015In: Citizenship Teaching and Learning, ISSN 1751-1917, E-ISSN 1751-1925, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 127-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do adult students enact citizenship, and what discursive and material conditions make certain enactments more or less possible? This article draws on 37 interviews with adult students at Swedish Folk High Schools and focuses on the everyday material-discursive enactments of interactive media in adult students’ statements about citizenship. Drawing on a post-constructional perspective, the analysis illustrates how students’ statements about citizenship are made possible by ever-present media technologies and the associated practices of ‘living in media’. Students’ statements continuously reiterate how notions of citizenship are entangled with the Internet (and other new media). However, while new media are deeply embedded in the everyday lives of citizens and enables important citizenship enactments, they are also a source of discomfort, giving rise to ambiguous statements. These double-edged statements refer on the one hand to negative implications on physical health, distraction from important tasks and an over-reliance on the Internet as an everyday need, and on the other hand to improved access to information, convivial communities and empowered citizenship.

  • 32.
    Rahm, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Skågeby, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Making change: produsing hybrid learning products2014In: Hybrid Pedagogy: a digital journal of learning, teaching, and technology, ISSN 2332-2098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Too often, we demand from our students written proof of learning in the form of academic text. This is perhaps especially true within the humanities and the social sciences. We have, however, previously argued for the importance of installing an agency for change in students. For us, this agency seems unlikely to come only from producing a text that will at worst only be read by an examiner and at best also by a few classmates. This feeling of agency and efficacy (the capacity to produce an effect) rather comes with produsing hybrid learning products belonging to new/other genres than the ’pure’ critically reflecting text (or hardcore exams). We do not oppose critical reflection as being a foundation stone of any education, but as Laurillard, we argue that further inspiration could be taken from engineering, architecture, computer science and medicine in encouraging more of a ”design thinking” in (digital) humanities students. On a more general scale this is an approach that would combine critical reflection and experiential learning, and imbue students with an agency to make change and, quite literally, push things forward.

  • 33.
    Rahm, Lina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Skågeby, Jörgen
    Stockholms universitet, Sweden.
    Prepare for Monsters!: Governance by Popular Culture2016In: The Irish Journal of Gothic and Horror Studies, ISSN 2009-0374, Vol. 1, no 12, p. 76-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, various stakeholders have applied the pop-cultural metaphor of the zombie in efforts that seek to aware and prepare citizens for potential threats and disasters. But what are the cultural and political consequences of applying this very specific metaphor in what are, essentially, attempts to govern populations? By studying how and why the zombie is used in civil defence courses, government information campaigns and popular science TV shows, this paper identifies five patterns to its cultural-political operation: (1) it emphasizes a world-view where complexity has become too overwhelming to handle and that we therefore need to go back to a more simple model of the world; (2) the solution to complexity is the application of an anthropocentric metaphor that makes specific what was previously unknown through arbitrary ruling and othering; (3) once complexity is reduced, the metaphor is easily overgeneralized to contexts far beyond its initial reach; (4) however, as such rules and generalizations are applied the metaphor comes to legitimize certain agencies and limit others in what is basically an attempt to maintain power differentials in the future; (5) and finally, the metaphor is being protected from falsification by relying on pseudo-scientific explanations. Conclusively, this cultural ambition to send every monster on a path towards comfortable transparency becomes limiting and by making the zombie the metaphor we prepare by (in order to make familiar what are irreducible social, cultural and political intricacies) we effectively foreclose many options for a more inclusive futur

  • 34.
    Skågeby, Jörgen
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Sweden.
    Arvola, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Editorial: Transhumanist Politics, Education, and Design2016In: Confero: Essays on Education, Philosophy and Politics, ISSN 2001-4562, Vol. 4, no 2Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue of Confero takes its start in an essay by John Mazarakis who presents an overarching perspective on the underpinning politics of transhumanism. Considering theoretical debates and differences in the transhumanist movement over the last two decades, Mazarakis proposes the emergence of two distinct political stances: the techno-progressive and the technolibertarian. Using Lyotardian concepts, Mazarakis questions the latent legacy of ‘the grand narratives of modernism’ and their potential to function as a basis for theorizing a transhuman future.

  • 35.
    Skågeby, Jörgen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Positive Resistance and the Queering of Digital Media Theory: On Course Dis/contents and Classroom Spaces2013In: Media Fields Journal, ISSN 2159-7553, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay considers the entangled nature of classroom spaces and mediated course content. The authors rework an example course on digital media theory by applying three queer tactics in order to make room for diversity. These tactics are disidentification, crisis and failure. Their application provided the original course content with a number of resonating queer themes, including temporality, virality, anarchives, glitch, heterodoxy, and agency for change. The final theme (agency for change) is expanded upon by resignifying resistance as something positive to be developed in the classroom space. Positive resistance includes an acknowledgement of oppression in both theory and practice as well as an appeal to values such as fairness, social justice and ethical accountability in critical analyses of media. The essay also introduces some unconventional genres of writing that can support the queering of digital media theory, namely: anti-thesis; media-archaeology; interaction criticism; media failure; and manifesto.

  • 36.
    Skågeby, Jörgen
    et al.
    Stockholm university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    What is Feminist Media Archaeology?2018In: communication +1, ISSN 2380-6109, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a fairly recent blog post, Jussi Parikka discusses how media archaeology can be criticized for being a “boy’s club”. In the introduction of this text, he writes: One of the set critiques of media archaeology is that it is a boys' club. That is a correct evaluation in so many ways when one has a look at the topics as well as authors of the circle of writers broadly understood part of 'media archaeology'. I make the same argument for instance in What is Media Archaeology?, but there is also something else that we need to attend to. There is however a danger that the critique also neglects the multiplicity inherent in the approach. For sure, there are critical points to be made in so many aspects of Kittler's and others' theoretical work, but at the same time it feels unfair to neglect the various female authors and artists at the core of the field. In other words, the critique often turns a blind eye to the women who are actively involved in media archaeology. Let's not write them out too easily. Parikka then goes on to briefly introduce several female researchers and artists who are active in the media archaeological field. These are women who are, in different ways, doing media archaeology. This is of course an important issue – skewed representations or lopsided citation practices are never good – and the contributions of these researchers are significant and important. However, we could also argue that there is an important difference between the body of work being done by women and, what we may call, feminist media archaeology. There can, of course, be overlaps between these two ways of representing feminist interests in media archaeology, but for feminist theorizing and practising to truly have an impact, we have to ask ourselves what is feminist media archaeology? By looking for empirical gaps and putting questions of, for example, design, power, infrastructure and benefit, to the fore we can shine a different light on the material-discursive genealogy of digital culture, still very much in the vein of media archaeological endeavors. What we suggest is quite simple – a transdisciplinary approach which emphasizes “the unity of intellectual frameworks beyond the disciplinary perspectives [which] points toward our potential to think in terms of frameworks, concepts, techniques, and vocabulary that we have not yet imagined”. As such, we want to take an exploratory tactic to the question posed in the title of this paper. We do not intend to provide a single nor definite answer – rather we want to think with media archaeology and feminism together, seeking to raise other questions in order to find dynamic parallels and crosscurrents.

  • 37.
    Wessbo, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Literature. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Forsell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Martín-Bylund, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Vestergren, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Open issue2017In: Confero: Essays on Education, Philosophy and Politics, ISSN 2001-4562, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 5-10Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This open issue of Confero presents four essays that all relate to questions of education and power. Laila Nielsen and Ralph Leighton compare how conditions of citizenship regarding ethnicity, gender, and social class are understood, based on interviews with teachers and students in upper secondary schools in England and Sweden. The second essay is written by Rasoul Nejadmehr who gives a thorough account of the "scientific education" as the dominant educational paradigm of the present. Through a historical analysis, Nejadmehr shows how this paradigm is deeply embedded with racial, colonial, and Eurocentric biases. The third essay by Marcus Samuelsson analyzes offical and unofficial inspections of the classroom that takes place when authorities conduct audits, but also when pupils post videos on social media. In the fourth essay of this issue, Tomas Wedin discusses changes in the Swedish school during the period of 1946-2000. 

1 - 37 of 37
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf