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  • 1.
    Abelius, M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, L J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Immunological interactions between mother and child: a characterisation of Th1-and Th2-like chemokines during pregnancy, postpartum and childhood in JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, vol 90, issue 2, pp 170-1712011In: JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, Elsevier , 2011, Vol. 90, no 2, p. 170-171Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 2.
    Abelius, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Enke, Uta
    University Hospital Jena, Germany.
    Varosi, Frauke
    University Hospital Jena, Germany.
    Hoyer, Heike
    University Hospital Jena, Germany.
    Schleussner, Ekkehard
    University Hospital Jena, Germany.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Markert, Udo R.
    University Hospital Jena, Germany.
    Placental immune response to apple allergen in allergic mothers2014In: Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 0165-0378, E-ISSN 1872-7603, Vol. 106, p. 100-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The immunological milieu in the placenta may be crucial for priming the developing foetal immune system. Early imbalances may promote the establishment of immune-mediated diseases in later life, including allergies. The initial exposure to allergens seems to occur in utero, but little is known about allergen-induced placental cytokine and chemokine release. The release of several cytokines and chemokines from placenta tissue after exposure to mast cell degranulator compound 48/80 or apple allergen in placentas from allergic and healthy mothers was to be analysed. Four placentas from women with apple allergy and three controls were applied in a placental perfusion model with two separate cotyledons simultaneously perfused with and without apple allergen (Mal d 1). Two control placentas were perfused with compound 48/80. In outflow, histamine was quantified spectrophotofluorometrically, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF and IFN-gamma by a cytometric multiplex bead array and IL-13 and CXCL10, CXCL11, CCL17 and CCL22 with an in-house multiplex Luminex assay. Compound 48/80 induced a rapid release of histamine, CXCL10, CXCL11, CCL17 and CCL22, but not of the other factors. Apple allergen induced a time-dependent release of IL-6 and TNF, but not of histamine, in placentas of women with apple allergy compared with the unstimulated cotyledon. CCL17 levels were slightly increased after allergen stimulation in control placentas. Allergens can induce placental cytokines and chemokines distinctly in allergic and healthy mothers. These mediators may affect the prenatal development of the immune system and modify the risk of diseases related to immune disorders in childhood such as allergies.

  • 3.
    Abelius, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jedenfalk, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Pregnancy modulates the allergen-induced cytokine production differently in allergic and non-allergic women2017In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 818-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The immunological environment during pregnancy may differ between allergic and non-allergic women. This study investigates the effect of maternal allergy on the allergen-induced cytokine and chemokine levels and whether pregnancy modulates these immune responses differently in allergic and non-allergic women. Methods: The birch-, cat-, phytohemagglutinin- and tetanus toxoid-induced interferon-gamma(IFN-gamma), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, the T-helper 1 (Th1)-associated chemokine CXCL10 and the Th2-associated chemokine CCL17 levels were quantified in 20 women with allergic symptoms (sensitized, n=13) and 36 women without allergic symptoms (non-sensitized, n=30) at gestational weeks 10-12, 15-16, 25, 35 and 2 and 12months post-partum. Results: Birch-, but not cat-induced, IL-5, IL-13 and CCL17 levels were increased during pregnancy as compared to post-partum in the sensitized women with allergic symptoms. In contrast, cat-, but not birch-induced, IL-5 and IL-13 levels were increased during pregnancy as compared to post-partum in the non-sensitized women without allergic symptoms. Furthermore, IFN-gamma secretion was increased in the first and decreased in the second and third trimesters in response to birch and decreased in the third trimester in response to cat as compared to post-partum in the non-sensitized women without allergic symptoms. Increased allergen-induced IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 levels were associated with allergic symptoms and sensitization. Conclusions: Pregnancy had a clear effect on the allergen-induced IL-5, IL-13, CCL17, IFN-gamma and CXCL10 production, with distinct enhanced Th2-responses to birch in the allergic group and to cat in the non-allergic group.

  • 4.
    Abelius, Martina S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    High cord blood levels of the T-helper 2-associated chemokines CCL17 and CCL22 precede allergy development during the first 6 years of life2011In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 70, no 5, p. 495-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exposure to a strong T-helper 2 (Th2)-like environment during fetal development may promote allergy development. Increased cord blood (CB) levels of the Th2-associated chemokine CCL22 were associated with allergy development during the first 2 y of life. The aim of the present study was to determine whether CB Th1- and Th2-associated chemokine levels are associated with allergy development during the first 6 y of life, allowing assessment of respiratory allergic symptoms usually developing in this period. The CB levels of cytokines, chemokines, and total IgE were determined in 56 children of 20 women with allergic symptoms and 36 women without allergic symptoms. Total IgE and allergen-specific IgE antibody levels were quantified at 6, 12, 24 mo, and 6 y of age. Increased CB CCL22 levels were associated with development of allergic sensitization and asthma and increased CCL17 levels with development of allergic symptoms, including asthma. Sensitized children with allergic symptoms showed higher CB CCL17 and CCL22 levels and higher ratios between these Th2-associated chemokines and the Th1-associated chemokine CXCL10 than nonsensitized children without allergic symptoms. A pronounced Th2 deviation at birth, reflected by increased CB CCL17 and CCL22 levels, and increased CCL22/CXCL10 and CCL17/CXCL10 ratios might promote allergy development later in life.

  • 5.
    Abelius, Martina S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg.
    Duchén, Karel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Placental Immune Milieu is Characterized by a Th2- and Anti-Inflammatory Transcription Profile, Regardless of Maternal Allergy, and Associates with Neonatal Immunity2015In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 73, no 5, p. 445-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PROBLEM: How maternal allergy affects the systemic and local immunological environment during pregnancy and the immune development of the offspring is unclear.

    METHOD OF STUDY: Expression of 40 genes was quantified by PCR arrays in placenta, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) from 7 allergic and 12 non-allergic women and their offspring.

    RESULTS: Placental gene expression was dominated by a Th2-/anti-inflammatory profile, irrespectively of maternal allergy, as compared to gene expression in PBMC. p35 expression in placenta correlated with fetal Tbx21 (ρ = -0.88, P < 0.001) and IL-5 expression in PBMC with fetal galectin1 (ρ = 0.91, P < 0.001). Increased expression of Th2-associated CCL22 in CBMC preceded allergy development.

    CONCLUSIONS: Gene expression locally and systemically during pregnancy was partly associated with the offspring's gene expression, possibly indicating that the immunological milieu is important for fetal immune development. Maternal allergy was not associated with an enhanced Th2 immunity in placenta or PBMC, while a marked prenatal Th2 skewing, shown as increased CCL22 mRNA expression, might contribute to postnatal allergy development.

  • 6.
    Abelius, Martina S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Duchén, Karel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gene expression in placenta, peripheral and cord blood mononuclear cells from allergic and non-allergic women2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The influence of maternal allergy on the development of immune responses and allergy in the offspring is not understood.

    Objective: To investigate (i) if maternal allergy influences the gene expression locally in placenta, systemically in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and fetally in cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC), (ii) if the gene expression in the placenta and PBMC influences the gene expression in CBMC and (iii) how the gene expression at birth relates to allergy development during  childhood.

    Methods: A real-time PCR array was used to quantify forty immune regulatory genes in placenta, PBMC (gestational week 39) and in CBMC from 7 allergic and 12 non-allergic women and their offspring. Furthermore, quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure mRNA expression of Tbx21, GATA-3, Foxp3, RORC and CCL22 in CBMC, selected based on present PCR array results and previous protein findings in cord blood, in 13 children who developed and 11 children who did not develop allergy during childhood.

    Results: The gene expression profile in the placenta revealed a T-helper (Th) 2-/anti-inflammatory environment as compared with gene expression systemically, in PBMC. Maternal allergy was associated with increased expression of p35 in PBMC and CBMC and p40 in placenta. Placental p35 expression correlated with fetal Tbx21 expression (Rho=-0.88, p<0.001) and maternal IL-5 expression in PBMC with fetal Galectin-1 (Rho=0.91, p<0.001) expression. Allergy development in the children was preceded by high mRNA expression of the Th2-associated chemokine CCL22 at birth.

    Conclusion and clinical relevance: Gene expression locally and systemically during pregnancy influenced the offspring’s gene expression at birth, indicating an interplay between maternal and fetal immunity. Children developing allergy during childhood had an increased expression of the Th2-associated chemokine CCL22 at birth, indicating a Th2 skewing before disease onset. Maternal allergy was not associated with a Th2-dominance in placenta, PBMC or CBMC.

  • 7.
    Abelius, Martina S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lempinen, Esma
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Th2-like chemokine levels are increased in allergic children and influenced by maternal immunity during pregnancy2014In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 387-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The influence of the intra-uterine environment on the immunity and allergy development in the offspring is unclear. We aimed to investigate (i) whether the pregnancy magnifies the Th2 immunity in allergic and non-allergic women, (ii) whether the maternal chemokine levels during pregnancy influenced the offspring’s chemokine levels during childhood and (iii) the relationship between circulating Th1/Th2-associated chemokines and allergy in mothers and children.

    Methods: The Th1-associated chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and the Th2- associated chemokines CCL17, CCL18 and CCL22 were quantified by Luminex and ELISA in 20 women with and 36 women without allergic symptoms at gestational week (gw) 10–12, 15–16, 25, 35, 39 and 2 and 12 months post-partum and in their children at birth, 6, 12, 24 months and 6 yr of age. Total IgE levels were measured using ImmunoCAP Technology.

    Results: The levels of the Th2-like chemokines were not magnified by pregnancy. Instead decreased levels were shown during pregnancy (irrespectively of maternal allergy status) as compared to post-partum. In the whole group, the Th1-like chemokine levels were higher at gw 39 than during the first and second trimester and post-partum. Maternal CXCL11, CCL18 and CCL22 levels during and after pregnancy correlated with the corresponding chemokines in the offspring during childhood. Increased CCL22 and decreased CXCL10 levels in the children were associated with sensitisation and increased CCL17 levels with allergic symptoms during childhood. Maternal chemokine levels were not associated with maternal allergic disease.

    Conclusions: Allergic symptoms and sensitisation were associated with decreased Th1-and increased Th2-associated chemokine levels during childhood, indicating a Th2 shift in the allergic children, possibly influenced by the maternal immunity during pregnancy.

  • 8.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jakobsson, H.E.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, A.F.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björksten, B.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Örebro University, Sweden .
    Engstrand, L.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Low gut microbiota diversity in early infancy precedes asthma at school age2014In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 842-850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Low total diversity of the gut microbiota during the first year of life is associated with allergic diseases in infancy, but little is known how early microbial diversity is related to allergic disease later in school age.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To assess microbial diversity and characterize the dominant bacteria in stool during the first year of life in relation to the prevalence of different allergic diseases in school age, such as asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC) and eczema.

    METHODS:

    The microbial diversity and composition was analysed with barcoded 16S rDNA 454 pyrosequencing in stool samples at 1 week, 1 month and 12 months of age in 47 infants which were subsequently assessed for allergic disease and skin prick test reactivity at 7 years of age (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01285830).

    RESULTS:

    Children developing asthma (n = 8) had a lower diversity of the total microbiota than non-asthmatic children at 1 week (P = 0.04) and 1 month (P = 0.003) of age, whereas allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (n = 13), eczema (n = 12) and positive skin prick reactivity (n = 14) at 7 years of age did not associate with the gut microbiota diversity. Neither was asthma associated with the microbiota composition later in infancy (at 12 months). Children having IgE-associated eczema in infancy and subsequently developing asthma had lower microbial diversity than those that did not. There were no significant differences, however, in relative abundance of bacterial phyla and genera between children with or without allergic disease.

    CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

    Low total diversity of the gut microbiota during the first month of life was associated with asthma but not ARC in children at 7 years of age. Measures affecting microbial colonization of the infant during the first month of life may impact asthma development in childhood.

  • 9.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jakobsson, Hedvig E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden .
    Bjorksten, Bengt
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Engstrand, Lars
    KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden .
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Reply: Gut microbiota diversity and atopic disease: Does breast-feeding play a role?2013In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 131, no 1, p. 248-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 10.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jakobsson, Hedvig E
    Department of Preparedness, Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control, Solna, Sweden.
    Andersson, Anders F
    Science for Life Laboratory, School of Biotechnology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björksten, Bengt
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, and the School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Department of Preparedness, Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control, Solna, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Low diversity of the gut microbiota in infants with atopic eczema2012In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 129, no 2, p. 434-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    It is debated whether a low total diversity of the gut microbiota in early childhood is more important than an altered prevalence of particular bacterial species for the increasing incidence of allergic disease. The advent of powerful, cultivation-free molecular methods makes it possible to characterize the total microbiome down to the genus level in large cohorts.

    Objective

    We sought to assess microbial diversity and characterize the dominant bacteria in stool during the first year of life in relation to atopic eczema development.

    Methods

    Microbial diversity and composition were analyzed with barcoded 16S rDNA 454-pyrosequencing in stool samples at 1 week, 1 month, and 12 months of age in 20 infants with IgE-associated eczema and 20 infants without any allergic manifestation until 2 years of age (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01285830).

    Results

    Infants with IgE-associated eczema had a lower diversity of the total microbiota at 1 month (P = .004) and a lower diversity of the bacterial phylum Bacteroidetes and the genus Bacteroides at 1 month (P = .02 and P = .01) and the phylum Proteobacteria at 12 months of age (P = .02). The microbiota was less uniform at 1 month than at 12 months of age, with a high interindividual variability. At 12 months, when the microbiota had stabilized, Proteobacteria, comprising gram-negative organisms, were more abundant in infants without allergic manifestation (Empirical Analysis of Digital Gene Expression in R [edgeR] test: P = .008, q = 0.02).

    Conclusion

    Low intestinal microbial diversity during the first month of life was associated with subsequent atopic eczema.

  • 11.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jakobsson, Ted
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björksten, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Oldaeus, Göran
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    No effect of probiotics on respiratory allergies: a seven-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial in infancy2013In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 556-561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Supplementation with the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri reduced the incidence of IgE-associated allergic disease in infancy. This treatment might therefore also reduce the risk of asthma and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in school age.

    Objective

    To evaluate whether perinatal and infant supplementation with L. reuteri reduced the prevalence of respiratory allergic disease in school age and to explore whether this supplementation was associated with any long-term side effects.

    Methods

    A randomized, placebo-controlled trial with oral supplementation with Lreuteri ATCC 55730 (1 × 108 CFU) during the last month of gestation and through the first year of life comprising 232 families with allergic disease, of whom 184 completed a 7-yr follow-up. The primary outcomes at 7 yr of age were allergic disease and skin prick test reactivity (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01285830).

    Results

    The prevalence of asthma (15% in the probiotic vs. 16% in placebo group), allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (27% vs. 20%), eczema (21% vs. 19%) and skin prick test reactivity (29% vs. 26%) was similar in the probiotic and placebo group. Growth indices and gastrointestinal symptoms were similar in the two groups. No severe adverse events were reported.

    Conclusion

    The effect of L. reuteri on sensitization and IgE-associated eczema in infancy did not lead to a lower prevalence of respiratory allergic disease in school age. Thus, the effect of L. reuteri on the immune system seems to be transient. Administration of L. reuteri during the last weeks of gestation and in infancy was not associated with any long-term side effects.

  • 12.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas R
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics MH.
    Jakobsson, Ted
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics MH.
    Böttcher, Malin Fagerås
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria C
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics MH.
    Oldaeus, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Probiotics in prevention of IgE-associated eczema: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial2007In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 119, no 5, p. 1174-1180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: An altered microbial exposure may underlie the increase of allergic diseases in affluent societies. Probiotics may alleviate and even prevent eczema in infants.

    OBJECTIVE: To prevent eczema and sensitization in infants with a family history of allergic disease by oral supplementation with the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri.

    METHODS: Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, which comprised 232 families with allergic disease, of whom 188 completed the study. The mothers received L reuteri ATCC 55730 (1 x 10(8) colony forming units) daily from gestational week 36 until delivery. Their babies then continued with the same product from birth until 12 months of age and were followed up for another year. Primary outcome was allergic disease, with or without positive skin prick test or circulating IgE to food allergens.

    RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of eczema was similar, 36% in the treated versus 34% in the placebo group. The L reuteri group had less IgE-associated eczema during the second year, 8% versus 20% (P = .02), however. Skin prick test reactivity was also less common in the treated than in the placebo group, significantly so for infants with mothers with allergies, 14% versus 31% (P = .02). Wheeze and other potentially allergic diseases were not affected.

    CONCLUSION: Although a preventive effect of probiotics on infant eczema was not confirmed, the treated infants had less IgE-associated eczema at 2 years of age and therefore possibly run a reduced risk to develop later respiratory allergic disease. CLINICAL IMPLICATION: Probiotics may reduce the incidence of IgE-associated eczema in infancy.

  • 13.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Sandberg, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Forsberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Bjorksten, B
    Karolinska Institute.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Th1/Th2-associated chemokine imbalance during infancy in children developing eczema, wheeze and sensitization2011In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 41, no 12, p. 1729-1739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Analyses of circulating chemokines offer novel tools to investigate the T helper (Th)1/Th2 imbalance in allergic disease in vivo. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjective To relate circulating Th1- and Th2-associated chemokines in infancy to allergic disease, sensitization and probiotic supplementation. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods Circulating levels of Th1-associated CXC-chemokine ligand (CXCL) 9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 and Th2-associated CC-chemokine ligand (CCL)17 and CCL22 were assessed with Luminex and CCL18 with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at birth (n = 109), 6 (n = 104), 12 (n = 116) and 24 months (n = 123) in 161 infants completing a double-blind placebo-controlled allergy prevention trial with Lactobacillus reuteri during the last month of gestation and through the first year of life. The infants were followed regarding the development of allergic disease and sensitization until 2 years of age. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults The Th2-associated chemokines CCL17 and CCL22 were the highest at birth and then decreased, whereas CCL18 and the Th1-associated chemokines increased with age. High Th2-associated chemokine levels were observed in children developing allergic disease. Sensitization was preceded by elevated levels of the Th2-associated CCL22 and reduced levels of the Th1-associated CXCL11 already at birth. The Th2-associated CCL17 was also elevated at birth in infants developing recurrent wheeze. A high Th2/Th1 ratio (CCL22/CXCL10) at birth associated with both sensitization and eczema development. The presence of L. reuteri in stool in the first week of life was associated with low CCL17 and CCL22 and high CXCL11 levels at 6 months of age. High Th1-associated chemokine levels were associated with day-care. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion and Clinical Relevance Allergic disease and sensitization in infancy was associated with low circulating Th1- and high Th2-associated chemokine levels already from birth. Circulating chemokines are useful for investigating the Th1/Th2 imbalance in allergic disease in vivo. Elucidation of the role of chemokines in allergic diseases may lead to future treatments.

  • 14.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Sandberg, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Forsberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bjorksten, B
    Karolinska Institute.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Th1/Th2-associated chemokine imbalance preceding allergic disease is influenced by birth size, breastfeeding, daycare and probiotics2009In: in Allergy, vol 64, 2009, Vol. 64, p. 56-56Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Analyses of circulating chemokines offer novel tools to investigate the Th1/Th2 imbalance in allergic disease in vivo and explore the influence of pre- and postnatal factors in infancy.

    Objective: To relate circulating Th1- and Th2-associated chemokines to the development of allergic disease, pre- and postnatal factors and probiotic supplementation in infancy.

    Methods: Circulating levels of Th1-associated CXC-chemokine ligand (CXCL)9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 and Th2-associated CC-chemokine ligand (CCL)17, CCL18 and CCL22 were assessed with Luminex and ELISA at birth (n=109), 6 (n=104), 12 (n=116) and 24 months (n=123) in 179 infants completing a double-blind placebo-controlled allergy prevention trial with Lactobacillus reuteri during the last month of gestation and through the first year of life. The infants were followed regarding development of allergic disease and sensitization until two years of age.

    Results: The Th2-associated chemokines were as highest at birth and then decreased, whereas the Th1-associated chemokines increased with age. Low Th1- and high Th2-associated chemokine levels were observed in children developing allergic disease. Sensitization was preceded by elevated CCL22 and reduced CXCL11 levels. High Th2-associated chemokine46 levels were associated with increased birth length and weight and long duration of breastfeeding, and high Th1-associated chemokine levels with day-care attendance. Presence of L. reuteri in stool the first week of life was associated with low CCL17 and CCL22 and high CXCL11 levels at 6 months.

    Conclusion: Allergic disease in infancy was associated with low circulating Th1- and high Th2-associated chemokine levels during the first year of life. The chemokine levels were affected by both pre and –postnatal factors.

  • 15.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. University of Toronto, Canada.
    You Wu, Richard
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gut microbiota and allergy: the importance of the pregnancy period2015In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 214-219Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Limited microbial exposure is suggested to underlie the increase of allergic diseases in affluent countries, and bacterial diversity seems to be more important than specific bacteria taxa. Prospective studies indicate that the gut microbiota composition during the first months of life influences allergy development, and support the theory that factors influencing the early maturation of the immune system might be important for subsequent allergic disease. However, recent research indicates that microbial exposure during pregnancy may be even more important for the preventative effects against allergic disease. This review gives a background of the epidemiology, immunology, and microbiology literature in this field. It focuses on possible underlying mechanisms such as immune-regulated epigenetic imprinting and bacterial translocation during pregnancy, potentially providing the offspring with a pioneer microbiome. We suggest that a possible reason for the initial exposure of bacterial molecular patterns to the fetus in utero is to prime the immune system and/or the epithelium to respond appropriately to pathogens and commensals after birth.

  • 16.
    Ahlbeck, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Ahlberg, Emelie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nyström Kronander, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Björkander, Janne
    Futurum, Academy of Health and Care, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Intralymphatic allergen immunotherapy against pollen allergy. A 3-year open follow-up study of 10 patients2018In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, ISSN 1081-1206, E-ISSN 1534-4436, Vol. 121, no 5, p. 626-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is the only treatment that affects the long-term development of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and induces clinical tolerance primarily by stimulating regulatory T (Treg) cells, attenuating T helper 2 (Th2) responses and synthesis of blocking antibodies1. Conventional AIT with subcutaneous injections, sublingual tablets or drops is effective, but consumes time and resources 2.

  • 17.
    Berg, Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Special Issue: Marcus Wallenberg International Symposium in Comparative Reproductive Immunology, "Immunology at the fetal maternal interface: Basic science and clinical applications", July 7-8th, 2011, Linkoping University, Sweden2011In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 66, no Issue supplement 1, p. 1-1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Bhai Mehta, Ratnesh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mirrasekhian, E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svensson, J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Freland, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sharma, S
    Brown University.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Trophoblast cells in immune regulation: modulation of macrophage polarization and production of IL-35 in JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, vol 90, issue 2, pp 165-1652011In: JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, Elsevier , 2011, Vol. 90, no 2, p. 165-165Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 19.
    Boij, R
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson-Ekdahl, K
    Uppsala University.
    Svensson, J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandholm, K
    Linneus University.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Palonek, E
    Karolinska University.
    Jarle, M
    Karolinska University.
    Biomarkers of coagulation, inflammation and angiogenesis are independently associated with preeclampsia in JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, vol 94, issue 1, pp 109-1092012In: JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, Elsevier , 2012, Vol. 94, no 1, p. 109-109Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 20.
    Boij, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Mjosberg, Jenny
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Svensson Arvelund, Judit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hjorth, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Regulatory T-cell Subpopulations in Severe or Early-onset Preeclampsia2015In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 74, no 4, p. 368-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem A deficiency in regulatory T (Treg) cells causing reduced immune regulatory capacity has been proposed in preeclampsia. Objective Utilizing recent advances in flow cytometry phenotyping, we aimed to assess whether a deficiency of Treg subpopulations occurs in preeclampsia. Method of study Six-color flow cytometry was used for Treg phenotyping in 18 preeclamptic women (one early-onset, one severe and 16 both), 20 women with normal pregnancy, and 20 non-pregnant controls. Results No differences were found in major Treg populations including CD127(low)CD25(+)/CD127(ow)FOXP3(+), resting (FOXP3(dim)CD45RA(+)), and activated (FOXP3(bright)CD45RA(-)) Treg cells, whereas preeclamptic women showed increased CTLA-4(+) and CCR4(+) proportions within resting/activated Treg populations. Corticosteroid treatment prior to blood sampling (n = 10) affected the distribution of Treg populations. Conclusions Although we found no major alterations in circulating Treg frequencies, differences in CTLA-4(+) and CCR4(+) frequencies suggest a migratory defect of Treg cells in preeclampsia. Corticosteroid treatment should be taken into account when evaluating Treg cells.

  • 21.
    Boij, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Judit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson-Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Sweden Linneaus University, Sweden .
    Sandholm, Kerstin
    Linneaus University, Sweden .
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Palonek, Elzbieta
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden Doping Control Lab, Sweden .
    Garle, Mats
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden Doping Control Lab, Sweden .
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Biomarkers of Coagulation, Inflammation, and Angiogenesis are Independently Associated with Preeclampsia2012In: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, ISSN 1046-7408, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 258-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem Although preeclampsia has been associated with inflammation, coagulation, and angiogenesis, their correlation and relative contribution are unknown. Method of Study About 114 women with preeclampsia, 31 with early onset (EOP) and 83 with late onset preeclampsia (LOP), and 100 normal pregnant controls were included. A broad panel of 32 biomarkers reflecting coagulation, inflammation, and angiogenesis was analyzed. Results Preeclampsia was associated with decreased antithrombin, IL-4 and placental growth factor levels and with increased C3a, pentraxin-3, and sFlt-1 levels, with more marked differences in the EOP group. The Th1-associated chemokines CXCL10 and CXCL11 were significantly higher in the preeclampsia and EOP group than in controls, respectively. No correlations between the biomarkers were found in preeclampsia. Multivariate logistic regression tests confirmed the results. Conclusions Cytokines, chemokines and complement activation seem to be part of a Th1-like inflammatory reaction in preeclampsia, most pronounced in EOP, where chemokines may be more useful than cytokines as biomarkers. Biomarkers were not correlated suggesting partly independent or in time separated mechanisms.

  • 22.
    Bruno, Valentina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Tor Vergata Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Svensson Arvelund, Judit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rubér, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Piccione, Emilio
    Tor Vergata Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Effects of low molecular weight heparin on the polarization and cytokine profile of macrophages and T helper cells in vitro2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 4166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is widely used in recurrent miscarriage treatment. The anticoagulant effects are established, while immunological effects are not fully known. Our aim was to assess LMWH effects on activation and polarization of central regulatory immune cells from healthy women, and on placenta tissues from women undergoing elective abortions. Isolated blood monocytes and T helper (Th) cells under different activation and polarizing conditions were cultured with or without LMWH. Flow cytometry showed that LMWH exposure induced increased expression of HLA-DR and CD206 in macrophages. This phenotype was associated with increased secretion of Th17-associated CCL20, and decreased secretion of CCL2 (M2-associated) and CCL22 (Th2), as measured by multiplex bead array. In accordance, LMWH exposure to Th cells reduced the proportion of CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T-cells, intensified IFN-gamma secretion and showed a tendency to increase the lymphoblast proportions. Collectively, a mainly pro-inflammatory effect was noted on two essential tolerance-promoting cells. Although the biological significancies of these in vitro findings are uncertain and need to be confirmed in vivo, they suggest the possibility that immunological effects of LMWH may be beneficial mainly at an earlier gestational age to provide an appropriate implantation process in women with recurrent miscarriage.

  • 23.
    Böttcher (Fagerås), Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Gustafson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Voor, T.
    Children's Clinic of Tartu University Clinics, Tartu, Estonia.
    Jenmalm, Maria C.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Endotoxin levels in Estonian and Swedish house dust and atopy in infancy2003In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 295-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Immune responses, including those to allergens, may be T helper (Th)2 skewed in newborns. In order to redress the fetal Th1/Th2 imbalance, Th1-stimulating factors, such as bacterial endotoxin, may be required. The increasing prevalence and severity of atopic diseases in industrialized countries, which are in marked contrast with the low prevalence of allergy among children in the formerly socialist countries of Europe, have been suggested to be caused by a reduced microbial stimulation.

    Aim To relate the endotoxin levels in house dust from two countries with a low (Estonia) and a high (Sweden) prevalence of allergy to the development of atopic disease and sensitization in the children during the first 2 years of life.

    Methods The study included 108 children from Tartu, Estonia and 111 children from Linköping, Sweden. Skin prick tests were performed at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months of age, and questionnaires were distributed to the families. At 24 months, a paediatrician examined the children. Dust samples were collected from mattresses and carpets and the endotoxin concentration was determined by a chromogenic Limulus assay.

    Results The endotoxin levels were higher in Estonian than in Swedish house dust (median levels 29 (range 0.25–280) and 14 (range 0.25–99) EU/mg dust, respectively, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the levels were inversely related to the development of atopic disease and sensitization in the Swedish, but not in the Estonian, children.

    Conclusions The low prevalence of atopic disease in Estonia may, at least in part, be related to the high endotoxin levels in this country. The findings support that high levels of endotoxin, or other bacterial products with Th1-stimulating properties, might protect children from developing atopic disease.

  • 24.
    Böttcher, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bjurström, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mai, Xiaomei
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Barn. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Allergen-induced cytokine secretion in atopic and non-atopic asthmatic children2003In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 345-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atopic asthma is characterized by excessive T helper 2 (Th2)-like immunity to allergens in the bronchial mucosa. The Th2-cytokine interleukin (IL)-4 induces IgE production, while the Th2-cytokine IL-5 promotes eosinophilic inflammation in the airways of asthmatics. Most asthmatics are atopic, but a subgroup is non-atopic. We hypothesize that allergen-induced Th2, particularly IL-5, responses can be observed in peripheral blood in both atopic and non-atopic asthmatic children but not in healthy control children. The aim of the present study was to determine IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, IL-10, IL-13 and IFN-γ secretion induced from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by a broad panel of inhalant allergens (timothy, cat, birch, dog and house dust mite) in asthmatic children with and without sensitization. The study included 13 atopic asthmatic, 5 non-atopic asthmatic, and 12 non-atopic non-asthmatic children. PBMC were stimulated with allergens and cytokine production was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Higher levels of cat and dog antigen-induced IL-5 release were more commonly observed in both atopic and non-atopic asthmatics than in controls. Children with atopic, but not non-atopic, asthma produced higher levels of allergen-induced IL-4 and IL-9 than controls. Non-atopic asthmatics produced more IL-10 than atopic asthmatics after cat stimulation. High levels of eosinophilia-associated IL-5 responses are induced by cat and dog allergen in both atopic and non-atopic asthmatic children. The Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-9 were associated only with atopic asthma, probably due to their IgE-inducing properties.

  • 25.
    Böttcher, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hellquist, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of breast milk from allergic and non-allergic mothers on mitogen- and allergen-induced cytokine production2003In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 27-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breast milk contains several components that provide specific immunity and affect the maturation of the infant's immune system. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of breast milk, on mitogen- and allergen-induced cytokine production from cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC), and if those effects differ between allergic and non-allergic mothers. The cells were incubated for 96 h with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), ovalbumin or cat dander in the presence of various dilutions of colostrum. Colostrum inhibited both mitogen- and cat-induced IFN-γ and mitogen-induced interleukin-4 (IL-4) production. The inhibition on IFN-γ production was to some extent caused by TGF-β, as the effect was modified when an anti-TGF-β antibody was added to the cultures. In contrast, colostrum enhanced allergen-induced production of the Th2-like cytokines IL-5 and IL-13, and this was accompanied with increased production of IL-10. No differences were found between allergic and non-allergic mothers. The inhibitory effect of breast milk on IFN-γ production, which was partly due to the high levels of TGF-β, together with the enhancing effect on IL-10 secretion, confirm that breast milk is anti-inflammatory. Although the production of IL-5 and IL-13 was enhanced by colostrum, this was accompanied with an increased production of IL-10. Together with the high levels of TGF-β in breast milk and inhibitory effect of colostrum on IL-4 production, this suggests a possible mechanism whereby breast-feeding may protect against the development of allergy. Despite differences in the composition of breast milk between allergic and non-allergic mothers, the effects of breast milk on cytokine production from CBMC were independent of the atopic status of the mothers.

  • 26.
    Böttcher, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Häggström, Bo
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Björksten, Bengt
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Total and allergen-specific immunoglobulin a levels in saliva in relation to the development of allergy in infants up to 2 years of age2002In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 32, no 9, p. 1293-1298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The association between salivary IgA levels and development of allergy is controversial and the employed methodology has been questioned. Objective: The aim of the study was to relate the levels of total IgA, SIgA and allergen-specific IgA antibodies in saliva to the development of allergy in infants during the first 2 years of life. Methods: Saliva samples from 80 infants participating in a prospective study regarding the development of allergy were collected at 3 or 6, and 12 and 24 months of age. Total IgA, SIgA and Fel d 1 and ▀-lactoglobulin specific IgA levels were analysed with ELISA. Results: The levels of total IgA and SIgA increased with age. The number of samples with detectable IgA to Fel d 1 tended to increase with age, whereas the opposite was observed for IgA to ▀-lactoglobulin. Infants who developed allergy tended to have higher levels of total IgA, and allergen-specific IgA was more commonly detected than in non-allergic children. In contrast, non-allergic children tended to have higher levels of SIgA. Furthermore, the levels of SIgA were higher in sensitized infants with no allergic symptoms than in sensitized children with symptoms. Infants with allergic parents had lower SIgA levels than infants without. Direct exposure to cat and cow's milk did not influence the levels of allergen-specific IgA levels, nor was there any association between breast-feeding and IgA production. Conclusion: The kinetics of food and inhalant allergen-specific IgA in saliva during the first 2 years of life is similar to what has earlier been shown for IgG in serum. Development of allergy tended to be associated with high levels of total and allergen-specific IgA antibodies, but low levels of SIgA. Furthermore, high levels of SIgA seemed to protect sensitized children from developing allergic symptoms during the first 2 years of life, supporting a possible protective role of SIgA against development of allergy.

  • 27.
    Böttcher, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Breastfeeding and the development of atopic disease during childhood2002In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 159-161Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Böttcher, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics .
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics .
    The effects of breast milk on mitogen and allergen induced cytokine production from cord blood cells2001In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 107, no 2, p. 261-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Böttcher, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Center for Allergy Research and Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska, Sweden.
    Cytokine, chemokine and secretory IgA levels in human milk in relation to atopic disease and IgA production in infants2003In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 35-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between breast-feeding, IgA production and development of atopic disease in children is a matter of controversy. Some of this controversy might be due to individual differences in the composition of breast milk. The aim of this study was to relate the levels of cytokines, chemokines and secretory (S)-IgA antibodies in breast milk to the development of atopic manifestation and salivary IgA production in infants. Cytokine, chemokine and SIgA levels, as measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), in colostrum and mature milk were analyzed in relation to the development of positive skin-prick tests (SPT), allergic symptoms and salivary IgA antibody production during the first 2 years of life in 53 infants. There was no association between levels of IL-4, -5, -6, -8, -10, -13, -16, IFN-γ, TGF-β1, -β2, RANTES, eotaxin or SIgA levels in the breast milk with either SPT-positivity, development of allergic symptoms or salivary IgA levels during the first 2 years of life in the infants. Thus, differences in the composition of cytokines, chemokines and SIgA in breast milk did not, to any major degree, affect the development of a positive SPT, atopic symptoms, nor salivary IgA antibody production during the first 2 years of life.

  • 30.
    Böttcher, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics .
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics .
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Immune responses to birch in young children during their first 7 years of life2002In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 57, p. 43-43Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Böttcher, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Garofalo, Roberto P.
    Department of Pediatrics, Division of Immunology/Allergy/Rheumatology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, U.S.A..
    Chemoattractant factors in breast milk from allergic and nonallergic mothers2000In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 592-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The allergy-preventing effect of breast-feeding remains controversial, possibly because of individual variations in the composition of the breast milk. Recently, we showed that allergic mothers had higher concentrations of IL-4 and lower concentrations of ovalbumin-specific IgA in their breast milk than nonallergic mothers. The aim of this study was to investigate the concentrations of chemokines and cytokines that are chemotactic to cells involved in allergic reactions in breast milk from allergic and nonallergic mothers. Cytokine and chemokine concentrations were determined with ELISA in colostrum and mature milk samples from 23 mothers with and 25 mothers without atopic symptoms. IL-8 was detected in all milk samples. RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted), eotaxin, and IL-16 were detected in 50%, 76%, and 48%, respectively, in colostrum and less commonly in mature milk. Macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, however, could not be detected in any of the samples. The concentrations of IL-8 and RANTES were higher in breast milk from allergic, compared with nonallergic, mothers. In conclusion, the presence of chemoattractant factors in breast milk may be responsible for the traffic of leukocytes from the maternal circulation to the breast milk. The higher concentrations of RANTES and IL-8 in allergic mothers may partly explain the controversy regarding the protective effect of breast-feeding against the development of allergy by stronger chemotaxis and activation of cells involved in allergic diseases, and possibly by elevated IgE production.

  • 32.
    Böttcher, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Garofalo, R
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Barn.
    Human milk polyunsaturated long-chain fatty acids and secretory immunoglobulin A antibodies and early childhood allergy2000In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 29-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possible protective effect of breast milk against atopic manifestations in infancy, i.e. atopic eczema and food allergy, has been controversial for the last decades. Besides the methodological problems, differences in the composition of human milk could explain these controversies. The aim of this study was to investigate the composition of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) levels to food proteins (ovalbumin and ▀-lactoglobulin) and an inhalant allergen (cat) in milk from mothers of allergic and non-allergic children. Blood samples were obtained at birth and at 3 months from 120 children. Skin prick tests were performed at 6, 12 and 18 months, and the development of atopic diseases was assessed in the children. Breast milk samples were collected from their mothers at birth and monthly during the lactation period. Milk PUFA composition was measured by gas chromatography, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure total S-IgA, anti-cat S-IgA, anti-ovalbumin S-IgA, and anti-▀-lactoglobulin S-IgA. Allergic disease developed in 44/120 children (22/63 children of allergic mothers and 22/57 children of non-allergic mothers). Lower levels of eicosapentaenoic acid, C20:5 n-3 (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid C22:5 n-3 (DPA), and docosatetraenoic acid C22:4 n-6 (DHA) (p < 0.05 for all) were found in mature milk from mothers of allergic as compared to milk from mothers of non-allergic children. The total n-6 : total n-3 and the arachidonic acid, C20:4 n-6 (AA) : EPA ratios were significantly lower in transitional and mature milk from mothers of allergic children, as compared to milk from mothers of non-allergic children. The PUFA levels in serum of allergic and non-allergic children were largely similar, except for higher levels of C22:4 n-6 and C22:5 n-6 (p < 0.05 for both) and a higher AA:EPA ratio in serum phospholipids in the former group (p < 0.05). Changes in the levels of milk PUFA were reflected in changes in PUFA serum phospholipids, particularly for the n-6 PUFA. The AA:EPA ratio in maternal milk was related, however, to the AA:EPA only in serum from non-allergic children, while this was not the case in allergic children. The levels of total S-IgA, anti-cat S-IgA, anti-ovalbumin S-IgA, and anti-▀-lactoglobulin S-IgA in milk from mothers of allergic, as compared to non-allergic, children were similar through the first 3 months of lactation. Low levels of n-3 PUFA in human milk, and particularly a high AA:EPA ratio in maternal milk and serum phospholipids in the infants, were related to the development of symptoms of allergic disease at 18 months of age. The milk PUFA composition influenced the composition of PUFA in serum phospholipids of the children. We also showed that the lower levels of colostral anti-ovalbumin S-IgA and lower total S-IgA in mature milk from atopic mothers did not influence the development of allergic disease in the children up to 18 months of age. The findings indicate that low a-linolenic acid, C18:3 n-3 (LNA) and n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCP) 20-22 carbon chains, but not the levels of S-IgA antibodies to allergens, are related to the development of atopy in children.

  • 33.
    Böttcher, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Garofalo, Roberto P.
    Department of Pediatrics, Division of Immunology/Allergy/Rheumatology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, USA.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cytokines in breast milk from allergic and nonallergic mothers2000In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 157-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The allergy-preventing effect of breast-feeding remains controversial, possibly because of individual variations in the composition of the breast milk. The aim of this study was to investigate the concentrations of cytokines involved in allergic reactions and IgA antibody production in breast milk from allergic and nonallergic mothers. The cytokine concentrations were determined in colostrum and 1-mo milk samples from 24 mothers with, and 25 mothers without, atopic symptoms, using commercial ELISA kits. The immunosuppressive cytokine transforming growth factor-β was predominant and was detectable in all milk samples. IL-6 was detected in the majority of colostral and mature milk samples, whereas the other cytokines were less commonly detected. The concentrations of IL-6, IL-10, and transforming growth factor-β, which are all involved in IgA synthesis, correlated with each other and with total IgA concentrations in colostrum. The concentrations of IL-4 were higher in colostrum from allergic than nonallergic mothers, and similar trends were seen for IL-5 and IL-13. In conclusion, transforming growth factor-β and IL-6 were the predominant cytokines in human milk. The correlation between the concentrations of cytokines involved in IgA synthesis, i.e. IL-10, IL-6, and transforming growth factor-β, may explain the stimulatory effect on IgA production in breast-fed babies. Varying concentrations of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 may explain some of the controversy regarding the possible allergy-preventive effect of breast-feeding.

  • 34.
    Böttcher, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics .
    Lindström, Annelie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics .
    Bjorksten, B.
    Björkstén, B., Centre for Allergy Research, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vaarala, O.
    Department of Molecular Medicine, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
    Reply [6]2006In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 117, no 1, p. 220Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 35.
    Casas, Rosaura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics .
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics .
    Cat allergen induced cytokine secretion and Fel d 1-IgG immune complexes in cord blood2002In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 109, no 1, p. 529-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Casas, Rosaura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics .
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics .
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Cat allergen induced cytokine secretion in relation with the detection of Fel d 1-IgG immune complexes in cord blood2002In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 57, p. 135-135Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Casas, Rosaura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cat allergen-induced cytokine secretion and Fel d 1–immunoglobulin G immune complexes in cord blood2004In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 591-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background We have recently obtained evidence for the presence of immune complexes (IC) in cord blood from allergic and non-allergic mothers. Such complexes could conceivably provide the fetus with the initial trigger for the priming of the T cell system already in utero.

    Objective To relate the presence of Fel d 1–IgG IC to T cell cytokine production in cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs) after stimulation with cat allergen.

    Methods CBMC obtained from babies of 15 allergic and 22 non-allergic mothers were cultured in the presence of cat allergen. The production of IFN-γ, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 was determined by ELISA. Furthermore, IgG1 and IgG4 antibodies to cat allergen in cord blood samples were measured by ELISA. A more sensitive ELISA was used to measure Fel d 1–IgG IC.

    Results The prevalence and levels of IC were similar in cord blood from children of allergic and non-allergic mothers. The production of IL-5, IL-10. IL-13 and IFN-γ by CBMC was not influenced by maternal atopy, but IFN-γ was less commonly detected in samples with IC. There was no association between the presence of IC and any other cytokines. The levels of IgG1 and IgG4 antibodies were similar in both groups, and tended to be associated with the presence of IC.

    Conclusion Immune complexes in cord blood may represent a normal mechanism for inducing primary immune responses, as the responses in babies from allergic and non-allergic mothers were largely similar. Low levels of IFN-γ seems to be related with the presence of IC in cord blood.

  • 38.
    Christmann, Benjamin S.
    et al.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bernstein, Charles N.
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Wayne Duck, L.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Mannon, Peter J.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bjorksten, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Elson, Charles O.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Human seroreactivity to gut microbiota antigens2015In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 136, no 5, p. 1378-1386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although immune responses directed against antigens from the intestinal microbiota are observed in certain diseases, the normal human adaptive immune response to intestinal microbiota is poorly defined. Objective: Our goal was to assess the adaptive immune response to the intestinal microbiota present in 143 healthy adults and compare this response with the response observed in 52 children and their mothers at risk of having allergic disease. Methods: Human serum was collected from adults and children followed from birth to 7 years of age, and the serum IgG response to a panel of intestinal microbiota antigens was assessed by using a novel protein microarray. Results: Nearly every subject tested, regardless of health status, had serum IgG that recognized a common set of antigens. Seroreactivity to the panel of antigens was significantly lower in atopic adults. Healthy infants expressed the highest level of IgG seroreactivity to intestinal microbiota antigens. This adaptive response developed between 6 and 12 months of age and peaked around 2 years of age. Low IgG responses to certain clusters of microbiota antigens during infancy were associated with allergy development during childhood. Conclusions: There is an observed perturbation of the adaptive response to antigens from the microbiota in allergic subjects. These perturbations are observable even in childhood, suggesting that optimal stimulation of the adaptive immune system by the microbiota might be needed to prevent certain immune-mediated diseases.

  • 39.
    Copland, DA
    et al.
    University of Bristol.
    Calder, CJ
    University of Bristol.
    Raveney, BJ
    University of Bristol.
    Nicholson, LB
    University of Bristol.
    Phillips, J
    SP Biopharma, Palo Alto, California.
    Cherwinski, H
    SP Biopharma, Palo Alto, California.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    SP Biopharma, Palo Alto, California.
    Sedgewick, JD
    SP Biopharma, Palo Alto, California.
    Dick, AD
    University of Bristol.
    Monoclonal antibody-mediated CD200 receptor signaling suppresses macrophage activation and tissue damage in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis2007In: American Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0002-9440, E-ISSN 1525-2191, Vol. 171, no 2, p. 580-588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Macrophage responses are regulated by multiple secreted factors as well as by cell surface receptors, including the inhibitory signals resulting from ligation of myeloid CD200 receptors (CD200R) by the widely distributed CD200. In the absence of CD200, animals display increased susceptibility to autoimmunity and earlier onset aggressive autoimmune disease. In these current experiments, an agonist monoclonal rat anti-mouse CD200R (DX109) antibody delivered a negative signal to bone marrow-derived macrophages, which suppressed interferon (IFN)-mediated nitric oxide (NO) and interleukin-6 production. Experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) was used as a model of organ-specific autoimmunity in the eye, a tissue with extensive neuronal and endothelial CD200 expression. In mice lacking CD200 (CD200-/-), increased numbers of retina-infiltrating macrophages displaying heightened NO responses were observed during EAU. In addition, we aimed to suppress disease by maintaining tonic suppression of macrophage activation via CD200R. Systemically administered DX109 monoclonal antibody suppressed EAU despite maintained T-cell proliferation and IFN production. Furthermore, locally administered DX109 monoclonal antibody resulted in an earlier resolution of disease. These experiments demonstrate that promoting CD200R-mediated signaling can successfully prevent full expression of IFN-mediated macrophage activation and protect against tissue damage during autoimmune responses.

  • 40.
    Dzidic, Majda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. CSIC, Spain; FISABIO, Spain; CIBER ESP, Spain.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Artacho, A.
    FISABIO, Spain; CIBER ESP, Spain.
    Collado, M. C.
    CSIC, Spain.
    Mira, A.
    FISABIO, Spain; CIBER ESP, Spain.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Oral microbiota maturation during the first 7 years of life in relation to allergy development2018In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 73, no 10, p. 2000-2011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Allergic diseases have become a major public health problem in affluent societies. Microbial colonization early in life seems to be critical for instructing regulation on immune system maturation and allergy development in children. Even though the oral cavity is the first site of encounter between a majority of foreign antigens and the immune system, the influence of oral bacteria on allergy development has not yet been reported. Objective Methods We sought to determine the bacterial composition in longitudinally collected saliva samples during childhood in relation to allergy development. Illumina sequencing of the 16S rDNA gene was used to characterize the oral bacterial composition in saliva samples collected at 3, 6, 12, 24 months, and 7 years of age from children developing allergic symptoms and sensitization (n = 47) and children staying healthy (n = 33) up to 7 years of age. Results Conclusion Children developing allergic disease, particularly asthma, had lower diversity of salivary bacteria together with highly divergent bacterial composition at 7 years of age, showing a clearly altered oral microbiota in these individuals, likely as a consequence of an impaired immune system during infancy. Moreover, the relative amounts of several bacterial species, including increased abundance of Gemella haemolysans in children developing allergies and Lactobacillus gasseri and L. crispatus in healthy children, were distinctive during early infancy, likely influencing early immune maturation. Early changes in oral microbial composition seem to influence immune maturation and allergy development. Future experiments should test the probiotic potential of L. gasseri and L. crispatus isolates.

  • 41.
    Dzidic, Majda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. FISABIO Fdn, Spain; Spanish National Research Council, Spain.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Artacho, Alejandro
    FISABIO Fdn, Spain.
    Björksten, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Collado, Maria Carmen
    Spanish National Research Council, Spain.
    Mira, Alex
    FISABIO Fdn, Spain.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aberrant IgA responses to the gut microbiota during infancy precede asthma and allergy development2017In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 139, no 3, p. 1017-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although a reduced gut microbiota diversity and low mucosal total IgA levels in infancy have been associated with allergy development, IgA responses to the gut microbiota have not yet been studied. Objective: We sought to determine the proportions of IgA coating together with the characterization of the dominant bacteria, bound to IgA or not, in infant stool samples in relation to allergy development. Methods: A combination of flow cytometric cell sorting and deep sequencing of the 16S rDNA gene was used to characterize the bacterial recognition patterns by IgA in stool samples collected at 1 and 12 months of age from children staying healthy or having allergic symptoms up to 7 years of age. Results: The children with allergic manifestations, particularly asthma, during childhood had a lower proportion of IgA bound to fecal bacteria at 12months of age compared with healthy children. These alterations cannot be attributed to differences in IgA levels or bacterial load between the 2 groups. Moreover, the bacterial targets of early IgA responses (including coating of the Bacteroides genus), as well as IgA recognition patterns, differed between healthy children and children with allergic manifestations. Altered IgA recognition patterns in children with allergy were observed already at 1 month of age, when the IgA antibodies are predominantly maternally derived in breast-fed children. Conclusion: An aberrant IgAresponsiveness to the gutmicrobiota during infancy precedes asthma and allergy development, possibly indicating an impaired mucosal barrier function in allergic children.

  • 42.
    Dzidic, Majda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. CSISP FISABIO, Spain; Inst Agrochem and Food Technol IATA CSIC, Spain.
    Collado, Maria C.
    Inst Agrochem and Food Technol IATA CSIC, Spain.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Artacho, Alejandro
    CSISP FISABIO, Spain.
    Stensson, Malin
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mira, Alex
    CSISP FISABIO, Spain.
    Oral microbiome development during childhood: an ecological succession influenced by postnatal factors and associated with tooth decay2018In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 12, no 9, p. 2292-2306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information on how the oral microbiome develops during early childhood and how external factors influence this ecological process is scarce. We used high-throughput sequencing to characterize bacterial composition in saliva samples collected at 3, 6, 12, 24 months and 7 years of age in 90 longitudinally followed children, for whom clinical, dietary and health data were collected. Bacterial composition patterns changed through time, starting with "early colonizers", including Streptococcus and Veillonella; other bacterial genera such as Neisseria settled after 1 or 2 years of age. Dental caries development was associated with diverging microbial composition through time. Streptococcus cristatus appeared to be associated with increased risk of developing tooth decay and its role as potential biomarker of the disease should be studied with species-specific probes. Infants born by C-section had initially skewed bacterial content compared with vaginally delivered infants, but this was recovered with age. Shorter breastfeeding habits and antibiotic treatment during the first 2 years of age were associated with a distinct bacterial composition at later age. The findings presented describe oral microbiota development as an ecological succession where altered colonization pattern during the first year of life may have long-term consequences for childs oral and systemic health.

  • 43.
    Dzidic, Majda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Inst Agrochem and Food Technol IATA CSIC, Spain; FISABIO, Spain.
    Mira, Alex
    FISABIO, Spain; CIBER ESP, Spain.
    Artacho, Alejandro
    FISABIO, Spain.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carmen Collado, Maria
    Inst Agrochem and Food Technol IATA CSIC, Spain.
    Allergy development is associated with consumption of breastmilk with a reduced microbial richness in the first month of life2019In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Early colonization with a diverse microbiota seems to play a crucial role for appropriate immune maturation during childhood. Breastmilk microbiota is one important source of microbes for the infant, transferred together with maternal IgA antibodies. We previously observed that allergy development during childhood was associated with aberrant IgA responses to the gut microbiota already at 1 month of age, when the IgA antibodies are predominantly maternally derived in breastfed infants. Objective To determine the microbial composition and IgA-coated bacteria in breastmilk in relation to allergy development in children participating in an intervention trial with pre- and post-natal Lactobacillus reuteri supplementation. Methods A combination of flow cytometric cell sorting and 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to characterize the bacterial recognition patterns by IgA in breastmilk samples collected one month post-partum from 40 mothers whose children did or did not develop allergic and asthmatic symptoms during the first 7 years of age. Results The milk fed to children developing allergic manifestations had significantly lower bacterial richness, when compared to the milk given to children that remained healthy. Probiotic treatment influenced the breastmilk microbiota composition. However, the proportions of IgA-coated bacteria, the total bacterial load and the patterns of IgA-coating were similar in breastmilk between mothers of healthy children and those developing allergies. Conclusion Consumption of breastmilk with a reduced microbial richness in the first month of life may play an important role in allergy development during childhood.

  • 44.
    Edström, Måns
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mellergård, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Mjösberg, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Press, Rayomand
    Karolinska Hospital.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Th1/Th2/Th17 and Treg related transcription factors and cytokines in multiple sclerosis2008In: JOURNAL OF NEUROIMMUNOLOGY, 2008, Vol. 203, no 2, p. 131-132Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Edström, Måns
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Huddinge University Hospital.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Regulatory T cells in Multiple Sclerosis – Indications of impaired function of suppressive capacity and a role for chemokines2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Regulatory T cells (Treg) are critical for immune regulation and homeostasis. In multiple sclerosis (MS), the function of these cells has been shown to be impaired, although the underlying mechanism has yet to be shown. In the current study, we aimed to characterize and assess the phenotypical, functional and transcriptional characteristics of memory and naïve Treg in MS patients and controls.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS 27 patients with relapsing-remitting disease were included, along with 29 healthy controls. Flow cytometry was used for detailed phenotyping of Treg subpopulations CD4+CD45RA+/- and CD4dimCD25++ and their expression of FOXP3, CD39 and HELIOS. CFSE (proliferation marker) and CD69 (activation marker) were used to investigate the functional capacity of Treg. A microarray was employed for genome-wide transcriptional characterization of isolated Treg.

    RESULTS CD4+CD45RA–CD25++ activated Treg displayed a higher expression of FOXP3 and CD39 than resting CD4+CD45RA+CD25+ Treg, while no significant phenotypical differences were observed in Treg subpopulations between patients and controls. However, a lower anti-proliferative capacity was observed in activated Treg of MS patients compared with those of controls (p<0.05), while suppression of activation was similar to controls. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of microarray data revealed enrichment for the GO gene set ‘chemokine receptor binding’ in MS Treg.

    CONCLUSION Although numerical phenotypical assessment of resting and activated Tregs did not reveal any significant difference between patients and controls, functional co-culturing experiments showed an impaired function in activated Treg of MS patients. Furthermore, GSEA revealed immune-related gene sets overexpressed in Treg of MS patients, possibly containing clues to the functional impairment. In particular over-activity in chemokine signalling in Treg would be of interest for further investigation.

  • 46.
    Edström, Måns
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mellergård, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Mjösberg, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Press, R
    Huddinge University Hospital.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Transcriptional characteristics of CD4+ T cells in multiple sclerosis: relative lack of suppressive populations in blood2011In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 57-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Multiple sclerosis (MS) is hypothetically caused by autoreactive Th1 and Th17 cells, whereas Th2 and regulatory T cells may confer protection. The development of Th subpopulations is dependant on the expression of lineage-specific transcription factors.

    Objective:The aim of this study was to assess the balance of CD4+T cell populations in relapsing-remitting MS.

    Methods:Blood mRNA expression of TBX21, GATA3, RORC, FOXP3 and EBI3 was assessed in 33 patients with relapsing-remitting MS and 20 healthy controls. In addition, flow cytometry was performed to assess T lymphocyte numbers.

    Results:In relapsing-remitting MS, diminished expression of FOXP3 (Treg) was found (p < 0.05), despite normal numbers of CD4+CD25hiTreg. Immunoregulatory EBI3 and Th2-associated GATA3 ([a-z]+) was also decreased in MS (p < 0.005 and p < 0.05, respectively). Expression of TBX21 (Th1) and RORC (Th17) did not differ between patients and controls. Similar changes were observed when analysing beta-interferon treated (n = 12) or untreated (n = 21) patients. Analysis of transcription factor ratios, comparing TBX21/GATA3 and RORC/FOXP3, revealed an increase in the RORC/FOXP3 ratio in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (p < 0.005).

    Conclusion:Our findings indicate systemic defects at the mRNA level, involving downregulation of beneficial CD4+phenotypes. This might play a role in disease development by permitting activation of harmful T cell populations.

  • 47.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Detection of spontaneous and antigen-induced human interleukin-4 responses in vitro: Comparison of ELISPOT, a novel ELISA and real-time RT-PCR2002In: JIM - Journal of Immunological Methods, ISSN 0022-1759, E-ISSN 1872-7905, Vol. 260, no 1-2, p. 55-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is an important T-helper cell type 2 (Th2) cytokine in man, driving Th2 polarisation and exerting the most antagonistic effects to the Th1 cytokine interferon-? (IFN-?). Nevertheless, few data on spontaneous and antigen-specific secretion of IL-4 in man are available, mainly due to difficulties in the detection of IL-4. In this study, we compared three assays that can detect antigen-induced IL-4 responses, ELISPOT, ELISA after blocking the IL-4 receptor during cell culture, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Spontaneous, antigen- and allergen-induced responses were analysed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from three groups with different secretion patterns for IL-4: atopic individuals, nonatopic individuals and pregnant women. ELISPOT displayed the highest sensitivity and was the only assay that could detect spontaneous secretion of IL-4 in all analysed samples. The IL-4 receptor blocking ELISA was considered best for the detection of in vitro antigen- and allergen-induced responses, since the results obtained from the ELISPOT and real-time RT-PCR displayed lower specificity, possibly because of seemingly aberrant IL-4 responses in the group of pregnant women. The real-time RT-PCR for detection of IL-4 mRNA proved to be sensitive, but expression of IL-4 mRNA was not correlated with the secretion of IL-4.

  • 48.
    Ekman, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sigurdardottir, G
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kartul, N
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Enerbäck, Charlotta
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology.
    Systemically elevated Th1-, Th2-and Th17-associated chemokines in psoriasis in JOURNAL OF INVESTIGATIVE DERMATOLOGY, vol 132, issue , pp S28-S282012In: JOURNAL OF INVESTIGATIVE DERMATOLOGY, Nature Publishing Group , 2012, Vol. 132, p. S28-S28Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 49.
    Ekman, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sigurdardottir, Gunnthorunn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kartul, Natalja
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Enerbäck, Charlotta
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Systemically elevated Th1-, Th2- and Th17-associated chemokines in psoriasis vulgaris before and after ultraviolet B treatment2013In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 93, no 5, p. 527-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemokines may contribute to the systemic inflammation that is linked to the increased risk of co-morbidities in patients with psoriasis. The aim of this study was to investigate circulating chemokines in patients with psoriasis and their relationship to disease severity. Analysis of plasma levels of chemokines in patients with psoriasis before narrowband ultraviolet B (UVB) therapy revealed increased expression of Th1-associated CXCL9 and -10, Th2-associated CCL17 and CCL22, and Th17-associated CCL20. CCL20 correlated with disease severity. UVB therapy reduced skin symptoms, but did not affect the chemokine levels in plasma. Anti-CD3 and anti-CD28-mediated activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) caused a higher secretion of Th2 cytokine interleukin (IL)-13 by PBMCs from patients with psoriasis than from healthy controls. The sustained high expression of inflammatory chemokines is a potential link to systemic inflammation in psoriasis. UVB therapy may be a more effective treatment of local rather than systemic inflammation.

  • 50.
    Ekman, Bertil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Alstrand, N
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. County Hospital, Kalmar .
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria C
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wahlberg, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Altered Chemokine Th1/Th2 Balance in Addison's Disease: Relationship with Hydrocortisone Dosing and Quality of Life2014In: Hormone and Metabolic Research, ISSN 0018-5043, E-ISSN 1439-4286, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 48-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adrenalitis found in autoimmune Addison’s disease (AAD) is considered having a Th1-driven pathogenesis. Circulating Th1- and Th2-associated chemokines responsible for the trafficking of leukocytes to inflammatory sites are markers for the Th1/Th2 balance. The aim of the study was to assess if the same daily hydrocortisone dose of 30 mg given in either 2 or 4 doses to patients with AAD could affect the Th1/Th2 balance of circulating chemokines.

    Fifteen patients (6 women) with AAD were included in this randomised, placebo controlled, double blind cross-over study. Samples for chemokines, Th1-associated (CXCL10, CXCL11) and Th2-associated (CCL17, CCL22), were drawn 5 times during a 24-h period at the end of each treatment period and analysed with Luminex. Seven control subjects did the same diurnal blood sampling once. Subjects with AAD had higher median diurnal levels of the Th1-associated chemokines than controls, CXCL10 [43 (33–56) pg/ml vs. 22 (19–34) pg/ml, p<0.01] and CXCL11 [37 (29–48) pg/ml vs. 16 (9–24) pg/ml, p<0.001], whereas no significant difference was found regarding the Th2-related chemokines. Similar chemokine levels were found when the same hydrocortisone dose of 30 mg was divided in 2 or 4 doses. Levels of CXCL11 correlated negatively with scores of SF-36 domains (high score indicate better health) of General Health (GH) and total score for Physical Component Summary (PCS), and these negative correlations were most pronounced at 04:00 h on the 2-dose regimen. Patients with AAD have a dominant Th1 chemokine profile that partially correlates to reduced quality of life.

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