liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Hahn, Robert G.
    et al.
    Sodertalje Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst Danderyds Hosp KIDS, Sweden.
    Hasselgren, Emma
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Bjorne, Hakan
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Zdolsek, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zdolsek, Joachim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Biomarkers of endothelial injury in plasma are dependent on kidney function2019In: Clinical hemorheology and microcirculation, ISSN 1386-0291, E-ISSN 1875-8622, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 161-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Injury (shedding) of the endothelial glycocalyx layer, which alters local blood flow and microvascular permeability, is assessed by measuring components of this layer in circulating blood. The influence of renal function on their concentrations is unknown. METHODS: Plasma and urine concentrations of three shedding products (syndecan-1, hyaluronic acid, and heparan sulfate) and creatinine were measured over 5 hours in 15 healthy volunteers and 15 postoperative patients; this guaranteed a spread of kidney functions. Renal clearances were calculated. RESULTS: Low renal clearances of syndecan-1 (mean 3.5 mL/min) and hyaluronic acid (0.8 mL/min) correlated inversely with the 6-fold variability in the plasma concentrations of these substances (r = -0 . 45 and-0.49). Low creatinine clearance correlated inversely (r = -0.60) and plasma creatinine directly (r = 0.52) with the two-fold variability in heparan sulfate, which was the only shedding substance that also correlated with C-reactive protein (r= 0.51) and, therefore, showed higher concentrations after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: The present explorative study suggests that a 6-fold variability in the plasma concentrations of three commonly measured endothelial shedding products can be understood by the kidneys ability to excrete them. This finding has implications when interpreting results of studies where shedding is assessed.

  • 2.
    Hahn, Robert G.
    et al.
    Sodertalje Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Zdolsek, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Hasselgren, Emma
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Zdolsek, Joachim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Bjoerne, Hakan
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Fluid volume kinetics of 20% albumin2019In: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0306-5251, E-ISSN 1365-2125, Vol. 85, no 6, p. 1303-1311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims A population kinetic model was developed for the body fluid shifts occurring when 20% albumin is given by intravenous infusion. The aim was to study whether its efficacy to expand the plasma volume is impaired after major surgery. Methods An intravenous infusion of 3 mL/kg 20% albumin over 30 minutes was given to 15 volunteers and to 15 patients on the 1(st) day after major open abdominal surgery. Blood samples and urine were collected during 5 hours. Mixed-effect modelling software was used to develop a fluid volume kinetic model, using blood haemoglobin and urine excretion the estimate body fluid shifts, to which individual-specific covariates were added in sequence. Results The rise in plasma albumin expanded the plasma volume in excess of the infused volume by relocating noncirculating fluid (rate constant k(21)), but it also increased losses of fluid from the kinetic system (k(b)). The balance between k(21) and k(b) maintained the rise in plasma albumin and plasma volume at a virtual steady-state for almost 2 hours. The rate constant for urinary excretion (k(10)) was slightly reduced by the preceding surgery, by a marked rise in plasma albumin, and by a high preinfusion urinary concentration of creatinine. The arterial pressure, body weight, and plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein and shedding products of the endothelial glycocalyx layer (syndecan-1, heparan sulfate, and hyaluronic acid) did not serve as statistically significant covariates. Conclusions There were no clinically relevant differences in the kinetics of 20% albumin between postoperative patients and volunteers.

  • 3.
    Hasselgren, Emma
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Zdolsek, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Zdolsek, Joachim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Bjoerne, Hakan
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Krizhanovskii, Camilla
    Sodertalje Hosp, Sweden; Danderyds Hosp KIDS, Sweden.
    Ntika, Stelia
    Sodertalje Hosp, Sweden; Danderyds Hosp KIDS, Sweden.
    Hahn, Robert G.
    Sodertalje Hosp, Sweden; Danderyds Hosp KIDS, Sweden.
    Long Intravascular Persistence of 20% Albumin in Postoperative Patients2019In: Anesthesia and Analgesia, ISSN 0003-2999, E-ISSN 1526-7598, Vol. 129, no 5, p. 1232-1239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Albumin may persist intravascularly for a shorter time in patients after major surgery than in healthy volunteers due to a surgery-induced breakdown (shedding) of the endothelial glycocalyx layer. METHODS: In this nonrandomized clinical trial, an IV infusion of 3 mL/kg of 20% albumin was given at a constant rate during 30 minutes to 15 patients on the first day after major open abdominal surgery (mean operating time 5.9 h) and to 15 conscious volunteers. Blood samples and urine were collected during 5 h and mass balance calculations used to estimate the half-lives of the administered albumin molecules and the induced plasma volume expansion, based on measurements of hemodilution and the plasma albumin concentration. RESULTS: At the end of the infusions, albumin had diluted the plasma volume by 13.3% +/- 4.9% (mean +/- SD) in the postoperative patients and by 14.2% +/- 4.8% in the volunteers (mean difference -0.9, 95% CI, -4.7 to 2.9; 1-way ANOVA P = .61), which amounted to twice the infused volume. The intravascular half-life of the infused albumin molecules was 9.1 (5.7-11.2) h in the surgical patients and 6.0 (5.1-9.0) h in the volunteers (Mann-Whitney U test, P = .26; geometric mean difference 1.2, 95% CI, 0.8-2.0). The half-life of the plasma volume expansion was 10.3 (5.3-17.6; median and interquartile range) h in the surgical patients and 7.6 (3.5-9.0) h in the volunteers (P = .10; geometric mean difference 1.5, 95% CI, 0.8-2.8). All of these parameters correlated positively with the body mass index (correlation coefficients being 0.42-0.47) while age and sex did not affect the results. CONCLUSIONS: Twenty percent albumin caused a long-lasting plasma volume expansion of similar magnitude in postoperative patients and volunteers.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf