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  • 1.
    Aneq Åström, Meriam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Evaluation of Right and Left Ventricular Function Using Speckle Tracking Echocardiography in Patients with Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy and Their First Degree RelativesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and aim: The identification of right ventricular abnormalities in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) in early stages is still difficult. The aim of this study was to investigate if longitudinal strain based on speckle tracking can detect subtle right (RV) or left ventricular (LV) dysfunction as an early sign of ARVC.

    Methods and results: Seventeen male patients, fulfilling Task force criteria for ARVC, 49 (32-70) years old, nineteen male first degree relatives 29 (19-73) y.o. and twenty-two healthy male volunteers 36 (24-66) y.o participated in the study. Twelve-lead and signal-averaged electrocardiograms were recorded. All subjects underwent echocardiography. LV and RV diameters, peak systolic velocity from tissue Doppler and longitudinal strain based on speckle tracking were measured from the basal and mid segments in both ventricles. RV longitudinal strain measurement was successful in first degree relatives and controls (95 resp. 86%) but less feasible in patients (59%). Results were not systematically different between first degree relatives and controls. Using discriminant analysis, we then developed an index based on echocardiographic parameters. All normal controls had an index <l while patients with abnormal ventricles had an index between 1-4. Some of the first degree relatives deviated from the normal pattern.

    Conclusion: Longitudinal strain of LV and RV segments was significantly lower in patients than in relatives and controls. An index was developed incorporating dimensional and functional echocardiographic parameters. In combination with genetic testing this index might help to detect early phenotype expression in mutation carriers.

  • 2.
    Aneq Åström, Meriam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Fluur, Christina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Rehnberg, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Novel plakophilin2 mutation. Three generation family with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy2012In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, Vol. 46, no 2, 72-75 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The autosomal dominant form of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC)has been linked to mutations in desmosomal proteins. Different studies have shown that amutation in plakophilin-2 (PKP 2) is a frequent genetic cause for ARVC. We describe a newmutation in the PKP2 gene, the genotype-phenotype variation in this mutation and its clinicalconsequences.

    Design: Individuals in a three generation family were investigated after the sudden cardiac death of a young male. Clinical evaluation, electrocardiography, echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, endomyocardial biopsy and genetic testing were performed.

    Results: A novel heterozygote mutation, a c.368G>A transition, located in exon 3 of the PKP2 gene was found (p.Trp123X). The phenotype was characterized by arrhythmia at an early age in some individuals, with mild abnormalities on imaging. However a relative carrying this mutation, with positive findings on endomyocardial biopsy had an otherwise normal phenotype, for 16 years, whereas a relative fulfilling the modified Task Force Criteria for ARVC turned out to be a non-carrier.

    Conclusions: This shows the variable penetrance and phenotypic expression in ARVC and highlights the need of genetic testing as well as a thorough phenotype examination as a part of the investigations in ARVC pedigrees.

  • 3.
    Aneq Åström, Meriam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Determination of right ventricular volume and function using multiple axially rotated MRI slices2011In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 31, no 3, 233-239 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pandgt;Background: The conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method for right ventricular (RV) volume and motion, using short-axis (SA) orientation, is limited by RV anatomy and shape. We suggest an orientation based on six slices rotated around the long axis of the RV, rotated long axis (RLA). Materials and methods: Three phantoms were investigated in SA and RLA using cine balanced steady-state free precession MRI. Volumes were calculated based on segmentation and checked against true volumes. In 23 healthy male volunteers, we used six long-axis planes from the middle of the tricuspid valve to the RV apex, rotated in 30 degrees increments. For comparison, short-axis slices were acquired. Imaging parameters were identical in both acquisitions. Results: Right ventricular end-diastolic (EDV), end-systolic (ESV) and stroke volumes (SV) determined in the RLA 179 center dot 1 +/- 29 center dot 3; 80 center dot 1 +/- 17 center dot 1; 99 center dot 3 +/- 16 center dot 9 ml and in the SA were 174 center dot 0 +/- 21 center dot 1; 78 center dot 8 +/- 13 center dot 6; 95 center dot 3 +/- 14 center dot 5 ml with P-values for the difference from 0 center dot 17 to 0 center dot 64 (ns). Interobserver variability ranged between 3 center dot 2% and 6 center dot 6% and intraobserver variability between 2 center dot 8% and 6 center dot 8%. In SA views, consensus for the definition of the basal slice was necessary in 39% of the volunteers for whom the average volume change was 20% in ESV and 10% in EDV. Conclusions: The RLA method results in better visualization and definition of the RV inflow, outflow and apex. Accurate measurement of RV volumes for diagnosis and follow-up of cardiac diseases are enhanced by the RLA orientation, even though additional acquisition time is required.

  • 4.
    Boano, Gabriella
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Åström Aneq, Meriam
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kemppi, Jennie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vánky, Farkas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cox-maze IV cryoablation and postoperative heart failure in mitral valve surgery patients2017In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 51, no 1, 15-20 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The indications for and the risk and benefit of concomitant surgical ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) have not been fully delineated. Our aim was to survey whether the Cox-maze IV procedure is associated with postoperative heart failure (PHF) or other adverse short-term outcomes after mitral valve surgery (MVS).

    DESIGN: Consecutive patients with AF undergoing MVS with (n = 50) or without (n = 66) concomitant Cox-maze IV cryoablation were analysed regarding perioperative data and one-year mortality.

    RESULTS: The patients in the Maze group were younger, were in lower NYHA classes, had better right ventricular function and had lower pulmonary artery pressure. The Maze group had 30 min longer median cross-clamp time (CCT) and 50% had PHF compared with 33% in the No-maze group, p = 0.09. Two patients in the No-maze group died within one year of surgery. Congestive heart failure (OR 4.3 [CI 95%: 1.8-10], p < 0.0001) and CCT (OR 1.03 [CI 95%: 1.01-1.04], p = 0.001) were associated with PHF.

    CONCLUSION: The current data cannot exclude that concomitant cryoablation increases the risk for PHF, possibly by increasing the cross clamp time.

  • 5.
    Carlén, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Åström Aneq, Meriam
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Gustafsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Loaded treadmill walking and cycle ergometry to assess work capacity: a retrospective comparison in 424 firefighters.2017In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 37, no 1, 37-44 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fitness of firefighters is regularly evaluated using exercise tests. We aimed to compare, with respect to age and body composition, two test modalities for the assessment work capacity. A total of 424 Swedish firefighters with cycle ergometer (CE) and treadmill (TM) tests available from Jan 2004 to Dec 2010 were included. We compared results from CE (6 min at 200 W, 250 W or incremental ramp exercise) with TM (6 min at 8° inclination, 4·5 km h(-1) or faster, wearing 24-kg protective equipment). Oxygen requirements were estimated by prediction equations. It was more common to pass the TM test and fail the supposedly equivalent CE test (20%), than vice versa (0·5%), P<0·001. Low age and tall stature were significant predictors of passing both CE and TM tests (P<0·05), while low body mass predicted accomplishment of TM test only (P = 0·006). Firefighters who passed the TM but failed the supposedly equivalent CE test within 12 months had significantly lower body mass, lower BMI, lower BSA and shorter stature than did those who passed both tests. Calculated oxygen uptake was higher in TM tests compared with corresponding CE tests (P<0·001). Body constitution affected approval differently depending on the test modality. A higher approval rate in TM testing suggests lower cardiorespiratory requirements compared with CE testing, even though estimated oxygen uptake was higher during TM testing. The relevance of our findings in relation to the occupational demands needs reconsidering.

  • 6.
    Karlsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Alfoldine Ando, Agota
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Åstrom Aneq, Meriam
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Exercise testing for long-term follow-up in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy2017In: Journal of Electrocardiology, ISSN 0022-0736, E-ISSN 1532-8430, Vol. 50, no 2, 176-183 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: We investigated arrhythmia, electrocardiography and physical work capacity (PWC) in the follow-up of ARVC. Design: Twenty-three patients (13 men; age 41 +/- 12 years) fulfilling diagnostic criteria were re-investigated after at least five years. Results: Ventricular arrhythmia during exercise testing (ET) was present in 14 patients (61%) and showed variation between examinations. In eleven (48%), complex ventricular ectopic activity was observed at peak exercise or immediately thereafter. Mutations known to be pathogenic in ARVC were present in 13 patients (57%) of which 11 developed complex ventricular arrhythmia at ET. PWC at baseline was 190 +/- 66 W (104 +/- 26%) decreasing to 151 +/- 61 W (91 +/- 23%, p = 0.008) after 10.7 years. Conclusion: The appearance of ventricular arrhythmia during exercise testing showed temporal variation but was.frequent in patients with relevant genetic mutation. Physical exercise capacity decreased over time in patients with ARVC in excess to the age-related deterioration and regardless of medication. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Svensson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Åström Aneq, Meriam
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Widlund, Kjerstin Ferm
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Fluur, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Green, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rehnberg, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy - 4 Swedish families with an associated PKP2 c.2146-1G>C variant.2016In: American journal of cardiovascular disease, ISSN 2160-200X, Vol. 6, no 2, 55-65 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the genotype-phenotype correlations in four unrelated families with a PKP2 c.2146-1G>C gene variant were studied. Our primary aim was to determine the carriers that fulfilled the arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) diagnostic criteria of 2010. Our secondary aim was to investigate whether any specific clinical characteristics can be attributed to this particular gene variant. Index patients were assessed using next generation ARVC panel sequencing technique and their family members were assessed by Sanger sequencing targeted at the PKP2 c.2146-1G>C variant. The gene variant carriers were offered a clinical follow-up, with evaluation based on the patient's history and a standard set of non-invasive testing. The PKP2 c.2146-1G>C gene variant was found in 23 of 41 patients who underwent the examination. Twelve of the 19 family members showed "possible ARVC". One with "borderline ARVC" and the rest with "definite ARVC" demonstrated re-polarization disturbances, but arrhythmia was uncommon. A lethal event occurred in a 14-year-old boy. In the present study, no definitive genotype-phenotype correlations were found, where the majority of the family members carrying the PKP2 c.2146-1G>C gene variant were diagnosed with "possible ARVC". These individuals should be offered a long-term follow-up since they are frequently symptomless but still at risk for insidious sudden cardiac death due to ventricular arrhythmia.

  • 8.
    Åström Aneq, Meriam
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy: Is it right?2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is an inherited heart disease, where sudden cardiac death in young seemingly healthy persons may be the first symptom. There is a need for more sensitive and accurate diagnostic methods to detect signs of disease, at an early stage and in relatives of affected individuals. The aim of this thesis is the evaluation of new non-invasive modalities in assessment of right ventricular (RV) volume and function with focus on patients with ARVC.

    Clinical and non-invasive follow-up of fifteen patients with ARVC during a mean period of 8 years permitted the evaluation of disease progression. RV volume analysis by magnetic resonance imaging relies on short axis (SA) views. A new axially rotated modality acquisition was tested and its feasibility in assessment of RV volume was evaluated. This acquisition seems to be able to improve the assessment of RV volume and function by reducing the uncertainty in defining the basal slice of the RV. A third study concentrated on analysis of RV regional and general function by echocardiography, using tissue Doppler imaging as well as two dimensional (2D) longitudinal strain based on speckle tracking in patients with ARVC, their first degree relatives and in healthy subjects. 2D strain showed a good feasibility in analysis of the RV function in relatives and controls but less in ARVC patients probably due to the progressive myocardial cell death with fibro-fatty replacement of the RV wall. In order to detect and follow up echocardiographic changes an index was developed combining dimensional and functional parameters for the left and for the right ventricle. Advances in the molecular genetics of ARVC have provided new insights into the understanding of the disease. Hitherto, 9 candidate genes have been identified. A new mutation in the plakophilin 2 gene was detected in a three generation family. The clinical phenotype related to this mutation was investigated.

    The studies have evaluated and developed methods for studying the right ventricle with special emphasis on ARVC. With the ultimate goal of preventing sudden death in ARVC, a combination of genetic testing and improved diagnostic methods may create an improved algorithm for risk stratification and selection to prophylactic treatment.

    List of papers
    1. Long-term follow-up in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy using Tissue Doppler Imaging
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term follow-up in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy using Tissue Doppler Imaging
    2008 (English)In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, Vol. 42, no 6, 368-374 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and describe different echocardiographic parameters and their change over time during almost 10 years follow-up period.

    Methods: Fifteen patients (9 male, 6 female), aged 22-58 years (mean 40) with a diagnosis of ARVC, were followed up for a period of 6-10 years (mean 8.7). Twelve-lead and a signal- averaged ECG was recorded. Tricuspid and mitral annular motion and tissue Doppler imaging were registered by echocardiography. Wall motion score index (WMSI) was calculated for the left and right ventricles.

    Results: We registered significant reduction in systolic tissue velocity on right ventricle free wall between the first and last investigations: 7-17cm/s (mean 11.8) to 4-15 (mean 9.1), p=0.005. WMSI increased by at least 0.2 in 10/14 patients for the right and in 8/15 patients for the left ventricle. A decrease in velocity time integral for the left ventricular outflow was observed (16-30 to 13-21, p=0.009).

    Conclusion: ARVC is a progressive disease with individual variation. Left ventricular involvement may occur early in the disease. Tissue Doppler imaging is a useful tool to follow-up right ventricular abnormalities.

    Keyword
    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, Doppler tissue imaging, progression, right ventricular function
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16180 (URN)10.1080/14017430802372384 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-01-09 Created: 2009-01-09 Last updated: 2011-09-06
    2. Determination of right ventricular volume and function using multiple axially rotated MRI slices
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determination of right ventricular volume and function using multiple axially rotated MRI slices
    2011 (English)In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 31, no 3, 233-239 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Pandgt;Background: The conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method for right ventricular (RV) volume and motion, using short-axis (SA) orientation, is limited by RV anatomy and shape. We suggest an orientation based on six slices rotated around the long axis of the RV, rotated long axis (RLA). Materials and methods: Three phantoms were investigated in SA and RLA using cine balanced steady-state free precession MRI. Volumes were calculated based on segmentation and checked against true volumes. In 23 healthy male volunteers, we used six long-axis planes from the middle of the tricuspid valve to the RV apex, rotated in 30 degrees increments. For comparison, short-axis slices were acquired. Imaging parameters were identical in both acquisitions. Results: Right ventricular end-diastolic (EDV), end-systolic (ESV) and stroke volumes (SV) determined in the RLA 179 center dot 1 +/- 29 center dot 3; 80 center dot 1 +/- 17 center dot 1; 99 center dot 3 +/- 16 center dot 9 ml and in the SA were 174 center dot 0 +/- 21 center dot 1; 78 center dot 8 +/- 13 center dot 6; 95 center dot 3 +/- 14 center dot 5 ml with P-values for the difference from 0 center dot 17 to 0 center dot 64 (ns). Interobserver variability ranged between 3 center dot 2% and 6 center dot 6% and intraobserver variability between 2 center dot 8% and 6 center dot 8%. In SA views, consensus for the definition of the basal slice was necessary in 39% of the volunteers for whom the average volume change was 20% in ESV and 10% in EDV. Conclusions: The RLA method results in better visualization and definition of the RV inflow, outflow and apex. Accurate measurement of RV volumes for diagnosis and follow-up of cardiac diseases are enhanced by the RLA orientation, even though additional acquisition time is required.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2011
    Keyword
    axial rotation, cine MRI, heart volumes, methodological comparison, normal values
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67837 (URN)10.1111/j.1475-097X.2011.01006.x (DOI)000289258100012 ()
    Note
    This is the authors’ version of the following article: Meriam Aneq Åström, Eva Nylander, Tino Ebbers and Jan Engvall, Determination of right ventricular volume and function using multiple axially rotated MRI slices, 2011, CLINICAL PHYSIOLOGY AND FUNCTIONAL IMAGING, (31), 3, 233-239. which has been published in final form at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-097X.2011.01006.x Copyright: Blackwell Publishing Ltd http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Brand/id-35.htmlAvailable from: 2011-04-29 Created: 2011-04-29 Last updated: 2013-09-03Bibliographically approved
    3. Evaluation of Right and Left Ventricular Function Using Speckle Tracking Echocardiography in Patients with Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy and Their First Degree Relatives
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of Right and Left Ventricular Function Using Speckle Tracking Echocardiography in Patients with Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy and Their First Degree Relatives
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and aim: The identification of right ventricular abnormalities in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) in early stages is still difficult. The aim of this study was to investigate if longitudinal strain based on speckle tracking can detect subtle right (RV) or left ventricular (LV) dysfunction as an early sign of ARVC.

    Methods and results: Seventeen male patients, fulfilling Task force criteria for ARVC, 49 (32-70) years old, nineteen male first degree relatives 29 (19-73) y.o. and twenty-two healthy male volunteers 36 (24-66) y.o participated in the study. Twelve-lead and signal-averaged electrocardiograms were recorded. All subjects underwent echocardiography. LV and RV diameters, peak systolic velocity from tissue Doppler and longitudinal strain based on speckle tracking were measured from the basal and mid segments in both ventricles. RV longitudinal strain measurement was successful in first degree relatives and controls (95 resp. 86%) but less feasible in patients (59%). Results were not systematically different between first degree relatives and controls. Using discriminant analysis, we then developed an index based on echocardiographic parameters. All normal controls had an index <l while patients with abnormal ventricles had an index between 1-4. Some of the first degree relatives deviated from the normal pattern.

    Conclusion: Longitudinal strain of LV and RV segments was significantly lower in patients than in relatives and controls. An index was developed incorporating dimensional and functional echocardiographic parameters. In combination with genetic testing this index might help to detect early phenotype expression in mutation carriers.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-70401 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-09-06 Created: 2011-09-06 Last updated: 2011-09-06Bibliographically approved
    4. Novel plakophilin2 mutation. Three generation family with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Novel plakophilin2 mutation. Three generation family with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, Vol. 46, no 2, 72-75 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The autosomal dominant form of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC)has been linked to mutations in desmosomal proteins. Different studies have shown that amutation in plakophilin-2 (PKP 2) is a frequent genetic cause for ARVC. We describe a newmutation in the PKP2 gene, the genotype-phenotype variation in this mutation and its clinicalconsequences.

    Design: Individuals in a three generation family were investigated after the sudden cardiac death of a young male. Clinical evaluation, electrocardiography, echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, endomyocardial biopsy and genetic testing were performed.

    Results: A novel heterozygote mutation, a c.368G>A transition, located in exon 3 of the PKP2 gene was found (p.Trp123X). The phenotype was characterized by arrhythmia at an early age in some individuals, with mild abnormalities on imaging. However a relative carrying this mutation, with positive findings on endomyocardial biopsy had an otherwise normal phenotype, for 16 years, whereas a relative fulfilling the modified Task Force Criteria for ARVC turned out to be a non-carrier.

    Conclusions: This shows the variable penetrance and phenotypic expression in ARVC and highlights the need of genetic testing as well as a thorough phenotype examination as a part of the investigations in ARVC pedigrees.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Informa Healthcare, 2012
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-70402 (URN)10.3109/14017431.2011.636068 (DOI)000301496200002 ()
    Note
    Funding agencies|FORSS||Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden| 12043 |Swedish Heart-Lung foundation| 20070864 |Available from: 2011-09-06 Created: 2011-09-06 Last updated: 2012-04-20Bibliographically approved
  • 9.
    Åström Aneq, Meriam
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Arytmogen högerkammarkardiomyopati2016In: Idrott och hjärtat / [ed] Mats Börjesson, Mikael Dellborg, Studentlitteratur, 2016, Vol. 1, 141-150 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Åström Aneq, Meriam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lindström, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Long-term follow-up in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy using Tissue Doppler Imaging2008In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, Vol. 42, no 6, 368-374 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and describe different echocardiographic parameters and their change over time during almost 10 years follow-up period.

    Methods: Fifteen patients (9 male, 6 female), aged 22-58 years (mean 40) with a diagnosis of ARVC, were followed up for a period of 6-10 years (mean 8.7). Twelve-lead and a signal- averaged ECG was recorded. Tricuspid and mitral annular motion and tissue Doppler imaging were registered by echocardiography. Wall motion score index (WMSI) was calculated for the left and right ventricles.

    Results: We registered significant reduction in systolic tissue velocity on right ventricle free wall between the first and last investigations: 7-17cm/s (mean 11.8) to 4-15 (mean 9.1), p=0.005. WMSI increased by at least 0.2 in 10/14 patients for the right and in 8/15 patients for the left ventricle. A decrease in velocity time integral for the left ventricular outflow was observed (16-30 to 13-21, p=0.009).

    Conclusion: ARVC is a progressive disease with individual variation. Left ventricular involvement may occur early in the disease. Tissue Doppler imaging is a useful tool to follow-up right ventricular abnormalities.

  • 11.
    Åström, Meriam Aneq
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brudin, Lars
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden .
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Evaluation of right and left ventricular function using speckle tracking echocardiography in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and their first degree relatives2012In: Cardiovascular Ultrasound, ISSN 1476-7120, Vol. 10, no 37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and aim: The identification of right ventricular abnormalities in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) in early stages is still difficult. The aim of this study was to investigate if longitudinal strain based on speckle tracking can detect subtle right (RV) or left ventricular (LV) dysfunction as an early sign of ARVC. Methods and results: Seventeen male patients, fulfilling Task force criteria for ARVC, 49 (32-70) years old, nineteen male first degree relatives 29 (19-73) y.o. and twenty-two healthy male volunteers 36 (24-66) y.o participated in the study. Twelve-lead and signal-averaged electrocardiograms were recorded. All subjects underwent echocardiography. LV and RV diameters, peak systolic velocity from tissue Doppler and longitudinal strain based on speckle tracking were measured from the basal and mid segments in both ventricles. RV longitudinal strain measurement was successful in first degree relatives and controls (95 resp. 86%) but less feasible in patients (59%). Results were not systematically different between first degree relatives and controls. Using discriminant analysis, we then developed an index based on echocardiographic parameters. All normal controls had an index less thanl while patients with abnormal ventricles had an index between 1-4. Some of the first degree relatives deviated from the normal pattern. Conclusion: Longitudinal strain of LV and RV segments was significantly lower in patients than in relatives and controls. An index was developed incorporating dimensional and functional echocardiographic parameters. In combination with genetic testing this index might help to detect early phenotype expression in mutation carriers.

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