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  • 1.
    Kandhasamy, Subramani
    et al.
    Central Leather Research Institute, India.
    Ramanathan, Giriprasath
    Central Leather Research Institute, India.
    Thangavelu, Muthukumar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thyagarajan, SitaLakshmi
    Central Leather Research Institute, India.
    Umamaheshwari, Narayanan
    Central Leather Research Institute, India.
    Santhanakrishnan, V. P.
    TNAU, India.
    Tiruchirapalli Sivagnanam, Uma
    Central Leather Research Institute, India.
    Thirumalai Perumal, Paramasivan
    Central Leather Research Institute, India.
    Nanofibrous matrixes with biologically active hydroxybenzophenazine pyrazolone compound for cancer theranosticsx2017In: Materials science & engineering. C, biomimetic materials, sensors and systems, ISSN 0928-4931, E-ISSN 1873-0191, Vol. 74, p. 70-85Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nanomaterial with the novel biologically active compounds has been actively investigated for application in cancer research. Substantial use of nanofibrous scaffold for cancer research with potentially bioactive compounds through electrospinning has not been fully explored. Here, we describe the series of fabrication of nanofibrous scaffold loaded with novel potential biologically active hydroxybenzo[a]phenazine pyrazol-5(4H)-one derivatives were designed, synthesized by a simple one-pot, two step four component condensation based on Michael type addition reaction of lawsone, benzene-1,2-diamine, aromatic aldehydes and 3-methyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-5 (4H)-one as the substrates. The heterogeneous solid state catalyst (Fe (III) Y-Zeolite) could effectively catalyze the reaction to obtain the product with high yield and short reaction time. The synthesized compounds (5a-5p) were analyzed by NMR, FTIR and HRMS analysis. Compound 5c was confirmed by single crystal XRD studies. All the compounds were biologically evaluated for their potential inhibitory effect on anticancer (MCF-7, Hep-2) and microbial (MRSA, MTCC 201 and FRCA) activities. Among the compounds 5i exhibited the highest levels of inhibitory activity against both MCF-7, Hep-2 cell lines. Furthermore, the compound 5i (BPP) was evaluated for DNA fragmentation, flow cytometry studies and cytotoxicity against MCF-7, Hep-2 and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell lines. In addition, molecular docking (PDB ID: 1T46) studies were performed to predict the binding affinity of ligand with receptor. Moreover, the synthesized BPP compound was loaded in to the PHB-PCL nanofibrous scaffold to check the cytotoxicity against the MCF-7, Hep-2 and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell lines. The in vitro apoptotic potential of the PHB-PCL-BPP nanofibrous scaffold was assessed against MCF-7, Hep-2 cancerous cells and fibroblast cells at 12, 24 and 48 h respectively. The nanofibrous scaffold with BPP can induce apoptosis and also suppress the proliferation of cancerous cells. We anticipate that our results can provide better potential research in nanomaterial based cancer research. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Lennikov, Anton
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Laboratory of Biomedical Cell Technologies, School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok, Russia.
    Mirabelli, Pierfrancesco
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Mukwaya, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schaupper, Mira
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thangavelu, Muthukumar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lachota, Mieszko
    Department of Immunology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.
    Ali, Zaheer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Selective IKK2 inhibitor IMD0354 disrupts NF-kappa B signaling to suppress corneal inflammation and angiogenesis2018In: Angiogenesis, ISSN 0969-6970, E-ISSN 1573-7209, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 267-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corneal neovascularization is a sight-threatening condition caused by angiogenesis in the normally avascular cornea. Neovascularization of the cornea is often associated with an inflammatory response, thus targeting VEGF-A alone yields only a limited efficacy. The NF-kappa B signaling pathway plays important roles in inflammation and angiogenesis. Here, we study consequences of the inhibition of NF-kappa B activation through selective blockade of the IKK complex I kappa B kinase beta (IKK2) using the compound IMD0354, focusing on the effects of inflammation and pathological angiogenesis in the cornea. In vitro, IMD0354 treatment diminished HUVEC migration and tube formation without an increase in cell death and arrested rat aortic ring sprouting. In HUVEC, the IMD0354 treatment caused a dose-dependent reduction in VEGF-A expression, suppressed TNF alpha-stimulated expression of chemokines CCL2 and CXCL5, and diminished actin filament fibers and cell filopodia formation. In developing zebrafish embryos, IMD0354 treatment reduced expression of Vegf-a and disrupted retinal angiogenesis. In inflammation-induced angiogenesis in the rat cornea, systemic selective IKK2 inhibition decreased inflammatory cell invasion, suppressed CCL2, CXCL5, Cxcr2, and TNF-alpha expression and exhibited anti-angiogenic effects such as reduced limbal vessel dilation, reduced VEGF-A expression and reduced angiogenic sprouting, without noticeable toxic effect. In summary, targeting NF-kappa B by selective IKK2 inhibition dampened the inflammatory and angiogenic responses in vivo by modulating the endothelial cell expression profile and motility, thus indicating an important role of NF-kappa B signaling in the development of pathologic corneal neovascularization.

  • 3.
    Mukwaya, Anthonny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mirabelli, Pierfrancesco
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lennikov, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Missouri, MO USA.
    Thangavelu, Muthukumar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Chonbuk Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Peebo, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping. Sorlandet Hosp Arendal, Norway.
    Repeat Corneal Neovascularization is Characterized by More Aggressive Inflammation and Vessel Invasion Than in the Initial Phase2019In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 60, no 8, p. 2990-3001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Treatment of corneal neovascularization can lead to vessel regression and recovery of corneal transparency. Here, we examined the response of the cornea to a repeated stimulus after initial vessel regression comparing the second wave of neovascularization with the first.

    Methods: Corneal neovascularization was induced by surgical suture placement in the rat cornea for 7 days, followed by suture removal and a 30-day regression period. Corneas were then re-sutured and examined for an additional 4 days. Longitudinal slit-lamp imaging, in vivo confocal microscopy, and microarray analysis of global gene expression was conducted to assess the inflammatory and neovascularization response. Inhibitory effect of topical dexamethasone for repeat neovascularization was assessed.

    Results: After initial robust neovascularization, 30 days of regression resulted in the recovery of corneal transparency; however, a population of barely functional persistent vessels remained at the microscopic level. Upon re-stimulation, inflammatory cell invasion, persistent vessel dilation, vascular invasion, and gene expression of VegfaIl1βIl6Ccl2Ccl3, and Cxcl2 all doubled relative to initial neovascularization. Repeat neovascularization occurred twice as rapidly as initially, with activation of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species, matrix metalloproteinase, and leukocyte extravasation signaling pathways, and suppression of anti-inflammatory LXR/RXR signaling. While inhibiting initial neovascularization, a similar treatment course of dexamethasone did not suppress repeat neovascularization.

    Conclusions: Persistent vessels remaining after the initial resolution of neovascularization can rapidly reactivate to facilitate more aggressive inflammation and repeat neovascularization, highlighting the importance of achieving and confirming complete vessel regression after an initial episode of corneal neovascularization.

  • 4.
    Mukwaya, Anthony
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mirabelli, Pierfrancesco
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lennikov, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Mason Eye Inst, MO USA.
    Thangavelu, Muthukumar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Chonbuk Natl Univ, South Korea; Chonbuk Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Ntzouni, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Peebo, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping. Sorlandet Hosp Arendal, Norway.
    Revascularization after angiogenesis inhibition favors new sprouting over abandoned vessel reuse2019In: Angiogenesis, ISSN 0969-6970, E-ISSN 1573-7209, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 553-567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inhibiting pathologic angiogenesis can halt disease progression, but such inhibition may offer only a temporary benefit, followed by tissue revascularization after treatment stoppage. This revascularization, however, occurs by largely unknown phenotypic changes in pathologic vessels. To investigate the dynamics of vessel reconfiguration during revascularization, we developed a model of reversible murine corneal angiogenesis permitting longitudinal examination of the same vasculature. Following 30 days of angiogenesis inhibition, two types of vascular structure were evident: partially regressed persistent vessels that were degenerate and barely functional, and fully regressed, non-functional empty basement membrane sleeves (ebms). While persistent vessels maintained a limited flow and retained collagen IV+ basement membrane, CD31+ endothelial cells (EC), and alpha-SMA+ pericytes, ebms were acellular and expressed only collagen IV. Upon terminating angiogenesis inhibition, transmission electron microscopy and live imaging revealed that revascularization ensued by a rapid reversal of EC degeneracy in persistent vessels, facilitating their phenotypic normalization, vasodilation, increased flow, and subsequent new angiogenic sprouting. Conversely, ebms were irreversibly sealed from the circulation by excess collagen IV deposition that inhibited EC migration and prevented their reuse. Fully and partially regressed vessels therefore have opposing roles during revascularization, where fully regressed vessels inhibit new sprouting while partially regressed persistent vessels rapidly reactivate and serve as the source of continued pathologic angiogenesis.

  • 5.
    Thangavelu, Muthukumar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Adithan, Aravinthan
    Chonbuk Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Parvathaleswara, Sastry Thotapalli
    CSIR Cent Leather Res Inst, India.
    Munusamy, Chamundeeswari
    St Josephs Coll Engn, India.
    Morphological Modification of Carbon Nanoparticles after Interacting with Methotrexate as a Potential Anticancer Agent2018In: Pharmaceutical research, ISSN 0724-8741, E-ISSN 1573-904X, Vol. 35, no 10, article id UNSP 184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Production of highly penetrable and targetable drug delivery particles is mainly focused by current therapy and such focus is achieved in our present study. The carbon nanoparticle (CNP) prepared from purely natural source was modified from spherical shape to cylindrical floral like structure after treatment with the anticancer drug methotrexate (CM). Methods The physiochemical properties of the CNP and CM was characterized using FT-IR/Raman Spectrometer, XRD, SEM, AFM, particle size analyzer and its biological evaluation using haemolysis and MTT assay. Results The shift in FT-IR peaks at 1592, 1120 cm(-1) and peaks of raman spectra observed at 1303, 1300 cm(-1) represents ordered carbon nanotubes. The morphological change from spherical to cylindrical floral like structure was observed using SEM and AFM and its particle size distribution analysis shows an average diameter of 269 nm for CM. XRD peak at 2 theta = 23.86A degrees (002) indicates the presence of large amount of amorphous material that corresponds to multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Haemocompatibility studies proved the safety level usage as 100 mu g/ml and MTT assay shows viability rate of 85-98% with mouse embryonic fibroblast (NIH/3 T3) and 30-45% with pancreatic carcinoma (MIA PaCa-2) and gastric cancer cell lines (SNU- 484) respectively.These results are also supported by phase contrast microscope images observed after staining with calcein AM and EthD-1. Conclusions The morphologically modified CNPs has shown good anticancer, biocompatibility and haemocompatibility property which is an important criterion to be satisfied by a biomedical product.

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