liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 361
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin N.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uhrig, Emily
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zidar, Josefina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Favati, A.
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almberg, J.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlbom, J.
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala Biomedical Centre BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Winberg, S.
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala Biomedical Centre BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Løvlie, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The Influence of Rearing on Behavior, Brain Monoamines, and Gene Expression in Three-Spined Sticklebacks2018In: Brain, behavior, and evolution, ISSN 0006-8977, E-ISSN 1421-9743, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 201-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The causes of individual variation in behavior are often not well understood, and potential underlying mechanisms include both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as early environmental, physiological, and genetic differences. In an exploratory laboratory study, we raised three-spined sticklebacks <i>(Gasterosteus aculeatus)</i> under 4 different environmental conditions (simulated predator environment, complex environment, variable social environment, and control). We investigated how these manipulations related to behavior, brain physiology, and gene expression later in life, with focus on brain dopamine and serotonin levels, turnover rates, and gene expression. The different rearing environments influenced behavior and gene expression, but did not alter monoamine levels or metabolites. Specifically, compared to control fish, fish exposed to a simulated predator environment tended to be less aggressive, more exploratory, and more neophobic; and fish raised in both complex and variable social environments tended to be less neophobic. Exposure to a simulated predator environment tended to lower expression of dopamine receptor DRD4A, a complex environment increased expression of dopamine receptor DRD1B, while a variable social environment tended to increase serotonin receptor 5-HTR2B and serotonin transporter SLC6A4A expression. Despite both behavior and gene expression varying with early environment, there was no evidence that gene expression mediated the relationship between early environment and behavior. Our results confirm that environmental conditions early in life can affect phenotypic variation. However, the mechanistic pathway of the monoaminergic systems translating early environmental variation into observed behavioral responses was not detected.

  • 2.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uhrig, Emily
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Southern Oregon Univ, OR 97520 USA.
    Garnham, Laura
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundgren, Kristoffer
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Child, Sarah
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Manchester, England.
    Lovlie, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Experimental manipulation of monoamine levels alters personality in crickets2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 16211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animal personality has been described in a range of species with ecological and evolutionary consequences. Factors shaping and maintaining variation in personality are not fully understood, but monoaminergic systems are consistently linked to personality variation. We experimentally explored how personality was influenced by alterations in two key monoamine systems: dopamine and serotonin. This was done using ropinirole and fluoxetine, two common human pharmaceuticals. Using the Mediterranean field cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus), we focused on the personality traits activity, exploration, and aggression, with confirmed repeatability in our study. Dopamine manipulations explained little variation in the personality traits investigated, while serotonin manipulation reduced both activity and aggression. Due to limited previous research, we created a dose-response curve for ropinirole, ranging from concentrations measured in surface waters to human therapeutic doses. No ropinirole dose level strongly influenced cricket personality, suggesting our results did not come from a dose mismatch. Our results indicate that the serotonergic system explains more variation in personality than manipulations of the dopaminergic system. Additionally, they suggest that monoamine systems differ across taxa, and confirm the importance of the mode of action of pharmaceuticals in determining their effects on behaviour.

  • 3.
    Abbott, Rebecca
    et al.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60611 USA.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    West, Janne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Elliott, James M.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60611 USA; Univ Queensland, Australia; Zurich Univ Appl Sci, Switzerland.
    Åslund, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    The qualitative grading of muscle fat infiltration in whiplash using fat and water magnetic resonance imaging2018In: The spine journal, ISSN 1529-9430, E-ISSN 1878-1632, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 717-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: The development of muscle fat infiltration (MFI) in the neck muscles is associated with poor functional recovery following whiplash injury. Custom software and time-consuming manual segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is required for quantitative analysis and presents as a barrier for clinical translation. PURPOSE: The purpose of this work was to establish a qualitative MRI measure for MFI and evaluate its ability to differentiate between individuals with severe whiplash-associated disorder (WAD), mild or moderate WAD, and healthy controls. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: This is a cross-sectional study. PATIENT SAMPLE: Thirty-one subjects with WAD and 31 age-and sex-matched controls were recruited from an ongoing randomized controlled trial. OUTCOME MEASURES: The cervical multifidus was visually identified and segmented into eighths in the axial fat/water images (C4-C7). Muscle fat infiltration was assessed on a visual scale: 0 for no or marginal MFI, 1 for light MFI, and 2 for distinct MFI. The participants with WAD were divided in two groups: mild or moderate and severe based on Neck Disability Index % scores. METHODS: The mean regional MFI was compared between the healthy controls and each of the WAD groups using the Mann-Whitney U test. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analyses were carried out to evaluate the validity of the qualitative method. RESULTS: Twenty (65%) patients had mild or moderate disability and 11 (35%) were considered severe. Inter- and intra-rater reliability was excellent when grading was averaged by level or when frequency of grade II was considered. Statistically significant differences (pamp;lt;.05) in regional MFI were particularly notable between the severe WAD group and healthy controls. The ROC curve, based on detection of distinct MFI, showed an area-under-the curve of 0.768 (95% confidence interval 0.59-0.94) for discrimination of WAD participants. CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary results suggest a qualitative MRI measure for MFI is reliable and valid, and may prove useful toward the classification of WAD in radiology practice. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Capodanno, Alessandra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rzepecka, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Downregulation of tumor suppressive microRNAs in vivo in dense breast tissue of postmenopausal women2017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 54, p. 92134-92142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women with dense breast tissue on mammography are at higher risk of developing breast cancer but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. De-regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) has been associated with the onset of breast cancer. miRNAs in the extracellular space participate in the regulation of the local tissue microenvironment. Here, we recruited 39 healthy postmenopausal women attending their mammography-screen that were assessed having extreme dense or entirely fatty breasts (nondense). Microdialysis was performed in breast tissue and a reference catheter was inserted in abdominal subcutaneous fat for local sampling of extracellular compounds. Three miRNAs, associated with tumor suppression, miR-193b, miR-365a, and miR-452 were significantly down-regulated in dense breast tissue compared with nondense breast tissue. In addition, miR-452 exhibited significant negative correlations with several pro-inflammatory cytokines in vivo, which was confirmed in vitro by overexpression of miR-452 in breast cancer cells. No differences were found of miR-21, -29a, -30c, 146a, -148a, -203, or -451 in breast tissue and no miRs were different in plasma. Extracellular miRNAs may be among factors that should be included in studies of novel prevention strategies for breast cancer.

  • 5.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rzepecka, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Equal Pro-inflammatory Profiles of CCLs, CXCLs, and Matrix Metalloproteinases in the Extracellular Microenvironment In Vivo in Human Dense Breast Tissue and Breast Cancer2018In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 8, article id 1994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inflammatory microenvironment affects breast cancer progression. Proteins that govern the inflammatory response are secreted into the extracellular space, but this compartment still needs to be characterized in human breast tissues in vivo. Dense breast tissue is a major risk factor for breast cancer by yet unknown mechanisms and no non-toxic prevention for these patients exists. Here, we used the minimal invasive technique of microdialysis for sampling of extracellular proteins in live tissues in situ in breast cancers of women before surgery and in healthy women having dense or non-dense breast tissue on mammography. Proteins were profiled using a proximity extension assay. Out of the 32 proteins assessed, 26 exhibited similar profiles in breast cancers and dense breast tissues; CCL-4, -7, -8, -11, -15, -16, -22, -23, and -25, CXCL-5, -8, -9, -16 as well as sIL-6R, IL-18, vascular endothelial growth factor, TGF-a, fibroblast growth factor 19, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -2, -3, and urokinase-type plasminogen activator were all increased, whereas CCL-3, CX3CL1, hepatocyte growth factor, and MMP-9 were unaltered in the two tissues. CCL-19 and -24, CXCL-1 and -10, and IL-6 were increased in dense breast tissue only, whereas IL-18BP was increased in breast cancer only. Our results provide novel insights in the inflammatory microenvironment in human breast cancer in situ and define potential novel therapeutic targets. Additionally, we show previously unrecognized similarities of the pro-inflammatory microenvironment in dense breast tissue and breast cancer in vivo suggesting that anti-inflammatory breast cancer prevention trials for women with dense breast tissue may be feasible.

  • 6.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rzepecka, Anna
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Increased nutrient availability in dense breast tissue of postmenopausal women in vivo2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 42733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer. Nutrient availability in the tissue microenvironment determines cellular events and may play a role in breast carcinogenesis. High mammographic density is an independent risk factor for breast cancer. Whether nutrient availability differs in normal breast tissues with various densities is unknown. Therefore we investigated whether breast tissues with various densities exhibited differences in nutrient availability. Healthy postmenopausal women from the regular mammographic screening program who had either predominantly fatty breast tissue (nondense), n = 18, or extremely dense breast tissue (dense), n = 20, were included. Microdialysis was performed for the in vivo sampling of amino acids (AAs), analyzed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectroscopy, glucose, lactate and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in breast tissues and, as a control, in abdominal subcutaneous (s.c.) fat. We found that dense breast tissue exhibited significantly increased levels of 20 proteinogenic AAs and that 18 of these AAs correlated significantly with VEGF. No differences were found in the s.c. fat, except for one AA, suggesting tissue-specific alterations in the breast. Glucose and lactate were unaltered. Our findings provide novel insights into the biology of dense breast tissue that may be explored for breast cancer prevention strategies.

  • 7.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Henefalk, Gustav
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Impact of a zoledronate coating on early post-surgical implant stability and marginal bone resorption in the maxilla-A split-mouth randomized clinical trial.2018In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, ISSN 0905-7161, E-ISSN 1600-0501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this clinical study was to evaluate the effect of a bisphosphonate coating on a titanium implant on the implant stability quotient (ISQ) and the radiographic marginal bone levels at implants during early healing (2-8 weeks).

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a randomized double-blind trial with internal controls, 16 patients received a dental implant coated with zoledronate and one uncoated implant as a control. The coated and uncoated implants which were visually indistinguishable were bone level titanium implants with a moderately rough surface and a microthreaded neck. ISQ values were obtained at insertion and at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks. Radiographs were obtained at insertion and at 8 weeks. The primary outcome was the difference in ISQ values between the coated implants and the control implants at 4 and 6 weeks, corrected for insertion values. The secondary outcome was loss of marginal bone level from insertion to 8 weeks.

    RESULTS: Implant stability quotient values remained largely constant over the 8 weeks, and there was no significant difference between coated and uncoated implants at any time point. There was 0.12 (SD 0.10) mm marginal bone loss at the control implants and 0.04 (SD 0.08) mm at the coated implants. The difference was 0.17 mm; SD 0.14; p < 0.006). On blind qualitative scoring, 13 of the 15 control implants and two of 15 coated implants showed small marginal bone defects (p = 0.003).

    CONCLUSIONS: There were no statistically significant differences observed in ISQ values between the coated and uncoated implants during the early healing. There was less marginal bone loss at the coated implants.

  • 8.
    Ahlbeck, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Ahlberg, Emelie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nyström Kronander, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Björkander, Janne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Intralymphatic allergen immunotherapy against pollen allergy. A 3-year open follow-up study of 10 patients2018In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, ISSN 1081-1206, E-ISSN 1534-4436, Vol. 121, no 5, p. 626-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is the only treatment that affects the long-term development of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and induces clinical tolerance primarily by stimulating regulatory T (Treg) cells, attenuating T helper 2 (Th2) responses and synthesis of blocking antibodies1. Conventional AIT with subcutaneous injections, sublingual tablets or drops is effective, but consumes time and resources 2.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-09-13 10:35
  • 9.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    VTI, Swedish Natl Rd and Transport Res Inst, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Anund, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. VTI, Swedish Natl Rd and Transport Res Inst, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Fors, Carina
    VTI, Swedish Natl Rd and Transport Res Inst, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjorn
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Effects of the road environment on the development of driver sleepiness in young male drivers2018In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 112, p. 127-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Latent driver sleepiness may in some cases be masked by for example social interaction, stress and physical activity. This short-term modulation of sleepiness may also result from environmental factors, such as when driving in stimulating environments. The aim of this study is to compare two road environments and investigate how they affect driver sleepiness. Thirty young male drivers participated in a driving simulator experiment where they drove two scenarios: a rural environment with winding roads and low traffic density, and a suburban road with higher traffic density and a more built-up roadside environment. The driving task was essentially the same in both scenarios, i.e. to stay on the road, without much interaction with other road users. A 2 x 2 design, with the conditions rural versus suburban, and daytime (full sleep) versus night-time (sleep deprived), was used. The results show that there were only minor effects of the road environment on subjective and physiological indicators of sleepiness. In contrast, there was an increase in subjective sleepiness, longer blink durations and increased EEG alpha content, both due to time on task and to night-time driving. The two road environments differed both in terms of the demand on driver action and of visual load, and the results indicate that action demand is the more important of the two factors. The notion that driver fatigue should be countered in a more stimulating visual environment such as in the city is thus more likely due to increased task demand rather than to a richer visual scenery. This should be investigated in further studies.

  • 10.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute VTI, S-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Jansson, Sabina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Anund, Anna
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute VTI, S-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Local changes in the wake electroencephalogram precedes lane departures2017In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 816-819Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this exploratory study is to investigate if lane departures are associated with local sleep, measured via source-localized electroencephalography (EEG) theta power in the 5-9 Hz frequency range. Thirty participants drove in an advanced driving simulator, resulting in 135 lane departures at high levels of self-reported sleepiness. These lane departures were compared to matching non-departures at the same sleepiness level within the same individual. There was no correspondence between lane departures and global theta activity. However, at the local level an increased risk for lane departures was associated with increased theta content in brain regions related to motor function.

  • 11.
    Albonico, Andrea
    et al.
    Human Vision and Eye Movement Laboratory, Departments of Medicine (Neurology), Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Furubacke, Amanda
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Human Vision and Eye Movement Laboratory, Departments of Medicine (Neurology), Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Barton, Jason J. S.
    Human Vision and Eye Movement Laboratory, Departments of Medicine (Neurology), Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Oruc, Ipek
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia, Canada; Program in Neuroscience, University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Perceptual efficiency and the inversion effect for faces, words and houses2018In: Vision Research, ISSN 0042-6989, E-ISSN 1878-5646, Vol. 153, p. 91-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Face and visual word recognition are two key forms of expert visual processing. In the domain of object recognition, it has been suggested that expert processing is characterized by the use of different mechanisms from the ones involved in general object recognition. It has been suggested that one traditional marker of expert processing is the inversion effect. To investigate whether face and word recognition differ from general object recognition, we compared the effect of inversion on the perceptual efficiency of face and visual word recognition as well as on the recognition of a third, non-expert object category, houses. From the comparison of identification contrast thresholds to an ideal observer, we derived the efficiency and equivalent input noise of stimulus processing in both upright and inverted orientations. While efficiency reflects the efficacy in sampling the available information, equivalent input noise is associated with the degradation of the stimulus signal within the visual system. We hypothesized that large inversion effects for efficiency and/or equivalent input noise should characterize expert high-level processes, and asked whether this would be true for both faces and words, but not houses. However, we found that while face recognition efficiency was profoundly reduced by inversion, the efficiency of word and house recognition was minimally influenced by the orientation manipulation. Inversion did not affect equivalent input noise. These results suggest that even though faces and words are both considered expert processes, only the efficiency of the mechanism involved in face recognition is sensitive to orientation.

  • 12.
    Alfredson, Jens
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Saab Aeronaut, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Trabasso, Luís Gonzaga
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. ITA, Brazil.
    Blomstrand, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eckerberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klamer, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ledin, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tarander, Jasmine
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Engine Failure Induced Task Load Transient for Simulation Based Certification Aiding for Aircraft2018In: ADVANCES IN HUMAN ASPECTS OF TRANSPORTATION, SPRINGER INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING AG , 2018, Vol. 597, p. 79-86Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is one of a series of studies, researching various aspects that all aim at enhanced simulation based certification aiding for aircraft. An experimental within-group design study was performed with 10 participants ( 5 male, and 5 female). The results showed a significant difference, F(2,16) = 5.11, p = 0.019, in mental workload between an engine failure condition and an normal condition for eye blink frequency. No effect of speed at the engine failure event on mental workload was found.

  • 13.
    Ali, Zaheer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Islam, Anik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sherrell, Peter
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Le-Moine, Mark
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lolas, Georgios
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Syrigos, Konstantinos
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Adjustable delivery of pro-angiogenic FGF-2 by alginate: collagen microspheres2018In: BIOLOGY OPEN, ISSN 2046-6390, Vol. 7, no 3, article id UNSP bio027060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Therapeutic induction of blood vessel growth (angiogenesis) in ischemic tissues holds great potential for treatment of myocardial infarction and stroke. Achieving sustained angiogenesis and vascular maturation has, however, been highly challenging. Here, we demonstrate that alginate: collagen hydrogels containing therapeutic, pro-angiogenic FGF-2, and formulated as microspheres, is a promising and clinically relevant vehicle for therapeutic angiogenesis. By titrating the amount of readily dissolvable and degradable collagen with more slowly degradable alginate in the hydrogel mixture, the degradation rates of the biomaterial controlling the release kinetics of embedded proangiogenic FGF-2 can be adjusted. Furthermore, we elaborate a microsphere synthesis protocol allowing accurate control over sphere size, also a critical determinant of degradation/release rate. As expected, alginate: collagen microspheres were completely biocompatible and did not cause any adverse reactions when injected in mice. Importantly, the amount of pro-angiogenic FGF-2 released from such microspheres led to robust induction of angiogenesis in zebrafish embryos similar to that achieved by injecting FGF-2-releasing cells. These findings highlight the use of microspheres constructed from alginate: collagen hydrogels as a promising and clinically relevant delivery system for pro-angiogenic therapy.

  • 14.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Halili, Shefqet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hildebrand, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Vesico-Uterine Fistula after TURB in pregnancy, a rare cause of genitourinary fistula2018In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 162-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 15.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    M2-macrophage infiltration and macrophage traits of tumor cells in urinary bladder cancer2018In: Urologic Oncology, ISSN 1078-1439, E-ISSN 1873-2496, Vol. 36, no 4, article id 159.e19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) constitute a subset of nonneoplastic cells in tumor stroma and influence cancer progression in solid tumors. The clinical significance of TAMs in urinary bladder cancer(UBC) is controversial.

    Methods

    We prospectively studied 103 patients with stage pT1–T4 UBC treated with cystectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Tumor sections were immunostained with M2-specific macrophage marker CD163 and proliferation marker Ki-67. The expression of these markers in cancer cells as well as macrophage infiltration (MI) in tumor stroma was analyzed in relation to clinical data and outcome.

    Results

    The mean rate of CD163 and Ki-67 expressed by cancer cells were 35% and 78%, respectively. With borderline significance, MI was associated with lower rate of lymph node metastasis (P = 0.06). CD163 expression in cancer cells was proportional to MI (P<0.014). Patients with CD163-positive tumors and strong MI had significantly longer cancer-specific survival (CSS) (76 months), compared to patient with CD163-positive tumors and weak MI (28 months) (P = 0.02).

    Conclusions

    M2-specific MI tends to be inversely correlated with LN metastasis and improved CSS in UBC. MI might have protective impact in CD163-positive tumors. Expression of CD163 in cancer cells is significantly correlated with MI and might have a tumor promoting impact.

  • 16.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    The expression profile of p14, p53 and p21 in tumour cells is associated with disease-specific survival and the outcome of postoperative chemotherapy treatment in muscle-invasive bladder cancer2018In: Urologic Oncology, ISSN 1078-1439, E-ISSN 1873-2496, Vol. 36, no 12, article id 530.e7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: We investigated the effects of alterations in the biological markers p14, p53, p21, and p16 in relation to tumour cell proliferation, T-category, N- category, lymphovascular invasion, and the ability to predict prognosis in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) treated with cystectomy and, if applicable, chemotherapy. Materials and methods: We prospectively studied patients with urinary bladder cancer pathological stage pT1 to pT4 treated with cystectomy, pelvic lymph node dissection and postoperative chemotherapy. Tissue microarrays from paraffin-embedded cystectomy tumour samples were examined for expression of immunostaining of p14, p53, p21, p16 and Ki-67 in relation to other clinical and pathological factors as well as cancer-specific survival. Results: The median age of the 110 patients was 70 years (range 51-87 years), and 85 (77%) were male. Pathological staging was pT1 to pT2 (organ-confined) in 28 (25%) patients and pT3 to pT4 (non-organ-confined) in 82 (75%) patients. Lymph node metastases were found in 47 patients (43%). P14 expression was more common in tumours with higher T-stages (P = 0.05). The expression of p14 in p53 negative tumours was associated with a significantly shorter survival time (P=0.003). Independently of p53 expression, p14 expression was associated with an impaired response to chemotherapy (P=0.001). The expression of p21 in p53 negative tumours was associated with significantly decrease levels of tumour cell proliferation detected as Ki-67 expression (P=0.03). Conclusions: The simultaneous expression of the senescence markers involved in the p53-pathway shows a more relevant correlation to the pathological outcome of MIBC than each protein separately. P14 expression in tumours with non-altered (p53-) tumours is associated with poor prognosis. P14 expression is associated with impaired response to chemotherapy. P21 expression is related to decreased tumour cell proliferation. (C) 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 17.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Endocrine and Sarcoma Surgery Unit, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna Stockholm, Sweden .
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Radio-guided sentinel lymph node detection and lymph node mapping in invasive urinary bladder cancer: a prospective clinical study.2017In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 120, no 3, p. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the possibility of detecting sentinel lymph nodes (SNs) in patients with urinary bladder cancer (BCa) intra-operatively and whether the histopathological status of the identified SNs reflected that of the lymphatic field.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied 103 patients with BCa pathological stage T1-T4 who were treated with cystectomy and pelvic lymph node (LN) dissection during 2005-2011 at the Department of Urology, Linköping University Hospital. Radioactive tracer Nanocoll 70 MBq and blue dye were injected into the bladder wall around the primary tumour before surgery. SNs were detected ex vivo during the operation with a handheld Geiger probe (Gamma Detection System; Neoprobe Corp., Dublin, OH, USA). All LNs were formalin-fixed, sectioned three times, mounted on slides and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. An experienced uropathologist evaluated the slides.

    RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 69 years, and 80 (77%) were male. Pathological staging was T1-12 (12%), T2-20 (19%), T3-48 (47%) and T4-23 (22%). A mean (range) number of 31 (7-68) nodes per patient were examined, totalling 3 253 nodes. LN metastases were found in 41 patients (40%). SNs were detected in 83 of the 103 patients (80%). Sensitivity and specificity for detecting metastatic disease by SN biopsy (SNB) varied between LN stations, with average values of 67% and 90%, respectively. LN metastatic density (LNMD) had a significant prognostic impact; a value of ≥8% was significantly related to shorter survival. Lymphovascular invasion (LVI) occurred in 65% of patients (n = 67) and was significantly associated with shorter cancer-specific survival (P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: We conclude that SNB is not a reliable technique for peri-operative localization of LN metastases during cystectomy for BCa; however, LNMD has a significant prognostic value in BCa and may be useful in the clinical context and in BCa oncological and surgical research. LVI was also found to be a prognostic factor.

  • 18.
    Alkner, Bjoern A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Orthopaedics, Eksjö, Region Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Halvardsson, Christina
    Falun Cent Hosp, Sweden.
    Brakenhielm, Gustaf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Orthopaedics, Eksjö, Region Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Eskilsson, Therese
    Falun Cent Hosp, Sweden.
    Andersson, Erika
    Falun Cent Hosp, Sweden.
    Fritzell, Peter
    Falun and Futurum Acad Hlth and Care, Sweden.
    Effect of postoperative pneumatic compression after volar plate fixation of distal radial fractures: a randomized controlled trial2018In: Journal of Hand Surgery, European Volume, ISSN 1753-1934, E-ISSN 2043-6289, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 825-831Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the difference between postoperative rehabilitation with or without adjunctive intermittent pneumatic compression therapy following distal radial fracture treated with volar plating. A total of 115 patients were randomized to a control or to an experimental group. After 4 weeks of immobilization the experimental group received intermittent pneumatic compression therapy in addition to conventional postoperative rehabilitation. Primary outcome up to 1 year postoperatively was assessed using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. No significant differences between groups were found. There were no clinically relevant differences regarding the secondary outcome measures swelling, strength, pain and flexibility. We conclude that postoperative intermittent pneumatic compression treatment had no major benefits. The results of the present study do not support general use of intermittent pneumatic compression initiated 4 weeks following volar plating surgery for distal radial fracture. Level of evidence: I

  • 19.
    Allard, Alexandra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Takman, Johanna
    Swedish Natl Rd and Transport Res Inst, Sweden.
    Uddin, Gazi Salah
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ahmed, Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The N-shaped environmental Kuznets curve: an empirical evaluation using a panel quantile regression approach2018In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 5848-5861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We evaluate the N-shaped environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) using panel quantile regression analysis. We investigate the relationship between CO2 emissions and GDP per capita for 74 countries over the period of 1994-2012. We include additional explanatory variables, such as renewable energy consumption, technological development, trade, and institutional quality. We find evidence for the N-shaped EKC in all income groups, except for the upper-middle-income countries. Heterogeneous characteristics are, however, observed over the N-shaped EKC. Finally, we find a negative relationship between renewable energy consumption and CO2 emissions, which highlights the importance of promoting greener energy in order to combat global warming.

  • 20.
    Allström, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Sweco TransportSystem, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bayen, Alexandre M.
    University of California Berkeley, USA.
    Fransson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Sweco TransportSystem, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gundlegård, David
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Patire, Anthony D.
    University of California Berkeley, USA.
    Rydergren, Clas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sandin, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Calibration Framework based on Bluetooth Sensors for Traffic State Estimation Using a Velocity based Cell Transmission Model2014In: Transportation Research Procedia, ISSN 2352-1465, Vol. 3, p. 972-981Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The velocity based cell transmission model (CTM-v) is a discrete time dynamical model that mimics the evolution of the traffic velocity field on highways. In this paper the CTM-v model is used together with an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for the purpose of velocity sensor data assimilation. We present a calibration framework for the CTM-v and EnKF. The framework consists of two separate phases. The first phase is the calibration of the parameters of the fundamental diagram and the second phase is the calibration of demand and filter parameters. Results from the calibrated model are presented for a highway stretch north of Stockholm, Sweden.

  • 21.
    Andersson, Elias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Arfwidsson, Oskar
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Thollander, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Benchmarking energy performance of industrial small and medium-sized enterprises using an energy efficiency index: Results based on an energy audit policy program2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 182, p. 883-895Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improved energy efficiency among industrial companies is recognized as a key effort to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. In this context, benchmarking industrial energy efficiency plays an important part in increasing industrial companies awareness of their energy efficiency potential. A method for calculating an energy efficiency index is proposed in this paper. The energy efficiency index is used to benchmark the energy performance of industrial small and medium-sized companies support and production processes. This enables the possibility to compare the energy performance of single energy end-use processes. This papers proposed energy efficiency index is applied to energy data from 11 sawmills that participated in the Swedish national energy audit program. The index values were compared with each sawmills energy saving potential, as stated in the energy audits. One conclusion is that the energy efficiency index is suitable as an energy strategy tool in industrial energy management and could be used both by industrial SMEs and by governmental agencies with an auditing role. However, it does require a harmonized categorization of energy end-use processes as well as quality assured energy data. Given this, a national energy end-use database could be created to facilitate the calculation of an energy efficiency index. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-02-10 14:54
  • 22.
    Andersson, Ellen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Albertsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Holmqvist, Annica
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    GRACE: Geriatric patients tReated with Avastin in CRC multiple linEs2017In: Clinical Practice, ISSN 2044-9038, E-ISSN 2044-9046, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 175-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continuous treatment with bevacizumab in elderly patients with mCRC: A phase IV prospective, open-label, single-arm trial to evaluate outcomes and safety with continuous bevacizumab treatment in combination with chemotherapy over disease progression.

  • 23.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Askenteg, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wikner, Ulrica
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    "To Cope with Everyday Life, I Need to Sleep" - A Phenomenographic Study Exploring Sleep Loss in Parents of Children with Atopic Dermatitis.2018In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 43, p. E59-E65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The whole family is affected when a child has atopic dermatitis (AD), and parents experience sleep disruption related to the child's condition leading to physical and mental exhaustion, mood swings, loss of concentration and lower job performance. This study aimed to explore and describe perceptions of sleep in parents of children <2 years old with AD, consequences of parental sleep loss, and what strategies the parents used to manage sleep loss and to improve sleep.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: This qualitative interview study had an inductive and descriptive design. Twelve parents (eleven mothers and one father) participated in the study. Data analysis was performed using a phenomenographic approach.

    RESULTS: Three categories of description were found: Acceptance and normalization of parental sleep loss; Changed routines and behavior to compensate for sleep loss; and Support is needed to gain sleep and manage daily life.

    CONCLUSIONS: Sleep loss due to the child's AD affected the parents' emotional state, mood, well-being, cognitive function, ability to concentrate and take initiative, and sensitivity to stress and sound negatively. The parents managed their sleep loss mainly by changing their behavior and creating new routines, by taking me-time and through support from partners.

    PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Pediatric nurses should acknowledge sleep loss in parents of small children with AD in time to prevent negative consequences, which affect the well-being of the entire family. Advice on how to improve sleep should be given early to increase the parents' understanding, make them feel safer and strengthen them in their parenthood.

  • 24.
    Anskär, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Mantorp.
    Lindberg, Malou
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. 1177 Med Advisory Serv, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Time utilization and perceived psychosocial work environment among staff in Swedish primary care settings2018In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, article id 166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Over the past decades, reorganizations and structural changes in Swedish primary care have affected time utilization among health care professionals. Consequently, increases in administrative tasks have substantially reduced the time available for face-to-face consultations. This study examined how work-time was utilized and the association between work time utilization and the perceived psychosocial work environment in Swedish primary care settings. Methods: This descriptive, multicentre, cross-sectional study was performed in 2014-2015. Data collection began with questionnaire. In the first section, respondents were asked to estimate how their workload was distributed between patients (direct and indirect patient work) and other work tasks. The questionnaire also comprised the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, which assessed the psychosocial work environment. Next a time study was conducted where the participants reported their work-time based on three main categories: direct patient-related work, indirect patient-related work, and other work tasks. Each main category had a number of subcategories. The participants recorded the time spent (minutes) on each work task per hour, every day, for two separate weeks. Eleven primary care centres located in southeast Sweden participated. All professionals were asked to participate (n = 441), including registered nurses, primary care physicians, care administrators, nurse assistants, and allied professionals. Response rates were 75% and 79% for the questionnaires and the time study, respectively. Results: All health professionals allocated between 30.9% - 37.2% of their work-time to each main category: direct patient work, indirect patient work, and other work. All professionals estimated a higher proportion of time spent in direct patient work than they reported in the time study. Physicians scored highest on the psychosocial scales of quantitative demands, stress, and role conflicts. Among allied professionals, the proportion of work-time spent on administrative tasks was associated with more role conflicts. Younger staff perceived more adverse working conditions than older staff. Conclusions: This study indicated that Swedish primary care staff spent a limited proportion of their work time directly with patients. PCPs seemed to perceive their work environment in negative terms to a greater extent than other staff members. This study showed that work task allocations influenced the perceived psychosocial work environment.

  • 25.
    Anund, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Fors, Carina
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ihlstrom, Jonas
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kecklund, Goran
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    An on-road study of sleepiness in split shifts among city bus drivers2018In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 114, p. 71-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bus drivers often work irregular hours or split shifts and their work involves high levels of stress. These factors can lead to severe sleepiness and dangerous driving. This study examined how split shift working affects sleepiness and performance during afternoon driving. An experiment was conducted on a real road with a specially equipped regular bus driven by professional bus drivers. The study had a within-subject design and involved 18 professional bus drivers (9 males and 9 females) who drove on two afternoons; one on a day in which they had driven early in the morning (split shift situation) and one on a day when they had been off duty until the test (afternoon shift situation). The hypothesis tested was that split shifts contribute to sleepiness during afternoon, which can increase the safety risks. The overall results supported this hypothesis. In total, five of the 18 drivers reached levels of severe sleepiness (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale 8) with an average increase in KSS of 1.94 when driving in the afternoon after working a morning shift compared with being off duty in the morning. This increase corresponded to differences observed between shift workers starting and ending a night shift. The Psychomotor Vigilance Task showed significantly increased response time with split shift working (afternoon: 0.337 s; split shift 0.347 s), as did the EEG-based Karolinska Drowsiness Score mean/max. Blink duration also increased, although the difference was not significant. One driver fell asleep during the drive. In addition, 12 of the 18 bus drivers reported that in their daily work they have to fight to stay awake while driving at least 2-4 times per month. While there were strong individual differences, the study clearly showed that shift working bus drivers struggle to stay awake and thus countermeasures are needed in order to guarantee safe driving with split shift schedules.

  • 26.
    Aresu, Emanuela
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Fluid and Mechanical Engineering Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Design process management for successful assembly systems2001Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Assembly system design is an important task for a manufacturing company regardless of the nature of its existing assembly activities. However, unlike the product development process, the process of designing assembly systems has not been emphasised.

    The research presented in this thesis aims at identifying and structuring the performance of assembly systems and their design processes, and proposing a framework for identifying important relationships between the results of specific design projects and influencing factors in the field of the design process. These objectives have been accomplished through theoretical and empirical studies. The empirical studies were carried out in the form of an interview study at 15 companies and three case studies at Swedish manufacturing companies both aimed at describing and analysing companies' assembly systems as well as their assembly system design processes.

    A number of characteristics of successful assembly systems have been identified and classified according to the system theory. They have then been structured in a model where the mentioned characteristics have been classified into nine groups indicating the performance of the assembly system. Assembly system performance is represented from a higher level of abstraction by assembly strategy, to a lower level of abstraction by quality, lead time and delivery precision, flexibility, cost and productivity of the assembly system.

    The assembly system design processes have also been investigated and analysed empirically, showing that structured methods are seldom used in the assembly system design process, but mainly experience and knowledge of system designers is utilised. Although larger companies worked more systematically, no specific method for the design of assembly system has been found. The performance of the assembly system design process has been identified and presented in a model with nine performance indicators into three levels, from a higher level of abstraction (design process strategy) to a lower level of abs traction (quality, lead time and delivery precision, flexibility, cost and productivity).

    From the two performance models, an approach to a matrix linking design factors to the design project results has been developed. Examples of the design factors have been given based on research studies in the field of product development, and on the theoretical and empirical studies presented in this thesis. The matrix described is an approach to a tool for the support of production managers and system designers in order to design successful assembly systems.

  • 27.
    Arvola, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Blomkvist, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wahlman, Fredrik
    Linköping University.
    Lifelogging in User Experience Research: Supporting Recall and Improving Data Richness2017In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 20, p. S3954-S3965Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of lifelogging is to help users collect data for self-monitoring and reflection. We have in this study explored how lifelogging technology (a camera and a heart rate monitor) can change user experience (UX) research, and we describe a novel approach. Data was collected for three days with four participants, and a 4-6-hours co-creation workshop with stimulated recall interview was held with each of them to create an experience timeline. The timeline includes selfreported key experiences, lifelog stimulated experiences, heart rate, decisions, and valence. The results show that the number of experiences in the timeline that come from data points stimulated by the lifelogging, are as many as the self-reported data points. Lessons learned include that the use of lifelogging produces highly detailed UX research, but it is very time consuming, due to the sheer amount of data.

  • 28.
    Asklöf, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Borendal Wodlin, Ninnie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Bioelectrical impedance analysis; a new method to evaluate lymphoedema, fluid status, and tissue damage after gynaecological surgery - A systematic review2018In: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, ISSN 0301-2115, E-ISSN 1872-7654, Vol. 228, p. 111-119Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this descriptive review is to summarise the current knowledge of non-invasive bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) used with gynaecological surgical patients in regard to postoperative development of lymphoedema and determination of perioperative fluid balance, and as a prognostic factor in cancer mortality and a predictor of postoperative complications. The databases PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and reference lists of selected articles were searched for relevant articles published during the period January 2008-April 2018. Only papers published in English were retrieved. Thirty-seven articles were evaluated. Where gynaecological studies were lacking, studies with a study population from neighbouring clinical fields were used instead. Studies on the clinical use of BIA with gynaecological surgical patients were divided into three categories: the postoperative development of lower limb lymphoedema (n = 7), perioperative hydration measuring (n = 3), and the BIA parameter phase angle as a prognostic factor in cancer survival and as predictive for postoperative complications (n = 6). Of these 16 studies only three used a pure gynaecological study population. Three different methods of BIA were used in these articles: single frequency-BIA, multifrequency-BIA and bioimpedance spectroscopy. BIA was found to detect lymphoedema with a sensitivity of 73% and a specificity of 84%. Studies indicated that BIA was able to detect lower limb lymphoedema at an early stage even before it became clinically detectable. During postoperative hydration measurements, an increase in extracellular fluid volume and extracellular fluid volume in relation to total body fluid volume, as well as a decrease in phase angle, were associated with higher frequencies of postoperative complications. Moreover, low values for the phase angle have been associated with increased mortality in cancer patients. However, the number of studies in this field was limited. From our review, BIA seems to be a useful tool for use in the clinical setting of the gynaecological surgical patient. The theoretical approach of using bioelectrical impedance values to measure the fluid distribution in the body compartments offers wide opportunities in the clinical setting. However, so far, all studies have set up cut-off limits within the study population, and reference values for a general population need to be defined. There are also rather few studies on a gynaecological study population. Hence, there is a need for further studies within gynaecological surgery focusing on early detection of lower limb lymphoedema, perioperative fluid balance, and postoperative complications in order to establish the value of BIA in clinical praxis. (C) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-06-18 12:44
  • 29.
    Asplund, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lövhall, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nadjm-Tehrani, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    In-store payments using Bitcoin2018In: 9th IFIP International Conference on New Technologies, Mobility and Security (NTMS), IEEE, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility of in-store payments would further increase the potential usefulness of cryptocurrencies. However, this would require much faster transaction verification than current solutions provide (one hour for Bitcoin) since customers are likely not prepared to wait a very long time for their purchase to be accepted by a store. We propose a solution for enabling in-store payments with waiting times in the order of a few seconds, which is still compatible with the current Bitcoin protocol. The idea is based on a payment card in combination with a protocol for ensuring that losing a card does not mean losing the money on it. We analyse the required transaction verification delay and also the potentially added risks that the solution brings compared to current systems.

  • 30.
    Axén, Linus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Tagesson, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Shcherbinin, Denis
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Custovic, Azra
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ojdanic, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Does municipal ownership affect audit fees?2018In: Journal of Management and Governance, ISSN 1385-3457, E-ISSN 1572-963XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses whether municipal ownership affects and determines audit fees. Our model of the determinants of audit fees was tested on data from 249 Swedishmunicipal and 240 private corporations within the real estate industry, thus extendingthe study of audit fees to hybrid organizations. The statistical analysis was followedup with interviews of five partners from five different audit firms. The resultof the study shows that municipal corporations are paying significantly lower auditfees than equivalent private corporations. This finding is primarily explained bylower perceived business risk and by the fact that municipalities are able to pushprices by coordinating procurements of audit services.

  • 31.
    Balasingam, Sadeshkumar
    et al.
    NU Hosp Grp Trollhattan Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Sernert, Ninni
    NU Hosp Grp Trollhattan Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kartus, Juri
    NU Hosp Grp Trollhattan Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Patients With Concomitant Intra-articular Lesions at Index Surgery Deteriorate in Their Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score in the Long Term More Than Patients With Isolated Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture: A Study From the Swedish National Anterior Cruciate Ligament Register2018In: Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopy And Related, ISSN 0749-8063, E-ISSN 1526-3231, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 1520-1529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To analyze and compare clinical outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction 5 and 10 years postsurgery between patients with concomitant intra-articular injuries and those with isolated ACL injury at reconstruction. Methods: Registrations were made using a web-based protocol by physicians for baseline and surgical data. Patients registered their Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) preoperatively and at 5 and 10 years postsurgery. The exclusion criteria for the present study were revisions of previously unregistered ACL surgeries, non-ACL surgeries, patients for whom 10-year follow-up data had not yet been collected, and the proportion of index surgeries that were revision or contralateral interventions. Results: There were 1,295 KOOS scores available for patients 5 years postsurgery, and 1,023 10 years postsurgery from a baseline of 2,751 index reconstructions. A deterioration between the 5-and 10-year scores was observed for patients with concomitant meniscus injury on the KOOS subscales for pain (P = .015), symptoms (P = .005), sport and recreation (P = .011), and knee-related quality of life (QoL) (P = .03) compared with patients with isolated ACL injury. Correspondingly, KOOS subscale score deterioration was seen for combined concomitant cartilage and meniscus injuries for pain (P = .005), symptoms (P = .009), sport and recreation (P = .006), and QoL (P amp;lt; .001). The largest deteriorations were found in sport and recreation (-5.9 points; confidence interval [CI] -10.1, -1.1) and QoL (-6.5 points; CI -10.3, -2.8) subscale scores for patients with concomitant meniscal and cartilage injuries. A similar pattern was not seen between patients with concomitant cartilage injury and isolated ACL injury. Conclusions: The present study reveals that concomitant meniscus injuries at the index operation, either in isolation or in combination with cartilage lesions, render a deterioration of scores on the KOOS outcome subscales for pain, sport and recreation, and quality of life between 5-and 10-year postsurgery follow-up of ACL-reconstructed patients. No such deterioration was seen for patients who had isolated ACL injury.

  • 32.
    Baldvinsdottir, Tinna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lilliecreutz, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Improved clinical management but not patient outcome in women with postpartum haemorrhage-An observational study of practical obstetric team training2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 9, article id e0203806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is the most common obstetric emergency. A well-established postpartum haemorrhage protocol in the labour ward is crucial for effective treatment. The aim of the study was to investigate if practical obstetric team training improves the patient outcome and clinical management of PPH. Setting The practical obstetric team training (PROBE) at Linkoping University Hospital, Sweden, with approximate 3000 deliveries annually, was studied between the years of 2004-2011. Each team consisted of one or two midwives, one obstetrician or one junior doctor and one nurse assistant. Emergency obstetrics cases were trained in a simulation setting. PROBE was scheduled during work hours at an interval of 1.5 years. Population Pre-PROBE women (N = 419 were defined as all women with vaginal birth between the years of 2004-2007 with an estimated blood loss of amp;gt;= 1000 ml within the first 24 hours of delivery. Post-PROBE women (N = 483) were defined as all women with vaginal birth between the years of 2008-2011 with an estimated blood loss of amp;gt;= 1000 ml within the first 24 hours of delivery. The two groups were compared regarding blood loss parameters and management variables using retrospective data from medical records. Results No difference was observed in estimated blood loss, haemoglobin level, blood transfusions or the incidence of postpartum haemorrhage between the two groups. Post-PROBE women had more often secured venous access (pamp;lt;0.001), monitoring of vital signs (pamp;lt;0.001) and received fluid resuscitation (pamp;lt;0.001) compared to pre-PROBE women. The use of uterine massage was also more common among the post-PROBE women compared with the pre-PROBE women (pamp;lt;0.001). Conclusion PROBE improved clinical management but not patient outcome in women with postpartum haemorrhage in the labour ward. These new findings may have clinical implications since they confirm that training was effective concerning the management of postpartum haemorrhage. However, there is still no clear evidence that simulation training improve patient outcome in women with PPH.

  • 33.
    Bar-Sever, Zvi
    et al.
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Biassoni, Lorenzo
    Great Ormond St Hosp Children NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Shulkin, Barry
    St Jude Childrens Res Hosp, TN 38105 USA.
    Kong, Grace
    Peter MacCallum Canc Ctr, Australia.
    Hofman, Michael S.
    Peter MacCallum Canc Ctr, Australia.
    Lopci, Egesta
    Humanitas Clin and Res Hosp, Italy.
    Manea, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Koziorowski, Jacek
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Castellani, Rita
    Ist Nazl Tumori, Italy.
    Boubaker, Ariane
    Clin Source, Switzerland.
    Lambert, Bieke
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Pfluger, Thomas
    Ludwig Maximilian Univ Hosp, Germany.
    Nadel, Helen
    British Columbia Childrens Hosp, Canada.
    Sharp, Susan
    Cincinnati Childrens Hosp Med Ctr, OH 45229 USA.
    Giammarile, Francesco
    IAEA, Austria.
    Guidelines on nuclear medicine imaging in neuroblastoma2018In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 45, no 11, p. 2009-2024Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nuclear medicine has a central role in the diagnosis, staging, response assessment and long-term follow-up of neuroblastoma, the most common solid extracranial tumour in children. These EANM guidelines include updated information on I-123-mIBG, the most common study in nuclear medicine for the evaluation of neuroblastoma, and on PET/CT imaging with F-18-FDG, F-18-DOPA and Ga-68-DOTA peptides. These PET/CT studies are increasingly employed in clinical practice. Indications, advantages and limitations are presented along with recommendations on study protocols, interpretation of findings and reporting results.

  • 34.
    Bendix, Marie
    et al.
    Department of Consultation Psychiatry, Psychiatry Southwest, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlstrom, Lars
    Department of Consultation Psychiatry, Psychiatry Southwest, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    John, Michael
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Lexne, Erik
    Färjestaden Health Care Centre, Sweden.
    Konig, Monika
    PBO Globen, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ostryd, Pia
    Region Östergötland.
    Issursing, Abha
    Department of Psychiatry, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Strindhall, Par
    Department of Psychiatry, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Letter: Towards a Swedish identity in consultation-liaison (CL) psychiatry and psychosomatics - Re-foundation of the Swedish Association of CL Psychiatry in JOURNAL OF PSYCHOSOMATIC RESEARCH, vol 108, issue , pp 20-212018In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 108, p. 20-21Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 35.
    Bengtsson, D.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar Cty Council, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Schroder, H. D.
    Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Berinder, K.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Maiter, D.
    Catholic Univ Louvain, Belgium.
    Hoybye, C.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ragnarsson, O.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Feldt-Rasmussen, U.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Rasmussen, A. Krogh
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    van der Lely, A.
    Erasmus Univ, Netherlands.
    Petersson, M.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Johannsson, G.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Andersen, M.
    Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Burman, P.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Tumoral MGMT content predicts survival in patients with aggressive pituitary tumors and pituitary carcinomas given treatment with temozolomide2018In: Endocrine (Basingstoke), ISSN 1355-008X, E-ISSN 1559-0100, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 737-739Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 36.
    Benosman, M. M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Tlemcen Univ, Biomed Engn Dept, Tilimsen 13000, Algeria.
    Bereksi-Reguig, F.
    Tlemcen Univ, Algeria.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    STRONG REAL-TIME QRS COMPLEX DETECTION2017In: Journal of Mechanics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0219-5194, Vol. 17, no 8, article id 1750111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is used as a marker of autonomic nervous system activity which may be related to mental and/or physical activity. HRV features can be extracted by detecting QRS complexes from an electrocardiogram (ECG) signal. The difficulties in QRS complex detection are due to the artifacts and noises that may appear in the ECG signal when subjects are performing their daily life activities such as exercise, posture changes, climbing stairs, walking, running, etc. This study describes a strong computation method for real-time QRS complex detection. The detection is improved by the prediction of the position of R waves by the estimation of the RR intervals lengths. The estimation is done by computing the intensity of the electromyogram noises that appear in the ECG signals and known here in this paper as ECG Trunk Muscles Signals Amplitude (ECG-TMSA). The heart rate (HR) and ECG-TMSA increases with the movement of the subject. We use this property to estimate the lengths of the RR intervals. The method was tested using famous databases, and also with signals acquired when an experiment with 17 subjects from our laboratory. The obtained results using ECG signals from the MIT-Noise Stress Test Database show a QRS complex detection error rate (ER) of 9.06%, a sensitivity of 95.18% and a positive prediction of 95.23%. This method was also tested against MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database, the result are 99.68% of sensitivity and 99.89% of positive predictivity, with ER of 0.40%. When applied to the signals obtained from the 17 subjects, the algorithm gave an interesting result of 0.00025% as ER, 99.97% as sensitivity and 99.99% as positive predictivity.

  • 37.
    Bergamino, Maurizio
    et al.
    Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, OK, USA.
    Farmer, Madison
    Roosevelt University, Department of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Yeh, Hung-Wen
    Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, OK, USA.
    Paul, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Statistical differences in the white matter tracts in subjects with depression by using different skeletonized voxel-wise analysis approaches and DTI fitting procedures2017In: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240, Vol. 1669, p. 131-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most significant contributors to the global burden of illness. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a procedure that has been used in several studies to characterize abnormalities in white matter (WM) microstructural integrity in MDD. These studies, however, have provided divergent findings, potentially due to the large variety of methodological alternatives available in conducting DTI research. In order to determine the importance of different approaches to coregistration of DTI-derived metrics to a standard space, we compared results from two different skeletonized voxel-wise analysis approaches: the standard TBBS pipeline and the Advanced Normalization Tools (ANTs) approach incorporating a symmetric image normalization (SyN) algorithm and a group-wise template (ANTs TBSS). We also assessed effects of applying twelve different fitting procedures for the diffusion tensor. For our dataset, lower fractional anisotropy (FA) and axial diffusivity (AD) in depressed subjects compared with healthy controls were found for both methods and for all fitting procedures. No group differences were found for radial and mean diffusivity indices. Importantly, for the AD metric, the normalization methods and fitting procedures showed reliable differences, both in the volume and in the number of significant between-groups difference clusters detected. Additionally, a significant voxel-based correlation, in the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, between AD and self-reported stress was found only for one of the normalization procedure (ANTs TBSS). In conclusion, the sensitivity to detect group-level effects on DTI metrics might depend on the DTI normalization and/or tensor fitting procedures used.

  • 38.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bich Hoang, Ngoc Thi
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
    Tärnberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kien Le, Ngai
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
    Svartström, Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Khanh Khu, Dung Thi
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
    Nilsson, Maud
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thanh Le, Hai
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olson, Linus
    TRAC, Sweden; TRAC, Vietnam; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Larsson, Mattias
    TRAC, Sweden; TRAC, Vietnam; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases. TRAC, Sweden; TRAC, Vietnam.
    Insertion sequence transpositions and point mutations in mgrB causing colistin resistance in a clinical strain of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae from Vietnam2018In: International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, ISSN 0924-8579, E-ISSN 1872-7913, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 789-793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resistance among Klebsiella pneumoniae to the last-resort antibiotics carbapenems and colistin is increasing worldwide. In this study, whole-genome sequencing was used to determine the colistin resistance mechanisms in clinical isolates of carbapenem-and colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae from Vietnam. Alterations in the regulatory gene mgrB, via mutations and insertion sequence transpositions, were found in 30 of 31 isolates, emphasising the importance of this resistance mechanism in colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae. (c) 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  • 39.
    Bergman, Emma Ahlen
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hartana, Ciputra Adijaya
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Johansson, Markus
    Sundsvall Hosp, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Linton, Ludvig B.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Berglund, Sofia
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hyllienmark, Martin
    TLA Targeted Immunotherapies AB, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Christian
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Holmstrom, Benny
    Akad Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Palmqvist, Karin
    Umea Univ, Sweden; Ostersund Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Hansson, Johan
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Alamdari, Farhood
    Vastmanland Hosp, Sweden.
    Huge, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Aljabery, Firas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Winerdal, Malin E.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Krantz, David
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Zirakzadeh, A. Ali
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Marits, Per
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Sjoholm, Louise K.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sherif, Amir
    Umea Univ, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Winqvist, Ola
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Increased CD4(+) T cell lineage commitment determined by CpG methylation correlates with better prognosis in urinary bladder cancer patients2018In: Clinical Epigenetics, E-ISSN 1868-7083, Vol. 10, article id 102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Urinary bladder cancer is a common malignancy worldwide. Environmental factors and chronic inflammation are correlated with the disease risk. Diagnosis is performed by transurethral resection of the bladder, and patients with muscle invasive disease preferably proceed to radical cystectomy, with or without neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The anti-tumour immune responses, known to be initiated in the tumour and draining lymph nodes, may play a major role in future treatment strategies. Thus, increasing the knowledge of tumour-associated immunological processes is important. Activated CD4(+) T cells differentiate into four main separate lineages: Th1, Th2, Th17 and Treg, and they are recognized by their effector molecules IFN-gamma, IL-13, IL-17A, and the transcription factor Foxp3, respectively. We have previously demonstrated signature CpG sites predictive for lineage commitment of these four major CD4(+ )T cell lineages. Here, we investigate the lineage commitment specifically in tumour, lymph nodes and blood and relate them to the disease stage and response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Blood, tumour and regional lymph nodes were obtained from patients at time of transurethral resection of the bladder and at radical cystectomy. Tumour-infiltrating CD4(+ )lymphocytes were significantly hypomethylated in all four investigated lineage loci compared to CD4(+) lymphocytes in lymph nodes and blood (lymph nodes vs rumour-infiltrating lymphocytes: IFNG -4229 bp p amp;lt; 0.0001, IL13 -11 bp p amp;lt; 0.05, IL17A -122 bp p amp;lt; 0.01 and FOXP3 -77 bp pamp;gt; 0.05). Examination of individual lymph nodes displayed different methylation signatures, suggesting possible correlation with future survival. More advanced post-cystectomy tumour stages correlated significantly with increased methylation at the IFNG -4229 bp locus. Patients with complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy displayed significant hypomethylation in CD4(+ )T cells for all four investigated loci, most prominently in IFNG p amp;lt; 0.0001. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy seemed to result in a relocation of Th1-committed CD4(+) T cells from blood, presumably to the tumour, indicated by shifts in the methylation patterns, whereas no such shifts were seen for lineages corresponding to IL13, IL17A and FOXP3. Conclusion: Increased lineage commitment in CD4(+) T cells, as determined by demethylation in predictive CpG sites, is associated with lower post-cystectomy tumour stage, complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and overall better outcome, suggesting epigenetic profiling of CD4(+) T cell lineages as a useful readout for clinical staging.

  • 40.
    Bergström, Annika
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Håkansson, Åsa
    Skanes Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Warrén Stomberg, Margareta
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bjerså, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Comfort Theory in Practice-Nurse Anesthetists Comfort Measures and Interventions in a Preoperative Context2018In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 162-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The Comfort Theory proposes a systematic work approach to respond to patients holistic needs. The usefulness of the Comfort Theory in the perioperative setting should be investigated. The aim of this study was to describe and analyze the nurse anesthetists comfort measures in the preoperative context on the basis of the Comfort Theory Design: Qualitative observational study Methods: Semi-structured, clinical observation data collection in the preoperative context and deductive thematic analysis Findings: The nurse anesthetists comfort measures in the preoperative phase in the operating room department aim to ensure the patients needs of relief, ease and transcendence in the physical, psycho-spiritual, environmental and socio-cultural contexts Conclusions: The application of the Comfort Theory to daily work in the preoperative phase is of value for the nurse anesthetist in becoming more aware of the individual holistic needs of the patient and in this way adapting and initiating comfort measures and interventions.

  • 41.
    Bergström, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlström, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hur RFID kan påverka logistisk effektivitet: en studie av den svenska dagligvarubranschen2006Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis is to study how the use of RFID and EPC would affect the Swedish food retail supply chain. This was done by mapping the flow of five different products in the supply chain at activity level. During this work, five manufacturers, two distribution centres and two retail stores were visited and carefully studied. These visits resulted in a flowchart for each company describing the product flow, with particular attention to the use of barcodes. The flowcharts were then used to create scenarios for each company, describing how the flow would change when using RFID-technology. The current flow for each company was then compared with its RFID scenario and analysed to see how logistic efficiency would be affected by the use of RFID-technology.

    The result of the study shows that all companies in the food retail supply chain would benefit from an implementation of RFID-technology. When comparing companies with a high usage of barcodes with companies where barcodes are little used, the conclusion can be drawn that both groups would experience improvements in different areas of logistic efficiency, but not necessarily to the same extent.

    When considering the drawbacks of using RFID, the greatest disadvantages are the large investments and costs of implementing the technology. The largest costs arise in modification of business systems and for hardware investments needed to utilize the technology.

    Apart from theses costs and investments, several positive changes in time consumption and traceability could be found. RFID/EPC makes it possible to replace manual checks with automatic ones, resulting in less time consumption and reduced staff throughout the supply chain. Furthermore, the possibility to trace every case and pallet results in more efficient and less expensive of product returns and recalls.

  • 42.
    Bečević, Zulmir
    et al.
    Institutionen för socialt arbete, Göteborgs universitet.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Frempong, James
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    (O)tryggheten och framtiden – viljan att göra skillnad2018In: Förortsdrömmar: Ungdomar, utanförskap och viljan till inkludering / [ed] Magnus Dahlstedt, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2018, p. 141-162Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta kapitel handlar om ungdomar som lever och verkar i två förortsområden i två av landets större städer, och närmare bestämt ungdomarnas sätt att förhålla sig till och navigera bland omgivningens förväntningar om dem och områdena de bor i. Områdena är två av de urbana miljöer som under senare år varit föremål för omfattande – och mestadels negativ – uppmärksamhet i offentlig debatt, inte minst till följd av sociala spänningar och oroligheter som bland annat har involverat ungdomar boende i områdena. Syftet är att analysera ungdomars tolkningar av sin tillvaro och sitt identitetsskapande i förortsområdets kontext, i relation till det omgivande samhällets förväntningar och tolkningar – om dem och om området. Hur förhåller sig ungdomarna till och navigerar bland omgivningens förväntningar och tolkningar om dem och om området? På vilket sätt formar dessa förväntningar och tolkningar ungdomarnas förståelse av sin tillvaro och sin tillhörighet till området – idag och i relation till en kommande framtid?

  • 43.
    Bjerrum, Ole Weis
    et al.
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Samuelsson, Jan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Ghanima, Waleed
    Univ Oslo, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Kauppila, Marjut
    Turku Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Andersen, Christen Lykkegaard
    Rigshosp, Denmark; Roskilde Hosp, Denmark.
    Thromboembolism prophylaxis in patients with Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms-Clinical practice among Nordic specialists2018In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 100, no 5, p. 475-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) have higher risks of developing thromboembolisms compared to the general population. International guidelines on the management of MPNs therefore include recommendations concerning thromboembolism prophylaxis. In clinical practice, strict adherence to guidelines may be challenging and dependent on factors such as physician experience, outpatient clinic setting, and access to therapy; however, no data exist on physician adherence or patient compliance to thromboembolism prophylaxis in MPNs. Objectives: The Nordic Myeloproliferative Neoplasm Study Group (NMPN) performed a survey among Nordic hematology specialists with the aim of documenting the implementation of international recommendations in a region of Northern Europe with similar healthcare systems. Results: The study showed that Nordic specialists managed their patients in accordance with international guidelines concerning medical intervention, but to a lesser degree regarding the management of additional cardiovascular risk factors. The survey also drew attention to the common clinical dilemma of combining antiaggregatory agents with vitamin K antagonists (VKA), or novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC), as well as phlebotomy limits in female polycythemia vera patients. Conclusions: The results of this study highlight the importance of considering all risk factors for thrombosis and an optimal collaboration with the primary healthcare sector.

  • 44.
    Bjurehed, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Brodin, Nina
    Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordenskiold, Ulla
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Improved Hand Function, Self-Rated Health, and Decreased Activity Limitations: Results After a Two-Month Hand Osteoarthritis Group Intervention2018In: Arthritis care & research, ISSN 2151-464X, E-ISSN 2151-4658, Vol. 70, no 7, p. 1039-1045Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To evaluate the effects on hand function, activity limitations, and self‐rated health of a primary care hand osteoarthritis (OA) group intervention. Hand OA causes pain, impaired mobility, and reduced grip force, which cause activity limitations. OA group interventions in primary care settings are sparsely reported.

    Methods

    Sixty‐four individuals with hand OA agreed to participate; 15 were excluded due to not fulfilling the inclusion criteria. The 49 remaining (90% female) participated in an OA group intervention at a primary care unit with education, paraffin wax bath, and hand exercise over a 6‐week period. Data were collected at baseline, end of intervention, and after 1 year. Instruments used were the Grip Ability Test (GAT), the Signals of Functional Impairment (SOFI), dynamometry (grip force), hand pain at rest using a visual analog scale (VAS), the Patient‐Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), the Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (Quick‐DASH), and the EuroQol VAS (EQ VAS). Data were analyzed using nonparametric statistics.

    Results

    Hand function, activity limitation, and self‐rated health significantly improved from baseline to end of intervention, grip force (right hand: P < 0.001; left hand: P = 0.008), SOFI (P = 0.011), GAT (P < 0.001), hand pain at rest (P < 0.001), PSFS (1: P = 0.008, 2: P < 0.001, and 3: P = 0.004), Quick‐DASH (P = 0.001), and EQ VAS (P = 0.039), and the effects were sustained after 1 year.

    Conclusion

    The hand OA group intervention in primary care improves hand function, activity limitation, and self‐rated health. The benefits are sustained 1 year after completion of the intervention.

  • 45.
    Bjälke, Christer
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Norrköping.
    Widén, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Norrköping.
    BOF (Barnorienterad familjeterapi): symtomens arena?1999Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Barnorienterad familjeterapi - BOF, en terapiform där barn och föräldrar leker tillsammans i en sandlåda med ett material av dockor, djur, träd, staket, etc. I studien undersöker vi om man med ledning av det som sker i leken, samhandlingen, kan se och förstå barnets problem, dvs det symtom familjen sökte till BUP för.

    Vi valde att dela in symtomen i tre huvudgrupper; externaliserande, dvs. utagerande symtom, internaliserande symtom, dvs mer inåtvända symtom som oro, ledsenhet samt somatiserande, där symtomen tar sig kroppsliga uttryck.

    Nio familjer som inledde en BOF-terapi vid BUP, Vrinnevisjukhuset under 1997-98 kom att ingå i undersökningen.

    Innan terapin påbörjades fyllde föräldrarna i ett CBCL -formulär om barnets symtom. BOF-terapin utfördes på vanligt sätt med filmning av sessionerna och samtal i familjen om filmerna. Därefter fick vi tillgång till filmerna. Vi fick ej veta något om symtom eller problematik. I ett fall kände vi anmälningsorsaken. Familjesammansättningen var också okänd för oss.

    Vi har studerat den första terapiomgången med barn, föräldrar och terapeut vid sandlådan. Filmen har transkriberats vilket innebär att varje  sammanhållen handling och verbal tur, dvs. yttrande, har dikterats in på band. Ex, Pojke gör: Tar bilen, Mamma säger: "Kom hit" Transkriptionen har skrivits ut och analyserats. Vi har sorterat och räknat antal handlingar och yttranden och för varje aktör. För att få veta intensiteten i leken har vi sedan delat antalet med lekens längd. Vi antog att intensivare lek kan tyda på utagerande problematik.

    Vi har läst materialet och försökt beskriva terapiomgångarna globalt avseende innehåll och teman i leken, gränser och aktivitet i sandlådan samt terapeutens agerande.

    I utskrifterna har vi även försökt finna handlingar och yttranden som visar på gränsergränssättning, aggressivitet, omsorg, oro-ängslan, sjukdom-skada, ledsenhet, att bli sedd etc. Vi har även försökt se till samspelet ur olika aspekter.

    De olika kategorierna har markerats i skriften, förts in i ett protokoll och räknats samman. Vi har jämfört de olika resultaten och ställt en hypotes om barnets symtom.

    Våra antaganden om varje barns symtom har jämförts med resultatet av CBCL-skattningen. Vi fann, att vi vid åtta av nio barn hamnat inom samma huvudgrupp av symtom som CBCL. Pojken som avvek hade, liksom flertalet av barnen, en dubbel problematik med både internaliserande och externaliserande symtom. I gruppen ingick inget barn med starka somatiserande symtom varför vi ej kan uttala oss om giltigheten för den gruppen.

    Vår slutsats är att barnets symtom syns i samleken och att BOF-sandlådan verkligen är symtomets arena.

  • 46.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Valtersson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    School of Health Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Stenström, Birgitta
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Foot barriers in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: an interview study among Swedish women and men2018In: Arthritis care & research, ISSN 2151-464X, E-ISSN 2151-4658, Vol. 70, no 9, p. 1348-1354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Foot impairments are related to reduced mobility and participation restrictions in daily activities in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The new biological medications are effective and reduce disease activity, but not disability to the same extent. Foot impairments are assumed to be related to participation restrictions also in patients with early RA, diagnosed after the introduction of biological medications. The knowledge of foot impairments needs to be more explored after the introduction of biological disease-modifying drugs (bDMARDs). The aim of this study was to explore the patients' perspective of foot impairments related to early RA.

    METHODS: The sample included 59 patients (20-63 years) who were interviewed about participation dilemmas in daily life using the Critical Incident Technique. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data related to foot impairments were extracted and analyzed thematically. A research partner validated the analysis. The study was approved by the Regional Ethics Committee.

    RESULTS: Patients with early RA described a variety of participation restrictions related to foot impairments: 1) foot hindrances in domestic life, 2) foot impairments influencing work, 3) leisure activities restricted by one's feet 4) struggling to be mobile 5) foot impairments as an early sign of rheumatic disease.

    CONCLUSION: There is a need to focus on foot impairments related to early RA, and for health care professionals to understand these signs. A suggestion for future research is to conduct a longitudinal follow-up of foot impairment related to medication, disease activity and disability in patients diagnosed after the introduction of bDMARDs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 47.
    Bladin, Kalle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Axelsson, Emil
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Broberg, Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Emmart, Carter
    Amer Museum Nat Hist, NY 10024 USA.
    Ljung, Patric
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bock, Alexander
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. NYU, NY 10003 USA.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Globe Browsing: Contextualized Spatio-Temporal Planetary Surface Visualization2018In: IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, ISSN 1077-2626, E-ISSN 1941-0506, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 802-811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Results of planetary mapping are often shared openly for use in scientific research and mission planning. In its raw format, however, the data is not accessible to non-experts due to the difficulty in grasping the context and the intricate acquisition process. We present work on tailoring and integration of multiple data processing and visualization methods to interactively contextualize geospatial surface data of celestial bodies for use in science communication. As our approach handles dynamic data sources, streamed from online repositories, we are significantly shortening the time between discovery and dissemination of data and results. We describe the image acquisition pipeline, the pre-processing steps to derive a 2.5D terrain, and a chunked level-of-detail, out-of-core rendering approach to enable interactive exploration of global maps and high-resolution digital terrain models. The results are demonstrated for three different celestial bodies. The first case addresses high-resolution map data on the surface of Mars. A second case is showing dynamic processes. such as concurrent weather conditions on Earth that require temporal datasets. As a final example we use data from the New Horizons spacecraft which acquired images during a single flyby of Pluto. We visualize the acquisition process as well as the resulting surface data. Our work has been implemented in the OpenSpace software [8], which enables interactive presentations in a range of environments such as immersive dome theaters. interactive touch tables. and virtual reality headsets.

  • 48.
    Blomstrand, Peter
    et al.
    Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Sjöblom, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Acad Hlth and Care, Sweden.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Engvall, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Overweight and obesity impair left ventricular systolic function as measured by left ventricular ejection fraction and global longitudinal strain2018In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 17, article id 113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Obesity is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and heart failure but it is unclear to which extent it is related to left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The aim of the study was to explore the effects of overweight and obesity on left ventricular systolic function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and a control group of non-diabetic persons. Methods: We prospectively investigated 384 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and 184 controls who participated in the CARDIPP and CAREFUL studies. The participants were grouped according to body mass index (normal weight amp;lt; 25 kg/m(2), overweight 25-29 kg/m(2), and obesity amp;gt;= 30 kg/m(2) ). Echocardiography was performed at the beginning of the study and after 4-years in the patient group. Results: Univariable and multivariable regression analysis revealed that variations in left ventricular ejection fraction, global longitudinal strain, left ventricular mass and diastolic function expressed as E/e (the ratio between early diastolic mitral flow and annular motion velocities) all are related to body mass index. The mean and standard deviation of left ventricular ejection fraction and global longitudinal strain values were 57% (8%) vs. - 18.6% (2.3%) for normal weight patients, 53% (8%) vs. - 17.5% (2.3%) for overweight, and 49% (9%) vs. - 16.2% (3.0%) for obese (p amp;lt; 0.05 vs. p amp;lt;0.05). Corresponding results in the control group were 58% (6%) vs. -22.3% (3.0%), 55% (7%) vs. - 20.8% (3.1%) and 54% (8%) - 19.6% (4.0%) (p amp;lt;0.05 vs. p amp;lt;0.05). Patients who gained weight from baseline to follow-up changed left ventricular ejection fraction (median and interquartile range) by - 1.0 (9.0) % (n =187) and patients who lost weight changed left ventricular ejection fraction by 1.0 (10.0) % (n =179) (p amp;lt;0.05). Conclusion: Overweight and obesity impair left ventricular ejection fraction and global longitudinal strain in both patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and non-diabetic persons.

  • 49.
    Bohman, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Klein, Johannes
    Geol Survey Finland, Finland.
    Landauer, Mia
    Univ Lapland, Finland; IIASA, Austria.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Juhola, Sirkku
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Univ Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki Inst Sustainabil Sci HELSUS, Finland.
    On the call for issue advocates, or what it takes to make adaptation research useful2018In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 149, no 2, p. 121-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay discusses the concept of usefulness of research for climate change adaptation. Based on prior research and stakeholder interactions with policymakers and practitioners in the Nordic countries, we contend that critical issues related to the usefulness of adaptation research seem less associated with content (i.e. research outputs), but rather centre around the efforts made to design and communicate research, that is, to put research at the service of society and make the case for adaptation on the political agenda. This, we argue, to some extent mirrors the situation and political context in the Nordic countries, where adaptation in many locations still is an issue in its infancy, not firmly established on the political agendas, and where working procedures are not yet institutionally settled. In this context, science is considered and sometimes used as a discursive tool to make the case for adaptation. Based on the calls for research that inspires, raises hope and helps to raise the issue of adaptation on the political agendas, we elaborate the role of honest issue advocates for researchers in the field of adaptation science.

  • 50.
    Bragde, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Jansson, Ulf
    Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Söderman, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Celiac disease biomarkers identified by transcriptome analysis of small intestinal biopsies2018In: Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences (CMLS), ISSN 1420-682X, E-ISSN 1420-9071, Vol. 75, no 23, p. 4385-4401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Establishing a celiac disease (CD) diagnosis can be difficult, such as when CD-specific antibody levels are just above cutoff or when small intestinal biopsies show low-grade injuries. To investigate the biological pathways involved in CD and select potential biomarkers to aid in CD diagnosis, RNA sequencing of duodenal biopsies from subjects with either confirmed Active CD (n=20) or without any signs of CD (n=20) was performed. Gene enrichment and pathway analysis highlighted contexts, such as immune response, microbial infection, phagocytosis, intestinal barrier function, metabolism, and transportation. Twenty-nine potential CD biomarkers were selected based on differential expression and biological context. The biomarkers were validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction of eight RNA sequencing study subjects, and further investigated using an independent study group (n=43) consisting of subjects not affected by CD, with a clear diagnosis of CD on either a gluten-containing or a gluten-free diet, or with low-grade intestinal injury. Selected biomarkers were able to classify subjects with clear CD/non-CD status, and a subset of the biomarkers (CXCL10, GBP5, IFI27, IFNG, and UBD) showed differential expression in biopsies from subjects with no or low-grade intestinal injury that received a CD diagnosis based on biopsies taken at a later time point. A large number of pathways are involved in CD pathogenesis, and gene expression is affected in CD mucosa already in low-grade intestinal injuries. RNA sequencing of low-grade intestinal injuries might discover pathways and biomarkers involved in early stages of CD pathogenesis.

1234567 1 - 50 of 361
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf