liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Buznyk, Oleksiy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. National Academic Medical Science Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Pasyechnikova, Nataliya
    National Academic Medical Science Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Islam, Mohammad Mirazul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Iakymenko, Stanislav
    National Academic Medical Science Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bioengineered Corneas Grafted as Alternatives to Human Donor Corneas in Three High-Risk Patients2015In: Clinical and Translational Science, ISSN 1752-8054, E-ISSN 1752-8062, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 558-562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corneas with severe pathologies have a high risk of rejection when conventionally grafted with human donor tissues. In this early observational study, we grafted bioengineered corneal implants made from recombinant human collagen and synthetic phosphorylcholine polymer into three patients for whom donor cornea transplantation carried a high risk of transplant failure. These patients suffered from corneal ulcers and recurrent erosions preoperatively. The implants provided relief from pain and discomfort, restored corneal integrity by promoting endogenous regeneration of corneal tissues, and improved vision in two of three patients. Such implants could in the future be alternatives to donor corneas for high-risk patients, and therefore, merits further testing in a clinical trial.

  • 2.
    Griffith, May
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lee, Chyan-Jang
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Buznyk, Oleksiy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Filatov Inst Eye Dis and Tissue Therapy, Ukraine.
    Artificial Corneas, and Reinforced Composite Implants for High Risk Donor Cornea Transplantation2017In: The Stem Cell Microenvironment and its Role in Regenerative Medicine and Cancer Pathogenesis, RIVER PUBLISHERS , 2017, Vol. 7, p. 93-102Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we review examples of artificial corneas that have been developed as alternatives to donor cornea transplantation. These consist of artificial corneas developed as prostheses and regenerative scaffolds. Examples of reinforced and composite implants developed within our group are profiled.

  • 3.
    Islam, Mohammad Mirazul
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA USA.
    Buznyk, Oleksiy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Filatov Institute of Eye Diseases and Tissue Therapy of the NAMS of Ukraine, Odessa, Ukraine.
    Reddy, Jagadesh C
    Tej Kohli Cornea Institute, LV Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India.
    Pasyechnikova, Nataliya
    Filatov Institute of Eye Diseases and Tissue Therapy of the NAMS of Ukraine, Odessa, Ukraine.
    Alarcon, Emilio I
    Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, ON Canada.
    Hayes, Sally
    School of Optometry and Vision Sciences College of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; 7Cardiff Institute for Tissue Engineering and Repair (CITER), Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Lewis, Philip
    School of Optometry and Vision Sciences College of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; 7Cardiff Institute for Tissue Engineering and Repair (CITER), Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    He, Chaoliang
    Key Laboratory of Polymer Eco-materials, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, China.
    Iakymenko, Stanislav
    Filatov Institute of Eye Diseases and Tissue Therapy of the NAMS of Ukraine, Odessa, Ukraine.
    Liu, Wenguang
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China.
    Meek, Keith M
    School of Optometry and Vision Sciences College of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; 7Cardiff Institute for Tissue Engineering and Repair (CITER), Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Sangwan, Virender S
    Tej Kohli Cornea Institute, LV Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada.
    Biomaterials-enabled cornea regeneration in patients at high risk for rejection of donor tissue transplantation2018In: NPJ Regenerative medicine, ISSN 2057-3995, Vol. 3, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The severe worldwide shortage of donor organs, and severe pathologies placing patients at high risk for rejecting conventional cornea transplantation, have left many corneal blind patients untreated. Following successful pre-clinical evaluation in mini-pigs, we tested a biomaterials-enabled pro-regeneration strategy to restore corneal integrity in an open-label observational study of six patients. Cell-free corneal implants comprising recombinant human collagen and phosphorylcholine were grafted by anterior lamellar keratoplasty into corneas of unilaterally blind patients diagnosed at high-risk for rejecting donor allografts. They were followed-up for a mean of 24 months. Patients with acute disease (ulceration) were relieved of pain and discomfort within 1-2 weeks post-operation. Patients with scarred or ulcerated corneas from severe infection showed better vision improvement, followed by corneas with burns. Corneas with immune or degenerative conditions transplanted for symptom relief only showed no vision improvement overall. However, grafting promoted nerve regeneration as observed by improved touch sensitivity to near normal levels in all patients tested, even for those with little/no sensitivity before treatment. Overall, three out of six patients showed significant vision improvement. Others were sufficiently stabilized to allow follow-on surgery to restore vision. Grafting outcomes in mini-pig corneas were superior to those in human subjects, emphasizing that animal models are only predictive for patients with non-severely pathological corneas; however, for establishing parameters such as stable corneal tissue and nerve regeneration, our pig model is satisfactory. While further testing is merited, we have nevertheless shown that cell-free implants are potentially safe, efficacious options for treating high-risk patients.

  • 4.
    Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. LV Prasad Eye Inst, India.
    Haagdorens, Michel K. C.
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Belgium; Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Mirazul Islam, Mohammad Mirazul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lewis, Philip
    Cardiff Univ, Wales.
    Samanta, Ayan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Liszka, Aneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Buznyk, Oleksiy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alarcon, Emilio I.
    Univ Ottawa, Canada.
    Zakaria, Nadia
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Belgium; Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Meek, Keith M.
    Cardiff Univ, Wales.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Montreal, Canada; Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Correction: Short peptide analogs as alternatives to collagen in pro-regenerative corneal implants (vol 69, pg 120, 2018)2018In: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 81, p. 330-331Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 5.
    Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. LV Prasad Eye Inst, India.
    Haagdorens, Michel K. C.
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Belgium; Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Mirazul Islam, Mohammad Mirazul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lewis, Philip
    Cardiff Univ, Wales.
    Samanta, Ayan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Liszka, Aneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Buznyk, Oleksiy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alarcon, Emilio I.
    Univ Ottawa, Canada.
    Zakaria, Nadia
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Belgium; Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Meek, Keith M.
    Cardiff Univ, Wales.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Montreal, Canada; Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Short peptide analogs as alternatives to collagen in pro-regenerative corneal implants2018In: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 69, p. 120-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Short collagen-like peptides (CLPs) are being proposed as alternatives to full-length collagen for use in tissue engineering, on their own as soft hydrogels, or conjugated to synthetic polymer for mechanical strength. However, despite intended clinical use, little is known about their safety and efficacy, mechanism of action or degree of similarity to the full-length counterparts they mimic. Here, we show the functional equivalence of a CLP conjugated to polyethylene glycol (CLP-PEG) to full-length recombinant human collagen in vitro and in promoting stable regeneration of corneal tissue and nerves in a pre- clinicalmini-pig model. We also show that these peptide analogs exerted their pro-regeneration effects through stimulating extracellular vesicle production by host cells. Our results support future use of CLP-PEG implants for corneal regeneration, suggesting the feasibility of these or similar peptide analogs in clinical application in the eye and other tissues. Statement of significance Although biomaterials comprising full-length recombinant human collagen and extracted animal collagen have been evaluated and used clinically, these macromolecules provide only a limited number of functional groups amenable to chemical modification or crosslinking and are demanding to process. Synthetic, customizable analogs that are functionally equivalent, and can be readily scaled-up are therefore very desirable for pre-clinical to clinical translation. Here, we demonstrate, using cornea regeneration as our test bed, that collagen-like-peptides conjugated to multifunctional polyethylene glycol (CLP-PEG) when grafted into mini-pigs as corneal implants were functionally equivalent to recombinant human collagen-based implants that were successfully tested in patients. We also show for the first time that these materials affected regeneration through stimulation of extracellular vesicle production by endogenous host cells that have migrated into the CLP-PEG scaffolds. (C) 2018 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 6.
    Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Haagdorens, Michel K. C.
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Belgium; Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Mirazul Islam, Mohammad Mirazul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lewis, Philip
    Cardiff Univ, Wales.
    Samanta, Ayan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Liszka, Aneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Buznyk, Oleksiy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alarcon, Emilio I.
    Univ Ottawa Heart Inst, Canada.
    Zakaria, Nadia
    Antwerp Univ Hosp, Belgium; Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    Meek, Keith M.
    Univ Ottawa Heart Inst, Canada.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Montreal, Canada; Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Short peptide analogs as alternatives to collagen in pro-regenerative corneal implants (vol 69, pg 120, 2018)2019In: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 88, p. 556-557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 7.
    Krishna Tummala, Gopi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Joffre, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lopes, Viviana R.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Liszka, Aneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Buznyk, Oleksiy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. NAMS Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hyperelastic Nanocellulose-Reinforced Hydrogel of High Water Content for Ophthalmic Applications2016In: ACS BIOMATERIALS SCIENCE and ENGINEERING, ISSN 2373-9878, Vol. 2, no 11, p. 2072-2079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A nanocellulose-reinforced poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel material of exceptionally high water content for ophthalmic applications is presented (amp;gt;90 wt %), which also features a hitherto unprecedented combination of optical, mechanical, viscoelastic, oxygen permeability, and biocompatibility properties. The hydrogel combines the desired softness with remarkable strain-dependent mechanical strength and thereby demonstrates hyperelastic, rubber-like mechanical properties. The observed unusual mechanical behavior is due to both high water content and the combination of relatively stiff cellulose nanowhiskers entangled in a soft polymer matrix of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), thus mimicking the structural characteristics of the corneas main constituents, i.e., water and collagen.

  • 8.
    Samarawickrama, Chameen
    et al.
    Moorfields Eye Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England; UCL Inst Ophthalmol, England; Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Samanta, Ayan
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; LV Prasad Eye Inst, India.
    Liszka, Aneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Buznyk, Oleksiy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. NAMS Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. LV Prasad Eye Inst, India; Univ Montreal, Canada; Univ Montreal, Canada.
    Allan, Bruce
    Moorfields Eye Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England; UCL Inst Ophthalmol, England.
    Collagen-Based Fillers as Alternatives to Cyanoacrylate Glue for the Sealing of Large Corneal Perforations2018In: Cornea, ISSN 0277-3740, E-ISSN 1536-4798, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 609-616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To describe the use of collagen-based alternatives to cyanoacrylate glue for the sealing of acute corneal perforations. Methods: A collagen analog comprising a collagen-like peptide conjugated to polyethylene glycol (CLP-PEG) and its chemical crosslinker were tested for biocompatibility. These CLP-PEG hydrogels, which are designed to act as a framework for corneal tissue regeneration, were then tested as potential fillers in ex vivo human corneas with surgically created full-thickness perforations. Bursting pressures were measured in each of 3 methods (n = 10 for each condition) of applying a seal: 1) cyanoacrylate glue with a polyethylene patch applied ab externo (gold standard); 2) a 100-mu m thick collagen hydrogel patch applied ab interno, and 3) the same collagen hydrogel patch applied ab interno supplemented with CLP-PEG hydrogel molded in situ to fill the remaining corneal stromal defect. Results: Cyanoacrylate gluing achieved a mean bursting pressure of 325.9 mm Hg, significantly higher than the ab interno patch alone (46.3 mm Hg) and the ab interno patch with the CLP-PEG filler (86.6 mm Hg). All experimental perforations were sealed effectively using 100 mu m hydrogel sheets as an ab interno patch, whereas conventional ab externo patching with cyanoacrylate glue failed to provide a seal in 30% (3/10) cases. Conclusions: An ab interno patch system using CLP-PEG hydrogels designed to promote corneal tissue regeneration may be a viable alternative to conventional cyanoacrylate glue patching for the treatment of corneal perforation. Further experimentation and material refinement is required in advance of clinical trials.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf