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  • 1.
    Dahm-Kähler, Pernilla
    et al.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Borgfeldt, Christer
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Skane University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Regional Cancer Center Western Sweden, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Staf, Christian
    Regional Cancer Center Western Sweden, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Falconer, Henrik
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjurberg, Maria
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stålberg, Karin
    Department of Women's and Children's health Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Högberg, Thomas
    Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Population-based study of survival for women with serous cancer of the ovary, fallopian tube, peritoneum or undesignated origin - on behalf of the Swedish gynecological cancer group (SweGCG).2017In: Gynecologic Oncology, ISSN 0090-8258, E-ISSN 1095-6859, Vol. 144, no 1, 167-173 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to determine survival outcome in patients with serous cancer in the ovary, fallopian tube, peritoneum and of undesignated origin.

    METHODS: Nation-wide population-based study of women≥18years with histologically verified non-uterine serous cancer, included in the Swedish Quality Registry for primary cancer of the ovary, fallopian tube and peritoneum diagnosed 2009-2013. Relative survival (RS) was estimated using the Ederer II method. Simple and multivariable analyses were estimated by Poisson regression models.

    RESULTS: Of 5627 women identified, 1246 (22%) had borderline tumors and 4381 had malignant tumors. In total, 2359 women had serous cancer; 71% originated in the ovary (OC), 9% in the fallopian tube (FTC), 9% in the peritoneum (PPC) and 11% at an undesignated primary site (UPS). Estimated RS at 5-years was 37%; for FTC 54%, 40% for OC, 34% for PPC and 13% for UPS. In multivariable regression analyses restricted to women who had undergone primary or interval debulking surgery for OC, FTC and PPC, site of origin was not independently associated with survival. Significant associations with worse survival were found for advanced stages (RR 2.63, P<0.001), moderate (RR 1.90, P<0.047) and poor differentiation (RR 2.20, P<0.009), neoadjuvant chemotherapy (RR1.33, P<0.022), residual tumor (RR 2.65, P<0.001) and platinum single (2.34, P<0.001) compared to platinum combination chemotherapy.

    CONCLUSION: Survival was poorer for serous cancer at UPS than for ovarian, fallopian tube and peritoneal cancer. Serous cancer at UPS needs to be addressed when reporting and comparing survival rates of ovarian cancer.

  • 2.
    Green, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology .
    Peterson, Curt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Horvath, G.
    Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    In response [2]2006In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 12, no 13, 4127-4129 p.Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 3.
    Green, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Horvath, György
    Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Peterson, Curt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    β-tubulin mutations in ovarian cancer using single strand conformation analysis – risk of false positive results from paraffin embedded tissues2006In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, Vol. 236, no 1, 148-154 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutations in the β-tubulin gene have been proposed as a resistance mechanism to paclitaxel. We therefore investigated the presence of mutations in the β-tubulin M40 gene in 40 ovarian tumours (16 paraffin-embedded and 24 freshly frozen) selected for good or poor response to chemotherapy with paclitaxel or non-tubulin-affecting regimens. The presence of mutations was investigated using single strand conformation analysis followed by sequencing of the products with altered mobility. No sequence variants in the exons of the β-tubulin M40 gene were detected. Non-reproducible shifts were identified, in eight out of 16 paraffin embedded samples. This may explain some of the previously published discrepancies. In conclusion, sequence variants in the β-tubulin M40 gene are rare and are unlikely to be a clinically relevant explanation of resistance to paclitaxel.

  • 4.
    Green, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    György, Horvath
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
    Peterson, Curt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Letters to the Editor: ABCB1 2677>T/A Genotype and paclitaxel pharmacogenetics in ovarian cancer - Response2006In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 12, no 13, 4127-4129 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 5.
    Green, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Horvath, Grörgy
    Department of Oncology Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Gothenburg.
    Peterson, Curt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    ABCB1 G1199A polymorphism and ovarian cancer response to paclitaxel2008In: Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, ISSN 0022-3549, E-ISSN 1520-6017, Vol. 97, no 6, 2045-2048 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), encoded by the ABCB1 gene, confers multi-drug resistance to a variety of antineoplastic agents, for example, paclitaxel. Recently, the G1199T/A polymorphism in the ABCB1 gene was shown to be important for the function of P-gp as well as for the resistance to several chemotherapeutic agents in vitro. We analyzed the allelic distribution of the G1199T/A and other polymorphisms in exons 11 and 12 of the ABCB1 gene in ovarian cancer patients treated with paclitaxel and carboplatin in order to evaluate their predictive value in vivo. The SNPs C1236T, G1199T/A, and A1308G were determined using Pyrosequencing in 51 patients with advanced ovarian cancer and correlated to the progression free survival. The G1199T/A SNP was found to affect the progression free survival. Although only two heterozygous (G/A) patients were found their mean progression free survival was only 2 months as compared to 19 months for the wild-type patients. This is in accordance with the higher resistance for the 1199A genetic variant found in vitro. Genotyping of the ABCB1 gene may be important for determining the tumor resistance to paclitaxel and provide useful information for individualized therapy.  

  • 6.
    Green, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Horvath, György
    Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Peterson, Curt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    mdr-1 single nucleotide polymorphisms in ovarian cancer tissue – G2677T/A correlates with response to paclitaxel chemotherapy2006In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, Vol. 12, no 3 pt 1, 854-859 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: P-glycoprotein, encoded by the mdr-1 gene, confers multidrug resistance to a variety of antineoplastic agents, e.g., paclitaxel. Recently, different polymorphisms in the mdr-1 gene have been identified and their consequences for the function of P-glycoprotein, as well as for the treatment response to P-glycoprotein substrates, are being clarified. We analyzed the allelic frequencies at polymorphic sites G2677T/A and C3435T in ovarian cancer patients with good or poor response to treatment with paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin in order to evaluate their predictive values.

    Experimental Design: Fifty-three patients were included in the study; 28 of them had been relapse-free for at least 1 year and 25 had progressive disease or relapsed within 12 months. A reference material consisting of 200 individuals was also analyzed. The genotypes of each single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) were determined using Pyrosequencing.

    Results: The G2677T/A SNP was found to significantly correlate with treatment outcome. The probability of responding to paclitaxel treatment was higher in homozygously mutated patients (T/T or T/A; Fisher's exact test; P < 0.05). The frequency of the T or A alleles was also higher in the group of patients who had a good response (P < 0.05). There was also a dose-dependent influence of the number of mutated alleles on the response to paclitaxel treatment (Χ2 test for linear-by-linear association; P = 0.03). However, the C3435T SNP was not found to correlate to treatment outcome.

    Conclusions: The mdr-1 polymorphism G2677T/A in exon 21 correlates with the paclitaxel response in ovarian cancer and may be important for the function of P-glycoprotein and resistance to paclitaxel and provide useful information for individualized therapy.

  • 7.
    Green, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Oncology Centre.
    Mirghani, Rajaa A
    Karolinska University .
    Rymark, Per
    Västerås Hospital.
    Åvall Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska University Hospital.
    Peterson, Curt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Oncology Centre.
    Pharmacogenetic Studies of Paclitaxel in the Treatment of Ovarian Cancer2009In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 104, no 2, 130-137 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of sequence variants in the CYP2C8, ABCB1 and CYP3A4 genes and the CYP3A4 phenotype for the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of paclitaxel in ovarian cancer patients. Thirty-eight patients were treated with paclitaxel and carboplatin. The genotypes of CYP2C8*1B, *1C, *2, *3, *4, *5, *6, *7, *8 and P404A, ABCB1 G2677T/A and C3435T, as well as CYP3A4*1B, were determined by pyrosequencing. Phenotyping of CYP3A4 was performed in vivo with quinine as a probe. The patients were monitored for toxicity and 23 patients underwent a more extensive neurotoxicity evaluation. Patients heterozygous for G/A in position 2677 in ABCB1 had a significantly higher clearance of paclitaxel than most other ABCB1 variants. A lower clearance of paclitaxel was found for patients heterozygous for CYP2C8*3 when stratified according to the ABCB1 G2677T/A genotype. In addition, the CYP3A4 enzyme activity in vivo affected which metabolic pathway was dominant in each patient, but not the total clearance of paclitaxel. The exposure to paclitaxel correlated to the degree of neurotoxicity. Our findings suggest that interindividual variability in paclitaxel pharmacokinetics might be predicted by ABCB1 and CYP2C8 genotypes and provide useful information for individualized chemotherapy.

  • 8.
    Green, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mirghani, Rajaa A.
    Rymark, Per
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Peterson, Curt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pharmacogenetics of Paclitaxel in the Treatment of Ovarian Cancer – a Pilot Study in Preparation of Individualized Chemotherapy2007In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Lindemann, Kristina
    et al.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Sydney, Australia; Westmead Hospital, Australia.
    Gibbs, Emma
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Åvall Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    dePont Christensen, Rene
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Woie, Kathrine
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Kalling, Marten
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Auranen, Annika
    Tampere University Hospital, Finland.
    Grenman, Seija
    Turku University Hospital, Finland; University of Turku, Finland.
    Hoegberg, Thomas
    Skåne University Hospital Lund, Sweden.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Skeie-Jensen, Tone
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Hjerpe, Elisabet
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Dorum, Anne
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Gebski, Val
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Kristensen, Gunnar
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Chemotherapy vs tamoxifen in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer: a phase III, randomised, multicentre trial (Ovaresist)2017In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 116, no 4, 455-463 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chemotherapy in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer (PROC) aims for palliation and prolonging of progression-free survival (PFS). This study compares Health-related Quality of Life (HRQoL) and efficacy between single-agent chemotherapy and tamoxifen in PROC. Methods: Patients with PROC were randomised (2 : 1) to chemotherapy (weekly paclitaxel 80 mg m(-2) or four weekly pegylated liposomal doxorubicin 40 mg m(-2)) or tamoxifen 40mg daily. The primary end point was HRQoL. Secondary end points were PFS by RECIST and overall survival (OS). Results: Between March 2002 and December 2007, 156 and 82 patients were randomised to chemotherapy and tamoxifen, respectively. In the chemotherapy arm, a significantly larger proportion of patients experienced a worsening in their social functioning. There was no difference in the proportion of patients experiencing improvement of gastrointestinal symptoms. Median PFS on tamoxifen was 8.3 weeks (95% CI, 8.0-10.4) compared with 12.7 weeks (95% CI, 9.0-16.3) on chemotherapy (HR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.16-2.05; log-rank P = 0.003). There was no difference in OS between the treatment arms. Conclusions: Patients on chemotherapy had longer PFS but experienced more toxicity and poorer HRQoL compared with tamoxifen. Control over gastrointestinal symptoms was not better on chemotherapy. These data are important for patient counselling and highlight the need to incorporate HRQoL end points in studies of PROC.

  • 10.
    Lindemann, Kristina
    et al.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway .
    Malander, Susanne
    University of Lund Hospital, Sweden .
    Christensen, Rene D.
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark .
    Mirza, Mansoor R.
    University of Copenhagen Hospital, Denmark .
    Kristensen, Gunnar B.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway Oslo University Hospital, Norway .
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Vergote, Ignace
    University Hospital Leuven, Belgium University Hospital Leuven, Belgium .
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Boman, Karin
    University Hospital, Sweden .
    Nordstrom, Britta
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Examestane in advanced or recurrent endometrial carcinoma: a prospective phase II study by the Nordic Society of Gynecologic Oncology (NSGO)2014In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 14, no 68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We evaluated the efficacy and safety of the aromatase inhibitor exemestane in patients with advanced, persistent or recurrent endometrial carcinoma. Methods: We performed an open-label one-arm, two-stage, phase II study of 25 mg of oral exemestane in 51 patients with advanced (FIGO stage III-IV) or relapsed endometrioid endometrial cancer. Patients were stratified into subsets of estrogen receptor (ER) positive and ER negative patients. Results: Recruitment to the ER negative group was stopped prematurely after 12 patients due to slow accrual. In the ER positive patients, we observed an overall response rate of 10%, and a lack of progression after 6 months in 35% of the patients. No responses were registered in the ER negative patients, and all had progressive disease within 6 months. For the total group of patients, the median progression free survival (PFS) was 3.1 months (95% CI: 2.0-4.1). In the ER positive patients the median PFS was 3.8 months (95% CI: 0.7-6.9) and in the ER negative patients it was 2.6 months (95% CI: 2.1-3-1). In the ER positive patients the median overall survival (OS) time was 13.3 months (95% CI: 7.7-18.9), in the ER negative patients the corresponding numbers were 6.1 months (95% CI: 4.1-8.2). Treatment with exemestane was well tolerated. Conclusion: Treatment of estrogen positive advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer with exemestane, an aromatase inhibitor, resulted in a response rate of 10% and lack of progression after 6 months in 35% of the patients.

  • 11.
    Mirza, M. R.
    et al.
    Nordic Soc Gynecol Oncol, Denmark; Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Monk, B. J.
    University of Arizona, AZ USA; Creighton University of Phoenix, AZ USA; Arizona Oncology Associates, AZ USA.
    Herrstedt, J.
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Oza, A. M.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Mahner, S.
    Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gynakol Onkol, Germany; University of Munich, Germany.
    Redondo, A.
    GEICO, Spain; Hospital University of La Paz, Spain.
    Fabbro, M.
    French Investigator Grp Ovarian and Breast Cancer GIN, France; Institute Cancer Montpellier, France.
    Ledermann, J. A.
    UCL, England; UCL, England.
    Lorusso, D.
    Ist Nazl Tumori, Italy.
    Vergote, I.
    Luxembourg Gynecol Oncology Grp, Belgium; University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Ben-Baruch, N. E.
    Kaplan Medical Centre, Israel.
    Marth, C.
    AGO Austria, Austria; Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria.
    Madry, R.
    Central and Eastern European Gynecol Oncology Grp, Poland; Uniwersytet Medical Poznaniu, Poland.
    Christensen, R. D.
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Berek, J. S.
    Stanford Comprehens Cancer Institute, CA USA.
    Dorum, A.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Tinker, A. V.
    British Columbia Cancer Agency, Canada.
    du Bois, A.
    Kliniken Essen Mitte, Germany.
    Gonzalez-Martin, A.
    GEICO, Spain; MD Anderson Cancer Centre Madrid, Spain.
    Follana, P.
    GINECO, France; Centre Antoine Lacassagne, France.
    Benigno, B.
    Northside Hospital, GA USA.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gilbert, L.
    McGill University, Canada.
    Rimel, B. J.
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA USA.
    Buscema, J.
    Arizona Oncology Associates, AZ USA.
    Balser, J. P.
    Veristat, MA USA.
    Agarwal, S.
    Tesaro, MA USA.
    Matulonis, U. A.
    Dana Farber Cancer Institute, MA 02115 USA.
    Niraparib Maintenance Therapy in Platinum-Sensitive, Recurrent Ovarian Cancer2016In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 375, no 22, 2154-2164 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Niraparib is an oral poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1/2 inhibitor that has shown clinical activity in patients with ovarian cancer. We sought to evaluate the efficacy of niraparib versus placebo as maintenance treatment for patients with platinum-sensitive, recurrent ovarian cancer. METHODS In this randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trial, patients were categorized according to the presence or absence of a germline BRCA mutation (gBRCA cohort and non-gBRCA cohort) and the type of non-gBRCA mutation and were randomly assigned in a 2: 1 ratio to receive niraparib (300 mg) or placebo once daily. The primary end point was progression-free survival. RESULTS Of 553 enrolled patients, 203 were in the gBRCA cohort (with 138 assigned to niraparib and 65 to placebo), and 350 patients were in the non-gBRCA cohort (with 234 assigned to niraparib and 116 to placebo). Patients in the niraparib group had a significantly longer median duration of progression-free survival than did those in the placebo group, including 21.0 vs. 5.5 months in the gBRCA cohort (hazard ratio, 0.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.17 to 0.41), as compared with 12.9 months vs. 3.8 months in the non-gBRCA cohort for patients who had tumors with homologous recombination deficiency (HRD) (hazard ratio, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.24 to 0.59) and 9.3 months vs. 3.9 months in the overall non-gBRCA cohort (hazard ratio, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.61; P amp;lt; 0.001 for all three comparisons). The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events that were reported in the niraparib group were thrombocytopenia (in 33.8%), anemia (in 25.3%), and neutropenia (in 19.6%), which were managed with dose modifications. CONCLUSIONS Among patients with platinum-sensitive, recurrent ovarian cancer, the median duration of progression-free survival was significantly longer among those receiving niraparib than among those receiving placebo, regardless of the presence or absence of gBRCA mutations or HRD status, with moderate bone marrow toxicity. (Funded by Tesaro; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01847274.)

  • 12.
    Pietzner, Klaus
    et al.
    Charite, Germany.
    Vergote, Ignace
    University Hospital Leuven, Belgium; Leuven Cancer Institute, Belgium.
    Santoro, Armando
    Ist Clin Humanitas, Italy.
    Chekerov, Radoslav
    Charite, Germany.
    Marme, Frederik
    University of Frauenklin Heidelberg, Germany.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Martinius, Holger
    Neovu Biotech GmbH, Germany.
    Friccius-Quecke, Hilke
    Neovu Biotech GmbH, Germany.
    Sehouli, Jalid
    Charite, Germany; North Eastern German Soc Gynecol NOGGO, Germany.
    Re-challenge with catumaxomab in patients with malignant ascites: results from the SECIMAS study2014In: Medical Oncology, ISSN 1357-0560, E-ISSN 1559-131X, Vol. 31, no 12, 308- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Malignant ascites is a common phenomenon in cancer patients. It poses a great challenge to the clinician, because of limited treatment options and strong impairment of the quality of life of the often palliative patients. The SECIMAS study investigated the feasibility of a re-challenge with four catumaxomab intraperitoneal infusions in patients who had already received a first cycle of four infusions in the phase III CASIMAS study, which compared catumaxomab with and without prednisolone premedication. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who received at least three catumaxomab infusions. Secondary endpoints included a composite safety score (CSS) summarising the worst grades for the main catumaxomab-related adverse events (pyrexia, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain), safety, efficacy and the occurrence of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs). Eight of nine screened patients received a second catumaxomab cycle. Compliance with a catumaxomab re-challenge was high: all eight patients (100 %) received all four infusions. The median CSS was 3.0 versus 3.4 in CASIMAS. The tolerability profile of the second catumaxomab cycle was comparable to that of the first cycle. Median puncture-free survival (48 days) and overall survival (407 days) were longer than in CASIMAS (35 and 103 days, respectively), although median time to next puncture was shorter (60 vs. 97 days). Of six patients sampled, all were ADA positive at screening and remained ADA positive until the end of the study. The presence of ADAs did not affect catumaxomabs safety or efficacy. The CSS and tolerability profile for catumaxomab in SECIMAS were comparable to those in CASIMAS. The majority of patients benefitted from a second cycle of catumaxomab. A re-challenge seems to be feasible and safe for selected patients with recurrent malignant ascites due to carcinoma after a first cycle of catumaxomab.

  • 13.
    Sehouli, Jalid
    et al.
    Charite, Germany .
    Pietzner, Klaus
    Charite, Germany .
    Wimberger, Pauline
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany .
    Vergote, Ignace
    University Hospital Leuven, Belgium .
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Schneeweiss, Andreas
    University of Heidelberg Hospital, Germany .
    Bokemeyer, Carsten
    University of Medical Centre Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany .
    Salat, Christoph
    Hematol Oncology Clin, Germany .
    Scambia, Giovanni
    Catholic University, Italy .
    Berton-Rigaud, Dominique
    CLCC Rene Gauducheau, France .
    Santoro, Armando
    Humanitas Cancer Centre, Italy .
    Cervantes, Andres
    University of Valencia, Spain .
    Tredan, Olivier
    Centre Leon Berard, France .
    Tournigand, Christophe
    Hop St Antoine, France .
    Colombo, Nicoletta
    University of Milano Bicocca, Italy .
    Dudnichenko, Alexander S.
    Kharkov Medical Academic Postgrad Educ, Ukraine .
    Westermann, Anneke
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Friccius-Quecke, Hilke
    Neovu Biotech GmbH, Germany .
    Lordick, Florian
    University of Cancer Centre Leipzig, Germany .
    Catumaxomab with and without prednisolone premedication for the treatment of malignant ascites due to epithelial cancer: results of the randomised phase IIIb CASIMAS study2014In: Medical Oncology, ISSN 1357-0560, E-ISSN 1559-131X, Vol. 31, no 8, 76- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This two-arm, randomised, multicentre, open-label, phase IIIb study investigated the safety and efficacy of a 3-h catumaxomab infusion with/without prednisolone premedication to reduce catumaxomab-related adverse events. Patients with malignant ascites due to epithelial cancer received four 3-h intraperitoneal catumaxomab infusions with/without intravenous prednisolone (25 mg) premedication before each infusion. The primary safety endpoint was a composite safety score calculated from the incidence and intensity of the most frequent catumaxomab-related adverse events (pyrexia, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain). Puncture-free survival (PuFS) was a co-primary endpoint. Time to next puncture (TTPu) and overall survival (OS) were secondary endpoints. Prednisolone premedication did not result in a significant reduction in the main catumaxomab-related adverse events. The mean composite safety score was comparable in both arms (catumaxomab plus prednisolone, 4.1; catumaxomab, 3.8; p = 0.383). Median PuFS (30 vs. 37 days) and TTPu (78 vs. 102 days) were shorter in the catumaxomab plus prednisolone arm than in the catumaxomab arm, but the differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.402 and 0.599, respectively). Median OS was longer in the catumaxomab plus prednisolone arm than in the catumaxomab arm (124 vs. 86 days), but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.186). The superiority of catumaxomab plus prednisolone versus catumaxomab alone could not be proven for the primary endpoint. Prednisolone did not result in a significant reduction in the main catumaxomab-related adverse events. The study confirms the safety and efficacy of catumaxomab administered as four 3-h intraperitoneal infusions for the treatment of malignant ascites.

  • 14.
    Sorbe, B.
    et al.
    Department of Gynecological Oncology, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden, Department of Gynecological Oncology, University Hospital, SE-701 85 Örebro, Sweden.
    Andersson, H.
    Department of Gynecological Oncology, University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Boman, K.
    Department of Gynecological Oncology, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Kalling, M.
    Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Treatment of primary advanced and recurrent endometrial carcinoma with a combination of carboplatin and paclitaxel - Long-term follow-up2008In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, ISSN 1048-891X, E-ISSN 1525-1438, Vol. 18, no 4, 803-808 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is no generally accepted standard chemotherapy in treatment of advanced and recurrent endometrial carcinoma. Cisplatin and doxorubicin with or without cyclophosphamide are widely used. Response rates have improved with combination chemotherapy compared with single-agent therapy. A platinum analog seems to be an important part of the chemotherapy regimen. Since few patients are cured from their disease and since the duration of response is short, further improvement of this therapy is warranted. During the past years, the taxanes (paclitaxel) are being added to prior evaluated regimens and not only improved response rates are reported but also increased toxicity is observed. In a prospective, phase II, multicenter study, carboplatin (area under the curve = 5) and paclitaxel (175 mg/m2) were evaluated in treatment of primary advanced and recurrent endometrial carcinoma. In total, 66 patients were recruited during the years 2000-2004. Eighteen primary advanced tumors and 48 recurrences were treated. All histologic types and tumor grades were allowed. The median follow-up was 57 months (range 37-69 months). The overall response rate was 67% (95% CI 55-78). The complete response rate was 29% and the partial response rate 38%. Primary advanced and recurrent tumors as well as endometrioid and nonendometrioid tumors showed similar response rates. The median response duration was 14 months. The 1- and 3-year survival rates were 82% and 33%, respectively. The main toxicities were hematologic and neurologic (sensory neuropathy). The response rates were encouraging, superior to prior platinum-containing regimens, but response duration and the long-term survival rate were still short. The neurologic toxicity was frequent and was a substantial problem in this series of patients. Further research is highly needed to improve the treatment of advanced and recurrent endometrial cancer. © 2007, Copyright the Authors.

  • 15.
    Stålberg, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bjurberg, M.
    Skånes University of Sjukhus, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Borgfeldt, C.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Dahm-Kahler, P.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Falconer, H.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Holmberg, E.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Staf, C.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Tholander, B.
    Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Högberg, T.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Risk factors for lymph node metastases in women with endometrial cancer: A population-based, nation-wide register studyOn behalf of the Swedish Gynecological Cancer Group2017In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 140, no 12, 2693-2700 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of lymphadenectomy in the management of early endometrial cancer remains controversial. In the recent ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO guidelines, lymphadenectomy is recommended for patients with endometrioid adenocarcinoma Grade 3 with deep myometrial invasion, but complete agreement was not achieved. In Sweden, DNA aneuploidy has been included as a high-risk factor. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of tumor histology, FIGO grade, DNA ploidy and myometrial invasion (MI) on occurrence of lymph node metastasis (LNM) in patients with endometrial cancer. The study design is a retrospective cohort study based on prospectively recorded register data. Endometrial cancer patients registered in the Swedish Quality Registry for Gynecologic Cancer 2010-2015 with FIGO Stages I-III and verified nodal status were included. Data on DNA ploidy, histology, FIGO grade and MI were included in multivariable log-binomial regression analyses with LNM as dependent variable. 1,165 cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The multivariable analyses revealed increased risk of LNM in patients with tumors with MI50% (risk ratio [RR]=4.1; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.0-5.6), nonendometrioid compared to endometrioid histology (RR 1.8; CI 1.4-2.4) and FIGO Grade 3 compared to Grade 1-2 tumors (RR 1.5; CI 1.1-2.0). No statistically significant association between DNA ploidy status and LNM was detected. This population-based, nation-wide study in women with endometrial cancer confirms a strong association between MI50%, nonendometrioid histology and FIGO Grade 3, respectively, and LNM. DNA ploidy should not be included in the preoperative decision making of removing nodes or not. Whats new? Whether lymphadenectomy is beneficial for women with endometrial cancer remains uncertain. Moreover, additional studies are needed to explore factors that reliably predict lymph node metastasis (LNM). Here, multiple factors, including tumor histology, grade of differentiation and DNA aneuploidy, were evaluated for associations with LNM risk in women with endometrial cancer and verified lymph node status. Most significantly, deep myometrial invasion in tumors increased LNM risk fourfold, whereas DNA ploidy had essentially no impact on LNM risk. The findings confirm the predictive relevance of myometrial invasion, histology and grade reported in previous single-center and multicenter studies.

  • 16.
    von Heideman, Anne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Tholander, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Grundmark, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Cajander, Stefan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Gerdin, Eva
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Holm, Leif
    Falun Central Hospital, Sweden .
    Axelsson, Agneta
    Vasteras Hospital, Sweden .
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Mahteme, Haile
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Daniel, Erika
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Chemotherapeutic drug sensitivity of primary cultures of epithelial ovarian cancer cells from patients in relation to tumour characteristics and therapeutic outcome2014In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 53, no 2, 242-250 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. A number of chemotherapeutic drugs are active in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) but so far choice of drugs for treatment is mostly empirically based. Testing of drug activity in tumour cells from patients might provide a rationale for a more individualised approach for drug selection. Material and methods. Sensitivity of EOC to chemotherapeutic drugs was analysed in 125 tumour samples from 112 patients using a short-term primary culture assay based on the concept of total cell kill. Sensitivity was related to tumour histology, treatment status and clinical tumour response. Results. For most EOC standard drugs serous high grade and clear cell EOC were the most sensitive subtypes and the mucinous tumours the most resistant subtype. Docetaxel, however, tended to show the opposite pattern. Samples from previously treated patients tended to be more resistant than those from treatment naive patients. The activity of cisplatin correlated with that of other drugs with the exception of docetaxel. Tumour samples from two sites in the same patient at the same occasion showed similar cisplatin sensitivity in contrast to samples taken at different occasions. Samples from patients responding in the clinic to treatment were more sensitive to most drugs than samples from non-responding patients. At the individual patient level, drug sensitivity in vitro compared with clinical response showed sensitivities and specificities in the 83-100% and 55-83% ranges, respectively. Conclusions. Assessment of EOC tumour cell drug sensitivity in vitro provides clinically relevant and potentially useful information for the optimisation of drug treatment.

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