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  • 1.
    Bråmå, Torsten
    et al.
    Saab, Linköping, Sweden.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Saab Aerosystems, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hansson, Erik
    Multidisciplinary Optimization of a Composite Wing Using an Alternative Approach for Static Aeroelasticity1995In: Aeroelasticity and structural dynamics 1995, 1995Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, Finspång, Sweden.
    DMAIC and DMADV - differences, similarities and synergies2007In: International Journal of Six Sigma and Competitive Advantage (IJSSCA), ISSN 1479-2494, E-ISSN 1479-2753, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 193-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Define, Measure, Analyse, Improve, Control (DMAIC) is the well-known Six Sigma methodology, while Define, Measure, Analyse, Design, Verify/Validate (DMADV) is the most commonly used methodology within Design for Six Sigma (DfSS). Many emphasise the differences between the two, but there are similarities as well. Based on Donald Wheeler's four process states, it is suggested when it is appropriate to use DMAIC or DMADV. However, in one specific state, which is quite common, neither of the two is appropriate. In the case of a process that is out of control but with only minor customer problems, a combination of DMAIC and DMADV, called for Define, Measure, Analyse, Design, Control (DMADC), is suggested. It was developed from experiences gained in process-improvement projects at Siemens in Sweden. Furthermore, contrary to the views of some authors, it is argued that there is no such thing as a 'five-sigma wall' between DMAIC and DfSS when improving processes.

  • 3.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Swedeb.
    Six Sigma management. Action research with some contributions to theories and methods.2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many companies around the world have implemented Six Sigma as a problem solving methodology especially useful for dealing with recurring problems in business processes. Since the 1980s when it was developed at Motorola, many companies have tried to implement Six Sigma to fit their own company’s culture and goals. This thesis presents a longitudinal case study describing the evolution of ‘Six Sigma Management’ at Siemens in Sweden. The success of the programme was to a large degree built on previous failures, confirming Juran’s old saying ‘Failure is a gold mine’. From the case study, success factors for implementing Six Sigma at Siemens are identified and compared to those given in the literature. Some of the most critical success factors identified at Siemens had not been mentioned as such in the literature before. The main conclusion of the study is that, in order to succeed and get sustainable results from a Six Sigma programme, Six Sigma should be integrated with Process Management, instead of just running Six Sigma as a separate initiative in an organisation. Furthermore, the thesis includes papers presenting methods and tools to be used in a Six Sigma programme or in Six Sigma projects. They deal with: how to identify suitable Six Sigma projects, how to select which Six Sigma methodology to use, how to find hidden misunderstandings between people from different knowledge domains, and how to simulate the impact of improvements to iterative processes. All these methods and tools have been developed and tested at Siemens. This has been an action research project, where the author has been employed by the company under investigation for eleven years and has actively influenced the changes in the company based on knowledge gained at the company as well as on research studies conducted at universities. In action research the change initiative under investigation is conducted and analysed in a single context. The readers are invited to draw their own conclusions on the applicability of the results to their own specific cases. In addition to this, some conclusions derived using analytical generalisation, applicable to a more general case, are presented in the thesis.

  • 4.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Towards a learning organization for product development2000Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The costs of late changes due to earlier misunderstandings in product development are very high, even though no company wants to admit how high they really are. From experience in Swedish industry and based on results from previous research found in the literature, the conclusion is drawn that people need to talk to one another to be able to understand one another and thereby avoid misunderstandings. Information technology can be used to increase the frequency and amount of information communicated within a product development organization but it cannot replace talking. This project aims at delivering methods that are intended to improve effectiveness of product development, i.e. fewer misunderstandings will contribute to improved quality and, as a consequence, lowered costs and shortened lead-times. The project also aims at delivering a method that is intended to improve organizational learning, which would in turn improve a company’s ability to adapt more easily to a changing environment. The ultimate goal and vision is more competitive companies.

    The following contributions to the theory of Engineering Management are presented in this thesis: (i) ‘An Engineering Management Model for Improvement of Organizational Learning’ is a theoretical model of how three management disciplines can be used together to improve organizational learning within a product development organization, based on the framework of Senge’s five disciplines. (ii) ‘Phantom Turbine Development’ is a presentation of how people engaged in development of technology and processes for product development can share goals and visions based on future customer needs. (iii) ‘Process Improvement Simulations’ are a method for simulating and comparing improvements to the development process before they actually take place. (iv) ‘Knowledge Overlapping Seminars (KOS)’ are a communication method for engineers in a product development team with the purpose of eliminating misunderstandings. Obstacles that occur in ‘ordinary meetings’ are avoided in a KOS.

    Action research has been used as research method. It has been performed at ABB STAL, a company developing gas and steam turbines, where the researcher of this project is employed. The approach used, collaborative action inquiry, is characterized by the researcher having an almost total identification with the activities and direction of change of the company, which is the case since the research is to a great extent based on the researcher’s own experience.

  • 5.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Rönnbäck, Åsa
    SIQ - Swedish Insititute for Quality, Sweden.
    A Tool For Measuring Quality Culture2016In: 19th QMOD Proceedings: International Conference on Quality and Service Sciences / [ed] Su Mi Dahlgaard-Park, Jens J. Dahlgaard, Lund University Library Press , 2016, p. 1272-1285Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s organizations face the challenge of measuring the right things and then using those measurements as a starting point to work with improved quality.  It is important to design a measurement tool that corresponds to the initiatives taken when a new management implementation such as adopting quality values is carried out. The failure to generate a shared value base is pointed out as one main cause for the inability to effectively apply Quality Management and Lean within organizations, thus it appears central to measure these values. However, the measuring of values and organizational culture, e.g. the soft side, seems to be missing within both concepts. The managers have great influence on what culture will be predominant in an organization, and how they act and behave affects the attitudes and behaviours of the co-workers within the organization. Therefore, there is a need for a tool that measures not only quality values, but also behaviours that support or obstruct a quality culture. Furthermore, it is of interest how the employees rank both the performance and the importance of quality values and behaviours. The tool should not be a ‘certification’ but rather a diagnostic tool for continuous improvement.

  • 6.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Danielsson, Mikael
    Propia AB, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Process Management 1-2-3: a maturity model and diagnostics tool2013In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 24, no 7-8, p. 933-944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we provide an insight into Process Management that offers a simple hands-on method to improve Process Management. Organisations implementing ‘some modern’ management concept sometimes fail or do not achieve the expected results. From our own industrial experiences, we found that organisations implementing Process Management sometimes start off on a ‘too-advanced’ level without having fulfilled the necessary prerequisites. For that purpose, in this article, we present a Process Management maturity model developed in an environment of industrial and academic cooperation. In addition to the model, we present a diagnostics tool that has been developed together with several companies to be used by organisations to assess their current level of process maturity. By using this, it is the purpose that organisations could reduce their risk of starting off ‘too high’ and thus failing in their efforts.

  • 7.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jakolini, Sebastian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Six Sigma diplomacy - the impact of Six Sigma on national patterns of corporate culture2014In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 25, no 7-8, p. 827-841Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking cultural aspects into account is seldom mentioned as a success factor in implementing Six Sigma. In this paper, we elaborate on the implications of implementing and applying Six Sigma in countries with different national cultures, especially in those with non-American cultures. Based on two longitudinal case studies, we show how to take cultural aspects into account when implementing Six Sigma, and also, how implementing Six Sigma influences the local national culture of the company. We argue that taking different aspects of national cultures into account when implementing Six Sigma within a global organisation will enhance understanding, cooperation and performance of the organisation.

  • 8.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Assessing the Quality of Elderly Care – Can Survey Incomparability be Solved by Vignettes?2014In: Proceedings of the 21st EurOMA conference, Palermo, Italy, Palermo, Italy., 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    User and customer surveys are the most commonly used instruments to evaluate the efficiency and quality of public services, but an important question is whether the data collected by the surveys are of sufficient quality to support decision making and improvements of public services. One of the mentioned problems is the interpersonal incomparability of survey responses, which may be biased if individuals interpret the questions in different ways and use response scales in systematically different ways. The purpose of the present study is therefore to investigate how the use of anchoring vignettes could improve the quality of survey results. Our results show that anchoring vignettes remove some noise from survey results and allow the correction of otherwise interpersonally incomparable survey responses. The suggested methodology has the potential to contribute to better evaluations of the quality of elderly care and, thereby, to better decisions on how to improve elderly care services.

  • 9.
    Fundin, Anders
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Alstom Power, Finspång, Sweden.
    Use Customer Feedback To Choose Six Sigma Projects2003In: Six Sigma Forum Magazine, ISSN 1539-4069, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 17-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Six Sigma methodology offers an organization significant improvement potential, but project selection is often a problem. A formalized customer feedback system can provide reliable and valuable information to a project selection team, since dissatisfied customers are a continuous source of ideas concerning product innovation and improvement. A case study illustrates how a Swedish turbine manufacturer uses feedback as a driving force in a process improvement process (PIP) that allows selection of Six Sigma projects vital to the development of new products. The application of Six Sigma allowed the firm to expand a fault handling process based on customer dissatisfaction from a product support process to one that encompass process issues as well. Implementation of the PIP is still in progress, but the improve phase has been completed and the check phase is in progress. Faults classified from process owners have resulted in the identification of 67 potential Six Sigma projects.

  • 10.
    Gregorio, Ruben
    et al.
    Delphi Diesel Systems, Barcelona, Spain.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Propia AB, Norrköping, Sweden.
    From expectations and needs of service customers to control chart specification limits2011In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 164-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim of this paper is to develop a model to help service organizations to set the specification limits according to the customer expectations.

    Design/methodology/approach – A review of relevant literature has been used to develop a new integrated model with ideas from the Kano model, SERVQUAL, Taguchi loss function, Importance Performance Analysis (IPA) and a new model, “the Trade-Off Importance”. A survey was carried out with 18 external customers and internal stakeholders of the Service Division of Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB in Finspong, Sweden.

    Findings – The model has demonstrated its robustness and credibility to set the specification limits. Additionally, it is a very powerful tool for service quality measurement and to set strategic directions.

    Research limitations/implications – First, articles published on this subject are few and there is no similar model in the literature to confirm or compare results. The proposed model must be further validated in future research. Second, this study is applied in a single service division, with a relatively small sample. Ideally, research should be conducted using multiple industries in order to ensure that the model is generalizable.

    Originality/value – To the best of one's knowledge, this paper is the first attempt to create a road-map to set the specification limits in services. Researchers should find that the proposed model fills the research gap. From a managerial standpoint the practical benefits in Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB suggest a new way of communicating to customers. The model will also improve the target setting in the Six Sigma projects.

  • 11.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Practice what you preach: Quality of education in education on quality2012In: , 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Practise what you preach: Quality of education in education on quality2012In: : How may organizations use Learning, Creativity and Innovation in realizing their dreams of excellence and recover from the economic crisis? / [ed] Su Mi Dahlgaard-Park, Jens J. Dahlgaard & Adam Hamrol, 2012, p. 855-867Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Practise what you preach: quality of education in education on quality2015In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 26, no 11-12, p. 1202-1212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The quality of teaching should be the central theme in the education on quality management (QM). Delivering bad courses about QM would reduce the legitimacy of the subject, since we do not practise what we preach. The purpose of this paper is to discuss how the quality of education can be enhanced through effective course design based on quality thinking and higher education theory. The study covers three university courses in the field of QM; an introductory course in QM, and courses in Six Sigma and Lean Production, respectively. Each course has been analysed and described in terms of factors affecting student learning and the perceived quality of the courses. The impact of course design on examination results and student evaluation has been studied and compared to historical data. The study demonstrates that course design can have a profound impact on student learning as well as course evaluation. Analysis of the three examples provided in this paper indicates that the QM principles can effectively be used in course design processes. Attention to the principles presented in this paper facilitates the design of courses that enhance learning and ensure higher student satisfaction. The application of QM principles in higher education has a long theoretical tradition. This paper provides three strong examples of how this can be done in practise.

  • 14.
    Mauléon, Christina
    et al.
    Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knowledge overlapping seminars: conversational arenas supporting joint directed action in projects2011In: Quality Management Journal, ISSN 1068-6967, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 33-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to test and evaluate a designed conversational seminar – the knowledge overlapping seminar (KOS) – as a support for joint directed action in projects. This conversational arena is designed to support the process of co-constructing shared understanding in projects with the aim of delimiting misunderstandings and creating knowledge overlap between people coming together from different organizational contexts. As misunderstandings often rise in projects among people who don't share the same language due to their belonging to different organizational contexts, there exists a need to develop methodologies that will assist in supporting the co-construction process of shared understanding in projects. This study proposes a designed conversational seminar for this purpose. KOSs are designed to be conversational arenas in which members of a project team have an opportunity to guide one another in their respective different domains of knowledge related and connected to the common project goal. The design of KOS aims to avoid conversational obstacles to effective knowledge overlap between members from different organizational contexts and from different knowledge domains, with special emphasis on avoiding prestige. The KOS has here been evaluated as being a promising conversational ?tool? for application in projects with a view to support joint directed action by achieving a shared understanding of the project goal and delimiting misunderstandings, with improved efficiency, quality, and, ultimately, more satisfied customers as a result.

  • 15.
    Navarro, Priscilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greening logistics by introducing process management: A viable tool for freight transport companies going green2018In: Supply Chain Forum: an International Journal, ISSN 1625-8312, E-ISSN 1624-6039, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 204-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the usage of process management within the freight transport industry is unknown and presumed low, it has been used within other sectors as an efficient approach for dealing with and fulfilling customer demands as well as environmental requirements. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how process management can enhance a customer focused greening in the transport and logistics sector. We present a literature review of the intersections of process management, freight transport and environmental sustainability. Furthermore, we conducted a case study of how two environmentally ambitious Swedish freight transport companies use process management to enhance environmental sustainability. We found that environmentally ambitious freight transport companies do not proactively use process management, and that workshops with topical experts and practitioners can be a way for introducing process management to enhance environmental sustainability in such companies.

  • 16.
    Navarro, Priscilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Using Process Management within Green Logistics – A case study2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    While Process Management has not commonly been used within the freight transport business, it has been used within other sectors as an efficient approach for dealing with and fulfilling customer demands as well as environmental requirements. The purpose of the current paper is to present a case study of how Swedish freight transport companies use Process Management to enhance environmental sustainability.

    Methodology/Approach

    We developed a case study with two environmentally ambitious Swedish freight transport companies. Information was collected by interviews, observations and workshops. We also studied three larger freight transport companies. The analysis is a comparison between empirical findings and literature.

    Findings

    Environmentally ambitious freight transport companies do not proactively use Process Management, and workshops with topical experts and practitioners can be a way for introducing Process Management to enhance environmental sustainability in such companies.

    Research Limitation/implication

    The results will be the basis for propositions for further research, and for practical implications for transport companies.

    Originality/Value of the paper

    A previous study of the intersection between Process Management and Green Logistics identified a void in literature, which makes this paper unique. Academically, this paper contributes to filling that void. Practically, the paper is useful for freight transport practitioners with interest in increasing sustainability in their operations.

  • 17.
    Navarro, Priscilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    What is the potential of process management to enhance sustainability in the freight transport sector?2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The freight transport sector largely contributes to the environmental footprint, and the freight transport industry lacks practical tools for implementing green initiatives. Process Management is an efficient approach for fulfilling customer demands as well as environmental requirements within other sectors. This paper presents a literature review of Process Management activities within the freight transport sector, with emphasis on environmental sustainability. While Green Logistics and Process Management are established academic research disciplines, there is little research found in the intersection between the two. Hence, there is a need for future research in this field.

  • 18.
    Poksinska, Bozena Bonnie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management.
    Measuring quality in elderly care: possibilities and limitations of the vignette method2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Measuring quality in elderly care: possibilities and limitations of the vignette method2017In: Total quality management and business excellence (Online), ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 28, no 9-10, p. 1194-1207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Listening to citizens is seen as an important source of information about public service performance. In Sweden, to secure the quality of elderly care, the National Board of Health and Welfare conducts a yearly survey of in-home elderly care services and nursing homes. A central problem of the existing survey methodology is the interpersonal incomparability of survey responses due to differences in preferences and health conditions. One way to deal with this problem is to use the survey methodology with anchoring vignettes. The purpose of the paper is to investigate the possibilities and limitations of using anchoring vignettes as a general survey method and specifically to test the method for measuring elderly care quality. The vignettes were developed interactively with professionals working in elderly care and evaluated with 1600 users of in-home elderly care services and nursing homes. The results showed that anchoring vignettes reduce the impact of respondents personal characteristics on survey results. In general, anchoring vignettes give more robust answers that reduce the problem of incomparability. However, anchoring vignettes increase the complexity of the questionnaire and have limited value in elderly care. Our results indicate that the method might be applicable when using healthier and younger respondents.

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