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  • 1.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Evidence-Based Practice in Practice: Exploring Conditions for Using Research in Physiotherapy2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research developments have led to increased opportunities for the use of improved diagnostic and treatment methods in physiotherapy and other areas of health care. The emergence of the evidence-based practice (EBP) movement has led to higher expectations for a more research-informed health care practice that integrates the best available research evidence with clinical experience and patient priorities and values. Physiotherapy research has grown exponentially, contributing to an increased interest in achieving a more evidence-based physiotherapy practice. However, implementation research has identified many individual and contextual barriers to research use. Strategies to achieve a more EBP tend to narrowly target individual practitioners to influence their knowledge, skills and attitudes concerning research use. However, there is an emerging recognition that contextual conditions such as leadership and culture are critical to successfully implementing EBP.

    Against this background, the overall aim of this thesis was to explore conditions at different levels, from the individual level to the organizational level and beyond, for the use of research and implementation of an evidence-based physiotherapy practice. The thesis consists of four interrelated papers that address various aspects of the aim. Individual and focus group interviews were conducted with physiotherapists and managers within physiotherapy in various county councils in Sweden between 2011 and 2014. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis, direct content analysis and hermeneutics.

    It was found that many different types of motivation underlie physiotherapists’ use of research in their clinical practice, from amotivation (i.e. a lack of intention to engage in research use) to intrinsic motivation (research use is perceived as interesting and satisfying in itself). Most physiotherapists tend to view research use in favourable terms. Physiotherapists’ participation in a research project can yield many individual learning experiences that might contribute to a more research-informed physiotherapy practice. However, organizational learning was more limited. Numerous conditions at different levels (individual, workplace and extra-organizational levels) provide support for physiotherapists’ use of research in their clinical practice. However, physiotherapy leaders appear to contribute to a modest degree to establishing a culture that is conducive to implementing EBP in physiotherapy practice. Instead, EBP issues largely seem to depend on committed individual physiotherapists who keep to up to date with research in physiotherapy and inform colleagues about the latest research findings.

    List of papers
    1. Applying self-determination theory for improved understanding of physiotherapists rationale for using research in clinical practice: a qualitative study in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Applying self-determination theory for improved understanding of physiotherapists rationale for using research in clinical practice: a qualitative study in Sweden
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 20-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Physiotherapists are generally positive to evidence-based practice (EBP) and the use of research in clinical practice, yet many still base clinical decisions on knowledge obtained during their initial education and/or personal experience. Our aim was to explore motivations behind physiotherapists use of research in clinical practice. Self-Determination Theory was applied to identify the different types of motivation for use of research. This theory posits that all behaviours lie along a continuum of relative autonomy, reflecting the extent to which a person endorses their actions. Eleven focus group interviews were conducted, involving 45 physiotherapists in various settings in Sweden. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis and the findings compared with Self-Determination Theory using a deductive approach. Motivations underlying physiotherapists use of research in clinical practice were identified. Most physiotherapists expressed autonomous forms of motivation for research use, but some exhibited more controlled motivation. Several implications about how more evidence-based physiotherapy can be achieved are discussed, including the potential to tailor educational programs on EBP to better account for differences in motivation among participants, using autonomously motivated physiotherapists as change agents and creating favourable conditions to encourage autonomous motivation by way of feelings of competence, autonomy and a sense of relatedness.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Informa Healthcare, 2014
    Keywords
    Physiotherapy, research use, self-determination theory
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102843 (URN)10.3109/09593985.2013.814185 (DOI)000328150600004 ()
    Available from: 2014-01-07 Created: 2014-01-02 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    2. What supports physiotherapists’ use of research in clinical practice? A qualitative study in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>What supports physiotherapists’ use of research in clinical practice? A qualitative study in Sweden
    2013 (English)In: Implementation Science, ISSN 1748-5908, E-ISSN 1748-5908, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Evidence-based practice has increasingly been recognized as a priority by professional physiotherapy organizations and influential researchers and clinicians in the field. Numerous studies in the past decade have documented that physiotherapists hold generally favorable attitudes to evidence-based practice and recognize the importance of using research to guide their clinical practice. Research has predominantly investigated barriers to research use. Less is known about the circumstances that actually support use of research by physiotherapists. This study explores the conditions at different system levels that physiotherapists in Sweden perceive to be supportive of their use of research in clinical practice.

    Methods

    Patients in Sweden do not need a referral from a physician to consult a physiotherapist and physiotherapists are entitled to choose and perform any assessment and treatment technique they find suitable for each patient. Eleven focus group interviews were conducted with 45 physiotherapists, each lasting between 90 and 110 minutes. An inductive approach was applied, using topics rather than questions to allow the participants to generate their own questions and pursue their own priorities within the framework of the aim. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    Analysis of the data yielded nine favorable conditions at three system levels supporting the participant’s use of research in clinical practice: two at the individual level (attitudes and motivation concerning research use; research-related knowledge and skills), four at the workplace level (leadership support; organizational culture; research-related resources; knowledge exchange) and three at the extra-organizational level (evidence-based practice guidelines; external meetings, networks, and conferences; academic research and education).

    Conclusions

    Supportive conditions for physiotherapists’ use of research exist at multiple interdependent levels, including the individual, workplace, and extra-organizational levels. Research use in physiotherapy appears to be an interactive and interpretative social process that involves a great deal of interaction with various people, including colleagues and patients.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BioMed Central, 2013
    Keywords
    Physical therapy, Evidence-based practice, Research use, System levels, Attitudes, Clinical practice
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-93865 (URN)10.1186/1748-5908-8-31 (DOI)000318418500001 ()
    Available from: 2013-06-11 Created: 2013-06-11 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    3. A Qualitative Study of Individual and Organizational Learning through Physiotherapists’ Participation in a Research Project
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Qualitative Study of Individual and Organizational Learning through Physiotherapists’ Participation in a Research Project
    2014 (English)In: International Journal of Clinical Medicine, ISSN 2158-284X, E-ISSN 2158-2882, Vol. 5, no 9, p. 514-524Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The need for evidence-based practice has been recognized by physiotherapy organizations over the past decades. Earlier studies have documented facilitators and barriers that affect the use and implementation of evidence-based practice. Less is known about what kind of interventions might be useful to implement evidence-based practice. This study explores what physiotherapists learn through participation in a research project relevant to their professional development towards achieving a more evidence-based physiotherapy practice. To what extent this learning was transferred to colleagues for organizational learning is also examined. This study was set in Sweden, where health care is publicly funded. Patients do not need a referral from a physician to consult a physiotherapist. Eleven interviews were conducted with physiotherapists who had participated in a randomized, controlled, multicenter, physiotherapy intervention investigating neck-specific exercise for patients with whiplash disorder. Gadamer’s hermeneutics was used to analyze the data. The physiotherapists described a range of learning experiences from their project participation, including instrumental learning (the concrete application of knowledge to achieve changes in practice) and conceptual learning (changes in knowledge, understanding or attitudes). The research project enabled the physiotherapists to develop new treatment techniques for broader application and extend their competence in techniques already known (instrumental learning). The physiotherapists believed that project participation enhanced their overall competence as physiotherapists, increased their job motivation and strengthened their self-confidence and self-efficacy (conceptual learning). Physiotherapists’ participation in the research project yielded many individual learning experiences, fostered positive attitudes to research and was conducive to achieving a more research-informed physiotherapy practice. Participation was associated with a deeper understanding of the challenges involved in conducting research. The transfer from indi-

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    OMICS, 2014
    National Category
    Information Systems, Social aspects
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119152 (URN)10.4236/ijcm.2014.59071 (DOI)
    Available from: 2015-06-10 Created: 2015-06-10 Last updated: 2019-01-10
    4. Fostering a culture of evidence-based physiotherapy practice: a qualitative analysis of the influence of health care leaders in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fostering a culture of evidence-based physiotherapy practice: a qualitative analysis of the influence of health care leaders in Sweden
    2015 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research in physiotherapy has increased rapidly over the last decade, yet studies have shown that many practice decisions continue to be based on knowledge obtained during initial physiotherapy education and/or personal experience, rather than findings from research. Both barriers and facilitators to achieving a more evidence-based practice (EBP) in physiotherapy have been identified. Leadership is one facilitator that has been recognized to have an important influence on the implementation of EBP in various settings. Our aim was to explore how physiotherapy leaders in Sweden influence the culture for implementation of evidence-based physiotherapy practice.

    Methods: Nine interviews with managers of physiotherapy clinics were conducted in various settings in Sweden. Data were analysed using qualitative analysis and a framework developed by Schein (Schein EH. Organizational culture and leadership. 4th ed. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass; 2010) was applied.

    Results: The framework identifies a number mechanisms by which leaders can influence the culture of an organization and/or groups within an organization. The mechanisms of paying attention to, measuring and controlling on a regular basis as well as deliberate role modelling, teaching and coaching did have some relevance. However, EBP issues seemed to depend on committed individuals, often younger physiotherapists, who were interested in research.

    Conclusions: Overall, there was limited relevance for most of the embedding mechanisms. The findings suggest that physiotherapy leaders in Sweden contribute to a modest degree to establishing a culture conducive to implementation of an evidence-based physiotherapy practice.

    Keywords
    Leadership; Culture; Evidence-based practice; Implementation; Physiotherapy
    National Category
    Physiotherapy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122171 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-10-23 Created: 2015-10-23 Last updated: 2015-10-23Bibliographically approved
  • 2.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Evidence-Based Physiotherapy Culture: The Influence of Health Care Leaders in Sweden2016In: Open Journal of Leadership, E-ISSN 2167-7751, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 51-69, article id 69786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research in physiotherapy has increased rapidly over the last decade, yet studies have shown that many practice decisions continue to be based on knowledge obtained during initial physiotherapy education and/or personal experience, rather than findings from research. Both barriers and facilitators to achieving a more evidence-based practice (EBP) in physiotherapy have been identified. Leadership is a facilitator that has been recognized to have an important influence on the implementation of EBP in various settings. Our aim was to explore how physiotherapy leaders in Sweden influence the culture for implementation of evidence-based physiotherapy practice. Nine interviews with managers of physiotherapy clinics were conducted in various settings in Sweden. Data were analysed using qualitative analysis and a framework developed by Schein(Schein, 2010) . Organizational Culture and Leadership (4th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass) was applied. The framework identifies a number of mechanisms by which leaders can influence the culture of an organization and/or groups within an organization. The mechanisms of paying attention to, measuring and controlling on a regular basis as well as deliberate role modelling, teaching and coaching did have some relevance. However, EBP issues seemed to depend on committed individuals, often younger physiotherapists, who were interested in research. Overall, there was limited relevance for most of the embedding mechanisms. The findings suggest that physiotherapy leaders in Sweden contribute to a modest degree to establishing a culture conducive to implementation of an evidence-based physiotherapy practice.

  • 3.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fostering a culture of evidence-based physiotherapy practice: a qualitative analysis of the influence of health care leaders in Sweden2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research in physiotherapy has increased rapidly over the last decade, yet studies have shown that many practice decisions continue to be based on knowledge obtained during initial physiotherapy education and/or personal experience, rather than findings from research. Both barriers and facilitators to achieving a more evidence-based practice (EBP) in physiotherapy have been identified. Leadership is one facilitator that has been recognized to have an important influence on the implementation of EBP in various settings. Our aim was to explore how physiotherapy leaders in Sweden influence the culture for implementation of evidence-based physiotherapy practice.

    Methods: Nine interviews with managers of physiotherapy clinics were conducted in various settings in Sweden. Data were analysed using qualitative analysis and a framework developed by Schein (Schein EH. Organizational culture and leadership. 4th ed. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass; 2010) was applied.

    Results: The framework identifies a number mechanisms by which leaders can influence the culture of an organization and/or groups within an organization. The mechanisms of paying attention to, measuring and controlling on a regular basis as well as deliberate role modelling, teaching and coaching did have some relevance. However, EBP issues seemed to depend on committed individuals, often younger physiotherapists, who were interested in research.

    Conclusions: Overall, there was limited relevance for most of the embedding mechanisms. The findings suggest that physiotherapy leaders in Sweden contribute to a modest degree to establishing a culture conducive to implementation of an evidence-based physiotherapy practice.

  • 4.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    A Qualitative Study of Individual and Organizational Learning through Physiotherapists’ Participation in a Research Project2014In: International Journal of Clinical Medicine, ISSN 2158-284X, E-ISSN 2158-2882, Vol. 5, no 9, p. 514-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for evidence-based practice has been recognized by physiotherapy organizations over the past decades. Earlier studies have documented facilitators and barriers that affect the use and implementation of evidence-based practice. Less is known about what kind of interventions might be useful to implement evidence-based practice. This study explores what physiotherapists learn through participation in a research project relevant to their professional development towards achieving a more evidence-based physiotherapy practice. To what extent this learning was transferred to colleagues for organizational learning is also examined. This study was set in Sweden, where health care is publicly funded. Patients do not need a referral from a physician to consult a physiotherapist. Eleven interviews were conducted with physiotherapists who had participated in a randomized, controlled, multicenter, physiotherapy intervention investigating neck-specific exercise for patients with whiplash disorder. Gadamer’s hermeneutics was used to analyze the data. The physiotherapists described a range of learning experiences from their project participation, including instrumental learning (the concrete application of knowledge to achieve changes in practice) and conceptual learning (changes in knowledge, understanding or attitudes). The research project enabled the physiotherapists to develop new treatment techniques for broader application and extend their competence in techniques already known (instrumental learning). The physiotherapists believed that project participation enhanced their overall competence as physiotherapists, increased their job motivation and strengthened their self-confidence and self-efficacy (conceptual learning). Physiotherapists’ participation in the research project yielded many individual learning experiences, fostered positive attitudes to research and was conducive to achieving a more research-informed physiotherapy practice. Participation was associated with a deeper understanding of the challenges involved in conducting research. The transfer from indi-

  • 5.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis.
    What supports physiotherapists’ use of research in clinical practice? A qualitative study in Sweden2013In: Implementation Science, ISSN 1748-5908, E-ISSN 1748-5908, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Evidence-based practice has increasingly been recognized as a priority by professional physiotherapy organizations and influential researchers and clinicians in the field. Numerous studies in the past decade have documented that physiotherapists hold generally favorable attitudes to evidence-based practice and recognize the importance of using research to guide their clinical practice. Research has predominantly investigated barriers to research use. Less is known about the circumstances that actually support use of research by physiotherapists. This study explores the conditions at different system levels that physiotherapists in Sweden perceive to be supportive of their use of research in clinical practice.

    Methods

    Patients in Sweden do not need a referral from a physician to consult a physiotherapist and physiotherapists are entitled to choose and perform any assessment and treatment technique they find suitable for each patient. Eleven focus group interviews were conducted with 45 physiotherapists, each lasting between 90 and 110 minutes. An inductive approach was applied, using topics rather than questions to allow the participants to generate their own questions and pursue their own priorities within the framework of the aim. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    Analysis of the data yielded nine favorable conditions at three system levels supporting the participant’s use of research in clinical practice: two at the individual level (attitudes and motivation concerning research use; research-related knowledge and skills), four at the workplace level (leadership support; organizational culture; research-related resources; knowledge exchange) and three at the extra-organizational level (evidence-based practice guidelines; external meetings, networks, and conferences; academic research and education).

    Conclusions

    Supportive conditions for physiotherapists’ use of research exist at multiple interdependent levels, including the individual, workplace, and extra-organizational levels. Research use in physiotherapy appears to be an interactive and interpretative social process that involves a great deal of interaction with various people, including colleagues and patients.

  • 6.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ståhl, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Applying self-determination theory for improved understanding of physiotherapists rationale for using research in clinical practice: a qualitative study in Sweden2014In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 20-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physiotherapists are generally positive to evidence-based practice (EBP) and the use of research in clinical practice, yet many still base clinical decisions on knowledge obtained during their initial education and/or personal experience. Our aim was to explore motivations behind physiotherapists use of research in clinical practice. Self-Determination Theory was applied to identify the different types of motivation for use of research. This theory posits that all behaviours lie along a continuum of relative autonomy, reflecting the extent to which a person endorses their actions. Eleven focus group interviews were conducted, involving 45 physiotherapists in various settings in Sweden. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis and the findings compared with Self-Determination Theory using a deductive approach. Motivations underlying physiotherapists use of research in clinical practice were identified. Most physiotherapists expressed autonomous forms of motivation for research use, but some exhibited more controlled motivation. Several implications about how more evidence-based physiotherapy can be achieved are discussed, including the potential to tailor educational programs on EBP to better account for differences in motivation among participants, using autonomously motivated physiotherapists as change agents and creating favourable conditions to encourage autonomous motivation by way of feelings of competence, autonomy and a sense of relatedness.

  • 7.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Thomas, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dissemination strategy for Lean thinking in health care2014In: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, ISSN 0952-6862, E-ISSN 1758-6542, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 391-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to contribute to knowledge about dissemination strategies for Lean thinking throughout multiple healthcare organisations.

    Design/methodology/approach – The Östergötland county council, Sweden (CCÖ ) was chosenas a case study for an healthcare Lean-thinking dissemination strategies. Document analysis and interviews were used and results were compared with similar strategies employed by staff at the National Health Service Institute for Innovation (NHSI) and improvement in Great Britain and the Odense University Hospital in Denmark.

    Findings – The Lean improvement programme was introduced to tackle challenges such as anageing society, rising care expectations and budgetary and economic constraints. It was designedas a long-term programme to create added value for patients and employee involvement. The dissemination strategy was: forming clear visions and objectives; piloting; training potential adopters; and formal dissemination. The CCÖ strategy was focused primarily on managers and was not meant to involve all staff until the implementation stage. Staff at the NHS attempted to address nurses’ needs during dissemination, which questioned whether the CCÖ managers’ dissemination strategy is sustainable.

    Practical implications – This paper inspires healthcare managers and decision makers who aim to disseminate Lean production in their organisations.

    Originality/value – There are many case studies describing Lean implementation in single healthcare organisations, but little is known about effective dissemination and implementation strategies in large healthcare systems. The authors, therefore, suggest activities for developing and implementing dissemination strategies in multiple healthcare organisations.

  • 8.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Törnvall, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Education to Increase Skills in Research Methods among Clinicians in Health Care2017In: Journal of Health & Medical Informatics, ISSN 2157-7420, Vol. 8, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The aim of this study was to evaluate participants’ and managers’ experience of the design and content of an education programme. The Knowledge to Action (KTA) framework was applied to identify the steps of knowledge creation and action in the education programme.

    Methods

    Data were collected from 18 participants representing two groups: participants in the intervention and supervisors and managers. Two focus groups took place: two with participants in the intervention (4 and 3 in each) and one with eleven managers.

    Results

    All steps in the KTA framework were identified and discussed from several aspects. The importance of selecting projects that were relevant and added value in their clinics was mentioned by all participants. The participants also mentioned that after the education, they had further understanding and increased skills in how to be active and perform continuous improvement projects. The step in the KTA process regarding how to adapt knowledge to local context was not discussed explicitly by the participants or managers.

    Discussion

    Education in research methods and performing improvement projects to develop the clinic creates a more positive attitude to working with continuous improvement. The participant’s self-esteem and knowledge increased regarding how to work with improvements. It is important to have the manager’s support to perform a project. Emphasis was on knowledge inquiry and synthesis and presenting the results with or without possible solutions. The participants and managers talked about barriers and knowledge use more generally and at an organizational level. This means that the participants did not gain the last bit of nowledge needed to put the action into practice. This implies that the problem regarding lack of implementation skills in health care might remain.

  • 9.
    Ehrlich, Carolyn
    et al.
    Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, University, Logan Campus, University Drive, Meadowbrook, Queensland, Australia.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Shared decision making: People with severe mental illness experiences of involvement in the care of their physical health2017In: Mental Health and Prevention, ISSN 2212-6570, Vol. 5, p. 21-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Addressing the poor physical health of people with severe mental illness (SMI) occurs within a complex mix of individual requirements. People with SMI often have demanding health and illness management workloads, which they are required to perform on a daily basis. Most clinical studies lack information on how much people are affected by the side effects they experience and how to manage these problems. Mental health staff often consider that their primary target is to reduce psychotic symptoms rather than health promotion. Therefore, the objective of this qualitative study was to describe the current experience of people with SMI, with the view to exploring ways that they might be involved in managing their physical health. Thirty-two people with lived experience of mental illness within a defined geographic area in Queensland, Australia, participated in semi-structured face-to-face interviews. Data were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Four key areas in which people with SMI were able to be involved in their health were identified: care continuity within a fragmented care system; medication management; credibility and being mastered; and self-mastery and self-managing health. Shared decision making in mental health care can contribute to equality, control and recovery. Involving people with SMI in shared decision making will contribute positively to their overall health. However, substantial changes are required to shift the health system from a traditional “health professional as expert” approach to one with the patients in the centre. © 2016 Elsevier GmbH

  • 10.
    Marcusson, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Nord, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thomas, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sverker, Annette M.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kelfve, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Motel-Klingebiel, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hellstrom, Ingrid
    Norrkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lyth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Operations management Region Östergötland, Research and Development Unit.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Operations management Region Östergötland, Research and Development Unit.
    Proactive healthcare for frail elderly persons: study protocol for a prospective controlled primary care intervention in Sweden2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 5, article id e027847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction The provision of healthcare services is not dedicated to promoting maintenance of function and does not target frail older persons at high risk of the main causes of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of a proactive medical and social intervention in comparison with conventional care on a group of persons aged 75 and older selected by statistical prediction.

    Methods and analysis In a pragmatic multicentre primary care setting (n=1600), a prediction model to find elderly (75+) persons at high risk of complex medical care or hospitalisation is used, followed by proactive medical and social care, in comparison with usual care. The study started in April 2017 with a run-in period until December 2017, followed by a 2-year continued intervention phase that will continue until the end of December 2019. The intervention includes several tools (multiprofessional team for rehabilitation, social support, medical care home visits and telephone support). Primary outcome measures are healthcare cost, number of hospital care episodes, hospital care days and mortality. Secondary outcome measures are number of outpatient visits, cost of social care and informal care, number of prescribed drugs, health-related quality of life, cost-effectiveness, sense of security, functional status and ability. We also study the care of elderly persons in a broader sense, by covering the perspectives of the patients, the professional staff and the management, and on a political level, by using semistructured interviews, qualitative methods and a questionnaire.

    Ethics and dissemination Approved by the regional ethical review board in Linköping (Dnr 2016/347-31). The results will be presented in scientific journals and scientific meetings during 2019–2022 and are planned to be used for the development of future care models.

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