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  • 1.
    Akay, Alpaslan
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; IZA, Sweden.
    Martinsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ralsmark, Hilda
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Relative concerns and sleep behavior2019In: Economics and Human Biology, ISSN 1570-677X, E-ISSN 1873-6130, Vol. 33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the relationship between relative concerns with respect to income and the quantity and quality of sleep using a 6-year panel dataset on the sleep behavior of people in Germany. We find a substantial negative association between relative income and number of hours of sleep and satisfaction with sleep, i.e., sleep quality, whereas there is no particular association between absolute level of income and sleep quantity and quality. A 10-percent increase in the income of relevant others is associated with 6-8 min decrease in a persons weekly amount of sleep on average, yet this effect is particularly strong among the relatively deprived, i.e., upward comparers, as this group shows a corresponding decrease in sleeping time of 10-12 min/week. These findings are highly robust to several specification checks, including measures of relative concerns, reference group, income inequality, and local price differences. The heterogeneity analysis reveals that the relationship is mainly driven by people with relatively fewer working hours, a higher demand for household production and leisure activities, and lower physical health and well-being. (C) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Bouchouicha, Ranoua
    et al.
    University of Reading, England.
    Martinsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Medhin, Haileselassie
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Ethiopian Dev Research Institute, Ethiopia.
    Vieider, Ferdinand M.
    University of Reading, England; WZB Berlin Social Science Centre, Germany.
    Stake effects on ambiguity attitudes for gains and losses2017In: Theory and Decision, ISSN 0040-5833, E-ISSN 1573-7187, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 19-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We test the effect of stake size on ambiguity attitudes. Compared to a baseline condition, we find subjects to bemore ambiguity seeking for small-probability gains and large-probability losses under high stakes. They are also more ambiguity averse for large-probability gains and small-probability losses. We trace these effects back to stake effects on decisions under risk (known probabilities) and uncertainty (unknown probabilities). For risk, we replicate previous findings. For uncertainty, we find an increase in probabilistic insensitivity under high stakes that is driven by increased uncertainty aversion for large-probability gains and for small-probability losses.

  • 3.
    Knutsson, Mikael
    et al.
    NTNU Trondheim Business Sch, Norway.
    Martinsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Persson, Emil
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wollbrant, Conny
    Univ Stirling, Scotland.
    Gender differences in altruism: Evidence from a natural field experiment on matched donations2019In: Economics Letters, ISSN 0165-1765, E-ISSN 1873-7374, Vol. 176, p. 47-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports new findings on gender differences in altruism. Conducting a natural field experiment (N = 2,164) we study donation behavior in a naturally occurring environment using a matched donation design. Contrary to previous research, we find that reducing the "price of altruism" by increasing matching efficiency has a significantly stronger effect on females than on males. (C) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Kocher, Martin G.
    et al.
    University of Munich, Germany; University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
    Martinsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Persson, Emil
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wang, Xianghong
    Renmin University of China, Peoples R China.
    Is there a hidden cost of imposing a minimum contribution level for public good contributions?2016In: Journal of Economic Psychology, ISSN 0167-4870, E-ISSN 1872-7719, Vol. 56, p. 74-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the effects of either exogenously imposing or endogenously letting subjects choose whether to impose minimum contribution levels (MCLs) in a linear public goods experiment using the strategy method. Our results on contribution levels to the public goods are fairly independent of how MCLs are imposed. We find that the main effect of an MCL on unconditional contributions is that it increases low contribution levels to the MCL imposed, while the effect of those contributing more than the MCL before its introduction depends on the size of the MCL. Unexpectedly, there is much more crowding out for a low MCL than for a relatively high MCL. However, the distribution of contribution types is stable across different MCLs. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Kocher, Martin G.
    et al.
    Institute Adv Studies, Austria; Ludwig Maximilians University of Munchen, Germany; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Martinsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Schindler, David
    Ludwig Maximilians University of Munchen, Germany.
    Overpricing and stake size: On the robustness of results from experimental asset markets2017In: Economics Letters, ISSN 0165-1765, E-ISSN 1873-7374, Vol. 154, p. 101-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We assess the effects of a stake size variation on experimental asset markets. Our results show that a fivefold increase in stake size leads to higher trading frequencies. Mispricing and overpricing, however, are not fundamentally different for different stake sizes. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    lHaridon, Olivier
    et al.
    Univ Rennes, France.
    Vieider, Ferdinand M.
    Univ Reading, England.
    Aycinena, Diego
    Univ Rosario, Argentina.
    Bandur, Agustinus
    Bina Nusantara Univ, Indonesia.
    Belianin, Alexis
    Higher Sch Econ, Russia.
    Cingl, Lubomir
    Univ Econ, Czech Republic.
    Kothiyal, Amit
    Max Planck Inst Human Dev, Germany.
    Martinsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Off the Charts: Massive Unexplained Heterogeneity in a Global Study of Ambiguity Attitudes2018In: Review of Economics and Statistics, ISSN 0034-6535, E-ISSN 1530-9142, Vol. 100, no 4, p. 664-677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ambiguity attitudes have been prominently used in economic models, but we still know little about their demographic correlates or their generalizability beyond the West. We analyze the ambiguity attitudes of almost 3,000 students across thirty countries. For gains, we find ambiguity aversion everywhere, while ambiguity aversion is much weaker for losses. Ambiguity attitudes change systematically with probabilities for both gains and losses. Much of the between-country variation can be explained through a few macroeconomic characteristics. In contrast, we find massive unexplained variation at the individual level. We also find much unexplained heterogeneity in individual responses to different decision tasks.

  • 7.
    Martinsson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Medhin, Haileselassie
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Environm and Climate Res Ctr, Ethiopia.
    Persson, Emil
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    MINIMUM LEVELS AND FRAMING IN PUBLIC GOOD PROVISION2019In: Economic Inquiry, ISSN 0095-2583, E-ISSN 1465-7295, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 1568-1581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a laboratory experiment in the field, we examine how the framing of a social dilemma, give to or take from a public good, interacts with a policy intervention that enforces a minimum contribution level to the public good. We find significantly higher cooperation in the give frame than in the take frame in our standard public goods experiment. When a minimum contribution level is introduced, contributions are crowded out in the give frame but crowded in in the take frame. Our results show the importance of choosing the frame when making policy recommendations. (JEL C91, H41)

  • 8.
    Martinsson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Persson, Emil
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Physician behavior and conditional altruism: the effects of payment system and uncertain health benefit2019In: Theory and Decision, ISSN 0040-5833, E-ISSN 1573-7187, Vol. 87, no 3, p. 365-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper experimentally investigates the altruistic behavior of physicians and whether this behavior is affected by payment system and uncertainty in health outcome. Subjects in the experiment take on the role of physicians and decide on the provision of medical care for different types of patients, who are identical in all respects other than the degree to which a given level of medical treatment affects their health. We investigate physician altruism from the perspective of ethical principles, by categorizing physicians according to how well their treatment decisions align with different principles for priority setting. The experiment shows that many physicians are altruistic toward their patients but also that the degree of altruism varies across patients with different medical needs. We find a strong effect of payment system that is overall unaffected by the introduction of risk and ambiguity in patients health outcomes. There is, however, substantial heterogeneity across individuals, in particular under the capitation payment system where physicians responses to the introduction of uncertainty in patient health are modulated by their own generic risk and ambiguity preferences.

  • 9.
    Martinsson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Persson, Emil
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Public Goods and Minimum Provision Levels: Does the Institutional Formation Affect Cooperation?2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 121, no 4, p. 1473-1499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate experimentally the role of institutional formation on the implementation of a binding minimum contribution level to a public good. Groups either face the minimum level exogenously imposed by a central authority, or are allowed to decide for themselves by means of a group vote whether a minimum level should be implemented. We find that a binding minimum contribution level has a positive and substantially significant effect on cooperation. Interestingly, we do not find an additional positive effect of democracy in the context of our experiment; the minimum-level intervention is as effective when exogenously implemented as when endogenously chosen.

  • 10.
    Posadzy, Kinga
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Josephson, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Martinsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Göteborgs universitet.
    How Does Dishonesty Affect Winning and the Willingness to Compete?: Evidence from a Stiff Competition Environment2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We experimentally investigate how the possibility of behaving dishonestly affects the willingness to compete and who the winner is when there is stiff competition. Our results show that although only some subjects are dishonest when competing, dishonest behaviour creates significant inefficiencies due to best performing subjects not winning. Willingness to compete, on the other hand, was unaffected.

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