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  • 1.
    Hemalatha, Thiagarajan
    et al.
    Department of Biological Materials, CSIR — Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600020, India.
    Periyathambi, Prabu
    Centre for Nanobiotechnology (CNBT), VIT, Vellore 632014, India.
    Gunadharini, Dharmalingam Nandagopal
    Department of Biological Materials, CSIR — Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600020, India.
    Gowthaman, Marichetti Kuppuswami
    Department of Biological Materials, CSIR — Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600020, India.
    Fabrication and characterization of dual acting oleyl chitosan functionalised iron oxide/gold hybrid nanoparticles for MRI and CT imaging.2018In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 112, p. 250-257, article id S0141-8130(17)34431-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bionanocomposites fabricated using metal nanoparticles serve a wide range of biomedical applications viz., site targeted drug delivery, imaging etc. Theranostics emerge as an important field of science, which focuses on the use of single entity for both disease diagnosis and treatment. The present work aimed at designing a multifunctional nanocomposite comprising of iron/gold hybrid nanoparticles, coated with oleyl chitosan and conjugated with methotrexate. The HR-TEM images revealed the spherical nature of the composite, while it's nontoxic and biocompatible property was proved by the MTT assay in NIH 3T3 cells and hemolysis assay. Though the VSM results exhibited the magnetic property, the MRI phantom images and X-ray contrast images demonstrated the potential of the composite to be used as contrast agent. Thus the prepared nanocomposite possess good cytocompatibility, magnetic property and also high X-ray attenuation, wherein it could serve as a novel platform for both MRI and CT diagnosis, as well as drug conjugation could aid in targeted drug delivery.

  • 2.
    Periyathambi, Prabu
    et al.
    Biological Materials/Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Adyar, Chennai 600 020, India.
    Sastry, Thotapalli Parvathaleswara
    Biological Materials/Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Adyar, Chennai 600 020, India.
    Anandasadagopan, Suresh Kumar
    Biochemistry and Biotechnology Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Adyar, Chennai 600 020, India.
    Manickavasagam, Kanagavel
    St.Isabel Hospital, Mylapore, Chennai 600 004, India.
    Macrophages mediated diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis using fibrin based magnetic nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents.2017In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, ISSN 0006-3002, E-ISSN 1878-2434, Vol. 1861, no 1 Pt A, p. 2992-3001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A variety of bioimaging tools assists in the diagnosis and evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other osteoarthritis. However, detection of RA in the early stages by targeting its macrophages with suitable contrast agents will help in arresting the progression of the disease.

    METHODS: In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness of using magnetic fibrin nanoparticles (MFNPs) conjugated with folic acid (FA-MFNPs) as a specific contrast agent to target the activated macrophages, which overexpress the folate receptors (FR) in the knee joints of rats with antigen-induced arthritis (AIA).

    RESULTS: FA-MFNPs were spherical with an average size of 18.3±1.6nm. In vitro studies have shown effective internalization of FA-MFNPs into the Raw264.7 macrophage cells. In vivo studies were carried out by injecting FA-MFNPs intravenously into the arthritic rats. The results showed enhanced MR imaging in the synovium of arthritic joints. Prussian blue histological staining confirmed uptake of FA-MFNPs by macrophages in the synovial tissue.

    CONCLUSION: The animal experiment results indicate that FA-MFNPs can be used as a specific MRI contrast agent in identifying phagocytic active macrophages in the synovial joints.

    GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: Blood is the precursor source for synthesising the fibrin-based iron oxide (magnetic) nanoparticles (MFNPs) with diameters between 12 and 15nm. It has excellent superparamagnetic behaviour, biocompatibility, osteogenic potency, hemocompatibility, and biodegradable properties. MFNPs-based nanocomposites might be a promising contrast agent for bioimaging.

  • 3.
    Periyathambi, Prabu
    et al.
    Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600020, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Vedakumari, Weslen S.
    Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600020, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Baskar, Santhosh Kumar
    Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600020, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Bojja, Sreedhar
    norganic and Physical Chemistry Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500607, Andhra Pradesh, India.
    Sastry, Thotapalli P.
    Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600020, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Osteogenic potency of magnetic fibrin nanoparticles—A novel perspective in bone tissue engineering2015In: Materials letters (General ed.), ISSN 0167-577X, E-ISSN 1873-4979, Vol. 139, p. 108-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, goat blood has been used as the starting material for the preparation of novel magnetic fibrin nanoparticles (MAG–FNPs) in tissue engineering. The synthesised nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), transmittance electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis. The osteogenic potential of MAG–FNPs was evaluated by performing cell viability assay and quantifying alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels using Saos-2 cells. The results obtained suggested that MAG–FNPs could serve as promising biomaterial for bone tissue engineering.

  • 4.
    Periyathambi, Prabu
    et al.
    Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600 020, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Vedakumari, Weslen S.
    Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600 020, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Bojja, Sreedhar
    Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500 607, Andhra Pradesh, India.
    Kumar, Santhosh B.
    Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600 020, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Sastry, Thotapalli P.
    Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600 020, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Green biosynthesis and characterization of fibrin functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles with MRI sensitivity and increased cellular internalization2014In: Materials Chemistry and Physics, ISSN 0254-0584, E-ISSN 1879-3312, Vol. 148, no 3, p. 1212-1220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing novel contrast agents for efficient MRI sensitivity is very essential for early diagnosis of cancer. In the present work, we have prepared novel, eco-friendly, non-toxic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) as efficient MRI contrast agents. Earth abundant magnetite sand was used for the preparation of IONPs using acid leaching method. Further, co-precipitation method was used to obtain fibrin functionalized iron nanoparticles (F-IONPs). The nanoparticles were crystalline in nature with average size distribution values as 15 nm and 35 nm for IONPs and F-IONPs respectively. Haemolysis and MTT assay proved the biocompatibility of the prepared nanoparticles with their distribution across the cytoplasm and nucleus in NIH 3T3 cells. Moreover, MRI and VSM results revealed the magnetic property of F-IONPs, with the magnetic saturation value of 51.7 emu g−1. Thus, F-IONPs with good cytocompatibility and high magnetic property can serve as a novel platform for enhanced MRI sensitivity and drug delivery.

  • 5.
    Periyathambi, Prabu
    et al.
    Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Adyar, Chennai 600 020, India .
    Vedakumari, Weslen S
    Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Adyar, Chennai 600 020, India .
    Sastry, Thotapalli P
    Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Adyar, Chennai 600 020, India .
    Time-dependent biodistribution, clearance and biocompatibility of magnetic fibrin nanoparticles: an in vivo study.2015In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 7, no 21, p. 9676-9685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, bioretention and toxicity of injected nanoparticles in the body has drawn much attention in biomedical research. In the present study, 5 mg Fe per kg body weight of magnetic fibrin nanoparticles (MFNPs) were injected into mice intravenously and investigated for their blood clearance profile, biodistribution, haematology and pathology studies for a time period of 28 days. Moderately long circulation of MFNPs in blood was observed with probable degradation and excretion into the bloodstream via monoatomic iron forms. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and Prussian blue staining results showed increased accumulation of MFNPs in the liver, followed by spleen and other organs. Body weight, spleen/thymus indexes, haematology, serum biochemistry and histopathology studies demonstrated that MFNPs were biocompatible. These results suggest the feasibility of using MFNPs for drug delivery and imaging applications.

  • 6.
    Vedakumari, Weslen S
    et al.
    Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600 020, India.
    Periyathambi, Prabu
    Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600 020, India.
    Babu, Saravana C
    Centre for Toxicology and Developmental Research, Sri Ramachandra University, Chennai, 600 116, India.
    Sastry, Thotapalli P
    Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600 020, India.
    Fibrin nanoparticles as Possible vehicles for drug delivery.2013In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, ISSN 0006-3002, E-ISSN 1878-2434, Vol. 1830, no 8, p. 4244-4253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Several issues have been raised emphasizing the harmful toxic effects of metal nanoparticles towards biological systems. Search of biological nanoparticles with excellent biocompatibility and bioavailability could address this problem.

    METHODS: Fibrin nanoparticles (FNP) were prepared using a novel technique and characterized for their physico-chemical properties. In vitro studies were performed to examine cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of FNP. Innate immune response to FNP was studied by (i) estimating in vitro generation of complement split products, C3a and C4d and (ii) in vivo expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6. In vivo biodistribution study was carried out by intravenous administration of FITC-labelled FNP in mice.

    RESULTS: FNP were spherical with size ranging from 25 to 28nm. In vitro studies proved the biocompatibility of the nanoparticles, with their distribution across the cytoplasm and nucleus of treated cells. Complement activation studies showed insignificant increase in the level of C3a when compared with positive control. RT-PCR results revealed significant upregulation of TNF-α and downregulation of IL-6 cytokines after 6h of FNP administration. In vivo biodistribution studies showed moderate blood circulation time, with predominant distribution of nanoparticles in the liver followed by the lungs, kidney and spleen. Haematology, serum biochemistry, and histopathology analyses demonstrated that FNP were non-toxic.

    CONCLUSION: Owing to their small size, low cost, ease of preparation and excellent biocompatibility, FNP might be a promising novel material for drug delivery applications.

    GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate the safe and promising use of FNP for biomedical applications.

1 - 6 of 6
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