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  • 1.
    Jahan, Yasmin
    et al.
    Hiroshima Univ, Japan.
    Moriyama, Michiko
    Hiroshima Univ, Japan.
    Rahman, Md. Moshiur
    Hiroshima Univ, Japan.
    Bin Shahid, Abu Sadat Mohammad Sayeem
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res, Bangladesh.
    Rahman, Atiqur
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hossain, Nasif
    Nagasaki Univ, Japan.
    Das, Sumon Kumar
    Menzies Sch Hlth Res, Australia.
    Hossain, Md. Iqbal
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res, Bangladesh.
    Faruque, Abu Syed Golam
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res, Bangladesh.
    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer
    Int Ctr Diarrhoeal Dis Res, Bangladesh.
    Changing trends in measles vaccination status between 2004 and 2014 among children aged 12-23 months in Bangladesh2020In: Tropical medicine & international health, ISSN 1360-2276, E-ISSN 1365-3156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To assess the current measles vaccination status in Bangladesh, explain changing differentials in measles vaccination, and determine contexts that may improve measles vaccination coverage. Methods Secondary data analysis of datasets (2004-2014) from the nationally representative Bangladesh Demographic and Health Surveys that followed stratified, multi-stage cluster sampling design conducted both in urban and rural contexts. Results 5468 children aged 12-23 months were surveyed, of whom 892 (16%) reported non-compliance to measles vaccine. After simultaneous adjusting for covariates in multivariate logistic regression, children who came from a poor socio-economic background, who had mothers with no formal schooling, who were underweight, of higher birth order (amp;gt;= 4), who had adolescent mothers, who had a history of home delivery and who had no exposure to media were observed to be significantly associated with lack of measles vaccination. Measles vaccination coverage among children of adolescent mothers was consistently low. Despite lack of media exposure, measles vaccination status gradually increased from 26% in 2004 to 33% in 2014. Lack of maternal education was no longer associated with measles vaccination status in 2007, 2011 and 2014. Stunted children continued to be associated with lack of measles immunisation in 2014. Children with higher birth order demonstrated 53% excess risk for not being immunised with measles vaccine. Mothers with no exposure to mass media were two times more likely to have children without measles immunisation as indicated by BDHS 2014 data. Conclusions Our findings will help policy makers formulate strategies for expanding measles vaccination coverage in order to achieve further reduction in disease burden and mortality in Bangladesh.

  • 2.
    Jahan, Yasmin
    et al.
    Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan.
    Moriyama, Michiko
    Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan.
    Rahman, Md Moshiur
    Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan.
    Rahman, Atiqur
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Self-monitoring urinary salt excretion device can be used for controlling hypertension for developing countries2019In: Clinical hypertension, ISSN 2056-5909, Vol. 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Restriction of dietary salt is widely recommended in the management of hypertension, but assessment of individual salt intake has drawn little attention. Monitoring nutritional salt intake through sodium excretion has been popular, because the main route for sodium (Na) excretion is through the urine. Nonetheless, direct measurement of dietary salt intake is time consuming and lacks accuracy. To collect a 24-h urine and measure the content is difficult method for most patients. In this review paper, we would like to explore the usefulness of measuring urinary salt excretion by using a self-monitoring device at home. Measuring daily overnight urine by the self-monitoring device at home will be useful for the management of hypertension suitable for each individual. From the recent increase of processed foods, the term "salt intake" would not accurately be equal to "sodium intake". Devices measuring urinary sodium excretion have been developed and evaluated on their accuracy and correlation with sodium intake. They must be handy, simple and capable of measuring large populations to be useful for monitoring of daily salt intake and to guide salt restriction as well as the long-term effects by dietary salt intake.

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  • 3.
    Jahan, Yasmin
    et al.
    Hiroshima Univ, Japan.
    Rahman, S M Atiqur
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ectopia Cordis: 6-Year Survival without Surgical Correction2020In: FETAL AND PEDIATRIC PATHOLOGY, ISSN 1551-3815Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Ectopia cordis is a complete or partial extrusion of the heart through a ventral defect in the thoracoabdominal wall, either isolated or accompanied by other viscera in instances of pentalogy of Cantrell. Case Report: This six-year-old child has survived with uncorrected ectopia cordis. He is unable to participate in strenuous physical activities and has respiratory limitations. Conclusion: Ectopia cordis most commonly results in stillbirth or neonatal death without surgical treatment. This report highlights the exceptional 6-year survival of a child without surgical correction.

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