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  • 1.
    Blok, Dennis
    et al.
    Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Ruiter, Iemkje
    Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Operability of child-resistant caps: review of current solutions and alternative ideas2016In: Innovation, development and sustainability in packaging, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Child-safe or child-resistant caps come in a range of solutions, but the dominant solution is a closure which has to be pushed down and turned simultaneously. The idea is that young children have neither the strength nor the dexterity required for this operation. Safe use of such a packaging solution requires that the safety feature is restored to the same condition after re-closing the package. Practice shows however, that child-safe caps also present a challenge to elderly and people with reduced hand function. For them, child-resistant caps are hard to open, which causes the packs to be poorly reclosed (intentionally or unintentionally), or even left open, leading to incidents.   

    Current solutions are (partly) based on the force to be exerted, but this may not be the best approach. As part of a re-design process of this type of packaging, a theoretical ergonomic assessment was made, combined with a set of expert interviews of academics in the field of packaging ergonomics. It is concluded that the push-and-turn solution is based on physical ergonomic properties that insufficiently distinguish children and intended users. An alternative solution space is mapped and evaluated based on different working principles. An ideal safety cap should utilise a cognitive set of actions and physical ergonomic distinction between children and users with reduced hand function or strength. 

  • 2.
    Chu, Wanjun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Design for Supporting Sustainable Behaviour Retention through Context Change2017In: Persuasive Technology: Development and implementation of personalized technologies to change attitudes and behaviours: 12th International Conference, PERSUASIVE 2017, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, April 4-6, 2017 Adjunct Proceedings / [ed] Peter W. de Vries, Thomas Van Rompay, Enschede,The Netherlands: Centre for eHealth & Wellbeing Research, Department of Psychology, Health and Technology, University of Twente , 2017, p. 72-73Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    De Koeijer, Bjorn
    et al.
    Top Institute Food and Nutrition, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    De Lange, Jos
    University of Twente, The Netherlands.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Desired, Perceived, and Achieved Sustainability: Trade-Offs in Strategic and Operational Packaging Development2017In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 10, article id 1923Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     The alignment of the strategic and the operational level of packaging development

    in relation to the integration of sustainability is not addressed extensively in current research.

    This paper aims to address this, by focusing on the decision-making interrelations of key actors

    (marketing and packaging development) within multidisciplinary product-packaging development

    teams. The research is conducted by means of a qualitative approach, consisting of semi-structured

    interviews with individual packaging development team members, complemented with a newly

    developed visualization tool. The research builds upon eight cases within brand owners, packaging

    material suppliers and packaging development consultants. The main findings of the study

    include the decision-making trade-offs between sustainability considerations and other project

    indicators, such as costs, time-to-market and technical challenges. These trade-offs are linked to

    the strategic and operational roles of key actors, and to internal and external factors influencing

    sustainable development processes. This research’s contribution is to address the alignment of the

    strategic and the operational levels of sustainable packaging development, in relation to (1) decision

    making and interrelations within multidisciplinary development teams; and (2) the relevance of

    development-influencing factors. This provides opportunities for further development of sustainable

    packaging models and tools, in order to align the strategic and operational level of development.

  • 4.
    de Koeijer, Bjorn
    et al.
    Top Institute Food and Nutr, Netherlands; University of Twente, Netherlands.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Henseler, Jorg
    University of Twente, Netherlands.
    Realizing Product-Packaging Combinations in Circular Systems: Shaping the Research Agenda2017In: Packaging technology & science, ISSN 0894-3214, E-ISSN 1099-1522, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 443-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have shown a shift in the focus of sustainable development from eco-efficiency (minimizing negative impacts) towards eco-effectiveness (optimizing positive impacts). Currently, a focus on circular models can be identified; Cradle to Cradle and circular economy are main examples of such models. However, the current number and variety of models and tools focusing on circular systems are limited with regard to packaging development. This paper explores packaging development models and tools in relation to circular systems, in order to identify the current status of the circularity focus. A range of identified models and tools is structured into two categories (generative and evaluative tools) which cover three types (protocols, diagrams and evaluations). This is in line with the distinction between early and later phases of development and the cumulative nature of environmental lock-in. Protocol-type models and tools come in different forms, such as principles, guidelines and checklists (e.g. Cradle to Cradle and DfE). Aside from these, eight diagram-type models are analysed, focusing on packaging development, sustainable development and sustainable packaging development. In contrast to generative design tools, evaluation-type models and tools (e.g. LCA) are most useful in the later stages of development processes. Resulting from the analysis of the models and tools, three types of integration - integrated product-packaging development, the cross-functional integration of actors and the front-end integration of sustainability considerations - are appropriate for the development of product-packaging combinations for circular systems. This leads to an agenda which shapes research directions towards achieving this development. (C) 2016 The Authors Packaging Technology and Science Published by John Wiley amp; Sons, Ltd.

  • 5.
    De Koning, Jotte Ilbine Jozine Charlotte
    et al.
    Delft University of technology, Netherlands.
    Crul, Marcel Rudolphus Maria
    Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Van Engelen, Jo
    Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Wever, Renee
    Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Brezet, JC
    Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Mental innovation space of Vietnamese agro-food firms2016In: British Food Journal, ISSN 0007-070X, E-ISSN 1758-4108, Vol. 118, no 6, p. 1516-1532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– Vietnamese agro-food firms are often small and have short value chains. They are facing increasing competition from multinationals to serve the consumers of the rising middle class. It is assumed that co-creation or open-innovation can be a competitive innovation strategy for the Vietnamese firms. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to understand whether the agro-food firms have the “mental space” or an according mindset to innovate with their customers. Design/methodology/approach– A three dimensional model of “mental innovation space” (MIS) was developed, comprising of the: focus of innovation, level of innovation and degree of collaboration. A total of 14 Vietnamese agro-food companies agreed to embark on a process of problem definition for innovation according to these three dimensions. This process creates a deeper understanding of the firms’ fuzzy front end of innovation and results in less hypothetical findings, compared with traditional interviews. Findings– The results show that the Vietnamese agro-food firms have a rather small MIS. They are inexperienced with innovation in new product development and are even more unfamiliar with co-creation. However, the firms recognise the need for innovation and are enthusiastic about the use of co-creation. The applications of co-creation firms foresee are close to the market, motivated by meeting customer demand and keeping up with competitors. Originality/value– The characteristics and willingness of the Vietnamese agro-food firms make that it is believed an open atmosphere can be created. Then, co-creation can foster innovation in order to strengthen their competitive position.

  • 6.
    de Koning, jotte Ilbine Jozine Charlotte
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology.
    Crul, Marcel Rudolphus Maria
    Delft University of Technology.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Models of co-creation2016In: ServDes.2016 / [ed] Nicola Morelli, Amalia de Götzen and Francesco Grani, 2016, p. 266-278Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to give an overview of the existing models of co-creation and create metamodels

    from these existing ones. The existing models were found in academic and popular

    or business publications. A total of 50 models was analysed and clustered and used to create

    4 meta-models of co-creation. These meta-models depict the ‘joint space of co-creation’, ‘the

    co-creation spectrum’, ‘the co-creation types’ and ‘the co-creation steps’. They form a

    framework to classify existing research as well as define boundaries for upcoming projects.

    These meta-models should contribute to the clarity, understanding and application of cocreation.

  • 7.
    De Koning, Jotte Ilbine Jozine Charlotte
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology Delft, The Netherlands.
    Crul, Marcel Rudolphus Maria
    Delft University of Technology Delft, The Netherlands.
    Wever, Renee
    Delft University of Technology Delft, The Netherlands.
    Brezet, Johannes Cornelis
    Delft University of Technology Delft, The Netherlands.
    Sustainable consumption in Vietnam: an explorative study among the urban middle class2015In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 608-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The middle class of Vietnam is growing and so is their consumption, especially in urbanareas. This is due to the effects of rapid economic growth, industrialization andincreasing wealth in combination with a young, growing population. This paper aims tounderstand current consumption patterns and consumption categories that can provide astart for sustainable lifestyles among the Vietnamese middle class.Data was collected in the capita l Hanoi, in the north of Vietnam. The current level ofawareness, knowle dge and attit ude was explored on five specific consumption topics:energy, transport, water, waste, and food. A combination of quantitati ve and qualitative datawas collected: 5 focus groups, 5 in-depth interviews and a survey among 158 Vietnameseurb an middle class consumers. The results are disc ussed according to the MOA model thatexplains behaviour as a function of three components: Motivation, Opportunity and Ability.The research concludes that awareness and knowledge of the urban middle class inVietnam on sustainable consumption is generally low. However, the motivation to livehealthy lifestyles and protect the planet for their future generations is rather high. Inorder to support more sustainable lifestyles, the awareness of environmental issues needsto be increased; knowledge needs to be made available and accessible (ability); and rolemodels need to set an example for the urban middle class of Vietnam.Furthermore, health in combination with food is the most important reason for peopleto pursue a sustainable lifestyle (motivation) and the need to change was expressed.However, a general distrust towards business and governmental actors was also found.Therefore, opportunities for bottom-up initiatives for sustainable food consumption mustbe explored in the future. This could support in engaging the middle class of Vietnam insustainable lifestyles.

  • 8.
    de koning, jotte Ilbine Jozine Charlotte
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology, Department of Design Engineering, Design for Sustainability, Landbergstraat 15, 2828CE Delft, The Netherlands.
    Ta, Thu Huong
    Hanoi University of Science and Technology, Room 228B Ta Quang Buu E-Library, No.1 Dai Co Viet Street, Hai Ba Trung, Ha Noi, Viet Nam.
    Crul, Marcel R. M.
    Delft University of Technology, Department of Design Engineering, Design for Sustainability, Landbergstraat 15, 2828CE Delft, The Netherlands.
    Wever, Renee
    Delft University of Technology, Department of Design Engineering, Design for Sustainability, Landbergstraat 15, 2828CE Delft, The Netherlands.
    Brezet, Johannes C.
    Delft University of Technology, Department of Design Engineering, Design for Sustainability, Landbergstraat 15, 2828CE Delft, The Netherlands/ Aalborg University, Department of Development and Planning, Fredrik Bajers Vej 5, P.O. Box 159, DK - 9100 Aalborg, Denmark.
    GetGreen Vietnam: towards more sustainable behaviour among the urban middle class2016In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 134, no part A, p. 178-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Vietnam, the middle class is expected to grow from 12 million to 33 million people between 2012 and 2020. The growth causes an increase as well as a shift in consumption. Products that were not accessible or affordable before will become increasingly so, such as cars, dishwashers, meat products and air-conditioning. In urban areas the changes are most prominent and so are the side effects: increased amounts of waste, smog, pollution and use of fossil energy or pesticides.

    The main objective of this study was to identify sustainable behaviour that followed or did not follow from the intervention project GetGreen Vietnam. 604 urban middle class consumers participated in a series of sustainable consumption trainings. Before, during and after the trainings, quantitative and qualitative data was collected on 90 sustainable actions.

    64% of the participants self-reported to be engaged in a sustainable action before the intervention and this percentage increased to 80% after. The group environment and activity-based meetings of GetGreen Vietnam project (GGVN) were critical for the success of the intervention. Participants reported that before GGVN certain actions were already habitual as a money saving strategy (e.g. sparse electricity use or food leftovers re-use) or due to past scarcity (e.g. sparse water use). Many participants reported the intention to buy sustainable products but fewer participants took action to do so.

    A powerful strategy toward more sustainable consumption in Vietnam can be to create more group-based activities around the themes of energy and shopping for food. A twofold approach is needed that both installs new sustainable consumption patterns and keeps old habits rooted in daily rituals. Role models should set an example for the young population and consumers and (Vietnamese) producers should be better connected to increase mutual trust and transparency.

  • 9.
    Deloughry, Niall
    et al.
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Wever, Renee
    TU Delft Netherlands .
    INCREASING THE ENTREPRENEURIAL SUCCESS OF DESIGN SCHOOL SPIN-OUTS2015In: DS82: Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education (E&PDE15), Great Expectations: Design Teaching, Research & Enterprise / [ed] Guy Bingham, Darren Southee, John McCardle, Ahmed Kovacevic, Erik Bohemia, Brian Parkinson, Bristol: The Design Society, 2015, p. 81-86Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Universities and Design schools prepare graduates in the principles of product development, through bachelor’s courses in Product/Industrial design and Business. Through the course of a typical design school education the graduate will have developed skills in research, idea generation and design thinking methodologies to support the development of Final year project (FYP). The business school graduate will similarly undertake a FYP to showcase the accumulated skills from the degree course. The typical FYP will produce the first embodiment or business plan of the new design/business proposal, expressed through the academic requirements of the design/business school. The requirement at undergraduate level generally does not include preparation for spin-out albeit many projects may embody many the characteristic developments necessary. This research will trace the project development stages from initial briefing towards spin-out, focussing on the study of entrepreneurial methodologies and philosophies as observed through case-studies projects from business school, design school and entrepreneurs independent of college structures. The focus of the research will be to discern the characteristic philosophies and methodologies with particular interest in ‘causal’ and ‘effectual’ thinking as observed in the development process.

  • 10.
    Ekströmer, Philip
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nåbo, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pavlasevic, Vanja
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklöf, David
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    CHALLENGING BRIEFS; LEARNING THROUGH CLIENT AND DESIGNER ROLES IN FRESHMEN DESIGN EDUCATION2017In: BUILDING COMMUNITY: DESIGN EDUCATION FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE, DESIGN SOC , 2017, p. 400-404Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper details an exploratory study of a design brief exchange method, using freshmen students in the beginner course Introduction to Design and Product Development at Linkoping University as a case. In design projects for clients, the design brief, irrespective of whether it is an explicit document or not, is generally seen as a critical step towards successful outcomes. From a design didactical perspective, it is a relevant question how to empower design students to engage with client-drafted briefs. In the proposed design brief exchange method, a student group drafts a design brief which they hand to a second group, while receiving a brief from a third. Every group thus performs both a client and designer role. A study was conducted on twelve student groups of 6-7 students each to investigate if and how the proposed method supports teaching students to cope with ambiguity. The students were, at several times during the course, prompted by staff to reflect on the brief they drafted in the role of clients as well as the brief received in their role as designers. Reflections were based on a set of questions and written in their project journal used for documentation in the course. Students and examiners reflections suggests that this is a promising approach to engage students in questioning client-drafted briefs and handle the ambiguity of design challenges.

  • 11.
    Ekströmer, Philip
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    In search of lost materiality; the case for physical modelling in Industrial Design Engineering education2018In: Proceedings of NordDesign 2018, Linköping, Sweden, 14th - 17th August / [ed] Philip Ekströmer, Johan Ölvander and Simon Schütte, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the recent years, Industrial Design Engineering students at Linköping University have

    frequently been observed to go directly from sketches into CAD, without making simple sketch

    models for evaluation in the early stages of their design process. This workflow gives them less

    information in their decision-making process and they lose the materiality of physical models,

    which is an aspect that many designers and researchers consider crucial for the development of

    form. This discussion paper explores whether this is an increasing trend and if so how it affects

    the breadth of design space exploration. In total, 25 master theses, covering a period of nine

    years, on Design and Product Development from Linköping University have been analysed.

    The design representations used and the diversity of the ideas across the product development

    process were visualized in graphs. This mapping supports our preliminary observation that the

    use of physical models is declining and suggests this decline correlates to a narrower

    exploration of the design space.

  • 12.
    Henriksson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berry, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Fluid and Mechatronic Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Student-developed laboratory exercises - An approach to cross-disciplinary peer education2016In: Proceedings of NordDesign 2016: part 2, The Design Society, 2016, p. 226-235Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With new technologies and demands from industry, universities need to adapt in order to educate engineers suited for the job market of tomorrow. Focusing on the fields of product development and mechanical engineering, topics such as new lightweight materials and lightweight designs are currently a focus of many industries, and the demand from industry is that engineers graduating should have some knowledge in these fields. In this case, a project was set up for a student-developed laboratory exercise in lightweight material, focusing on the interconnection between material properties, geometry and manufacturing technology in order to fulfil a contextual requirement. The industry chosen was the aircraft industry, due to its heavy emphasis on light weight. The chosen component (a civil aircraft radome) meant that material properties not necessarily connected to high specific strength became important, something that adds educational value to the exercise. Since the introduction of the exercise, the plan is to introduce the laboratory exercise in more courses where the interdisciplinary connections between material properties, geometry and manufacturing technology needs to be explained for students as well as evaluate how this approach to exercise development can be improved and further utilized. This paper presents the learnings from setting up the laboratory exercise, as well as discusses the possibilities of thesis works as an enabler for peer education and puts these in a context for a future, adaptive engineering education that quickly can add or renew material in the curriculum without substantial investment of resources.

  • 13.
    Kucuksayrac, Elif
    et al.
    Istanbul Technical University, Turkey; Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Brezet, Han
    Aalborg University, Denmark; Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Universities’ intermediary role in the “design for sustainability” field: Case studies from the Netherlands and Turkey2017In: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, ISSN 1467-6370, E-ISSN 1758-6739, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 455-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper aims to investigate the intermediary role of universities in spreading design for

    sustainability into industry.

    Design/methodology/approach – Three case studies were undertaken on Delft University of Technology, Design for Sustainability Program from The Netherlands; a center on sustainable consumption and production; and Prof. Göksel Demirer from Middle East Technical University, Environmental Engineering Department from Turkey.

    Findings – The process and evolution of the intermediary roles of the cases are explained. Three types of structures, through which universities undertake intermediary role, are investigated via the cases studies, a program, a center and an individual scientist.

    Originality/value – This study is a first attempt to investigate the intermediary role of universities in the design for sustainability field. 

  • 14.
    Segalas, Jordi
    et al.
    UPC.
    De Eyto, Adam
    University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.
    McMahon, Muireann
    University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.
    Joore, Peter
    NHL.
    Crul, Marcel
    NHL.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jimenez, Alex
    Nutcreatives.
    CIRCULAR DESIGN – LEARNING FOR INNOVATIVE DESIGN FOR SUSTAINABILITY: ERAMUS + KNOWLEDGE ALLIANCE PROJECT FOR SUSTAINABLE DESIGN2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Segalas, Jordi
    et al.
    Univ Politecn Cataluna, Spain.
    de Eyto, Adam
    Univ Limerick, Ireland.
    McMahon, Muireann
    Univ Limerick, Ireland.
    Joore, Peter
    Stichting NHL, Netherlands; Technol Univ Delft, Netherlands.
    Crul, Marcel
    Stichting NHL, Netherlands.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jimenez, Alex
    NutCreatives, Spain.
    CIRCULAR DESIGN - LEARNING FOR INNOVATIVE DESIGN FOR SUSTAINABILITY: ERAMUS plus KNOWLEDGE ALLIANCE PROJECT FOR SUSTAINABLE DESIGN2017In: BUILDING COMMUNITY: DESIGN EDUCATION FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE, DESIGN SOC , 2017, p. 224-229Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Circular-Design - Learning for Innovative Design for Sustainability (L4IDS) project is a three year (2016-2019) Erasmus + Knowledge Alliance financed project. The goal of the project is to promote sustainable consumption and production of products and services in Europe. This is achieved through a knowledge co-creation process and the development of training materials in order to teach and train students, faculty and enterprise staff of the design sector in Innovative Design for Sustainability (IDfS) strategies. The project is aligned with European Circular Economy policies and contributes to the realization of a more sustainable society. There is an abundance of learning schemes, courses, and teaching materials in higher education on DfS but few of these focuses on Knowledge Co-Creation and Innovation and none through continuous professional development. This paper will present an overview of previous initiatives around DfS in higher education, focusing on those that rise above the level of a single institution. By mapping these initiatives on the triangle Design for Sustainability (DfS)-Knowledge Co-Creation - Innovation, we will articulate the gap which the L4IDS project aims to bridge. For this, we will use an adapted version of the DfS Evolutionary framework. The mapping will be based on a case study publication on knowledge co-creation processes in design for sustainability. Specifically, the study will focus on the position of Digital Fabrication Labs (DFL) in this innovative design for sustainability triangle.

  • 16.
    Segalas, jordi
    et al.
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Catalunya, Spain.
    De Eyto, Adam
    Univeristy of Limerick, Ireland.
    McMahon, Muireann
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Joore, Peter
    NHL University of Applied Sciences, Leeuwarden, Netherlands.
    Crul, Marcel
    NHL University of Applied Sciences, Leeuwarden, Netherlands.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jimenez, Alex
    Nutcreatives,Barcelona, Spain.
    Circular Design – Learning for innovative design for sustainability project.2017In: 18th European Roundtable for Sustainable Consumption and Production: Towards a Greener Challenge & Evolution in the Framework of the Circular Economy, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Stolk, Egbert
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Christiaans, Henri
    Industrial Design Engineering of the TU Delft. The Netherlands.
    Herder, Paulien
    Engineering Systems Design in Energy and Industry, Delft University of Technology, The Netherland.
    In memory of Ina Trix Klaasen2015In: Journal of Design Research, ISSN 1748-3050, E-ISSN 1569-1551, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 323-324Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Velander Gisslén, Anna
    et al.
    Stiftelsen Svensk Industridesign (SVID).
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hållbarhet börjar med design2017In: Swedish Design Research Journal, ISSN 2000-964X, no 1, p. 8-10Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Våra resurser är inte oändliga och det vi producerar och konsumerar har en betydande inverkan på vår miljö. Här har design en stor och viktig roll att fylla.

  • 19.
    Velander Gisslén, Anna
    et al.
    Stiftelsen Svensk Industridesign (SVID).
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sustainability starts with design2017In: swedish design research journal, ISSN 2000-964X, no 1, p. 8-10Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Resources are not endless and what we produce and consume has a significant impact on our environment. In this context design has a decisive role to play. Two European projects help designers to work with ecodesign for greater sustainability.

  • 20.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A gripping tale – reflections on human-packaging interaction research2017In: 2nd Innovations in Food Packaging, Shelf Life and Food Safety Conference, 3-6 October 2017. Stadthalle Erding, Munich, Germany, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The research field of human-packaging interaction, which includes both marketing and ergonomics, is gaining attention. Based on recent work within this field, in particular papers published in packaging-specific outlets, a reflection on the state-of-the-art will be presented. Within this literature, certain user groups, and certain types of packaging have received far more attention than others, leading to obvious gaps in the literature. Even within wellresearched packaging types, such as the opening of jars, data comparability across different studies is not always optimal. Furthermore, packages which receive the most attention in academic research do not necessarily match the packaging types most notorious for their challenging interaction. Apart from different user groups that are studied in the human-packaging interaction literature, there are also at least two types of researchers working on those studies. In the first, and larger group, are psychologists, marketers, and ergonomists who on occasion select packaging as a useful focus of their studies. In the second, and smaller group, are packaging professionals who happen to focus on marketing or ergonomics questions. Both groups tend to ask different research questions and make different choices in their research design. Hence, clear avenues for future research can be identified, based on packaging types, user groups, as well as research questions and research design. These will be discussed, also in light of their connection to packaging design processes.

  • 21.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Designing out food waste2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    About 30% of the food grown never gets eaten. It is lost or wasted somewhere between farm and fork. If we are to feed a still growing population, tackling that 30% is a sensible strategy. This talk is based on a range of projects by students from Linköping University, showing how we could design our food-related practices differently. Academic degrees.

  • 22.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    human-packaging interactions: recent trends and research gaps2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Touching Tubs and Grabbing Gable-tops: An Editorial to the Special Issue on Human-packaging Interaction2016In: Packaging technology & science, ISSN 0894-3214, E-ISSN 1099-1522, Vol. 29, p. 603-606Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This editorial covers the recent advances in marketing and ergonomics research with respect to packaging, in

    particular, the papers that form part of the special issue on human-packaging interaction. It presents a classification

    of contributions to the literature in four categories, namely, (a) research methodology; (b) design methodology;

    (c) insights; and (d) industry application. Based on the discussion of recent literature, a research

    agenda is proposed.

  • 24.
    Wever, Renee
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Delft University of Technology.
    Charnley, Fiona
    Centre for Competitive Creative Design (C4D) Cranfield University, UK.
    Brass, Clare
    SustainRCA, Royal College of Art, London, UK.
    Harrison, Lizzie
    SustainRCA, Royal College of Art, London, UK.
    Preparing designers for a circular economy goldrush; exploring the implications for education2015In: Global Cleaner Production and Sustainable Consumption Conference, Sitges, Barcelona, 1-4 November, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the changing role of designers in a circular economy setting, focusing on the different skill sets needed for this role from educational and industrial perspectives. Relevant literature from the areas of Cradle-to-cradle, Biomimicry, Product Life Extension and Whole System Design are reviewed to begin to identify the requirements of design for a circular economy. Furthermore, implications for design teaching and the stage at which skills should be taught during a designer’s educational journey are explored.

     

    The analysis is based on early experiences of course and curriculum development from three pioneering universities, and an expert workshop held at the Re-thinking Progress Symposium organized by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation.

  • 25.
    Wikström, Fredrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Verghese, Karli
    School of Design, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Auras, Rafael
    School of Packaging, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.
    Olsson, Annika
    Department of Design Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Williams, Helén
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Wever, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Grönman, Kaisa
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Lappeenranta, Finland.
    Pettersen, Marit Kvalvåg
    Nofima, Norway.
    Møller, Hanne
    Ostfold Research, Kråkerøy, Norway.
    Soukka, Risto
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Lappeenranta, Finland.
    Packaging Strategies That Save Food: A Research Agenda for 20302018In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thoroughly considering and optimizing packaging systems can avoid food loss and waste.

    We suggest a number of issues that must be explored and review the associated challenges.

    Five main issues were recognized through the extensive experience of the authors and engagement

    of multiple stakeholders. The issues promoted are classified as follows: (1) identify

    and obtain specific data of packaging functions that influence food waste; (2) understand

    the total environmental burden of product/package by considering the trade-off between

    product protection and preservation and environmental footprint; (3) develop understanding

    of how these functions should be treated in environmental footprint evaluations; (4)

    improve packaging design processes to also consider reducing food waste; and (5) analyze

    stakeholder incentives to reduce food loss and waste. Packaging measures that save food

    will be important to fulfill the United Nations Sustainable Development goal to halve per

    capita global food waste at the retail and consumer levels and to reduce food losses along

    production and supply chains.

1 - 25 of 25
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