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  • 1.
    Blomberg, Rina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Soderlund, Goran B. W.
    Western Norway Univ Appl Sci, Norway.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Speech Processing Difficulties in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 1536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The large body of research that forms the ease of language understanding (ELU) model emphasizes the important contribution of cognitive processes when listening to speech in adverse conditions; however, speech-in-noise (SIN) processing is yet to be thoroughly tested in populations with cognitive deficits. The purpose of the current study was to contribute to the field in this regard by assessing SIN performance in a sample of adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and comparing results with age-matched controls. This population was chosen because core symptoms of ADHD include developmental deficits in cognitive control and working memory capacity and because these top-down processes are thought to reach maturity during adolescence in individuals with typical development. The study utilized natural language sentence materials under experimental conditions that manipulated the dependency on cognitive mechanisms in varying degrees. In addition, participants were tested on cognitive capacity measures of complex working memory-span, selective attention, and lexical access. Primary findings were in support of the ELU-model. Age was shown to significantly covary with SIN performance, and after controlling for age, ADHD participants demonstrated greater difficulty than controls with the experimental manipulations. In addition, overall SIN performance was strongly predicted by individual differences in cognitive capacity. Taken together, the results highlight the general disadvantage persons with deficient cognitive capacity have when attending to speech in typically noisy listening environments. Furthermore, the consistently poorer performance observed in the ADHD group suggests that auditory processing tasks designed to tax attention and working memory capacity may prove to be beneficial clinical instruments when diagnosing ADHD.

  • 2.
    Shirnin, Denis
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Blomberg, Rina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Speech perception in noise: prediction patterns of neural pre-activation in lexical processing2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether the neural correlates of lexical expectations could be used to predict speech in noise perception. We analyse mag-netoencephalography (MEG) data from 20 normal hearing participants, who read a set of couplets (a pair of phrases with rhyming end words) prior to the experiment. During the experiment, the participants are asked to listen to the couplets, whose intelligibility is set to 80%. However, the last word is pronounced with a delay of 1600 ms (i.e. expectation gap) and is masked at 50% of intelligibility. At the end of each couplet, the participants are asked to indicate if the last word was cor-rect, i.e. corresponding to the expected word. Given the oscillatory characteristics of neural patterns of lexical expectations during the expectation gap, can we predict the participant’s actual perception of the last word? In order to approach this re-search question, we aim to identify the correlation patterns between the instances of neural pre-activation, occurring during the interval of the expectation gap and the type of the given answer. According to the sequential design of the experiment, the expectation gap is placed 4400 ms prior to the time interval dedicated to the participant’s answer. Machine Learning approach has been chosen as the main tool for the pattern recognition.

  • 3.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Blomberg, Rina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlstrom, Orjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Phonological expectations override semantic mismatch during speech in noise perception2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Perception of speech in noise is modulated by stimulus-driven and knowledge-driven processes. In the ELU model, working memory capacity (WM) has been proposed to play a determinant role in the resolution of a mismatch between knowledge-based predictions and stimulus-based processing. However, the neural correlates and the temporal course of the mismatch resolution have not been investigated. After exposure to 48 semantically coherent couplets, 20 normal-hearing participants were tested in a MEG study. Couplet sentences were presented in background noise with 80% intelligibility, except the last word of the couplet that was presented with 50% intelligibility. This last word could be either 1) the word that was in the exposure couplet, or 2) a phonologically related but semantically incorrect word, or 3) a semantically coherent but phonologically incorrect word, or 4) a semantically and phonologically incorrect word. Before the presentation of the last word, participants had time to predict it and their task was to answer if the presented word was the correct one. Behavioural results showed more errors in the condition 2 than conditions 3 or 4, suggesting that phonological compatibility overrides semantic mismatch when intelligibility is poor. Preliminary results of the neural correlates reflecting the role of WM in the mismatch resolution between the knowledge-driven and stimulus-driven processes will be presented.

  • 4.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Blomberg, Rina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersen, L. Møller
    Dept. of Clin. Neurosci., The Natl. Res. Facility for Magnetoencephalography, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, D.
    Dept. of Clin. Neurosci., The Natl. Res. Facility for Magnetoencephalography, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Resolving discrepancies between incoming auditory information and linguistic expectations2018In: Neuroscience 2018: 48th annual meeting of Society for Neuroscience, Society for Neuroscience , 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Speech perception in noise is dependent on stimulus-driven and knowledge-driven processes. Here we investigate the neural correlates and time course of discrepancies between incoming auditory information (i.e. stimulus-driven processing) and linguistic expectations (knowledge-driven processing) by including 20 normal hearing adults in a MEG study. Participants read 48 rhyming sentence pairs beforehand. In the scanner, they listened to sentences that corresponded exactly to the read sentences except that the last word (presented after 1600 millisecond delay and with 50% intelligibility) was only correct in half of the cases. Otherwise, it was 1) phonologically but not semantically related, 2) semantically but not phonologically related, or 3) neither phonologically nor semantically related to the sentence. Participants indicated by button press whether the last word matched the sentence they had read outside the scanner. Behavioural results showed more errors in condition 1 than in conditions 2 or 3, suggesting that phonological compatibility overrides semantic discrepancy when intelligibility is poor. Event-related field analysis demonstrated larger activity on frontal sites for correct than unrelated words, suggesting that the former were more accurately expected than the latter. An early M170 component was also observed, possibly reflecting expectation violation in the auditory modality. Dipole analysis will reveal whether M170 could be modulated by type of linguistic discrepancy. Distributed-network analysis will further our understanding of the time course and neural correlates of discrepancies between incoming auditory information and linguistic expectations.

  • 5.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Blomberg, Rina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Modulation of the neural expectation violation marker during speech perception in noise.2018Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 5 of 5
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