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  • 1.
    Chung, Rosanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Pigment hade antiinflammatoriska effekter vid kranskärlssjukdom2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114, no 33-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 2.
    Chung, Rosanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Gustafsson, Nelly
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Liberation of lutein from spinach: Effects of heating time, microwavereheating and liquefaction2019In: Food Chemistry, ISSN 0308-8146, E-ISSN 1873-7072, Vol. 277, p. 573-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lutein, abundant in dark leafy vegetables, has been associated with several health promoting effects. Still, to what extent different preparation conditions and practices affect the liberation of lutein from food is not fully understood. Here, we compared a range of domestic methods under realistic conditions to prepare spinach, the most common lutein-rich vegetable. After preparations, samples were processed by in vitro digestion and lutein was quantified by HPLC. Data indicate that short-term and medium-term heating of spinach, independent of heating method, substantially reduced liberated lutein and reduction was most pronounced after long boiling times. Interestingly, the loss of lutein in heated samples was partly compensated when samples were reheated in the microwave. However, the highest yield of liberated lutein was obtained from liquefied spinach. Additional dairy enhanced the liquefaction effect. Thus, for optimal liberation of lutein, liquefaction of raw spinach appears to be the method of choice.

  • 3.
    Chung, Rosanna W S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Leandersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Lundberg, Anna K
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lutein exerts anti-inflammatory effects in patients with coronary artery disease.2017In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 262, p. 87-93, article id S0021-9150(17)30197-1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Many coronary artery disease (CAD) patients exhibit chronic low-grade inflammation. Carotenoids are anti-oxidants with potential anti-inflammatory properties. Here, we first assessed relationships between interleukin (IL)-6 and individual carotenoids in plasma from CAD patients. Based on the results, we proceeded to assess anti-inflammatory effects of one carotenoid, lutein, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from CAD patients.

    METHODS: Lutein + zeaxanthin (isomers with lutein being dominant), β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, α- and β-carotene and IL-6 were measured in plasma from 134 patients with stable angina (SA) and 59 patients with acute coronary syndrome. In 42 patients, plasma measurements were also performed 3 months after coronary intervention. PBMCs from SA patients were pre-treated with lutein (1, 5 and 25 μM) for 24 h followed by 24 h incubation ± lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cell pellets were collected for IL-6, IL-1β and TNF mRNA and intracellular lutein. Cytokine secretion was measured in cell media.

    RESULTS: Only lutein + zeaxanthin were inversely correlated with IL-6 in SA patients at baseline (r = -0.366, p < 0.001) and follow-up (r = -0.546, p < 0.001). Ex vivo, lutein was taken up by PBMCs from SA patients in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with lutein dose-dependently lowered LPS-induced secretion of IL-6, IL-1β (p < 0.01) and TNF (p < 0.05), and also reduced IL-6, IL-1β and TNF mRNA expression (p < 0.05).

    CONCLUSIONS: Clinical findings highlighted the inverse association between lutein and IL-6 in CAD patients. Anti-inflammatory effects of lutein in PBMCs from CAD patients were consolidated in ex vivo experiments. Taken together, these results show that lutein has the potential to play a role in resolution of chronic inflammation in CAD patients.

  • 4.
    Chung, Rosanna
    et al.
    Heart Research Institute, Australia.
    Wang, Zeneng
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Bursill, Christina A.
    South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Australia.
    Wu, Ben J.
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Bailee, Philip J.
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Rye, Kerry-Anne
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Effect of long-term dietary sphingomyelin supplementation on atherosclerosis in mice2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 12, article id e0189523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sphingomyelin (SM) levels in the circulation correlate positively with atherosclerosis burden. SM is a ubiquitous component of human diets, but it is unclear if dietary SM increases circulating SM levels. Dietary choline increases atherosclerosis by raising circulating trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) levels in mice and humans. As SM has a choline head group, we ask in this study if dietary SM accelerates atherosclerotic lesion development by increasing circulating SM and TMAO levels. Three studies were performed: (Study 1) C57BL/6 mice were maintained on a high fat diet with or without SM supplementation for 4 weeks prior to quantification of serum TMAO and SM levels; (Study 2) atherosclerosis was studied in apoE(-/-) mice after 16 weeks of a high fat diet without or with SM supplementation and (Study 3) apoE(-/-) mice were maintained on a chow diet for 19 weeks without or with SM supplementation and antibiotic treatment prior to quantification of atherosclerotic lesions and serum TMAO and SM levels. SM consumption did not increase circulating SM levels or atherosclerosis in high fat-fed apoE(-/-) mice. Serum TMAO levels in C57BL/6 mice were low and had no effect atherosclerosis lesion development. Dietary SM supplementation significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion area in the aortic arch of chow-fed apoE(-/-) mice. This study establishes that dietary SM does not affect circulating SM levels or increase atherosclerosis in high fat-fed apoE(-/-) mice, but it is anti-atherogenic in chow-fed apoE(-/-) mice.

  • 5.
    Jönsson, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Chung, Rosanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Glucocorticoid sensitivity and inflammatory status of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with coronary artery disease2018In: Annals of Medicine, ISSN 0785-3890, E-ISSN 1365-2060, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 260-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Mechanisms behind sustained inflammation in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) are not clarified but hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction may have a role. Here, we investigated whether inflammatory status of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was associated with altered glucocorticoid sensitivity in CAD patients. Methods: In 55 CAD patients and 30 controls, mRNA levels of GR-alpha, GR-beta, NF-kappa B, I kappa B alpha, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 were measured in PBMCs. Suppressive effects of dexamethasone on GR-alpha, GR-beta, NF-kappa B, I kappa B alpha, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 mRNA levels were assessed in PBMCs ex vivo. Salivary cortisol was repeatedly measured over 3 days. Results: GR-alpha mRNA levels were higher in CAD patients than in controls, 0.50 (0.38-0.59) versus 0.26 (0.18-0.37), pamp;lt;.001, while GR-beta mRNA levels were equally low in both groups. GR-alpha mRNA expression was associated with inflammatory gene expression and, also, with flatter diurnal cortisol rhythm. In both patients and controls, dexamethasone suppressed gene expression of NF-B, IB, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 (p amp;lt; .001). Dexamethasone also reduced GR-alpha mRNA levels (p amp;lt; .001), while LPS increased it (p amp;lt; .001). Conclusions: PBMCs from CAD patients displayed an inflammatory gene expression profile. This was not explained by reduced glucocorticoid sensitivity. Instead, inflammation was associated with increased expression of GR-alpha mRNA, suggesting a hypocortisolemic state.

  • 6.
    Mahmood, Zeid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enocsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bäck, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Chung, Rosanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Salivary and plasma levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and myeloperoxidase at rest and after acute physical exercise in patients with coronary artery disease2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 2, article id e0207166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Low-grade systemic inflammation is a predictor of recurrent cardiac events in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Plasma proteins such as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and myeloperoxidase (MPO) have been shown to reflect basal as well as stress-induced inflammation in CAD. Measurements of MMP-9 and MPO in saliva might pose several advantages. Therefore, we investigated whether salivary levels of MMP-9 and MPO corresponded to plasma levels in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), both at rest and after acute physical exercise. Methods A bicycle ergometer test was used as a model for stress-induced inflammation. Twenty-three CAD patients performed the test on two occasions 3-6 months apart. Whole unstimulated saliva was collected before, directly after and 30 min after exercise while plasma was collected before and after 30 min. MMP-9 and MPO in saliva and plasma were determined by Luminex. Results MMP-9 and MPO levels were 2- to 4-fold higher in saliva than in plasma. Amongst the saliva samples, and also to a great extent amongst the plasma samples, the levels of both types of protein showed strong intercorrelations between the levels at rest and after exercise during the two visits. However, there were no (or weak) correlations between salivary and plasma MMP-9 and none between salivary and plasma MPO. Conclusion We conclude that salivary diagnostics cannot be used to assess systemic levels of MMP-9 and MPO in CAD patients, neither at rest nor after acute physical exercise.

  • 7.
    Ong, Kwok Leung
    et al.
    Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Chung, Rosanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hui, Nicholas
    Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rye, Kerry-Anne
    Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Usefulness of Certain Protein Biomarkers for Prediction of Coronary Heart Disease2020In: American Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0002-9149, E-ISSN 1879-1913, Vol. 125, no 4, p. 542-548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identification of biomarkers can help monitor and prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. We performed an exploratory analysis to identify potential biomarkers for coronary heart disease (CHD) in participants from the Life Conditions, Stress, and Health study. A total of 1,007 participants (50% women), randomly selected from the general population, were followed for incident CHD at 8 and 13 years of follow-up. Plasma levels of 184 CVD-related biomarkers were measured in samples collected at baseline in 86 cases with CHD and 184 age- and sex-matched controls by proximity extension assay. Biomarker levels were presented as normalized protein expression values (log 2 scale). After adjusting for confounding factors, 6 biomarkers showed significant association with incident CHD at 13 years. In a sensitivity analysis, this association remained significant at 8 years for 3 biomarkers; collagen alpha-1(I) chain (COL1A1), bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6), and interleukin-6 receptor alpha chain (IL-6R alpha). When entering these biomarkers in the full adjustment model simultaneously, their association with incident CHD at 13 years remained significant, hazards ratio being 0.671, 0.335, and 2.854, respectively per unit increase in normalized protein expression values. Subjects with low COL1A1, low BMP-6, and high IL-6R alpha levels had a hazards ratio of 5.097 for incident CHD risk (p = 0.019), compared with those without. In conclusion, we identified COL1A1, BMP-6 and IL-6Ra as biomarkers for incident CHD over a long-term follow-up in this exploratory analysis. For COL1A1 and BMP-6 this has not been previously reported. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings and establish their clinical relevance. (C) 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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