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  • 1.
    Askari Ghotbabadi, Sadegh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Ul Haq, Atta
    University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Macias-Montero, Manuel
    University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Levchenko, Igor
    Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
    Yu, Fengjiao
    University of St Andrews, Scotland.
    Zhou, Wuzong
    University of St Andrews, Scotland.
    (Ken) Ostrikov, Kostya
    Queensland University of Technology, Australia; Queensland University of Technology, Australia; CSIRO, Australia.
    Maguire, Paul
    University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Svrcek, Vladimir
    National Institute Adv Ind Science and Technology, Japan.
    Mariotti, Davide
    University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Ultra-small photoluminescent silicon-carbide nanocrystals by atmospheric-pressure plasmas2016In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 8, no 39, p. 17141-17149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly size-controllable synthesis of free-standing perfectly crystalline silicon carbide nanocrystals has been achieved for the first time through a plasma-based bottom-up process. This low-cost, scalable, ligand-free atmospheric pressure technique allows fabrication of ultra-small (down to 1.5 nm) nanocrystals with very low level of surface contamination, leading to fundamental insights into optical properties of the nanocrystals. This is also confirmed by their exceptional photoluminescence emission yield enhanced by more than 5 times by reducing the nanocrystals sizes in the range of 1-5 nm, which is attributed to quantum confinement in ultra-small nanocrystals. This method is potentially scalable and readily extendable to a wide range of other classes of materials. Moreover, this ligand-free process can produce colloidal nanocrystals by direct deposition into liquid, onto biological materials or onto the substrate of choice to form nanocrystal films. Our simple but efficient approach based on non-equilibrium plasma environment is a response to the need of most efficient bottom-up processes in nanosynthesis and nanotechnology.

  • 2.
    Askari, Sadegh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany.
    Mariotti, Davide
    Ulster Univ, North Ireland.
    Stehr, Jan Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Benedikt, Jan
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany.
    Keraudy, Julien
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Helmersson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Low-Loss and Tunable Localized Mid-Infrared Plasmons in Nanocrystals of Highly Degenerate InN2018In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 5681-5687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasmonic response of free charges confined in nanostructures of plasmonic materials is a powerful means for manipulating the light-material interaction at the nanoscale and hence has influence on various relevant technologies. In particular, plasmonic materials responsive in the mid-infrared range are technologically important as the mid-infrared is home to the vibrational resonance of molecules and also thermal radiation of hot objects. However, the development of the field is practically challenged with the lack of low-loss materials supporting high quality plasmons in this range of the spectrum. Here, we demonstrate that degenerately doped InN nanocrystals (NCs) support tunable and low-loss plasmon resonance spanning the entire midwave infrared range. Modulating free-carrier concentration is achieved by engineering nitrogen-vacancy defects (InN1-x, 0.017 amp;lt; x amp;lt; 0.085) in highly degenerate NCs using a nonequilibrium gas-phase growth process. Despite the significant reduction in the carrier mobility relative to intrinsic InN, the mobility in degenerate InN NCs (amp;gt;60 cm(2)/(V s)) remains considerably higher than the carrier mobility reported for other materials NCs such as doped metal oxides, chalcogenides, and noble metals. These findings demonstrate feasibility of controlled tuning of infrared plasmon resonances in a low-loss material of III-V compounds and open a gateway to further studies of these materials nanostructures for infrared plasmonic applications.

  • 3.
    Zhang, Ri-Chao
    et al.
    Zhejiang University, Peoples R China; Queens University of Belfast, North Ireland; University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Sun, Dan
    Queens University of Belfast, North Ireland.
    Lu, Ai
    China Academic Engn Phys, Peoples R China.
    Askari Ghotbabadi, Sadegh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Macias-Montero, Manuel
    University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Joseph, Paul
    Victoria University, Australia.
    Dixon, Dorian
    University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Ostrikov, Kostya
    Queensland University of Technology, Australia; CSIRO, Australia.
    Maguire, Paul
    University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Mariotti, Davide
    University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Microplasma Processed Ultrathin Boron Nitride Nanosheets for Polymer Nanocomposites with Enhanced Thermal Transport Performance2016In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 8, no 21, p. 13567-13572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Research Article reports on the enhancement of the thermal transport properties of nanocomposite materials containing hexagonal boron nitride in poly(vinyl alcohol) through room-temperature atmospheric pressure direct-current microplasma processing. Results show that the microplasma treatment leads to exfoliation of the hexagonal boron nitride in isopropyl alcohol, reducing the number of stacks from amp;gt;30 to a few or single layers. The thermal diffusivity of the resulting nanocomposites reaches 8.5 mm(2) s(-1) times greater than blank poly(vinyl alcohol) and twice that of nanocomposites containing nonplasma treated boron nitride nanosheets. From TEM analysis, we observe much less aggregation Of the nanosheets after plasma processing along with indications of an amorphous carbon interfacial layer, which may contribute to stable dispersion of boron nitride nanosheets in the resulting plasma treated colloids.

  • 4.
    Zhang, Ri-Chao
    et al.
    East China Jiaotong University, Peoples R China; Queens University, North Ireland; University of Ulster, North Ireland; University of Loughborough, England.
    Sun, Dan
    Queens University, North Ireland.
    Zhang, Ruirui
    East China Jiaotong University, Peoples R China; Queens University, North Ireland; University of Ulster, North Ireland; University of Loughborough, England.
    Lin, Wen-Feng
    University of Loughborough, England.
    Macias-Montero, Manuel
    University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Patel, Jenish
    Marwadi Educ Fdn Grp Institute, India.
    Askari Ghotbabadi, Sadegh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    McDonald, Calum
    University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Mariotti, Davide
    University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Maguire, Paul
    University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Gold nanoparticle-polymer nanocomposites synthesized by room temperature atmospheric pressure plasma and their potential for fuel cell electrocatalytic application2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 46682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conductive polymers have been increasingly used as fuel cell catalyst support due to their electrical conductivity, large surface areas and stability. The incorporation of metal nanoparticles into a polymer matrix can effectively increase the specific surface area of these materials and hence improve the catalytic efficiency. In this work, a nanoparticle loaded conductive polymer nanocomposite was obtained by a one-step synthesis approach based on room temperature direct current plasmaliquid interaction. Gold nanoparticles were directly synthesized from HAuCl4 precursor in poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT: PSS). The resulting AuNPs/PEDOT: PSS nanocomposites were subsequently characterized under a practical alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell operation condition for its potential application as an electrocatalyst. Results show that AuNPs sizes within the PEDOT: PSS matrix are dependent on the plasma treatment time and precursor concentration, which in turn affect the nanocomposites electrical conductivity and their catalytic performance. Under certain synthesis conditions, unique nanoscale AuNPs/PEDOT: PSS core-shell structures could also be produced, indicating the interaction at the AuNPs/polymer interface. The enhanced catalytic activity shown by AuNPs/PEDOT: PSS has been attributed to the effective electron transfer and reactive species diffusion through the porous polymer network, as well as the synergistic interfacial interaction at the metal/polymer and metal/metal interfaces.

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