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  • 1.
    Chalangar, Ebrahim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Halmstad Univ, Sweden.
    Machhadani, Houssaine
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lim, Seung-Hyuk
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pettersson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Halmstad Univ, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Influence of morphology on electrical and optical properties of graphene/Al-doped ZnO-nanorod composites2018In: Nanotechnology, ISSN 0957-4484, E-ISSN 1361-6528, Vol. 29, no 41, article id 415201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of future 3D-printed electronics relies on the access to highly conductive inexpensive materials that are printable at low temperatures (amp;lt;100 degrees C). The implementation of available materials for these applications are, however, still limited by issues related to cost and printing quality. Here, we report on the simple hydrothermal growth of novel nanocomposites that are well suited for conductive printing applications. The nanocomposites comprise highly Al-doped ZnO nanorods grown on graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs). The ZnO nanorods play the two major roles of (i) preventing GNPs from agglomerating and (ii) promoting electrical conduction paths between the graphene platelets. The effect of two different ZnO-nanorod morphologies with varying Al-doping concentration on the nanocomposite conductivity and the graphene dispersity are investigated. Time-dependent absorption, photoluminescence and photoconductivity measurements show that growth in high pH solutions promotes a better graphene dispersity, higher doping levels and enhanced bonding between the graphene and the ZnO nanorods. Growth in low pH solutions yields samples characterized by a higher conductivity and a reduced number of surface defects. These samples also exhibit a large persistent photoconductivity attributed to an effective charge separation and transfer from the nanorods to the graphene platelets. Our findings can be used to tailor the conductivity of novel printable composites, or for fabrication of large volumes of inexpensive porous conjugated graphene-semiconductor composites.

  • 2.
    Lim, Seung-Hyuk
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Korea Adv Institute Science and Technology, South Korea.
    Chul Sim, Young
    Korea Adv Institute Science and Technology, South Korea.
    Yoo, Yang-Seok
    Korea Adv Institute Science and Technology, South Korea.
    Choi, Sunghan
    Korea Adv Institute Science and Technology, South Korea.
    Lee, Sangwon
    Korea Adv Institute Science and Technology, South Korea.
    Cho, Yong-Hoon
    Korea Adv Institute Science and Technology, South Korea.
    Formation of a-plane facets in three-dimensional hexagonal GaN structures for photonic devices2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 9356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Control of the growth front in three-dimensional (3D) hexagonal GaN core structures is crucial for increased performance of light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and other photonic devices. This is due to the fact that InGaN layers formed on different growth facets in 3D structures exhibit various band gaps which originate from differences in the indium-incorporation efficiency, internal polarization, and growth rate. Here, a-plane {11 (2) over bar0} facets, which are rarely formed in hexagonal pyramid based growth, are intentionally fabricated using mask patterns and adjustment of the core growth conditions. Moreover, the growth area covered by these facets is modified by changing the growth time. The origin of the formation of a-plane {11 (2) over bar0} facets is also discussed. Furthermore, due to a growth condition transition from a 3D core structure to an InGaN multi-quantum well, a growth front transformation (i.e., a transformation of a-plane {11 (2) over bar0} facets to semi-polar {11 (2) over bar2} facets) is directly observed. Based on our understanding and control of this novel growth mechanism, we can achieve efficient broadband LEDs or photovoltaic cells.

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