liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 25 of 25
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Buyanova, Irina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stehr, Jan Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tu, C. W.
    University of Calif La Jolla, CA USA.
    Novel GaP/GaNP core/shell nanowires for optoelectronics and photonics (invited talk)2016In: The 7th IEEE International Nanoelectronics Conference 2016, IEEE , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    GaNP-based nanowires (NWs) represent a novel material system that has a great potential in a variety of optoelectronic and photonic applications. In this paper we review our recent results showing that advantages provided by alloying with nitrogen can be realized and even further enhanced in novel coaxial GaNP NWs grown on Si substrates. Based on combined mu-photoluminescence and optically detected magnetic resonance measurements, we identify the optimum structural design of these nanowires. We also demonstrate that these novel structures have potential as nanoscale light sources of linearly polarized light.

  • 2.
    Chen, Shula
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ishikawa, Fumitaro
    Ehime University, Japan.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Origin of radiative recombination and manifestations of localization effects in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires2014In: Applied Physics Letters, ISSN 0003-6951, E-ISSN 1077-3118, Vol. 105, no 25, p. 253106-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radiative carrier recombination processes in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a Si substrate are systematically investigated by employing micro-photoluminescence (mu-PL) and mu-PL excitation (mu-PLE) measurements complemented by time-resolved PL spectroscopy. At low temperatures, alloy disorder is found to cause localization of photo-excited carriers leading to predominance of optical transitions from localized excitons (LE). Some of the local fluctuations in N composition are suggested to lead to strongly localized three-dimensional confining potential equivalent to that for quantum dots, based on the observation of sharp and discrete PL lines within the LE contour. The localization effects are found to have minor influence on PL spectra at room temperature due to thermal activation of the localized excitons to extended states. Under these conditions, photo-excited carrier lifetime is found to be governed by non-radiative recombination via surface states which is somewhat suppressed upon N incorporation. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  • 3.
    Chen, Shula
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jansson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ishikawa, Fumitaro
    Ehime University, Japan.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Core-shell carrier and exciton transfer in GaAs/GaNAs coaxial nanowires2016In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology B, ISSN 1071-1023, E-ISSN 1520-8567, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 04J104-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comprehensive studies of GaAs/GaNAs coaxial nanowires grown on Si substrates are carried out by temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation, to evaluate effects of the shell formation on carrier recombination. The PL emission from the GaAs core is found to transform into a series of sharp PL lines upon radial growth of the GaNAs shell, pointing toward the formation of localization potentials in the core. This hampers carrier transfer at low temperatures from the core in spite of its wider bandgap. Carrier injection from the core to the optically active shell is found to become thermally activated at Tamp;gt;60 K, which implies that the localization potentials are rather shallow. (C) 2016 American Vacuum Society.

  • 4.
    Chubarov, M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pedersen, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Högberg, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engelbrecht, J.A. A.
    Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, South Africa .
    O'Connel, J.
    Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, South Africa .
    Henry, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Boron nitride: A new photonic material2014In: Physica. B, Condensed matter, ISSN 0921-4526, E-ISSN 1873-2135, Vol. 439, p. 29-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rhombohedral boron nitride (r-BN) layers were grown on sapphire substrate in a hot-wall chemical vapor deposition reactor. Characterization of these layers is reported in details. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is used as a routine characterization tool to investigate the crystalline quality of the films and the identification of the phases is revealed using detailed pole figure measurements. Transmission electron microscopy reveals stacking of more than 40 atomic layers. Results from Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements are compared with XRD data showing that FTIR is not phase sensitive when various phases of sp(2)-BN are investigated. XRD measurements show a significant improvement of the crystalline quality when adding silicon to the gas mixture during the growth; this is further confirmed by cathodoluminescence which shows a decrease of the defects related luminescence intensity.

  • 5.
    Chubarov, M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pedersen, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Högberg, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engelbrecht, J.A. A.
    Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa.
    O'Connel, J.
    Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa.
    Henry, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Characterization of Boron Nitride Thin Films2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rhombohedral Boron Nitride layers were grown on sapphire substrate in a hot-wall CVD reactor. The characterization of those layers is reported and the results are discussed in correlation with the various growth parameters used.

  • 6.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Micro-photoluminescence and micro-Raman spectroscopy of novel semiconductor nanostructures2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Low-dimensional semiconductor structures, such as one-dimensional nanowires (NWs) and zerodimensional quantum dots (QDs), are materials with novel fundamental physical properties and a great potential for a wide range of nanoscale device applications. Here, especially promising are direct bandgap II-VI and III-V compounds and related alloys with a broad selection of compositions and band structures. For examples, NWs based on dilute nitride alloys, i.e. GaNAs and GaNP, provide both an optical active medium and well-shaped cavity and, therefore, can be used in a variety of advanced optoelectronic devices including intermediate band solar cells and efficient light-emitters. Self-assembled InAs QDs formed in the GaAs matrix are proposed as building blocks for entangled photon sources for quantum cryptography and quantum information processing as well as for spin light emitting devices. ZnO NWs can be utilized in a variety of applications including efficient UV lasers and gas sensors. In order to fully explore advantages of nanostructured materials, their electronic properties and lattice structure need to be comprehensively characterized and fully understood, which is not yet achieved in the case of aforementioned material systems. The research work presented this thesis addresses a selection of open issues via comprehensive optical characterization of individual nanostructures using micro-Raman ( -Raman) and micro-photoluminescence ( -PL) spectroscopies.

    In paper 1 we study polarization properties of individual GaNP and GaP/GaNP core/shell NWs using polarization resolved μ-PL spectroscopy. Near band-edge emission in these structures is found to be strongly polarized (up to 60% at 150K) in the orthogonal direction to the NW axis, in spite of their zinc blende (ZB) structure. This polarization response, which is unusual for ZB NWs, is attributed to the local strain in the vicinity of the N-related centers participating in the radiative recombination and to their preferential alignment along the growth direction, presumably caused by the presence of planar defects. Our findings therefore show that defect engineering via alloying with nitrogen provides an additional degree of freedom to control the polarization anisotropy of III-V nanowires, advantageous for their applications as a nanoscale source of polarized light.

    Structural and optical properties of novel coaxial GaAs/Ga(N)As NWs grown on Si substrates, were evaluated in papers 2-4. In paper 2 we show by using -Raman spectroscopy that, though nitrogen incorporation shortens a phonon correlation length, the GaNAs shell with [N]<0.6% has a low degree of alloy disorder and weak residual strain. Additionally, Raman scattering by the GaAs-like and GaNlike phonons is found to be enhanced when the excitation energy approaches the E+ transition energy. This effect was attributed the involvement of intermediate states that were created by N-related clusters in proximity to the E+ subband. Recombination processes in these structures were studied in paper 3 by means of μ-PL, μ-PL excitation (μ-PLE), and time-resolved PL spectroscopies. At low temperatures, the alloy disorder is found to localize photo-excited carriers leading to predominance of localized exciton (LE) transitions in the PL spectra. Some of the local fluctuations in N composition are suggested to create three-dimensional confining potentials equivalent to that for QDs, based on the observation of sharp PL lines within the LE contour. In paper 4 we show that the formation of these QD-like confinement potentials is somewhat facilitated in spatial regions of the NWs with a high density of structural defects, based on correlative spatially-resolved structural and optical studies. It is also concluded the principal axis of these QD-like local potentials is mainly oriented along the growth direction and emit light that is linearly polarized in the direction orthogonal to the NW axis. At room temperature, the PL emission is found to be dominated by recombination of free carriers/excitons and their lifetime is governed by non-radiative recombination via surface states. The surface recombination is found to become less severe upon N incorporation due to N-induced modification of the surface states, possibly due to partial surface nitridation. All these findings suggest that the GaNAs/GaAs hetero-structures with the onedimensional geometry are promising for fabrication of novel optoelectronic devices on foreign substrates (e.g. Si).

    Fine-structure splitting (FSS) of excitons in semiconductor nanostructures has significant implications in photon entanglement, relevant to quantum information technology and spintronics. In paper 5 we study FSS in various laterally-arranged single quantum molecular structures (QMSs), including double QDs (DQDs), quantum rings (QRs), and QD-clusters (QCs), by means of polarization resolved μ-PL spectroscopy. It is found that FSS strongly depends on the geometric arrangements of the QMSs, which can effectively tune the degree of asymmetry in the lateral confinement potential of the excitons and can reduce FSS even in a strained QD system to a limit similar to strain-free QDs.

    Fabrication of nanostructured ZnO-based devices involves, as a compulsory step, deposition of thin metallic layers. In paper 6 we investigate impact of metallization by Ni on structural quality of ZnO NWs by means of Raman spectroscopy. We show that Ni coating of ZnO NWs causes passivation of surface states responsible for the enhanced intensity of the A1(LO) in the bare ZnO NWs. From the resonant Raman studies, strong enhancement of the multiline Raman signal involving A1(LO) in the ZnO/Ni NWs is revealed and is attributed to the combined effects of the Fröhlich interaction and plasmonic coupling. The latter effect is also suggested to allow detection of carbon-related species absorbed at the surface of a single ZnO/Ni NW, promising for utilizing such structures as efficient nano-sized gas sensors.

    List of papers
    1. Origin of strong photoluminescence polarization in GaNP nanowires
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Origin of strong photoluminescence polarization in GaNP nanowires
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 14, no 9, p. 5264-5269Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The III-V semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have a great potential for applications in a variety of future electronic and photonic devices with enhanced functionality. In this work, we employ polarization resolved micro-photoluminescence (µ-PL) spectroscopy to study polarization properties of light emissions from individual GaNP and GaP/GaNP core/shell nanowires (NWs) with average diameters ranging between 100 and 350 nm. We show that the near-band-edge emission, which originates from the GaNP regions of the NWs, is strongly polarized (up to 60 % at 150 K) in the direction perpendicular to the NW axis. The polarization anisotropy can be retained up to room temperature. This polarization behavior, which is unusual for zinc blende NWs, is attributed to local strain in the vicinity of the N-related centers participating in the radiative recombination and to preferential alignment of their principal axis along the growth direction. Our findings therefore show that defect engineering via alloying with nitrogen provides an additional degree of freedom to tailor the polarization anisotropy of III-V nanowires, advantageous for their applications as nanoscale emitters of polarized light.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Chemical Society (ACS), 2014
    Keywords
    Nanowire; photoluminescence; polarization
    National Category
    Condensed Matter Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109932 (URN)10.1021/nl502281p (DOI)000341544500053 ()25162940 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-08-28 Created: 2014-08-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    2. Structural properties of GaNAs nanowires probed by micro-Raman spectroscopy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Structural properties of GaNAs nanowires probed by micro-Raman spectroscopy
    2016 (English)In: Semiconductor Science and Technology, ISSN 0268-1242, E-ISSN 1361-6641, Vol. 31, no 2, article id 025002Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    GaNAs-based nanowires (NWs) form a novel material system of potential importance for applications in advanced optoelectronic and photonic devices, thanks to the advantages provided by band-structure engineering, one-dimensional architecture and the possibility to combine them with mainstream silicon technology. In this work we utilize the micro-Raman scattering technique to systematically study the structural properties of such GaAs/GaNAs core/shell NW structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a Si substrate. It is shown that the employed one-dimensional architecture allows the fabrication of a GaNAs shell with a low degree of alloy disorder and weak residual strain, at least within the studied range of nitrogen (N) compositions [N] < 0.6%. Raman scattering by the GaAs-like and GaN-like phonons is found to be enhanced when the excitation energy approaches the E + transition energy. Since this effect is found to be more pronounced for the GaN-like phonons, the involved intermediate states are concluded to be localized in proximity to N impurities, i.e. they likely represent N-related cluster states located in proximity to E + .

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    IOP Publishing, 2016
    National Category
    Physical Sciences Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123937 (URN)10.1088/0268-1242/31/2/025002 (DOI)000372412900004 ()
    Available from: 2016-01-14 Created: 2016-01-14 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
    3. Origin of radiative recombination and manifestations of localization effects in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Origin of radiative recombination and manifestations of localization effects in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Applied Physics Letters, ISSN 0003-6951, E-ISSN 1077-3118, Vol. 105, no 25, p. 253106-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Radiative carrier recombination processes in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a Si substrate are systematically investigated by employing micro-photoluminescence (mu-PL) and mu-PL excitation (mu-PLE) measurements complemented by time-resolved PL spectroscopy. At low temperatures, alloy disorder is found to cause localization of photo-excited carriers leading to predominance of optical transitions from localized excitons (LE). Some of the local fluctuations in N composition are suggested to lead to strongly localized three-dimensional confining potential equivalent to that for quantum dots, based on the observation of sharp and discrete PL lines within the LE contour. The localization effects are found to have minor influence on PL spectra at room temperature due to thermal activation of the localized excitons to extended states. Under these conditions, photo-excited carrier lifetime is found to be governed by non-radiative recombination via surface states which is somewhat suppressed upon N incorporation. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2014
    National Category
    Chemical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113778 (URN)10.1063/1.4905090 (DOI)000346914000026 ()
    Available from: 2015-02-02 Created: 2015-01-30 Last updated: 2019-06-28
    4. Strongly polarized quantum-dot-like light emitters embedded in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strongly polarized quantum-dot-like light emitters embedded in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 8, no 35, p. 15939-15947Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Recent developments in fabrication techniques and extensive investigations of the physical properties of III-V semiconductor nanowires (NWs), such as GaAs NWs, have demonstrated their potential for a multitude of advanced electronic and photonics applications. Alloying of GaAs with nitrogen can further enhance the performance and extend the device functionality via intentional defects and heterostructure engineering in GaNAs and GaAs/GaNAs coaxial NWs. In this work, it is shown that incorporation of nitrogen in GaAs NWs leads to formation of three-dimensional confining potentials caused by short-range fluctuations in the nitrogen composition, which are superimposed on long-range alloy disorder. The resulting localized states exhibit a quantum-dot like electronic structure, forming optically active states in the GaNAs shell. By directly correlating the structural and optical properties of individual NWs, it is also shown that formation of the localized states is efficient in pure zinc-blende wires and is further facilitated by structural polymorphism. The light emission from these localized states is found to be spectrally narrow (similar to 50-130 mu eV) and is highly polarized (up to 100%) with the preferable polarization direction orthogonal to the NW axis, suggesting a preferential orientation of the localization potential. These properties of self-assembled nano-emitters embedded in the GaNAs-based nanowire structures may be attractive for potential optoelectronic applications.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Royal Society of Chemistry, 2016
    Keywords
    GaNAs, nanowires, core/shell structures, defects, light emission, polarization
    National Category
    Physical Sciences Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123938 (URN)10.1039/c6nr05168e (DOI)000382839100014 ()
    Note

    Funding agencies: Financial support by the Swedish Energy Agency (grant # P40119-1) and the Swedish Research Council (grants # 2015-05532 and 2008-405) is greatly appreciated. The Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation is gratefully acknowledged for support of the Electron Microscopy laboratory in Linkoping.

    Available from: 2016-01-14 Created: 2016-01-14 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
    5. Exciton Fine-Structure Splitting in Self-Assembled Lateral InAs/GaAs Quantum-Dot Molecular Structures
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exciton Fine-Structure Splitting in Self-Assembled Lateral InAs/GaAs Quantum-Dot Molecular Structures
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 5741-5749Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Fine-structure splitting (FSS) of excitons in semiconductor nanostructures is a key parameter that has significant implications in photon entanglement and polarization conversion between electron spins and photons, relevant to quantum information technology and spintronics. Here, we investigate exciton FSS in self-organized lateral InAs/GaAs quantum-dot molecular structures (QMSs) including laterally aligned double quantum dots (DQDs), quantum-dot clusters (QCs), and quantum rings (QRs), by employing polarization-resolved microphotoluminescence (μPL) spectroscopy. We find a clear trend in FSS between the studied QMSs depending on their geometric arrangements, from a large FSS in the DQDs to a smaller FSS in the QCs and QRs. This trend is accompanied by a corresponding difference in the optical polarization directions of the excitons between these QMSs, namely, the bright-exciton lines are linearly polarized preferably along or perpendicular to the [11̅0] crystallographic axis in the DQDs that also defines the alignment direction of the two constituting QDs, whereas in the QCs and QRs, the polarization directions are randomly oriented. We attribute the observed trend in the FSS to a significant reduction of the asymmetry in the lateral confinement potential of the excitons in the QRs and QCs as compared with the DQDs, as a result of a compensation between the effects of lateral shape anisotropy and piezoelectric field. Our work demonstrates that FSS strongly depends on the geometric arrangements of the QMSs, which effectively tune the degree of the compensation effects and are capable of reducing FSS even in a strained QD system to a limit similar to strain-free QDs. This approach provides a pathway in obtaining high-symmetry quantum emitters desirable for realizing photon entanglement and spintronic devices based on such nanostructures, utilizing an uninterrupted epitaxial growth procedure without special requirements for lattice-matched materials combinations, specific substrate orientations, and nanolithography.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Chemical Society (ACS), 2015
    National Category
    Condensed Matter Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118007 (URN)10.1021/acsnano.5b01387 (DOI)000356988500013 ()25965972 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-05-20 Created: 2015-05-20 Last updated: 2018-09-05
  • 7.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Optical properties of novel semiconductor nanostructures2014Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Semiconductor nanostructures, such as one-dimensional nanowires (NWs) and zerodimensional quantum dots (QDs), have recently gained increasing interest due to their unique physical properties that are found attractive for a wide variety of applications ranging from gas sensing and spintronics to optoelectronics and photonics. Here, especially promising are nanostructures based on compound semiconductors, including ZnO, GaNP and GaAs/InAs. For examples, ZnO NWs are used for gas sensing. They also serve as an active material in UV light sources, owing to its wide band gap combined with a large exciton binding energy. GaNP NWs are a novel material system that allows realization of efficient amber lightemitting diodes and novel intermediate-band solar cells with an anticipated high efficiency. InAs QDs formed in the GaAs matrix are efficient emitters of near IR light and can be utilized in future spin-functional devices for applications in spintronics and quantum information processing. The realization of the full potential of semiconductor nanostructures requires detailed knowledge of their electronic and structural properties which is far from being complete at the present stage of research. In this thesis we address some of these important issues using optical characterization techniques, such as micro-Raman and  microphotoluminescence (μ-PL) spectroscopies.

    In paper I we use Raman spectroscopy to investigate effects of metallization by nickel on electronic and structural properties of ZnO/Ni core/shell NWs. We show that coating ZnO NWs with Ni shells causes passivation of surface states whereas subsequent annealing leads to formation of new defects, evident from appearance of the corresponding local vibrational modes. Ni coating is also found to strongly enhance the multiline Raman signal involving A1(LO) phonon scattering, based on the performed resonant Raman studies. This is attributed to an enhanced Fröhlich interaction at the ZnO/Ni heterointerface combined with coupling of the scattered light with local surface plasmons excited in the Ni shell. The latter effect is also suggested to allow detection of carbon-related species absorbed at the surface of a single ZnO/Ni NW, promising for utilizing such structures as efficient nano-sized gas sensors.

    In paper II we study polarization properties of GaNP nanowires and related axial structures. By employing polarization resolved μ-PL spectroscopy performed on a single NW, we show that alloying with nitrogen allows one to achieve strong orthogonal polarization of light emission even in zinc-blende nanowires of various diameters and that the polarization anisotropy can be retained up to room temperature. This polarization response, which is unusual for zinc blende NWs, is attributed to the local strain in the vicinity of the N-related centers participating in the radiative recombination and to the preferential alignment of their principal axis along the growth direction. Our findings therefore show that defect engineering via alloying with nitrogen provides an additional degree of freedom to control the polarization anisotropy of III-V nanowires, advantageous for their applications as nanoscale emitters of polarized light.

    In paper III we investigate exciton fine-structure splitting (FSS) in self-organized InGaAs/GaAs nanostructures including laterally-aligned double quantum dots (DQDs), quantum-dot clusters (QCs) and quantum rings (QRs), by employing polarization resolved μ-PL spectroscopy. We find a clear trend in FSS between the studied nanostructures depending on their geometric arrangements, from a large FSS in the DQDs to a smaller FSS in the QCs and QRs with an overall higher geometric symmetry. This trend is accompanied by a corresponding difference in the polarization directions of the excitonic emissions between these nanostructures, namely, the bright-exciton lines are linearly polarized along or perpendicular to a specific crystallographic axis in the DQDs structure that also defines the alignment of the two QDs, whereas in the QCs and QRs the polarization directions are randomly oriented. We attribute these trends to the interplay between intrinsic effects, such as a statistic shape deviation, atomistic randomness and strain-induced piezoelectricity. Our work demonstrates that FSS can be effectively controlled by geometric engineering of the nanostructures, capable of reducing FSS to the limit similar to strain-free QDs and thus providing a new pathway in fabricating high-symmetry quantum emitters desirable for realizing photon entanglement and spintronic devices based on such nanostructures.

    List of papers
    1. Effects of Ni-coating on ZnO nanowires: A Raman scattering study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Ni-coating on ZnO nanowires: A Raman scattering study
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 113, no 21, p. 214302-1-214302-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Structural properties of ZnO/Ni core/shell nanowires (NWs) are studied in detail by means of Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that formation of the Ni shell leads to passivation of surface states responsible for the observed enhanced intensity of the A1(LO) Raman mode of the bare ZnO NWs. It also causes appearance of 490 cm−1 and 710 cm−1 modes that are attributed to local vibrational modes of a defect/impurity (or defects/impurities). This defect is concluded to be preferably formed in annealed ZnO/Ni NWs and is unlikely to contain a Ni atom, as the same Raman modes were also reported for the Ni-free ZnO nanostructures. From our resonant Raman studies, we also show that the ZnO/Ni core/shell NWs exhibit an enhanced Raman signal with a multiline structure involving A1(LO). This observation is attributed to combined effects of an enhanced Fröhlich interaction at the ZnO/Ni heterointerface and coupling of the scattered light with local surface plasmons excited in the Ni shell. The plasmonic effect is also suggested to allow detection of carbon-related species absorbed at the surface of a single ZnO/Ni NW, promising for applications of such structures as efficient nano-sized gas sensors.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2013
    National Category
    Condensed Matter Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-93878 (URN)10.1063/1.4807912 (DOI)
    Available from: 2013-06-11 Created: 2013-06-11 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    2. Origin of strong photoluminescence polarization in GaNP nanowires
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Origin of strong photoluminescence polarization in GaNP nanowires
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 14, no 9, p. 5264-5269Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The III-V semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have a great potential for applications in a variety of future electronic and photonic devices with enhanced functionality. In this work, we employ polarization resolved micro-photoluminescence (µ-PL) spectroscopy to study polarization properties of light emissions from individual GaNP and GaP/GaNP core/shell nanowires (NWs) with average diameters ranging between 100 and 350 nm. We show that the near-band-edge emission, which originates from the GaNP regions of the NWs, is strongly polarized (up to 60 % at 150 K) in the direction perpendicular to the NW axis. The polarization anisotropy can be retained up to room temperature. This polarization behavior, which is unusual for zinc blende NWs, is attributed to local strain in the vicinity of the N-related centers participating in the radiative recombination and to preferential alignment of their principal axis along the growth direction. Our findings therefore show that defect engineering via alloying with nitrogen provides an additional degree of freedom to tailor the polarization anisotropy of III-V nanowires, advantageous for their applications as nanoscale emitters of polarized light.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Chemical Society (ACS), 2014
    Keywords
    Nanowire; photoluminescence; polarization
    National Category
    Condensed Matter Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109932 (URN)10.1021/nl502281p (DOI)000341544500053 ()25162940 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-08-28 Created: 2014-08-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    3. Control of exciton fine-structure splitting in geometrically engineered self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum molecular structures
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Control of exciton fine-structure splitting in geometrically engineered self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum molecular structures
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fine-structure splitting (FSS) of excitons in semiconductor nanostructures is a key parameter that has significant implications in photon entanglement and polarization conversion between electron spins and photons, relevant to quantum information technology and spintronics. Here, we investigate exciton FSS in self-organized InAs/GaAs quantum molecular structures (QMSs) including laterally-aligned double quantum dots (DQDs), quantum-dot clusters (QCs) and quantum rings (QRs), by employing polarization-resolved micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy. We find a clear trend in FSS between the studied QMSs depending on their geometric arrangements, from a large FSS in the DQDs to a smaller FSS in the QCs and QRs with an overall higher geometric symmetry. This trend is accompanied by a corresponding difference in the optical polarization directions of the excitons between these QMSs, namely, the bright-exciton lines are linearly polarized preferably along or perpendicular to the [11̅0] crystallographic axis in the DQDs that also defines the alignment of the two constituting QDs, whereas in the QCs and QRs the polarization directions are randomly oriented. We attribute the observed trends in the FSS to a significant reduction of the anisotropic strain field in the high symmetry QCRs and QCs as compared with the low-symmetry  DQDs. Our work demonstrates that FSS can be effectively controlled by geometric engineering of the QMSs, capable of reducing FSS even in a strained QD system to a limit similar to strain-free QDs. This approach provides a new pathway in obtaining high-symmetry quantum emitters desirable for realizing photon entanglement and spintronic devices based on such nanostructures, without special requirements for lattice-matched materials combinations, specific substrate orientations and nanolithography.

    National Category
    Physical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112353 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-11-24 Created: 2014-11-24 Last updated: 2017-03-27Bibliographically approved
  • 8.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Grinderslev, Jakob B.
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Andersson, Mikael S.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Armstrong, Jeff
    Rutherford Appleton Lab, England.
    Karlsson, Maths
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Jensen, Torben R.
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Klarbring, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simak, Sergey
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Haussermann, Ulrich
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Analysis of Dihydrogen Bonding in Ammonium Borohydride2019In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 123, no 47, p. 28631-28639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structural and vibrational properties of ammonium borohydride, NH4BH4, have been examined by first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations and inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The H disordered crystal structure of NH4BH4 is composed of the tetrahedral complex ions NH4+ and BH4-, which are arranged as in the fcc NaCl structure and linked by intermolecular dihydrogen bonding. Upon cooling, the INS spectra revealed a structural transition between 45 and 40 K. The reversible transition occurs upon heating between 46 and 49 K. In the low-temperature form reorientational dynamics are frozen. The libration modes for BH4- and NH4+ are near 300 and 200 cm(-1), respectively. Upon entering the fcc high-temperature form, NH4+ ions attain fast reorientational dynamics, as indicated in the disappearance of the NH4+ libration band, whereas BH4- ions become significantly mobile only at temperatures above 100 K. The vibrational behavior of BH4- ions in NH4BH4 compares well to the heavier alkali metal borohydrides, NaBH4-CsBH4. DFT calculations revealed a nondirectional nature of the dihydrogen bonding in NH4BH4 with only weak tendency for long-range order. Different rotational configurations of complex ions appear quasi-degenerate, which is reminiscent of glasses.

  • 9.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ishikawa, F.
    Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama, Japan.
    Chen, Weimin M
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Structural properties of GaNAs nanowires probed by micro-Raman spectroscopy2016In: Semiconductor Science and Technology, ISSN 0268-1242, E-ISSN 1361-6641, Vol. 31, no 2, article id 025002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    GaNAs-based nanowires (NWs) form a novel material system of potential importance for applications in advanced optoelectronic and photonic devices, thanks to the advantages provided by band-structure engineering, one-dimensional architecture and the possibility to combine them with mainstream silicon technology. In this work we utilize the micro-Raman scattering technique to systematically study the structural properties of such GaAs/GaNAs core/shell NW structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a Si substrate. It is shown that the employed one-dimensional architecture allows the fabrication of a GaNAs shell with a low degree of alloy disorder and weak residual strain, at least within the studied range of nitrogen (N) compositions [N] < 0.6%. Raman scattering by the GaAs-like and GaN-like phonons is found to be enhanced when the excitation energy approaches the E + transition energy. Since this effect is found to be more pronounced for the GaN-like phonons, the involved intermediate states are concluded to be localized in proximity to N impurities, i.e. they likely represent N-related cluster states located in proximity to E + .

  • 10.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ishikawa, Fumitaro
    Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, 790-8577 Matsuyama, Japan.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Characterization of GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires by means of Raman scattering spectroscopy2015In: Abstract Book, 2015, p. IP2.27-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jansson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stehr, Jan Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Per O. Å.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ishikawa, Fumitaro
    Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama, Japan.
    Chen, Weimin M.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Buyanova, Irina A.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Strongly polarized quantum-dot-like light emitters embedded in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires2016In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 8, no 35, p. 15939-15947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent developments in fabrication techniques and extensive investigations of the physical properties of III-V semiconductor nanowires (NWs), such as GaAs NWs, have demonstrated their potential for a multitude of advanced electronic and photonics applications. Alloying of GaAs with nitrogen can further enhance the performance and extend the device functionality via intentional defects and heterostructure engineering in GaNAs and GaAs/GaNAs coaxial NWs. In this work, it is shown that incorporation of nitrogen in GaAs NWs leads to formation of three-dimensional confining potentials caused by short-range fluctuations in the nitrogen composition, which are superimposed on long-range alloy disorder. The resulting localized states exhibit a quantum-dot like electronic structure, forming optically active states in the GaNAs shell. By directly correlating the structural and optical properties of individual NWs, it is also shown that formation of the localized states is efficient in pure zinc-blende wires and is further facilitated by structural polymorphism. The light emission from these localized states is found to be spectrally narrow (similar to 50-130 mu eV) and is highly polarized (up to 100%) with the preferable polarization direction orthogonal to the NW axis, suggesting a preferential orientation of the localization potential. These properties of self-assembled nano-emitters embedded in the GaNAs-based nanowire structures may be attractive for potential optoelectronic applications.

  • 12.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Klarbring, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Haussermann, Ulrich
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Simak, Sergey
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Temperature-induced phase transition and Li self-diffusion in Li2C2: A first-principles study2019In: PHYSICAL REVIEW MATERIALS, ISSN 2475-9953, Vol. 3, no 2, article id 023602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lithium carbide, Li2C2, is a fascinating material that combines strong covalent and weak ionic bonding resulting in a wide range of unusual properties. The mechanism of its phase transition from the ground-state orthorhombic (Immm) to the high-temperature cubic (Fm (3) over barm) crystal structure is not well understood and here we elucidate it with help of first-principles calculations. We show that stabilization of the cubic phase is a result of a temperature-induced disorientation of the C-C dumbbells and their further thermal rotations. Due to these rotations rather large deviatoric stress, which is associated with the dumbbell alignment along one of the crystallographic axes, averages out making the cubic structure mechanically stable. At high temperature we observe a type-II superionic transition to a state of high Li self-diffusion involving collective ionic motion mediated by the formation of Frenkel pairs.

  • 13.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Puttisong, Yuttapoom
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huang, Yuqing
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Buyanova, Irina A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Suraprapapich, Suwaree
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, La Jolla, California, United States.
    Tu, Charles. W.
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, La Jolla, California 92093, United States.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Exciton Fine-Structure Splitting in Self-Assembled Lateral InAs/GaAs Quantum-Dot Molecular Structures2015In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 5741-5749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fine-structure splitting (FSS) of excitons in semiconductor nanostructures is a key parameter that has significant implications in photon entanglement and polarization conversion between electron spins and photons, relevant to quantum information technology and spintronics. Here, we investigate exciton FSS in self-organized lateral InAs/GaAs quantum-dot molecular structures (QMSs) including laterally aligned double quantum dots (DQDs), quantum-dot clusters (QCs), and quantum rings (QRs), by employing polarization-resolved microphotoluminescence (μPL) spectroscopy. We find a clear trend in FSS between the studied QMSs depending on their geometric arrangements, from a large FSS in the DQDs to a smaller FSS in the QCs and QRs. This trend is accompanied by a corresponding difference in the optical polarization directions of the excitons between these QMSs, namely, the bright-exciton lines are linearly polarized preferably along or perpendicular to the [11̅0] crystallographic axis in the DQDs that also defines the alignment direction of the two constituting QDs, whereas in the QCs and QRs, the polarization directions are randomly oriented. We attribute the observed trend in the FSS to a significant reduction of the asymmetry in the lateral confinement potential of the excitons in the QRs and QCs as compared with the DQDs, as a result of a compensation between the effects of lateral shape anisotropy and piezoelectric field. Our work demonstrates that FSS strongly depends on the geometric arrangements of the QMSs, which effectively tune the degree of the compensation effects and are capable of reducing FSS even in a strained QD system to a limit similar to strain-free QDs. This approach provides a pathway in obtaining high-symmetry quantum emitters desirable for realizing photon entanglement and spintronic devices based on such nanostructures, utilizing an uninterrupted epitaxial growth procedure without special requirements for lattice-matched materials combinations, specific substrate orientations, and nanolithography.

  • 14.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sukrittanon, S.
    Graduate Program of Materials Science and Engineering, La Jolla, California, USA .
    Tu, C. W.
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, USA .
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Preferential formation of nitrogen clusters in GaNP nanowires probed by polarization resolved μ-photoluminescence2014In: abstract book, 2014, p. p.67-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sukrittanon, Supanee
    University of California, La Jolla, USA.
    Kuang, Yanjin
    University of California, La Jolla, USA.
    Tu, Charles W.
    University of California, La Jolla, USA.
    Persson, Per O. Å.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Origin of strong photoluminescence polarization in GaNP nanowires2014In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 14, no 9, p. 5264-5269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The III-V semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have a great potential for applications in a variety of future electronic and photonic devices with enhanced functionality. In this work, we employ polarization resolved micro-photoluminescence (µ-PL) spectroscopy to study polarization properties of light emissions from individual GaNP and GaP/GaNP core/shell nanowires (NWs) with average diameters ranging between 100 and 350 nm. We show that the near-band-edge emission, which originates from the GaNP regions of the NWs, is strongly polarized (up to 60 % at 150 K) in the direction perpendicular to the NW axis. The polarization anisotropy can be retained up to room temperature. This polarization behavior, which is unusual for zinc blende NWs, is attributed to local strain in the vicinity of the N-related centers participating in the radiative recombination and to preferential alignment of their principal axis along the growth direction. Our findings therefore show that defect engineering via alloying with nitrogen provides an additional degree of freedom to tailor the polarization anisotropy of III-V nanowires, advantageous for their applications as nanoscale emitters of polarized light.

  • 16.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wang, X. J.
    National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China .
    Devika, M.
    Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju, Republic of Korea .
    Koteeswara Reddy, N.
    Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500712, Republic of Korea.
    Tu, C. W.
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA .
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Effects of Ni-coating on ZnO nanowires: A Raman scattering study2013In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 113, no 21, p. 214302-1-214302-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Structural properties of ZnO/Ni core/shell nanowires (NWs) are studied in detail by means of Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that formation of the Ni shell leads to passivation of surface states responsible for the observed enhanced intensity of the A1(LO) Raman mode of the bare ZnO NWs. It also causes appearance of 490 cm−1 and 710 cm−1 modes that are attributed to local vibrational modes of a defect/impurity (or defects/impurities). This defect is concluded to be preferably formed in annealed ZnO/Ni NWs and is unlikely to contain a Ni atom, as the same Raman modes were also reported for the Ni-free ZnO nanostructures. From our resonant Raman studies, we also show that the ZnO/Ni core/shell NWs exhibit an enhanced Raman signal with a multiline structure involving A1(LO). This observation is attributed to combined effects of an enhanced Fröhlich interaction at the ZnO/Ni heterointerface and coupling of the scattered light with local surface plasmons excited in the Ni shell. The plasmonic effect is also suggested to allow detection of carbon-related species absorbed at the surface of a single ZnO/Ni NW, promising for applications of such structures as efficient nano-sized gas sensors.

  • 17.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wang, X. J.
    National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China .
    Koteeswara Reddy, N.
    Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500712, Republic of Korea.
    Tu, C. W.
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA .
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Raman scattering studies of Ni-coated ZnO nanorods2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Fillipov, Stanislav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Puttisong, Yuttapoom
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Huang, Yuqing
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Suraprapapich, Suwaree
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, La Jolla, California, USA.
    Tu, C. W.
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, La Jolla, California, USA.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Control of exciton fine-structure splitting in geometrically engineered self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum molecular structuresManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fine-structure splitting (FSS) of excitons in semiconductor nanostructures is a key parameter that has significant implications in photon entanglement and polarization conversion between electron spins and photons, relevant to quantum information technology and spintronics. Here, we investigate exciton FSS in self-organized InAs/GaAs quantum molecular structures (QMSs) including laterally-aligned double quantum dots (DQDs), quantum-dot clusters (QCs) and quantum rings (QRs), by employing polarization-resolved micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy. We find a clear trend in FSS between the studied QMSs depending on their geometric arrangements, from a large FSS in the DQDs to a smaller FSS in the QCs and QRs with an overall higher geometric symmetry. This trend is accompanied by a corresponding difference in the optical polarization directions of the excitons between these QMSs, namely, the bright-exciton lines are linearly polarized preferably along or perpendicular to the [11̅0] crystallographic axis in the DQDs that also defines the alignment of the two constituting QDs, whereas in the QCs and QRs the polarization directions are randomly oriented. We attribute the observed trends in the FSS to a significant reduction of the anisotropic strain field in the high symmetry QCRs and QCs as compared with the low-symmetry  DQDs. Our work demonstrates that FSS can be effectively controlled by geometric engineering of the QMSs, capable of reducing FSS even in a strained QD system to a limit similar to strain-free QDs. This approach provides a new pathway in obtaining high-symmetry quantum emitters desirable for realizing photon entanglement and spintronic devices based on such nanostructures, without special requirements for lattice-matched materials combinations, specific substrate orientations and nanolithography.

  • 19.
    Ren, Qijun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chen, Shula
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Devika, M.
    Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju, Republic of Korea .
    Koteeswara Reddy, N.
    Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju, Republic of Korea.
    Tu, C. W.
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA .
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Evidence for coupling between exciton emissions and surface plasmon in Ni-coated ZnO nanowires2012In: Nanotechnology, ISSN 0957-4484, E-ISSN 1361-6528, Vol. 23, no 42, p. 425201-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show that coating ZnO nanowires (NWs) with a transition metal, such as Ni, can increase the efficiency of light emission at room temperature. Based on detailed structural and optical studies, this enhancement is attributed to energy transfer between near-band-edge emission in ZnO and surface plasmons in the Ni film which leads to an increased rate of the spontaneous emission. It is also shown that the Ni coating leads to an enhanced non-radiative recombination via surface states, which becomes increasingly important at low measurement temperatures and in annealed ZnO/Ni NWs.

  • 20.
    Spektor, Kristina
    et al.
    ESRF, France.
    Crichton, Wilson A.
    ESRF, France.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Simak, Sergey
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Haussermann, Ulrich
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Exploring the Mg-Cr-H System at High Pressure and Temperature via in Situ Synchrotron Diffraction2019In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, E-ISSN 1520-510X, Vol. 58, no 16, p. 11043-11050Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complex transition metal hydride Mg3CrH8 has been previously synthesized using high pressure conditions. It contains the first group 6 homoleptic hydrido complex, [Cr(II)H-7](5-). Here, we investigated the formation of Mg3CrH8 by in situ studies of reaction mixtures of 3MgH(2)-Cr-H-2 at 5 GPa. The formation of the known orthorhombic form (o-Mg3CrH8) was noticed at temperatures above 635 degrees C, albeit at a relatively slow rate. At temperatures around 750 degrees C a high temperature phase formed rapidly, which upon slow cooling converted into o-Mg3CrH8. The phase transition at high pressures occurred reversibly at similar to 735 degrees C upon heating and at similar to 675 degrees C upon slow cooling. Upon rapid cooling, a monoclinic polymorph (m-Mg3CrH8) was afforded which could be subsequently recovered and analyzed at ambient pressure. m-Mg3CrH8 was found to crystallize in P2(1)/n space group (a = 5.128 angstrom, b = 16.482 angstrom, c = 4.805 angstrom, beta = 90.27 degrees). Its structure elucidation from high resolution synchrotron powder diffraction data was aided by first-principles DFT calculations. Like the orthorhombic polymorph, m-Mg3CrH8 contains pentagonal bipyramidal complexes [CrH7](5-) and interstitial H-. The arrangement of metal atoms and interstitial H- resembles closely that of the high pressure orthorhombic form of Mg3MnH7. This suggests similar principles of formation and stabilization of hydrido complexes at high pressure and temperature conditions in the Mg-Cr-H and Mg-Mn-H systems. Calculated enthalpy versus pressure relations predict o-Mg3CrH8 being more stable than m-Mg3CrH8 by 6.5 kJ/mol at ambient pressure and by 13 kJ/mol at 5 GPa. The electronic structure of m-Mg3CrH8 is very similar to that of o-Mg3CrH8. The stable 18-electron complex [CrH7](5-) is mirrored in the occupied states, and calculated band gaps are around 1.5 eV.

  • 21.
    Spektor, Kristina
    et al.
    ESRF, France.
    Crichton, Wilson A.
    ESRF, France.
    Konar, Sumit
    Univ Edinburgh, Scotland; Univ Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klarbring, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simak, Sergey
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Haussermann, Ulrich
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Unraveling Hidden Mg-Mn-H Phase Relations at High Pressures and Temperatures by in Situ Synchrotron Diffraction2018In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, E-ISSN 1520-510X, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 1614-1622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The MgMnH system was investigated by in situ high pressure studies of reaction mixtures MgH2MnH2. The formation conditions of two complex hydrides with composition Mg3MnH7 were established. Previously known hexagonal Mg3MnH7 (h-Mg3MnH7) formed at pressures 1.52 GPa and temperatures between 480 and 500 degrees C, whereas an orthorhombic form (o-Mg3MnH7) was obtained at pressures above 5 GPa and temperatures above 600 degrees C. The crystal structures of the polymorphs feature octahedral [Mn(I)H-6](5) complexes and interstitial H-. Interstitial H- is located in trigonal bipyramidal and square pyramidal interstices formed by Mg2+ ions in h- and o-Mg3MnH7, respectively. The hexagonal form can be retained at ambient pressure, whereas the orthorhombic form upon decompression undergoes a distortion to monoclinic Mg3MnH7 (m-Mg3MnH7). The structure elucidation of o- and m-Mg3MnH7 was aided by first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Calculated enthalpy versus pressure relations predict m- and o-Mg3MnH7 to be more stable than h-Mg3MnH7 above 4.3 GPa. Phonon calculations revealed o-Mg3MnH7 to be dynamically unstable at pressures below 5 GPa, which explains its phase transition to m-Mg3MnH7 on decompression. The electronic structure of the quenchable polymorphs h- and m-Mg3MnH7 is very similar. The stable 18-electron complex [MnH6](5-) is mirrored in the occupied states, and calculated band gaps are around 1.5 eV. The study underlines the significance of in situ investigations for mapping reaction conditions and understanding phase relations for hydrogen-rich complex transition metal hydrides.

  • 22.
    Stehr, Jan Eric
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chen, S. L.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials.
    Filippov, S.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Devika, M.
    Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju, Republic of Korea .
    Koteeswara Reddy, N.
    Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500712, Republic of Korea.
    Tu, C. W.
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA .
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Defect properties of ZnO nanowires2014In: AIP Conference Proceedings, ISSN 0094-243X, E-ISSN 1551-7616, Vol. 1583, p. 272-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work we examined optical and defect properties of as-grown and Ni-coated ZnO nanowires (NWs) grown by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition by means of optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR). Several grown-in defects are revealed by monitoring visible photoluminescence (PL) emissions and are attributed to Zn vacancies, O vacancies, a shallow (but not effective mass) donor and exchange-coupled pairs of a Zn vacancy and a Zn interstitial. It is also found that the same ODMR signals are detected in the as-grown and Ni-coated NWs, indicating that metal coatings does not significantly affect formation of the aforementioned defects and that the observed defects are located in the bulk of the NWs.

  • 23.
    Stehr, Jan Eric
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chen, Shula
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Devika, M
    Gwangju Institute Science and Technology, South Korea .
    Koteeswara Reddy, N
    Gwangju Institute Science and Technology, South Korea .
    Tu, C W
    Gwangju Institute Science and Technology, South Korea University of Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA .
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Defect properties of ZnO nanowires revealed from an optically detected magnetic resonance study2013In: Nanotechnology, ISSN 0957-4484, E-ISSN 1361-6528, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 015701-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) complemented by photoluminescence measurements is used to evaluate optical and defect properties of ZnO nanowires (NWs) grown by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition. By monitoring visible emissions, several grown-in defects are revealed and attributed to Zn vacancies, shallow (but not effective mass) donor and exchange-coupled pairs of Zn vacancies and Zn interstitials. It is also found that the intensity of the donor-related ODMR signals is substantially lower in the NWs compared with that in bulk ZnO. This may indicate that formation of native donors is suppressed in NWs, which is beneficial for achieving p-type conductivity.

  • 24.
    Stehr, Jan Eric
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dobrovolsky, Alexander
    Filippov, Stanislav
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kuang, Y. J.
    Department of Physics, University of California, La Jolla, California, USA.
    Sukrittanon, S.
    Graduate Program of Materials Science and Engineering, La Jolla, California, USA .
    Tu, C. W.
    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA .
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    GaP/GaNP core/shell nanowires - a novel material system for optoelectronics and photonics2014In: Abstract Book of the 3rd Int. Conf. on Nanostructures, Nanomaterials and Nanoengineering, 2014, p. 31-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Stehr, Jan Eric
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wang, Xingjun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filippov, Stanislav
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pearton, S J.
    University of Florida, FL USA .
    Gueorguiev Ivanov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buyanova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Defects in N, O and N, Zn implanted ZnO bulk crystals2013In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 113, no 10, p. 103509-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comprehensive characterization of defects formed in bulk ZnO single crystals co-implanted with N and Zn as well as N and O atoms is performed by means of optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) complemented by Raman and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopies. It is shown that in addition to intrinsic defects such as Zn vacancies and Zn interstitials, several N-related defects are formed in the implanted ZnO. The prevailed configuration of the defects is found to depend on the choices of the co-implants and also the chosen annealing ambient. Specifically, co-implantation with O leads to the formation of (i) defects responsible for local vibrational modes at 277, 511, and 581 cm−1; (ii) a N-related acceptor with the binding energy of 160 ± 40 meV that is involved in the donor-acceptor pair emission at 3.23 eV; and (iii) a deep donor and a deep NO acceptor revealed from ODMR. Activation of the latter defects is found to require post-implantation annealing in nitrogen ambient. None of these defects are detected when N is co-implanted with Zn. Under these conditions, the dominant N-induced defects include a deep center responsible for the 3.3128 eV PL line, as well as an acceptor center of unknown origin revealed by ODMR. Formation mechanisms of the studied defects and their role in carrier recombination are discussed.

1 - 25 of 25
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf