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  • 1.
    Buhl-Mortensen, Lene
    et al.
    Institute of Marine Research, Bergen Norway.
    Myhr, Anne
    Norwegian Institute of Gene Ecology, Tromsö Norway.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society.
    Carbon sequestration, the precautionary approach and the responsibility of scientists2005In: Water Science and Technology, ISSN 0273-1223, Vol. 52, no 6, 205-212 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews problems connected to the use of the deep-sea and sub-sea geological formations for carbon sequestration. We will focus on the risks and dangers involved in using this kind of large-scale engineering approach, which is not yet fully tested, to combat global warming. We will not provide a complete discussion on the technologies involved, but concentrate on a few principal questions, such as the responsibility of environmental scientists involved in this research. We will also discuss carbon sequestration in relation to the precautionary approach. We argue that there may be a place for large-scale engineering attempts, but this should be the last rather than the first option. © IWA Publishing 2005.

  • 2.
    Grankvist, Hannah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society.
    Germ line gene therapy - why not!2004In: XVIIIth European Conference on Philosophy of Medicine and Health Care,2004, 2004, 48-49 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Jaarsma, Pier
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gelhaus, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry and Habilitation.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Living the Categorical Imperative: autistic perspectives on lying and truth telling-between Kant and care ethics2012In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 15, no 3, 271-277 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lying is a common phenomenon amongst human beings. It seems to play a role in making social interactions run more smoothly. Too much honesty can be regarded as impolite or downright rude. Remarkably, lying is not a common phenomenon amongst normally intelligent human beings who are on the autism spectrum. They appear to be 'attractively morally innocent' and seem to have an above average moral conscientious objection against deception. In this paper, the behavior of persons with autism with regard to deception and truthfulness will be discussed in the light of two different ethical theories, illustrated by fragments from autobiographies of persons with autism. A systemizing 'Kantian' and an empathizing 'ethics of care' perspective reveal insights on high-functioning autism, truthfulness and moral behavior. Both perspectives are problematic from the point of view of a moral agent with autism. High-functioning persons with autism are, generally speaking, strong systemizes and weak empathizers. Particularly, they lack 'cognitive empathy' which would allow them to understand the position of the other person. Instead, some tend to invent a set of rules that makes their behavior compatible with the expectations of others. From a Kantian point of view, the autistic tendency to always tell the truth appears praiseworthy and should not be changed, though it creates problems in the social life of persons with autism. From a care ethics perspective, on the other hand, a way should be found to allow the high-functioning persons with autism to respect the feelings and needs of other persons as sometimes overruling the duty of truthfulness. We suggest this may even entail 'morally educating' children and adolescents with autism to become socially skilled empathic 'liars'.

  • 4.
    Jaarsma, Pier
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Autism as a Natural Human Variation: Reflections on the Claims of the Neurodiversity Movement2012In: Health Care Analysis, ISSN 1065-3058, E-ISSN 1573-3394, Vol. 20, no 1, 20-30 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neurodiversity has remained a controversial concept over the last decade. In its broadest sense the concept of neurodiversity regards atypical neurological development as a normal human difference. The neurodiversity claim contains at least two different aspects. The first aspect is that autism, among other neurological conditions, is first and foremost a natural variation. The other aspect is about conferring rights and in particular value to the neurodiversity condition, demanding recognition and acceptance. Autism can be seen as a natural variation on par with for example homosexuality. The broad version of the neurodiversity claim, covering low-functioning as well as high-functioning autism, is problematic. Only a narrow conception of neurodiversity, referring exclusively to high-functioning autists, is reasonable. We will discuss the effects of DSM categorization and the medical model for high functioning autists. After a discussion of autism as a culture we will analyze various possible strategies for the neurodiversity movement to claim extra resources for autists as members of an underprivileged culture without being labelled disabled or as having a disorder. We will discuss their vulnerable status as a group and what obligation that confers on the majority of neurotypicals.

  • 5.
    Jaarsma, Pier
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Arts and Humanities. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Editorial Material: Autism, Accommodation and Treatment: A Rejoinder to Chong-Ming Lims Critique in BIOETHICS, vol 29, issue 9, pp 684-6852015In: Bioethics, ISSN 0269-9702, E-ISSN 1467-8519, Vol. 29, no 9, 684-685 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We are very grateful to Chong-Ming Lim for his thoughtful reply published in this journal on one of our articles, which motivated us to think more carefully about accommodating autistic individuals and treating autism. However we believe there are some confusions in Lims argument. Lim uses the accommodation thesis, according to which we should accommodate autistic individuals rather than treat autism, as the starting point for his reasoning. He claims that if the accommodation thesis is right, then we should not treat autistic individuals for their autism, not even low-functioning (i.e. intellectually disabled) ones, because this would be disrespectful to all autistic individuals. We should instead limit ourselves to accommodate all autistic individuals. However, the opposition between accommodation and treatment is not valid in the case of autism, because of ambiguity in the concepts of accommodation and treatment. Moreover there is confusion in Lims reasoning caused by omitting important facts about the practice of treating autism.

  • 6.
    Jaarsma, Pier
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Human capabilities, mild autism, deafness and the morality of embryo selection2013In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 16, no 4, 817-824 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A preimplantation genetic test to discriminate between severe and mild autism spectrum disorder might be developed in the foreseeable future. Recently, the philosophers Julian Savulescu and Guy Kahane claimed that there are strong reasons for prospective parents to make use of such a test to prevent the birth of children who are disposed to autism or Asperger’s disorder. In this paper we will criticize this claim. We will discuss the morality of selection for mild autism in embryo selection in a hypothetical in vitro fertilization (IVF) situation where preimplantation genetic diagnosis is performed and compare this with a similar selection for congenital deafness. To do this we first discuss relevant human differences. We then introduce the principle of human capabilities (PC) and compare this principle with the principle of procreative beneficence (PB) introduced by Savulescu and Kahane. We apply the two principles to selection for mild autism and selection for congenital deafness. We argue that PC allows for the selection for mild autism but rules out selection for congenital deafness. PB will not give clear answers; the ruling of PB depends to a large extent on expected social, cultural and political developments. We will argue that PC is preferable to PB. We will discuss arguments for the value of mild autism for individuals who have this condition and argue that they are able to lead a life with human dignity provided autism-friendly social circumstances are present. Neither PC nor PB yields strong reasons for prospective parents to seek to prevent the birth of children who are disposed to mild autism spectrum disorder.

  • 7.
    Kristensson, Ulf
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Wahlström, Jan
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Dahlbäck, Björn
    Lunds universitet.
    Jordin, Bo
    Socialstyrelsen.
    Olsson, Håkan
    Lunds universitet.
    Wallgren, Arne
    Lunds universitet.
    Törnkvist, Helene
    SBU.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Gendiagnostik vid sjukdom - och innan den bryter ut2003In: Gendiagnostik i sjukvården / [ed] Niklas Dahl, Ulf Landegren, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2003, 31-42 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Omar, Faisal
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Omnell-Persson, Marie
    Skane University Hospital.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Priority Setting in Swedish Kidney Transplantation: Assessment for Transplant Candicacy and Allocation of Deceased Donor Kidneys in Transplant  International, vol 24, issue SI, pp 127-1272011In: TRANSPLANT INTERNATIONAL, Springer Verlag (Germany) / Wiley-Blackwell , 2011, Vol. 24, no SI, 127-127 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 9.
    Omar, Faisal
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tinghög, Gustav
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Omnell Persson, Marie
    Department of Nephrology and Transplantation, Skåne University Hospital (Malmö), Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Priority setting in kidney transplantation: A qualitative study evaluating Swedish practices2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 41, no 2, 206-215 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Kidney transplantation is the established treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease; it increases survival, and quality of life, while being more cost effective than dialysis. It is, however, limited by the scarcity of kidneys. The aim of this paper is to investigate the fairness of the priority setting process underpinning Swedish kidney transplantation in reference to the Accountability for Reasonableness (A4R) framework. To achieve this, two significant stages of the process influencing access to transplantation are examined: assessment for transplant candidacy, and allocation of kidneys from deceased donors.

    Methods: Semi-structured interviews were the main source of data collection. Fifteen Interviewees included transplant surgeons, nephrologists, and transplant coordinators representing centers nationwide. Thematic analysis was used to analyze interviews, with the Accountability for Reasonableness framework serving as an analytical lens.

    Results: Decision-making both in the assessment and allocation stages are based on clusters of factors that belong to one of three levels: patient, professional, and the institutional levels. The factors appeal to values such as maximizing benefit, priority to the worst off, and equal treatment which are traded off.

    Discussion and Conclusions: The factors described in this paper and the values on which they rest on the most part satisfy the relevance condition of the accountability for reasonableness framework. There are however two potential sources for unequal treatment which we have identified: clinical judgment and institutional policies relating both to assessment and allocation. The appeals mechanisms are well developed and supported nationally which help to offset differences between centers. There is room for improvement in the areas of publicity and enforcement. The development of explicit national guidelines for assessing transplant candidacy and the creation of a central kidney allocation system would contribute to standardize practices across centers; and in the process help to better meet the conditions of fairness in reference to the A4R. The benefits of these policy proposals in the Swedish kidney transplant system merit serious consideration.

  • 10.
    Omar, Faisal
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tinghög, Gustav
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Arts and Humanities. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Risk för orättvis prioritering av patienter vid njurtransplantation: En enda väntelista bör införas, visar studie av svensk praxis2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 111, no 37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to investigate the fairness of the priority setting process underpinning Swedish kidney transplantation in reference to the Accountability for Reasonableness (A4R) framework, 15 interviews with transplant surgeons, nephrologists, and coordinators were carried out. The factors described by interviewees and the values they rest on satisfy the relevance criterion of the A4R. Two potential sources for unfair inequalities were identified, namely the use of clinical judge­ments and varying institutional policies among dif­ferent centres. It is recommended that factors and values used in the priority process are made more public. Sweden should also consider a national, centralised system for allocation of kidneys and not rely on present day local allocation.

  • 11.
    Omar, Faisal
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tinghög, Gustav
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Incentivizing deceased organ donation: A Swedish priority-setting perspective.2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 39, no 2, 156-163 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The established deceased organ donation models in many countries, relying chiefly on altruism, have failed to motivate a sufficient number of donors. As a consequence organs that could save lives are routinely missed leading to a growing gap between demand and supply. The aim of this paper is twofold; firstly to develop a proposal for compensated deceased organ donation that could potentially address the organ shortage; secondly to examine the compatibility of the proposal with the ethical values of the Swedish healthcare system.

    METHODS: The proposal for compensating deceased donation is grounded in behavioural agency theory and combines extrinsic, intrinsic and signalling incentives in order to increase prosocial behaviour. Furthermore the compatibility of our proposal with the values of the Swedish healthcare system is evaluated in reference to the principles of human dignity, needs and solidarity, and cost effectiveness.

    RESULTS: Extrinsic incentives in the form of a €5,000 compensation towards funeral expenses paid to the estate of the deceased or family is proposed. Intrinsic and signalling incentives are incorporated by allowing all or part of the compensation to be diverted as a donation to a reputable charity. The decision for organ donation must not be against the explicit will of the donor.

    CONCLUSIONS: We find that our proposal for compensated deceased donation is compatible with the values of the Swedish healthcare system, and therefore merits serious consideration. It is however important to acknowledge issues relating to coercion, commodification and loss of public trust and the ethical challenges that they might pose.

  • 12.
    Omar, Faisal
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Tinghög, Gustav
    Linköping University. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Incentivizing organ donation: a Swedish priority setting perspective (oral presentation)2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Omar, Faisal
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tinghög, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tinghög, Gustav
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Transplant tourism and compensated kidney donation: A survey of opinions amongst Swedish medical students2010In: International Journal of Health Promotion & Education, ISSN 1463-5240, Vol. 48, no 4, 106-112 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Transplant tourism and proposals for regulated compensated donation are reactions to the global scarcity in kidneys. These areas raise unique ethical challenges in medical education and clinical practice. We aimed to elucidate the opinions of soon-to-be physicians on transplant tourism, and compensated donation. We investigated how these opinions are formed, if they are interrelated, and their impact on encounters with patients.

    Design and Methods: a 14 item survey was developed using cognitive interviewing techniques, and distributed to the graduating class at Linköping Medical University. Spearman's correlation coefficient and Pearson's chi-square test were employed to investigate significant associations.

    Results: The response rate was 43/47 (92%). The majority were strongly (64%), or somewhat (29%) against transplant tourism. Those with strong negative positions on transplant tourism were significantly (p<0.05) more likely to dissuade patients from pursuing it. More students expressed support for regulated compensation from a clinical perspective (34%) as compared with support from an ethical perspective (15%).

    Conclusions: The opinions of young physicians on transplant tourism are a significant indicator for their clinical approach. Young physicians balance competing ethical responsibilities such as respect for autonomy against concerns for kidney vendors in the developing world. Clinical and policy scenarios, similar to those used in this survey are useful tools for students to explore challenging ethical issues within their medical education, to provide appropriate guidance for patients and empower them through health education.

     

  • 14.
    Omar, Faisal
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tufveson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Compensated Living Kidney Donation: A Plea for Pragmatism2010In: HEALTH CARE ANALYSIS, ISSN 1065-3058, Vol. 18, no 1, 85-101 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kidney transplantation is the most efficacious and cost-effective treatment for end-stage renal disease. However, the treatments accessibility is limited by a chronic shortage of transplantable kidneys, resulting in the death of numerous patients worldwide as they wait for a kidney to become available. Despite the implementation of various measures the disparity between supply and needs continues to grow. This paper begins with a look at the current treatment options, including various sources of transplantable kidneys, for end-stage renal disease. We propose, in accordance with others, the introduction of compensated kidney donation as a means of addressing the current shortage. We briefly outline some of the advantages of this proposal, and then turn to examine several of the ethical arguments usually marshaled against it in a bid to demonstrate that this proposal indeed passes the ethics test. Using available data of public opinions on compensated donation, we illustrate that public support for such a program would be adequate enough that we can realistically eliminate the transplant waiting list if compensation is introduced. We urge a pragmatic approach going forward; altruism in living kidney donation is important, but altruism only is an unsuccessful doctrine.

  • 15.
    Omar, Faisal
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Tufveson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University.
    Letter: Reply: Ethical Perspectives on Living Donor Organ Transplantation in Asia2010In: Liver transplantation, ISSN 1527-6465, E-ISSN 1527-6473, Vol. 16, no 7, 917-917 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 16.
    Persson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Hamlin, Sven
    GRI Göteborgs universitet.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Profitable exchanges for scientists: The case of Swedish human embryonic stem cell research2007In: Health Care Analysis, ISSN 1065-3058, Vol. 15, no 4, 291-304 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article two inter-related issues concerning the ongoing commercialisation of biomedical research are analyzed. One aim is to explain how scientists and clinicians at Swedish public institutions can make profits, both commercially and scientifically, by controlling rare human biological material, like embryos and embryonic stem cell lines. This control in no way presupposes legal ownership or other property rights as an initial condition. We show how ethically sensitive material (embryos and stem cell lines) have been used in Sweden as a foundation for a commercial stem cell enterprise-despite all official Swedish strictures against commercialisation in this area. We also show how political decisions may amplify the value of controlling this kind of biological material. Another aim of the article is to analyze and discuss the meaning of this kind of academic commercial enterprise in a wider context of research funding strategies. A conclusion that is drawn is that the academic turn to commercial funding sources is dependent on the decline of public funding. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  • 17.
    Persson, Anders
    et al.
    Högskolan i väst.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Contested technologies2008 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Addressing the important perspectives on xenotransplantation and human embryonic stem cell research, this book explores both the enthusiastic proponents and vehement resistance to these new biomedical technologies. Investigating the political, social, and ethical forces behind this kind of research and development, as well as the commercial actors and strong financial incentives that are necessary, these stories of hope, fear, and hype are matched by stories of success, failure, and fraud, showing how these technologies have become truly polarizing.

  • 18.
    Persson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Humana embryonala stamceller: etik, politik och ekonomi2001In: Vest: journal for science and technology studies, ISSN 0238-6025, no 3-4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Persson, Anders
    et al.
    Tema Tema teknik och social förändring.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society.
    Setting standards in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: Networking Science; Politics, Ethics and Economics2007In: European Science Foundation Exploratory Workshop From standards to concerted programs of collective action. The standardization Process of medical practice.,2007, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

        

  • 20.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A more secure existence: Rethinking the myth of individual origin2013In: Johanssonian Investigations: Essays in honour of Ingvar Johansson on his seventieth birthday / [ed] Christer Svennerlid, Jan Almäng, Rögnvaldur Ingthorsson, Frankfurt am Main: Ontos Verlag, 2013, 717-727 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decades, Ingvar Johansson has made a formidable contribution to the development of philosophy in general and perhaps especially to the development of metaphysics. This volume consists of original papers written by 50 philosophers from all over the world in honour of Ingvar Johansson to celebrate his 70th birthday. The papers cover traditional issues in metaphysics and the philosophy of mind, applied ethics and applied metaphysics, the nature of human rights, the philosophy of economics and sports. Some of the papers study the philosophy of Ingvar Johansson.All of them studies subjects which he has shown an interest in. The variety of subjects covered, testifies to the extraordinary wide range of issues his thought has had a bearing on.

  • 21.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    ES cell guidelines in Sweden2002In: Nature Biotechnology, ISSN 1087-0156, Vol. 20, 224- p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Ethical issues in human embryonic stem cell research2002In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, Vol. 81, no 5, 377-382 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Ethical issues in tissue engineering2008In: Tissue Engineering / [ed] Ulrich Meyer, Jörg Handschel, Hans Peter Wiesmann, Thomas Meyer, London: Academic Press , 2008, 685-703 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tissue Engineering (or regenerative medicine) is a rapidly developing field of research pursued by very different branches of medicine. The most results are published by orthopedists [28] and cardiologists, but meanwhile, there is nearly no special subject that does not investigate in this area. Furthermore, there is a multitude of methods and techniques that are involved in tissue engineering. Therefore, it is difficult to define or to describe the scope of “tissue engineering” in one sentence.

  • 24.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Arts and Humanities. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ethical Issues in Tissue Engineering2014In: Tissue Engineering, Academic Press, 2014, 2, 809-837 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Från nyttomoral till rättigheter2003Book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Governance and Ethics in Biosciences and Biotechnology2008In: Bioethics, Politics and Business, Köpenhamn: Nordic Council of Ministers , 2008, 55-64 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the decision-making involving biosciences and biotechnology, both politicians and the general public have come to increasingly rely on different kinds of experts and specialised bodies. Interest groups such as industry, religious authorities and consumer organisations also try to influence political decision-making, and the role of the media has not always been - it is claimed - as neutral as the public perceives it to be. At the same time, according to the democratic ideal, ultimate power should rest with the parliamentarians and with the people. Who has the power in decision-making in biotechnology? Can there be legitimate expertise in bioethics? How can we improve the power balance? These are some of the questions this book seeks to answer.

    The book is divided into three parts. The first part presents articles dealing with the role of biopolitics and the expert bodies in relation to the democratic ideal. The second part looks at the special role of the media in relation to decision-making in bioethics and biopolitics. The third part of the book looks at the links between the biotechnology industry and bioethical decision-making.

  • 27.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society.
    Governance and ethics in biosciences and biotechnology. Invited talk2007In: okänd,2007, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    In vitro meat - some moral issues2009In: Ethical futures: bioscience and food horizons / [ed] Millar, K, Hobson West, P & Nerlich, B, 2009, 170-174 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Increasing the availability of humn organs for transplantation - some ethical issues2001In: Transplantation Proceedings, ISSN 0041-1345, Vol. 33, 1877- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Introducing the new meat. Problems and prospects2013In: Etikk i praksis, ISSN 1890-3991, E-ISSN 1890-4009, Vol. 7, no 1, 24-37 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultured meat, or in vitro meat, is one of the ideas that are being proposed to help solve the problems associated with the ever-growing global meat consumption. The prospect may bring benefit for the environment, climate, and animal ethics, but has also generated doubts and criticism. A discussion of the possible environmental benefit and of animal ethics issues in relation to cultured meat production will be given. A perceived ’unnaturalness’ of cultured meat may be one of the strongest barriers for public acceptance. This will be discussed and rejected. As to our relations with nature and animals, it is plausible that cultured meat will lead to improvement rather than to deterioration. The issue of public acceptance and some of the problems of introducing this new product on the market will also be discussed. 

  • 31.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society.
    Kommersialisering och intressekonflikter. Inbjuden föreläsning2007In: Vetenskapsrådets konferens om kommersialisering av forskning 4 oktober 2007,2007, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Le savoir proscrit: le clonage et manipulation génétique en question2000In: Y-a-t-il des limites éthiques à la recherche scientifique? : actes du / [ed] Perry Proellochs; Daniel Schulthess, Genevé: Éditions M´decine & hygiène , 2000, 111-124 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [fr]

    I. Questions de principe. 1. Trois arguments pour la liberté de la science. 2. Le choix des thèmes de recherche en tant que décision morale. 3. Redéfinir la question du savoir proscrit en science. 4. Limites du savoir et limites pour l'action. 5. Une communauté libérale peut-elle imposer des limites à la recherche scientifique ? 6. Le droit peut-il poser des limites au savoir ? L'opposition de la question fondamentale et de l'approche traditionnelle. II. Domaines spécifiques. 1. Recherche médicale contrôlée ou procédés médicaux de routine ? Considérations éthiques et politiques pour une ligne de conduite. 2. Le savoir proscrit : le clonage et la manipulation génétique en question. 3. Le génie génétique et les limites de la recherche scientifique. 4. La communauté scientifique doit-elle accepter des résultats de recherche obtenus par des crimes capitaux ? 5. Les commissions d'éthique entre la science et la société.

  • 33.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Priority Setting in Medical Research and the Health Casre System - the Swedish Case2000In: Health care prioritisation :: ethical, legal and economic perspectives / [ed] Lotta Vahlne Westerhäll, Stockholm: Santérus , 2000, 139-164 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Priority The Value of Life2002In: Gene technology and economy: An Interdisciplinary Perspective / [ed] Susanne Lundin and Lynn Åkesson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press , 2002, 85-91 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The mapping of the entire human gene pool, the Hugo project, makes clear that genetics and gene technology concern life itself. This work sheds light on the links between biotechnology and economics from a multidisciplinary perspective.

  • 35.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Reproductive ectogenesis: The third era of human reproduction and some moral consequences2004In: Science and Engineering Ethics, ISSN 1353-3452, Vol. 10, no 4, 615-626 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a well known story Derek Parfit describes a disconnection between two entities that normally (in real life) travel together through space and time, namely your personal identity consisting of both mind and body. Realising the possibility of separation, even if it might never happen in real life, new questions arise that cast doubt on old solutions. In human reproduction, in real life, at present the fetus spends approximately nine months inside the pregnant woman. But, we might envisage other possibilities. Historically, the first era is the normal conception inside the woman, the growth of the fetus in the womb and then, after nine months, birth and the appearance of a new individual. The second era is In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF). The fetus starts outside the woman as a fertilised egg, moves to the body of the woman and spends nine month there, where the body of the woman and the fetus travel together in space-time to separate at birth. In the third era of reproductive ectogenesis, the two never travel together. The fetus spends its gestational time entirely outside the woman's body. We have two entities separated in space-time the whole time. The intimate connection consisting in the fetus being a part of the woman's body is gone. In this paper I will briefly comment on the three eras of human reproduction - and primarily on the relationship between the new individual and the woman - and then spend some time with a fictional story illustrating some moral consequences of the third era. The story is from Pig Pharmaceuticals Limited and how they in the year 2050 report the successful development of pig-related pregnancies with transgenic pigs as surrogate mothers. Finally, I will comment on some of the possible consequences - moral, social and psychological - and argue that all debates about abortion that depend on the fetus being a part of the woman's body will no longer apply. The fetus, in the third era, can be protected without infringement on women's right to control their bodies. I will argue that there is a therapeutic imperative that drives the development towards the third era, which means - maybe unfortunately - that it will be very difficult to stop the third era from becoming a reality.

  • 36.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Starting Clinical Trials of Xenotransplantation - reflections on the ethics of the early phase2000In: Journal of Medical Ethics, ISSN 0306-6800, Vol. 26, 231-236 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Stramare regler för xenotransplantation föreslås i ny rapport: risken för allvarlig smitta kan inte uteslutas2000In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 97, 1926-1928 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    The Future of Xenotransplantation - what are the ethical problems?2000In: Transplantation Proceedings, ISSN 0041-1345, Vol. 32, no 5, 1177-1178 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Varifrån ska stamcellerna hämtas?2003In: Människa eller material. Fem forskare diskuterar etiska och juridiska aspekter på stamcellsforskning, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2003, 20-29 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Vilsna studenter eller målinriktade kollegor? Olika sätt att organisera forskarutbildningen2005In: Kunskapens vägar och forskningspraktik, Lund: Arkiv förlag , 2005, 111-124 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Värde mot värde i vården: värdebaserad vård: är vi så bra vi kan bli?2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 111, no 22Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Welin, Stellan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society.
    Arnasson, Wilhjalmur
    University of Iceland.
    von Troil, Helena
    Nordic committee of bioethics.
    Sirnes, Torvald
    Dr Rokkan Center, Norway.
    Elster, Jakab
    University of Oslo.
    Jensen, Thomas
    Aarhus University.
    Westerlund, Katarina
    Uppsala universitet.
    Debate and communication2007In: Stem cell research in the Nordic countries. Science, ethics, public debate and law, Oslo: Nordforsk , 2007, 40-45 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Welin, Stellan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Berlin, Johanna
    Sik, Göteborg.
    Gold, Julie
    Chalmers, Göteborg.
    Köttproduktion utan djur2008In: Klimatfrågan på bordet / [ed] Birgitta Johansson, Stockholm: Formas , 2008, 1, 261-271 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Mat åt nio miljarder - klimatet är en joker, Johan Kuylenstierna Vi måste minska sårbarheten i ordlingssystemen, Jakob Lundberg och Fredrik Moberg Euoropas mat i nytt klimat, Thomas OhlssonKött och klimat - kunskap som funnits länge, Annika Carlsson-KanyamaAlla matens utsläpp borde synas i klimatrapporteringen. Christel CederbergMatval för klimatets skull - svenska äpplen och mindre pizzor, Charlotte Lagerberg FogelbergVärms jordklotet upp av fisken på din tallrik, Friederike ZieglerVälfyllda lastrum ger klimateffektiva transporter, Gunilla JönssonMaten i soptunnan - vem täljer trägubbar för att elda upp dem, Karin Östergren coh Ulf SonessonKlimatmärkning av mat - vad kan det ge och när ska det ske, Oksana Mont och Katsiarna PaulavetsAha - klimatmärkt mat, Helena Shanahan och Helene WåhlanderHoppfull oro - en medelväg för klimatvänlig matkonsumtion, Maria OjalaSvensk växtodling i nytt klimat, Herik Eckersten, Håkan Fogelfors och Roland SigvaldMat och klimat - ett växtgenetiskt perspektiv, Christina DixeliusNya krav på djurhållning, Ann Albihn och Ulf MagnussonMindre metan från högavkastande kor, Jan Bertilsson och Gunnar BörjessonKöttproduktion utan djur, Stellan Welin, Johanna Berlin och Julie GoldJordbruk med naturen som modell, Johanna BjörklundÄr ekomat bättre eller sämre för klimatet, Niels Andresen, Ann-Marie Dock Gustavsson och Johan WahlanderEkologiskt jordbruk ger mera koldioxid i atmosfären, Olof Andrén och Holger KirchmannKlimatvänligt jordbruk - hur kan det se ut, Göte Bertilsson

  • 44.
    Welin, Stellan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gold, Julie
    Chalmers tekniska högskola, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Köd uden dyr?: Kan ny teknik göre problemer med dyreetik og miljö til historie?2012In: Köd: En antologi / [ed] Mickey Gjerris, Kristian Bjørkdahl, Köbenhavn: Tiderne Skifter , 2012, 285-294 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Welin, Stellan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gold, Julie
    Chalmers tekniska högskola, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Berlin, Johanna
    SIK.
    In vitro meat. What are the moral issues?2012In: The Philosophy of Food / [ed] David Kaplan, Berkeley, California: University of California Press, 2012, 292-304 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Welin, Stellan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Lundin, Susanne
    Lunds universitet.
    Organtransplantation, etik och kultur i Japan. Japanen kan välja mellan hjärndöd och hjärtdöd för egen del.2001In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 98, 662-665 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Welin, Stellan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Persson, Anders
    Tema teknik och social förändring Tema.
    Hemlin, Sven
    Humsam Göteborgs universitet.
    Lönsamt utbyte? Embryonala stamceller i gränslandet mellan klinik, universitet och marknad2007In: Att forma vår framtid. Bioteknikens möjligheter och problem / [ed] Göran Hermerén,Carl-Gustaf Andrén, Lund: Nordic Academic Press , 2007, 220-234 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Människans livsvillkor har förändrats dramatiskt genom historien i takt med att tekniken utvecklats. Ny kunskap ger nya möjligheter. Föräsndringen kommer med all säkerhet att fortsätta. Men hur?År 2003 förklarade The International Human Gemone Organisation att arbetet med att kartlägga människans arvsmassa hade förverkligats snabbare än förväntat. Därmed öppnades möjligheter att än en gång förändra människans livsvillkor, och på ett mera grundläggande sätt än tidigare. Nu kan vi inte bara förändra vår omgivning utan dessutom med genteknik och nanoteknik påverka vad en människa är. Den möjligheten är en etisk utmaning.Vad betyder riskbedömningar, etik, livsåskådningar och kulturella föreställningar när vi väljer hur den nya tekniken ska användas? Att forma vår framtid belyser dagens arbete med stamcellsforskning och nanoteknik. Texterna diskuterar frågor som hantering av genetisk information, kommersialisering och postgenom forskning i ett globalt perspektiv.

  • 48.
    Welin, Stellan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Sandrin, Mauro S.
    Some ethical problems in xenotransplantation: introductory remarks at Ethics Workshop2006In: Xenotransplantation, ISSN 0908-665X, Vol. 13, no 6, 500-501 p.Other (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Welin, Stellan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Sanner, Margareta
    Uppsala universitet.
    Nydahl, Anders
    Örebro sjukhus.
    Etiskt acceptabelt med icke-terapeutisk ventilation av möjlig organdonator2005In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 102, 141-146 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Welin, Stellan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Var der Weele, Cor
    LEI, Wageningen UR, the Netherlands.
    Cultured Meat: will it separate us from nature?2012In: Climate Change and Sustainable Development: Ethical perspectives on land use and food production / [ed] Thomas Potthast and Simon Meish, Wageningen: Wageningen Academic Publishers, 2012, 348-351 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In vitro meat, or cultured meat, is one of the ideas that are being proposed to help solve the problems associated with the ever growing global meat consumption. The prospect is a source or great moral hope, but also generates doubts and criticism. In this paper, we focus on worries about (1) the alleged unnaturalness of in vitro meat; and (2) the possible deterioration of our relations with nature and animals. We will argue that arguments about (un)naturalness take us to any conclusion we want. As to our relations with nature and animals, we think it more plausible that cultured meat will lead to improvement than to deterioration.

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