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  • 1.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kelfve, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Äldres materiella förhållanden2017In: Vem är den äldre - Äldrebilder i ett åldrande Sverige / [ed] Abramsson, Marianne; Hydén Lars-Christer & Motel Klingebiel Andreas, Stockholm: Nationell Kvalitetsplan för Äldreomsorgen , 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Kelfve, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Univ Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fors, Stefan
    Univ Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Univ Stockholm, Sweden.
    Getting better all the time? Selective attrition and compositional changes in longitudinal and life course studies2017In: Longitudinal and life course studies, ISSN 1124-9064, E-ISSN 1757-9597, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 104-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Longitudinal surveys are valuable tools for investigating health and social outcomes across the life course. In such studies, selective mortality leads to changes in the social composition of the sample, but little is known about how selective survey participation affects the sample composition, in addition to the selective mortality. In the present paper, we followed a Swedish cohort sample over six waves 1968-2011. For each wave we recalculated the distribution of baseline characteristics in the sample among i) the sample still alive and ii) the sample still alive and with complete follow-up. The results show that the majority of the compositional changes in the cohort were modest and driven mainly by mortality. However, for some characteristics, class in particular, the selection was considerable and in addition, was substantially compounded by survey non-participation. We suggest that sample selections should be taken into account when interpreting the results of longitudinal studies, in particular when researching social inequalities.

  • 3.
    Kelfve, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Wastesson, Jonas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Fors, Stefan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Johnell, Kristina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Morin, Lucas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Is the level of education associated with transitions between care settings in older adults near the end of life? A nationwide, retrospective cohort study2018In: Palliative Medicine: A Multiprofessional Journal, ISSN 0269-2163, E-ISSN 1477-030X, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 366-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: End-of-life transitions between care settings can be burdensome for older adults and their relatives. Aim: To analyze the association between the level of education of older adults and their likelihood to experience care transitions during the final months before death. Design: Nationwide, retrospective cohort study using register data. Setting/participants: Older adults (65 years) who died in Sweden in 2013 (n = 75,722). Place of death was the primary outcome. Institutionalization and multiple hospital admissions during the final months of life were defined as secondary outcomes. The decedents level of education (primary, secondary, or tertiary education) was considered as the main exposure. Multivariable analyses were stratified by living arrangement and adjusted for sex, age at time of death, illness trajectory, and number of chronic diseases. Results: Among community-dwellers, older adults with tertiary education were more likely to die in hospitals than those with primary education (55.6% vs 49.9%; odds ratio (OR) = 1.21, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14-1.28), but less likely to be institutionalized during the final month before death (OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.76-0.91). Decedents with higher education had greater odds of remaining hospitalized continuously during their final 2 weeks of life (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.02-1.22). Among older adults living in nursing homes, we found no association between the decedents level of education and their likelihood to be hospitalized or to die in hospitals. Conclusion: Compared with those who completed only primary education, individuals with higher educational attainment were more likely to live at home until the end of life, but also more likely to be hospitalized and die in hospitals.

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