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  • 1.
    Bednarska, Olga
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tapper, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Lowén, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Neurotransmittor Concentration in Pregenual ACC in Stool Consistency Patient Subgroups With IBS2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The Anterior Cingulate Cortex (ACC) is a key region of the central autonomic brain network. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is characterized abdominal pain and bowel habit disturbances. Autonomic dysregulation has been reported in IBS as well as altered ACC activation in pregenual ACC during visceral stimulation 1 2. Glutamate is the major excitatory and Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain.

    Aim & Methods

    We aimed to measure neurotransmitter concentration in the pregenual ACC, in stool consistency subgroups with IBS by using quantitative neurotransmitter Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (qMRS)Seven patients with IBS-mixed (6 women) and five patients with IBS -diarrhea (4 women) according to Rome 3 were included. Mean age was 34.2 years (SD 5.3) with no significant difference between subgroups.  Patients completed symptom severity score (IBS-SSS). Quantitative MRS was measured in a 3T MRI scanner. A water-suppressed MEGA-PRESS sequence (TR 2.0 s, TE 68 ms) was used with the editing pulses placed at 1.90 ppm (‘ON-dynamics’) and at 7.46 ppm (‘OFF-dynamics’) with a voxel (3x3x3 cm3) placed in the pACC. Each MEGA-PRESS measurement resulted in a sequence of 40 OFF- and ON-dynamics, where each was computed by 8 phase cycles. Directly after each water-suppressed MEGA-PRESS measurement, a shorter 2-dynamic unsuppressed water MEGA-PRESS measurement was performed within the same voxel, which was used to obtain the concentrations in physically well-defined units of [mM]. The GABA concentrations were computed by averaging the difference spectra obtained by subtracting each OFF-dynamic from subsequent ON-dynamic and using LCModel (Version 6.3) for the final quantification. The Glutamate concentrations were obtained by only averaging the OFF-dynamics, which were not affected by the editing pulses. Additionally, all dynamics were phase and frequency corrected prior to the averaging. For group comparison unpaired T-tests were used.

    Results

    Patients had moderate to severe symptoms with IBS-SSS of 367 (SD 79.7). There was no significant difference between IBS subgroups in terms of IBS-SSS. Mean pACC GABA concentration was 1.66 (SD 0.17) mM in IBS-M and 1.65 (SD 0.27) mM in IBS-D. There was no significant difference between groups (p=0.9). Mean pACC Glutamate concentration was 4.54 (0.35) mM in IBS-M and 5.13 (SD 0.64) mM in IBS-D. There was no significant difference between groups, although a trend with p=0.06 was observed.

    Conclusion

    Further qMRS data have to be collected in IBS patients as well as healthy controls to evaluate if IBS subgroups demonstrate alterations in pACC glutamate and GABA concentrations

  • 2.
    Bednarska, Olga
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Casado-Bedmar, Maite
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Salvo-Romero, Eloisa
    University of Autonoma Barcelona, Spain.
    Vicario, Maria
    University of Autonoma Barcelona, Spain.
    Mayer, Emeran A.
    University of Calif Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Keita, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide and Mast Cells Regulate Increased Passage of Colonic Bacteria in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome2017In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 153, no 4, p. 948-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND amp; AIMS: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is associated with intestinal dysbiosis and symptoms of IBS develop following gastroenteritis. We aimed to study the passage of live bacteria through the colonic epithelium, and determine the role of mast cells (MCs) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in barrier regulation in IBS and healthy individuals. METHODS: Colon biopsies from 32 women with IBS and 15 age-matched healthy women (controls) were mounted in Ussing chambers; we measured numbers of fluorescently labeled Escherichia coli HS and Salmonella typhimurium that passed through from the mucosal side to the serosal side of the tissue. Some biopsies were exposed to agents that block the VIP receptors (VPAC1 and VPAC2) or MCs. Levels of VIP and tryptase were measured in plasma and biopsy lysates. Number of MCs and MCs that express VIP or VIP receptors were quantified by immunofluorescence. Biopsies from an additional 5 patients with IBS and 4 controls were mounted in chambers and Salmonella were added; we studied passage routes through the epithelium by transmission electron microscopy and expression of tight junctions by confocal microscopy. RESULTS: In colon biopsies from patients with IBS, larger numbers of E coli HS and S typhimurium passed through the epithelium than in biopsies from controls (P amp;lt;.0005). In transmission electron microscopy analyses, bacteria were found to cross the epithelium via only the transcellular route. Bacterial passage was reduced in biopsies from patients with IBS and controls after addition of antibodies against VPACs or ketotifen, which inhibits MCs. Plasma samples from patients with IBS had higher levels of VIP than plasma samples from controls. Biopsies from patients with IBS had higher levels of tryptase, larger numbers of MCs, and a higher percentage of MCs that express VPAC1 than biopsies from controls. In biopsies from patients with IBS, addition of Salmonella significantly reduced levels of occludin; subsequent addition of ketotifen significantly reversed this effect. CONCLUSIONS: We found that colonic epithelium tissues from patients with IBS have increased translocation of commensal and pathogenic live bacteria compared with controls. The mechanisms of increased translocation include MCs and VIP.

  • 3.
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    et al.
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Zheng, Tenghao
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hadizadeh, Fatemeh
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bujanda, Luis
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Univ Basque Country, Spain.
    Bresso, Francesca
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Agreus, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Andreasson, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Dlugosz, Aldona
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Greger
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Schmidt, Peter T.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Simren, Magnus
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Nardone, Gerardo
    Univ Federico II, Italy.
    Cuomo, Rosario
    Federico II Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Usai-Satta, Paolo
    Azienda Osped G Brotzu, Italy.
    Galeazzi, Francesca
    Padova Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Neri, Matteo
    G DAnnunzio Univ and Fdn, Italy; G DAnnunzio Univ and Fdn, Italy.
    Portincasa, Piero
    Univ Bari, Italy.
    Bellini, Massimo
    Univ Pisa, Italy.
    Barbara, Giovanni
    Univ Bologna, Italy.
    Latiano, Anna
    Casa Sollievo Sofferenza Hosp, Italy.
    Huebenthal, Matthias
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany.
    Thijs, Vincent
    Florey Inst Neurosci and Mental Hlth, Australia.
    Netea, Mihai G.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; Univ Bonn, Germany.
    Jonkers, Daisy
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Chang, Lin
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Mayer, Emeran A.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Wouters, Mira M.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Boeckxstaens, Guy
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Camilleri, Michael
    Mayo Clin, MN USA; Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Franke, Andre
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany.
    Zhernakova, Alexandra
    Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Netherlands.
    DAmato, Mauro
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Ikerbasque, Spain.
    Female-Specific Association Between Variants on Chromosome 9 and Self-Reported Diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome2018In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 155, no 1, p. 168-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND amp; AIMS: Genetic factors are believed to affect risk for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but there have been no sufficiently powered and adequately sized studies. To identify DNA variants associated with IBS risk, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the large UK Biobank population-based cohort, which includes genotype and health data from 500,000 participants. METHODS: We studied 7,287,191 high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms in individuals who self-reported a doctors diagnosis of IBS (cases; n = 9576) compared to the remainder of the cohort (controls; n = 336,499) (mean age of study subjects, 40-69 years). Genome-wide significant findings were further investigated in 2045 patients with IBS from tertiary centers and 7955 population controls from Europe and the United States, and a small general population sample from Sweden (n = 249). Functional annotation of GWAS results was carried out by integrating data from multiple biorepositories to obtain biological insights from the observed associations. RESULTS: We identified a genome-wide significant association on chromosome 9q31.2 (single nucleotide polymorphism rs10512344; P = 3.57 x 10(-8)) in a region previously linked to age at menarche, and 13 additional loci of suggestive significance (P amp;lt; 5.0 x 10(-6)). Sex-stratified analyses revealed that the variants at 9q31.2 affect risk of IBS in women only (P = 4.29 x 10(-10) in UK Biobank) and also [GRAPHICS] associate with constipation-predominant IBS in women (P = .015 in the tertiary cohort) and harder stools in women (P = .0012 in the population-based sample). Functional annotation of the 9q31.2 locus identified 8 candidate genes, including the elongator complex protein 1 gene (ELP1 or IKB-KAP), which is mutated in patients with familial dysautonomia. CONCLUSIONS: In a sufficiently powered GWAS of IBS, we associated variants at the locus 9q31.2 with risk of IBS in women. This observation may provide additional rationale for investigating the role of sex hormones and autonomic dysfunction in IBS.

  • 4.
    Chen, Michelle P
    et al.
    Asian Hospital And Medical Center, Muntinlupa.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lowén, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Labus, Jennifer S.
    Brain Research Institute UCLA, Los Angeles, USA.
    Kilpatrick, Lisa A.
    American Academy of Physician Assistants, USA.
    Mayer, Emeran A.
    Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicin, Los Angeles, USA.
    Tillisch, Kirsten
    Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, USA.
    Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptoms Are Related to the Resting Brain's Sensorimotor Network2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Ek, Weronica E
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Reznichenko, Anna
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Ripke, Stephan
    Massachusetts General Hospital Boston, Cambridge Massachussetts, USA .
    Niesler, Beate
    University of Heidelberg, Germany .
    Zucchelli, Marco
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Rivera, Natalia V
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Schmidt, Peter T
    University Hospital, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm .
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Magnusson, Patrik
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Talley, Nicholas J
    University of Newcastle, Australia .
    Holliday, Elizabeth G
    University of Newcastle, Australia .
    Houghton, Lesley
    University of Manchester UK and Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville USA.
    Gazouli, Maria
    University of Athens, Greece .
    Karamanolis, George
    University of Athens, Greece .
    Rappold, Gudrun
    University of Heidelberg, Germany.
    Burwinkel, Barbara
    University Women's Clinic, University of Heidelberg, Germany.
    Surowy, Harald
    University Women's Clinic, University of Heidelberg, Germany.
    Rafter, Joseph
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Assadi, Ghazaleh
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Li, Ling
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Papadaki, Evangelia
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Gambaccini, Dario
    University of Pisa, Pisa Italy .
    Marchi, Santino
    University of Pisa, Pisa Italy .
    Colucci, Rocchina
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine University of Pisa, Italy .
    Blandizzi, Corrado
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine University of Pisa, Italy .
    Barbaro, Raffaella
    University of Bologna, Italy .
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University .
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Skånes University Hospital, Malmö .
    Tornblom, Hans
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg.
    Bresso, Francesca
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm .
    Andreasson, Anna
    Sweden Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University.
    Dlugosz, Aldona
    Karolinska Instituet, Stockholm .
    Simren, Magnus
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg.
    Agreus, Lars
    Karolinska Institutet Stockholm .
    Lindberg, Greger
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Boeckxstaens, Guy
    Leuven University, Leuven, Belgium .
    Bellini, Massimo
    University of Pisa, Italy .
    Stanghellini, Vincenzo
    University of Bologna, Italy .
    Barbara, Giovanni
    University of Bologna, Italy .
    Daly, Mark J
    Massachusetts General Hospital Boston, Cambridge Massachussetts, USA .
    Camilleri, Michael
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA .
    Wouters, Mira M
    Leuven University, Belgium .
    D'Amato, Mauro
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Exploring the genetics of irritable bowel syndrome: a GWA study in the general population and replication in multinational case-control cohorts.2015In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 64, p. 1774-1782Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: IBS shows genetic predisposition, but adequately powered gene-hunting efforts have been scarce so far. We sought to identify true IBS genetic risk factors by means of genome-wide association (GWA) and independent replication studies.

    DESIGN: We conducted a GWA study (GWAS) of IBS in a general population sample of 11 326 Swedish twins. IBS cases (N=534) and asymptomatic controls (N=4932) were identified based on questionnaire data. Suggestive association signals were followed-up in 3511 individuals from six case-control cohorts. We sought genotype-gene expression correlations through single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-expression quantitative trait loci interactions testing, and performed in silico prediction of gene function. We compared candidate gene expression by real-time qPCR in rectal mucosal biopsies of patients with IBS and controls.

    RESULTS: One locus at 7p22.1, which includes the genes KDELR2 (KDEL endoplasmic reticulum protein retention receptor 2) and GRID2IP (glutamate receptor, ionotropic, delta 2 (Grid2) interacting protein), showed consistent IBS risk effects in the index GWAS and all replication cohorts and reached p=9.31×10(-6) in a meta-analysis of all datasets. Several SNPs in this region are associated with cis effects on KDELR2 expression, and a trend for increased mucosal KDLER2 mRNA expression was observed in IBS cases compared with controls.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that general population-based studies combined with analyses of patient cohorts provide good opportunities for gene discovery in IBS. The 7p22.1 and other risk signals detected in this study constitute a good starting platform for hypothesis testing in future functional investigations.

  • 6.
    Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo
    et al.
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Zheng, Tenghao
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bujanda, Luis
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Univ Basque Country, Spain.
    Dlugosz, Aldona
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Greger
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Schmidt, Peter T.
    Univ Basque Country, Spain.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Simren, Magnus
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Nardone, Gerardo
    University Federico II, Naples, Italy.
    Cuomo, Rosario
    Federico II Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Usai-Satta, Paolo
    Azienda Osped G Brotzu, Italy.
    Galeazzi, Francesca
    Padova Univ Hosp, Italy.
    Neri, Matteo
    G DAnnunzio Univ and Fdn, Italy.
    Portincasa, Piero
    G DAnnunzio Univ and Fdn, Italy.
    Bellini, Massimo
    Univ Bari, Italy.
    Barbara, Giovanni
    Univ Pisa, Italy.
    Jonkers, Daisy
    Univ Bologna, Italy.
    Eswaran, Shanti
    Univ Michigan, MI USA.
    Chey, William D.
    Univ Michigan, MI USA.
    Kashyap, Purna
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Chang, Lin
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Mayer, Emeran A.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Wouters, Mira M.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Boeckxstaens, Guy
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Camilleri, Michael
    Mayo Clin, MN USA; Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Franke, Andre
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands; Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany.
    DAmato, Mauro
    Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Basque Sci Fdn, Spain.
    Increased Prevalence of Rare Sucrase-isomaltase Pathogenic Variants in Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients2018In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 16, no 10, p. 1673-1676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 7.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Viktorsson, Lisa
    Carlsson, Ann-Kristin
    Jones, Michael P.
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Olsen Faresjö, Ashild
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    More negative self-esteem and inferior coping strategies among patients diagnosed with IBS compared with patients without IBS - a case-control study in primary care2015In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 16, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a chronic, relapsing gastrointestinal disorder,that affects approximately 10% of the general population and the majority are diagnosed  in primary care. IBS has been reported to be associated with altered psychological and cognitive functioning such as mood disturbances, somatization, catastrophizing or altered visceral interoception by negative emotions and stress. The aim was to  investigate the psychosocial constructs of self-esteem and sense of coherence among IBS patients compared to non-IBS patients in primary care.     

    Methods

    A case–control study in primary care setting among IBS patients meeting the ROME III         criteria (n = 140) compared to controls i.e. non-IBS patients (n = 213) without any         present or previous gastrointestinal complaints. The data were collected through self-reportedquestionnaires of psychosocial factors.     

    Results

    IBS-patients reported significantly more negative self-esteem (p < 0.001), lower scores         for positive self-esteem (p < 0.001), and lower sense of coherence (p < 0.001) than the controls. The IBS-cases were also less likely to report ‘good’ health status (p < 0.001) and less likely to report a positive belief in the future (p < 0.001). After controlling for relevant confounding factors in multiple regressions, the elevation  in negative self-esteem among IBS patients remained statistically significant (p =0.02), as did the lower scores for sense of coherence among IBS cases (p = 0.04).     

    Conclusions

    The more frequently reported negative self-esteem and inferior coping strategies among         IBS patients found in this study suggest the possibility that psychological therapies         might be helpful for these patients. However these data do not indicate the causal         direction of the observed associations. More research is therefore warranted to determine whether these psychosocial constructs are more frequent in IBS patients.

  • 8.
    Hadizadeh, Fatemeh
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Isfahan Univ Med Sci, Iran.
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; BioDonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain.
    Belheouane, Meriem
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany; Max Planck Inst Evolutionary Biol, Germany.
    Vallier, Marie
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany; Max Planck Inst Evolutionary Biol, Germany.
    Sauer, Sascha
    Max Delbruck Ctr Mol Med BIMSB BIH, Germany.
    Bang, Corinna
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany.
    Bujanda, Luis
    BioDonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Univ Pais Vasco UPV EHU, Spain.
    Andreasson, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Agreus, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Sci Life Lab, Sweden.
    Talley, Nicholas J.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Univ Newcastle, Australia; Mayo Clin, MN USA; AGIRA, Australia.
    Rafter, Joseph
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Baines, John F.
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany; Max Planck Inst Evolutionary Biol, Germany.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Franke, Andre
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Germany.
    DAmato, Mauro
    BioDonostia Hlth Res Inst, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Basque Sci Fdn, Spain.
    Faecal microbiota composition associates with abdominal pain in the general population2018In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 67, no 4, p. 778-+Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 9.
    Hadizadeh, Fatemeh
    et al.
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Nutrition, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. susanne.walter@liu.se.
    Belheouane, Meriem
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Plön, Germany; Institute for Experimental Medicine, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Heinsen, Femke-Anouska
    Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology, Kiel University, Kiel, Germany.
    Andreasson, Anna
    Division for Family Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Agreus, Lars
    Division for Family Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Clinical Genomics Facility, Science for Life Laboratory, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Baines, John F
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Plön, Germany; Institute for Experimental Medicine, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Rafter, Joseph
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franke, Andre
    Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology, Kiel University, Kiel, Germany.
    DAmato, Mauro
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; BioCruces Health Research Institute and IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao, Spain.
    Stool frequency is associated with gut microbiota composition2017In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 559-560Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Henström, Maria
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Diekmann, Lena
    University of Vet Medical Hannover, Germany.
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hadizadeh, Fatemeh
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kuech, Eva-Maria
    University of Vet Medical Hannover, Germany.
    von Koeckritz-Blickwede, Maren
    University of Vet Medical Hannover, Germany.
    Thingholm, Louise B.
    Christian Albrechts University of Kiel, Germany.
    Zheng, Tenghao
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Assadi, Ghazaleh
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Dierks, Claudia
    University of Vet Medical Hannover, Germany.
    Heine, Martin
    University of Vet Medical Hannover, Germany.
    Philipp, Ute
    University of Vet Medical Hannover, Germany.
    Distl, Ottmar
    University of Vet Medical Hannover, Germany.
    Money, Mary E.
    University of Maryland, MD 21201 USA; Meritus Medical Centre, MD USA.
    Belheouane, Meriem
    Max Planck Institute Evolutionary Biol, Germany; Christian Albrechts University of Kiel, Germany.
    Heinsen, Femke-Anouska
    Christian Albrechts University of Kiel, Germany.
    Rafter, Joseph
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nardone, Gerardo
    Federico II University Hospital, Italy.
    Cuomo, Rosario
    Federico II University Hospital, Italy.
    Usai-Satta, Paolo
    Azienda Osped G Brotzu, Italy.
    Galeazzi, Francesca
    Padova University Hospital, Italy.
    Neri, Matteo
    GDAnnunzio University, Italy; University of GDAnnunzio, Italy.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Simren, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of N Carolina, NC USA.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Schmidt, Peter T.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Greger
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Dlugosz, Aldona
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Agreus, Lars
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Andreasson, Anna
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Mayer, Emeran
    University of Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Baines, John F.
    Max Planck Institute Evolutionary Biol, Germany; Christian Albrechts University of Kiel, Germany.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Portincasa, Piero
    University of Bari Aldo Moro, Italy.
    Bellini, Massimo
    University of Pisa, Italy.
    Stanghellini, Vincenzo
    University of Bologna, Italy.
    Barbara, Giovanni
    University of Bologna, Italy.
    Chang, Lin
    University of Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Camilleri, Michael
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Franke, Andre
    Christian Albrechts University of Kiel, Germany.
    Naim, Hassan Y.
    University of Vet Medical Hannover, Germany.
    DAmato, Mauro
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; BioDonostia Health Research Institute, Spain; Basque Science Fdn, Spain; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Functional variants in the sucrase-isomaltase gene associate with increased risk of irritable bowel syndrome2018In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 67, no 2, p. 263-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective IBS is a common gut disorder of uncertain pathogenesis. Among other factors, genetics and certain foods are proposed to contribute. Congenital sucraseisomaltase deficiency (CSID) is a rare genetic form of disaccharide malabsorption characterised by diarrhoea, abdominal pain and bloating, which are features common to IBS. We tested sucrase-isomaltase (SI) gene variants for their potential relevance in IBS. Design We sequenced SI exons in seven familial cases, and screened four CSID mutations (p.Val557Gly, p. Gly1073Asp, p.Arg1124Ter and p.Phe1745Cys) and a common SI coding polymorphism (p.Val15Phe) in a multicentre cohort of 1887 cases and controls. We studied the effect of the 15Val to 15Phe substitution on SI function in vitro. We analysed p.Val15Phe genotype in relation to IBS status, stool frequency and faecal microbiota composition in 250 individuals from the general population. Results CSID mutations were more common in patients than asymptomatic controls (p=0.074; OR=1.84) and Exome Aggregation Consortium reference sequenced individuals (p=0.020; OR=1.57). 15Phe was detected in 6/7 sequenced familial cases, and increased IBS risk in case-control and population-based cohorts, with best evidence for diarrhoea phenotypes (combined p=0.00012; OR=1.36). In the population-based sample, 15Phe allele dosage correlated with stool frequency (p=0.026) and Parabacteroides faecal microbiota abundance (p=0.0024). The SI protein with 15Phe exhibited 35% reduced enzymatic activity in vitro compared with 15Val (pamp;lt;0.05). Conclusions SI gene variants coding for disaccharidases with defective or reduced enzymatic activity predispose to IBS. This may help the identification of individuals at risk, and contribute to personalising treatment options in a subset of patients.

  • 11.
    Henström, Maria
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hadizadeh, Fatemeh
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Isfahan University of Medical Science, Iran.
    Beyder, Arthur
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; BioDonostia Health Research Institute, Spain.
    Zheng, Tenghao
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Assadi, Ghazaleh
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Rafter, Joseph
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bujanda, Luis
    BioDonostia Health Research Institute, Spain.
    Agreus, Lars
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Andreasson, Anna
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Dlugosz, Aldona
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Greger
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Schmidt, Peter T.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Talley, Nicholas J.
    University of Newcastle, Australia.
    Simren, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Wouters, Mira
    Leuven University, Belgium.
    Farrugia, Gianrico
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    DAmato, Mauro
    BioDonostia Health Research Institute, Spain; BioCruces Health Research Institute, Spain; Basque Fdn Science, Spain; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    TRPM8 polymorphisms associated with increased risk of IBS-C and IBS-M2017In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 66, no 9, p. 1725-+Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 12.
    Icenhour, Adriane
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Witt, Suzanne
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Elsenbruch, Sigrid
    University of Duisburg Essen, Germany.
    Lowén, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Tillisch, Kirsten
    University of Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Mayer, Emeran A.
    University of Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Brain functional connectivity is associated with visceral sensitivity in women with Irritable Bowel Syndrome2017In: NeuroImage: Clinical, ISSN 0353-8842, E-ISSN 2213-1582, Vol. 15, p. 449-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased perception of visceral stimuli is a key feature of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). While altered resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) has been also reported in IBS, the relationship between visceral hypersensitivity and aberrant rsFC is unknown. We therefore assessed rsFC within the salience, sensorimotor and default mode networks in patients with and without visceral hypersensitivity and in healthy controls (HCs). An exploratory resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study was performed in 41 women with IBS and 20 HCs. Group independent component analysis was used to derive intrinsic brain networks. Rectal thresholds were determined and patients were subdivided into groups with increased (hypersensitive IBS, N = 21) or normal (normosensitive IBS, N= 20) visceral sensitivity. Between-group comparisons of rsFC were carried-out using region-of-interest analyses and peak rsFC values were extracted for correlational analyses. Relative to normosensitive IBS, hypersensitive patients showed increased positive rsFC of pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and thalamus within the salience network and of posterior insula within the sensorimotor network. When compared to both hypersensitive IBS and HCs, normosensitive IBS showed decreased positive rsFC of amygdala and decreased negative rsFC in dorsal anterior insula within the DMN. DMN and sensorimotor network rsFC were associated with rectal perception thresholds, and rsFC in posterior insula was correlated with reported symptom severity in IBS. Our exploratory findings suggest that visceral sensitivity in IBS is related to changes in FC within resting-state networks associated with interoception, salience and sensory processing. These alterations may play an important role in hypervigilance and hyperalgesia in IBS.

  • 13.
    Jankipersadsing, Soesma A.
    et al.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands; University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Hadizadeh, Fatemeh
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Isfahan University of Medical Science, Iran.
    Jan Bonder, Marc
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Tigchelaar, Ettje F.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands; Top Institute Food and Nutr, Netherlands.
    Deelen, Patrick
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Fu, Jingyuan
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Andreasson, Anna
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Agreus, Lars
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Wijmenga, Cisca
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Hysi, Pirro
    Kings Coll London, England.
    DAmato, Mauro
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; BioDonostia Health Research Institute San Sebastian, Spain; Basque Fdn Science, Spain.
    Zhernakova, Alexandra
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Letter: A GWAS meta-analysis suggests roles for xenobiotic metabolism and ion channel activity in the biology of stool frequency in GUT, vol 66, issue 4, pp 756-7582017In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 66, no 4, p. 756-758Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 14.
    Johansson, E
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ingemansson, A
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Ryn, A-K
    Hallbook, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery UHL.
    Randomized trial of biofeedback or medical treatment for fecal incontinence in NEUROGASTROENTEROLOGY AND MOTILITY, vol 24, issue , pp 183-1832012In: NEUROGASTROENTEROLOGY AND MOTILITY, Blackwell Publishing , 2012, Vol. 24, p. 183-183Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 15.
    Karling, Pontus
    et al.
    Umeå University Hospital.
    Abrahamsson, Hasse
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Dolk, Anders
    Karolinska University.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Hellstrom, Per M
    Karolinska University.
    Knowles, Charles H
    St Bartholomews & Royal London School of Med & Dent,.
    Kjellstrom, Lars
    Ersta Hospital.
    Lindberg, Greger
    Karolinska University.
    Lindfors, Per-Johan
    Ersta Hospital.
    Nyhlin, Henry
    Ersta Hospital.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Malmo University Hospital.
    Schmidt, Peter T
    Karolinska University.
    Sjolund, Kristina
    Trelleborg Hospital.
    Sjovall, Henrik
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Function and dysfunction of the colon and anorectum in adults: Working team report of the Swedish Motility Group (SMoG)2009In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY, ISSN 0036-5521, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 646-660Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Symptoms of fecal incontinence and constipation are common in the general population. These can, however, be unreliably reported and are poorly discriminatory for underlying pathophysiology. Furthermore, both symptoms may coexist. In the elderly, fecal impaction always must be excluded. For patients with constipation, colon transit studies, anorectal manometry and defecography may help to identify patients with slow-transit constipation and/or pelvic floor dysfunction. The best documented medical treatments for constipation are the macrogols, lactulose and isphagula. Evolving drugs include lubiprostone, which enhances colonic secretion by activating chloride channels. Surgery is restricted for a highly selected group of patients with severe slow-transit constipation and for those with large rectoceles that demonstrably cause rectal evacuatory impairment. For patients with fecal incontinence that does not resolve on antidiarrheal treatment, functional and structural evaluation with anorectal manometry and endoanal ultrasound or magnetic resonance (MR) of the anal canal may help to guide management. Sacral nerve stimulation is a rapidly evolving alternative when other treatments such as biofeedback and direct sphincter repair have failed. Advances in understanding the pathophysiology as a guide to treatment of patients with constipation and fecal incontinence is a continuing important goal for translational research. The content of this article is a summary of presentations given by the authors at the Fourth Meeting of the Swedish Motility Group, held in Gothenburg in April 2007.

  • 16. Larsson, M. B. O.
    et al.
    Tillisch, K.
    Mayer, E. A.
    Jarcho, J.
    Lalbus, J.
    Naliboff, B.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Brain response during expectation and delivery of visceral stimulation differs between IBS patients and healthy controls: an fMRI study2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17. Larsson, M.
    et al.
    Sjöberg, M.
    Craig, A. D.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Labus, J.
    University of California, Los Angeles.
    Mayer, E. A.
    University of California, Los Angeles.
    Naliboff, B.
    University of California, Los Angeles.
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Tillisch, K.
    University of California, Los Angeles.
    Walter, Susanna A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Brain Response to Expectation and Delivery of Rectal Distensions Before and After Hypnotherapy and Education Intervention in Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS): an fMRI Study2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim & MethodsWe aimed to determine the effect of standardized hypnosis treatment (HYP) on symptom outcomes and brain activity compared to an education intervention (EDU). Twenty-seven women with IBS were evaluated before and after treatment with hypnotherapy (n=17) or educational intervention (n=10). Behavioural treatment outcomes were determined by Severity Scoring System (IBS-SSS). A decrease of 50 points in SSS score was considered clinically significant treatment response. Blood oxygenated level dependent (BOLD) signal were acquired by using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance scanner during expectation and delivery of large rectal distension (45 mmHg). Group comparisons of treatment effects were performed within the general linear model in SPM8. Region of interest analyses were performed with significance threshold of p<0.05, family-wise error corrected.

    ResultsThere were no group differences in baseline SSS scores. Clinically significant change in SSS was observed in HYP (82%, n=14) and EDU (60%, n=6). Mean improvement in SSS was 108 (range -277 to 29) in HYP and 62 (range -250 to 79) in EDU (ns). During cued expectation of rectal distension, HYP was associated with significantly decreased activation in the left dorsal and ventral anterior insula, left mid insula, left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC) and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). Respectively, the EDU group showed less BOLD activity in the left ventral anterior insula after treatment. No significant treatment effect on brain response to the 45 mmHg distension was observed.

    ConclusionWhile both treatments improve IBS symptoms, the standardized hypnosis treatment has a more widespread central effect compared to education. The brain effects are seen during the expectation of rectal discomfort, but not during the experience of aversive rectal distensions. These findings are consistent with a HYP-induced reduction in pain expectation, rather than pain perception

  • 18.
    Larsson, M
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Gastroenterology.
    Tillisch, K
    University of Calif Los Angeles, USA .
    Mayer, E
    Oppenheimer Family Centre Neurobiol Stress, USA .
    Naliboff, B
    Oppenheimer Family Centre Neurobiol Stress, USA .
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Do IBS patients without rectal hypersensitivity adapt to repeated aversive rectal distensions? in NEUROGASTROENTEROLOGY AND MOTILITY, vol 24, issue , pp 109-1102012In: NEUROGASTROENTEROLOGY AND MOTILITY, Blackwell Publishing , 2012, Vol. 24, p. 109-110Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 19.
    Larsson, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Tillisch, Kirsten
    UCLA, Los Angeles, USA.
    Craig, Bud
    Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, Arizona.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Labus, Jennifer
    UCLA, Los Angeles, USA.
    Naliboff, Bruce
    UCLA, Los Angeles, USA.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Mayer, Emeran
    UCLA, Los Angeles, USA.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Brain Responses to Visceral Stimuli Reflect Visceral Sensitivity Thresholds in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome2012In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 142, no 3, p. 463-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND & AIMS:

    Only a fraction of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have increased perceptual sensitivity to rectal distension, indicating differences in processing and/or modulation of visceral afferent signals. We investigated the brain mechanisms of these perceptual differences.

    METHODS:

    We analyzed data from 44 women with IBS and 20 female healthy subjects (controls). IBS symptom severity was determined by a severity scoring system. Anxiety and depression symptoms were assessed using the hospital anxiety and depression score. Blood oxygen level-dependent signals were measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging during expectation and delivery of high (45 mmHg) and low (15 mmHg) intensity rectal distensions. Perception thresholds to rectal distension were determined in the scanner. Brain imaging data were compared among 18 normosensitive and 15 hypersensitive patients with IBS and 18 controls. Results were reported significant if peak P-values were ≤.05, with family-wise error correction in regions of interest.

    RESULTS:

    The subgroups of patients with IBS were similar in age, symptom duration, psychological symptoms, and IBS symptom severity. Although brain responses to distension were similar between normosensitive patients and controls, hypersensitive patients with IBS had greater activation of insula and reduced deactivation in pregenual anterior cingulate cortex during noxious rectal distensions, compared to controls and normosensitive patients with IBS. During expectation of rectal distension, normosensitive patients with IBS had more activation in right hippocampus than controls.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Despite similarities in symptoms, hyper- and normosensitive patients with IBS differ in cerebral responses to standardized rectal distensions and their expectation, consistent with differences in ascending visceral afferent input.

  • 20.
    Lowen, M B O
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mayer, E A.
    University of Calif Los Angeles, CA USA .
    Sjoberg, M
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Tillisch, K
    University of Calif Los Angeles, CA USA .
    Naliboff, B
    University of Calif Los Angeles, CA USA .
    Labus, J
    University of Calif Los Angeles, CA USA .
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Effect of hypnotherapy and educational intervention on brain response to visceral stimulus in the irritable bowel syndrome2013In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 37, no 12, p. 1184-1197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Gut-directed hypnotherapy can reduce IBS symptoms, but the mechanisms underlying this therapeutic effect remain unknown. Aim To determine the effect of hypnotherapy and educational intervention on brain responses to cued rectal distensions in IBS patients. Methods Forty-four women with moderate-to-severe IBS and 20 healthy controls (HCs) were included. Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals were measured by functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) during expectation and delivery of high- (45mmHg) and low-intensity (15mmHg) rectal distensions. Twenty-five patients were assigned to hypnotherapy (HYP) and 16 to educational intervention (EDU). Thirty-one patients completed treatments and posttreatment fMRI. Results Similar symptom reduction was achieved in both groups. Clinically successful treatment (all responders) was associated with significant BOLD attenuation during high-intensity distension in the dorsal and ventral anterior insula (cluster size 142, P=0.006, and cluster size 101, P=0.005 respectively). Moreover HYP responders demonstrated a prepost treatment BOLD attenuation in posterior insula (cluster sizes 59, P=0.05) while EDU responders had a BOLD attenuation in prefrontal cortex (cluster size 60, P=0.05). Prepost differences for expectation conditions were almost exclusively seen in the HYP group. Following treatment, the brain response to distension was similar to that observed in HCs, suggesting that the treatment had a normalising effect on the central processing abnormality of visceral signals in IBS. Conclusions The abnormal processing and enhanced perception of visceral stimuli in IBS can be normalised by psychological interventions. Symptom improvement in the treatment groups may be mediated by different brain mechanisms. Clinical trial number: NCT01815164.

  • 21.
    Lowén, Mats B. O.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mayer, E.
    Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Tillisch, K.
    Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Labus, J.
    Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Naliboff, B.
    Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Thorell, Lars-Håkan
    Emotra AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Deficient habituation to repeated rectal distensions in irritable bowel syndrome patients with visceral hypersensitivity2015In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 646-655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients show evidence of altered central processing of visceral signals. One of the proposed alterations in sensory processing is an altered engagement of endogenous pain modulation mechanisms. The aim was to test the hypothesis that IBS patients with (IBS-S) and without visceral hypersensitivity (IBS-N) differ in their ability to engage endogenous pain modulation mechanism during habituation to repeated visceral stimuli.

    Methods Brain blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response was measured during repeated rectal distension and its anticipation in 33 IBS patients with and without visceral hypersensitivity and 18 healthy controls (HCs). BOLD response to early and late phase of the distension series was compared within and between groups.

    Key Results While BOLD response was similar during the early phase of the experiment, IBS-S showed greater BOLD response than IBS-N and HCs during the late phase of the distension series. IBS-S showed increasing BOLD response both to the anticipation and delivery of low intensity rectal distensions in brain regions including insula, anterior and mid cingulate cortex. IBS-N showed decreasing BOLD response to repeated rectal distensions in brain regions including insula, prefrontal cortex and amygdala.

    Conclusions & Inferences These findings are consistent with compromised ability of IBS-S to respond to repeated delivery of rectal stimuli, both in terms of sensitization of sensory pathways and habituation of emotional arousal. The fact that both IBS subgroups met Rome criteria, and did not differ in terms of reported symptom severity demonstrates that similar symptom patterns can result from different underlying neurobiological mechanisms.

  • 22.
    Lundberg, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Icenhour, Adriane
    Bednarska, O.
    Tapper, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Witt, ST
    Elsenbruch, S
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Increased inhibitory neurotransmission within anterior cingulate cortex is related to comorbid anxiety in irritable bowel syndrome.2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Molinder, Herdis
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Agreus, Lars
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kjellström, Lars
    Sabbatsberg Hospital, Sweden.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Talley, Nicholas J.
    University of Newcastle, Australia.
    Andreasson, Anna
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyhlin, Henry
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    How individuals with the irritable bowel syndrome describe their own symptoms before formal diagnosis2015In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 120, no 4, p. 276-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate how individuals fulfilling the Rome II criteria for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) spontaneously described their symptoms. Method: From a general population, 1,244 randomly sampled adults were asked to describe their gastrointestinal symptoms (if any) verbally, in their own words, at a semi-structured interview. Their own descriptions were sorted into five symptom clusters. The participants independently completed a written questionnaire (the Rome II Modular Questionnaire (RMIIMQ)). Results: A total of 601 participants reported at least one gastrointestinal symptom, and 128 had IBS according to the RMIIMQ. After exclusion of organic causes, previously diagnosed IBS, or additional gastrointestinal diagnosis, 81 participants with IBS according to RMIIMQ remained. Five participants (6%) described symptoms included in the full definition of IBS, but none fulfilled the Rome II criteria completely. Abdominal pain or other IBS-related symptoms were reported by 64 (79%), and 12 (15%) did not report any IBS-like symptom. Conclusion: Previously undiagnosed individuals, who fulfil criteria for Rome II-IBS, often express their complaints in words that do not fit into the current diagnostic criteria.

  • 24.
    Morren, Geert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of magnetic sacral root stimulation on anorectal pressure and volume2001In: Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, ISSN 0012-3706, E-ISSN 1530-0358, Vol. 44, no 12, p. 1827-1833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Electrical sacral root stimulation induces defecation in spinal cord injury patients and is currently under examination as a new therapy for fecal incontinence. In contrast to electrical stimulation, magnetic stimulation is noninvasive. To gain more insight into the mechanism of action of sacral root stimulation, we studied the effects of magnetic sacral root stimulation on anorectal pressure and volume in both fecal incontinence and spinal cord injury patients.

    METHODS: Three groups were examined: 14 healthy volunteers, 18 fecal incontinence patients, and 14 spinal cord injury patients. Repetitive magnetic sacral root stimulation was performed bilaterally using bursts of five seconds at 5 Hz. Anal and rectal pressure changes and rectal volume changes were measured.

    RESULTS: An increase in anal pressure was seen in 100 percent of the control subjects, in 86 percent of the spinal cord injury patients, and in 73 percent of the fecal incontinence patients (P=0.03). The overall median pressure rise after right-sided and left-sided stimulation was 12 (interquartile range, 8-18.5) and 13 (interquartile range, 6-18) mmHg at the mid anal level. A decrease in rectal volume was provoked in 72 percent of the control subjects, in 79 percent of the spinal cord injury patients, and in 50 percent of the fecal incontinence patients. Overall median volume changes after right-sided and left-sided stimulation were 10 (range, 5-22) and 9 (range, 5-21) percent from baseline volume. An increase in rectal pressure could be measured in 56 percent of the control subjects, 77 percent of the fecal incontinence patients, and 43 percent of the spinal cord injury patients. Median pressure rises after right-sided and left-sided stimulation were 5 (range, 3-12) and 5 (range, 3-5) mmHg.

    CONCLUSIONS: Magnetic sacral root stimulation produces an increase in anal and rectal pressure and a decrease in rectal volume in healthy subjects and patients with fecal incontinence or a spinal cord injury.

  • 25.
    Morren, Geert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindehammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of the sacroanal motor pathway by magnetic and electric stimulation in patients with fecal incontinence2001In: Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, ISSN 0012-3706, E-ISSN 1530-0358, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 167-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The aim of this controlled study was to examine whether it was feasible to use magnetic stimulation as a new diagnostic tool to evaluate the motor function of the sacral roots and the pudendal nerves in patients with fecal incontinence.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: Nineteen consecutive patients (17 females) with a median age of 67 (range, 36-78) years referred for fecal incontinence and 14 healthy volunteers (six females) with a median age of 42 (range, 23-69) years were examined. Latency times of the motor response of the external anal sphincter were measured after electric transrectal stimulation of the pudendal nerve and magnetic stimulation of the sacral roots.

    RESULTS: The success rates of pudendal nerve terminal motor latency and sacral root terminal motor latency measurements were 100 and 85 percent, respectively, in the control group and 94 and 81 percent, respectively, in the fecal incontinence group. Median left pudendal nerve terminal motor latency was 1.88 (range, 1.4-2.9) milliseconds in the control group and 2.3 (range, 1.8-4) milliseconds in the fecal incontinence group (P <0.006). Median right pudendal nerve terminal motor latency was 1.7 (range, 1.3-3.4) milliseconds in the control group and 2.5 (range, 1.7-6) milliseconds in the fecal incontinence group (P <0.003). Median left sacral root terminal motor latency was 3.3 (range, 2.1-6) milliseconds in the control group and 3.7 (range, 2.8-4.8) milliseconds in the fecal incontinence group (P <3 0.03). Median right sacral root terminal motor latency was 3 (range, 2.6-5.8) milliseconds in the control group and 3.9 (range, 2.5-7.2) milliseconds in the fecal incontinence group (P =0.15).

    CONCLUSIONS: Combined pudendal nerve terminal motor latency and sacral root terminal motor latency measurements may allow us to study both proximal and distal pudendal nerve motor function in patients with fecal incontinence. Values of sacral root terminal motor latency have to be interpreted cautiously because of the uncertainty about the exact site of magnetic stimulation and the limited magnetic field strength.

  • 26.
    Morren, Geert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindehammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Latency of compound muscle action potentials of the anal sphincter after magnetic sacral stimulation2001In: Muscle and Nerve, ISSN 0148-639X, E-ISSN 1097-4598, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 1232-1235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to present the failure rate and normal values for motor latency of the anal sphincter after magnetic sacral stimulation (LMSS) using a modified recording technique. A bipolar sponge electrode was placed in the anal canal for recording. A ground electrode was placed in the rectum to reduce stimulus artifact. Magnetic stimulation was induced through a twin coil energized by a Maglite-r25 generator. Two groups were examined: 14 healthy volunteers and 14 patients with a spinal cord injury (SCI) above the conus. Nine of 56 studies (16%) failed. There were no significant differences in latency between right- and left-sided stimulation or between the healthy group and the SCI patients. As described, LMSS measurements are minimally invasive and have a low failure rate. They may be used to test the integrity of the distal motor pathway in patients with bladder or bowel dysfunction who may benefit from continuous electrical sacral root stimulation.

  • 27. Morren, GL
    et al.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Medical treatment of patients with faecal incontinence but without diarrhoea.2000In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 118, no 4, p. 5468-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Norlin, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Tegelstrom, V
    National board of forensic medicine, Sweden.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Jones, M P
    Psychology Department, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Faresjö, Åshild
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cortisol levels in hair are altered in irritable bowel syndrome - A case control study in primary care.2017In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 93, p. 69-75, article id S0022-3999(16)30613-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Stress is an important component in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Long term Hypothalamus Pituitary Adrenal (HPA)-axis activity can be studied by measuring hair cortisol concentrations (HCC). Some previous studies have indicated a dysregulated HPA-axis in IBS patients, but cortisol levels in hair have not yet been studied. We investigated whether HCC and self-reported stress differentiate IBS patients from controls.

    METHODS: In a cross-sectional study within 10 Swedish Primary Health Care Centers we compared patients in working age with active IBS to patients without GI complaints. The participants donated hair samples and completed questionnaires including a scale of self-reported perceived stress (PSS). 169 Rome III-fulfilling IBS patients and 316 non-IBS patients were available for final analyses.

    RESULTS: IBS patients had significantly lower HCC, median=16.3pg/mg, IQR=26.9pg/mg, compared to non-IBS patients, median=22.8pg/mg, IQR=29.1pg/mg. There was also a difference in the distribution of HCC quintiles between the two groups, with 30.2% IBS patients and 14.2% of non-IBS patients in the lowest quintile of HCC. PSS was higher among IBS patients with a mean (SD) total score of 25.3 (8.0) compared to controls 21.4, (7.5). Quintiles of HCC and PSS stayed significantly but very weakly related to IBS (B=-0.332, Std error=0.146, p<0.005) in multivariable analyses.

    CONCLUSION: This study suggests a possible suppression of the HPA-axis activity in a considerable portion of IBS patients.

  • 29.
    Sjödahl, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Johansson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ingemansson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ryn, Ann-Katrine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Combination therapy with biofeedback, loperamide, and stool-bulking agents is effective for the treatment of fecal incontinence in women - a randomized controlled trial2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 50, no 8, p. 965-974Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Biofeedback and medical treatments have been extensively used for moderate fecal incontinence (FI). There is limited data comparing and combining these two treatments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of biofeedback and medical treatments, separately and in combination. Material and methods. Sixty-four consecutive female patients, referred to a tertiary centre for FI, were included. The patients were randomized to start with either biofeedback (4-6 months) or medical treatment with loperamide and stool-bulking agents (2 months). Both groups continued with a combination of treatments, i.e. medical treatment was added to biofeedback and vice versa. A two-week prospective bowel symptom diary and anorectal physiology were evaluated at baseline, after single-and combination treatments. Results. Fifty-seven patients completed the study. Median number of leakage episodes during two weeks decreased from 6 to 3 (p less than 0.0001) from baseline to completion. The patients showed a significant (1) decrease in number of leakages without forewarning (p = 0.04); (2) decrease in number of stools with urgency (p = 0.001); (3) decrease in number of loose stool consistency; and (4) an increase in rectal sensory thresholds, both for maximum tolerable rectal pressure and first sensation (less than 0.01). The combination treatment was superior to both single treatments in terms of symptoms and functions. There was no significant difference between the two groups at any time point. Conclusions. The combination therapy with biofeedback and medical treatment is effective for symptom relief in FI. The symptom improvement was associated with improved fecal consistency, reduced urgency, and increased rectal sensory thresholds.

  • 30. Tillisch, Kirsten
    et al.
    Larsson, Mats
    Kilpatrick, Lisa
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Women With Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Show Altered Default Mode Network Connectivity2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology.
    Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Diagnostic Symptom Criteria and Impact of Rectal Distensions on Cortisol and Electrodermal Activity2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a population prevalence questionnaire study we demonstrated that constipation and fecal incontinence are common problems in the general Swedish population with a similar magnitude as in other Western countries. 95.6% of the population had between three bowel movements per day and three per week. Constipation was mostly defined by “hard stools” and “the need of using laxatives”.

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is characterized by abdominal pain/discomfort and abnormal bowel habits. The diagnostic criteria of IBS are based on clinical symptoms. Division of IBS patients into symptom subgroups appears important as their bowel symptoms are characterized by heterogeneity. International criteria to subgroup IBS (Rome II) are based on expert consensus and not on evidence. We investigated the variation of stool consistency and defecatory symptoms in 135 IBS patients by symptom diary cards. Most patients had

    alternating stool consistency. When subgroups were based on stool consistency, all kinds of defecatory symptoms (straining, urgency, and feeling of incomplete evacuations) were frequently present in all subgroups. Stool frequency was in the normal range in the majority of patients. We propose that IBS subgroups should be based on stool consistency. We suggest that Rome II supportive criteria must be reconsidered as the determination of presence or absence of specific symptoms does not work as an instrument for categorization of IBS patients into diarrhoea- and constipation-predominant. We also propose that abnormal stool frequency should be excluded to define subgroups of IBS. Alternating stool consistency and presence of different defecatory symptoms, regardless of stool consistency should be included as criteria for IBS.

    Stress is known to play an important role in the onset and modulation of IBS symptoms. From experimental studies there is evidence for a stress-dependent alteration of visceral sensitivity. The biological mechanisms responsible for the causal link between stress and IBS symptoms are not completely understood, but the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and the autonomous nervous system seem to play a prominent role in the pathophysiology of IBS. We investigated visceral sensitivity and the effect of repeated maximal tolerable rectal distensions on salivary cortisol levels and skin conductance in patients with IBS, chronic constipation and healthy volunteers.

    We found that the expectancy of the experimental situation per se (provocation of bowel symptoms by rectal distensions) compared to non-experimental days at home measured as salivary cortisol had a high impact on the level of arousal in IBS. IBS patients had higher skin conductance values than controls in the beginning of distension series and lower rectal thresholds for first sensation, urge and discomfort than healthy controls and constipation patients. IBS patients demonstrated habituation to repeated subjective maximal tolerable rectal distensions according to sympathetic activity although patients continued to rate their discomfort as maximal. Constipation patients had lower sympathetic activity than IBS patients before and during repeated rectal distensions. None of the groups demonstrated a significant increase in cortisol after repetitive rectal distensions.

    We conclude that Rome II supportive criteria for IBS should be reconsidered according to our findings. IBS patients are more sensitive to pre-experimental stress than healthy controls and patients with constipation. This should be considered in the design of experimental IBS studies. IBS patients habituated to subjective maximal tolerable, repetitive rectal distensions with decreasing sympathetic activity. Since responses to repeated stimuli of close-to-pain intensities are resistant to habituation this finding could be caused by psychological influences on perception, that is, perceptual response bias.

    List of papers
    1. A population-based study on bowel habits in a Swedish community: prevalence of faecal incontinence and constipation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A population-based study on bowel habits in a Swedish community: prevalence of faecal incontinence and constipation
    Show others...
    2002 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, Vol. 37, no 8, p. 911-916Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The self-reported bowel habits and the prevalence of faecal incontinence and constipation in men and women between the ages of 31 and 76 are assessed.

    Methods: A postal questionnaire was sent to a random sample ( n = 2000) of the total population of persons between the ages of 31 and 76 living in the County of Östergötland, Sweden.

    Results: The response rate was 80.5%. Overall, 67.8% reported one bowel movement per day and 4.4% had more than 21 or less than 3 bowel movements per week. This means that 95.6% had between 3 bowel movements a day to 3 bowel movements a week. Among women, 4.3%, and among men, 1.7%, reported less than 3 bowel movements per week. Women and men used the same terms to describe the definition of constipation. Women had a significantly higher self-reported prevalence of constipation than men ( P < 0.0001). About 20% of all women considered themselves constipated. The use of laxatives increased with age and 22% and 10% of elderly women and men, respectively, used laxatives including bulking agents for at least every fourth toilet procedure. About 10% reported leakage of faeces more often than once a month in the case of loose stools. With solid faeces, the rate of leakage was 1.4% and 0.4% for women and men, respectively. Soiling of underclothes more than once a month occurred in 21% of men and in 14.5% of women ( P = 0.006) and involuntary daily leakage of gas in 5.9% of men and 4.9% of women (n.s.).

    Conclusions: Constipation and faecal incontinence are common problems in a general Swedish population.

    Keywords
    Bowel Habits, Constipation, Faecal Incontinence, Population-BASED, Prevalence, Questionnaire
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14179 (URN)10.1080/003655202760230865 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-12-07 Created: 2006-12-07 Last updated: 2009-08-21
    2. Subgroups of irritable bowel syndrome: a new approach
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Subgroups of irritable bowel syndrome: a new approach
    2004 (English)In: European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 0954-691X (print) 1473-5687 (online), Vol. 16, no 10, p. 991-994Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The newly revised Rome criteria for the definition of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), derived from the consensus of experts in the field, were developed in order to identify subgroups of IBS patients for research. The criteria have, to our knowledge, never been validated. Both when trying to include IBS patients in studies and in clinical practice we found it difficult to apply the Rome 2 supportive criteria.

    Aim: To study the variation of stool consistency and defecatory symptoms in IBS patients prospectively with diary cards and to validate the Rome 2 supportive criteria.

    Methods: Sixty IBS patients, included by interview according to the Rome 1 criteria, recorded their bowel symptoms on diary cards over 40 days. Four subgroups were found, characterised by loose-stool-predominant, hard-stool-predominant, alternating stool consistency, and loose stools only. Urgency, straining and feeling of incomplete evacuation occurred in all but seven individuals, irrespective of subgroup.

    Results: The Rome 2 criteria could subclassify seven patients into diarrhoea-predominant IBS based on stool consistency and absence of straining and could subclassify no patients into constipation-predominant IBS, as urge was present in nearly all patients. Fifty-three patients could not be classified according to the Rome 2 criteria, as they had defecatory symptoms of all kinds.

    Conclusion: As the Rome 2 supportive criteria use the presence or absence of specific defecatory symptoms as an instrument for categorising IBS patients into diarrhoea- and constipation-predominant subgroups, these criteria could not be used for the majority of IBS patients in this study and should be reconsidered.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14180 (URN)10.1097/00042737-200410000-00007 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-12-07 Created: 2006-12-07 Last updated: 2009-10-31
    3. New criteria for irritable bowel syndrome based on prospective symptom evaluation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>New criteria for irritable bowel syndrome based on prospective symptom evaluation
    2005 (English)Other (Other academic)
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14181 (URN)10.1111/j.1572-0241.2005.00305_5.x (DOI)
    Note
    Letter to the editor, in American Journal of Gastroenterology vol. 100, no. 11 (2005), pp 2598-2599Available from: 2006-12-07 Created: 2006-12-07 Last updated: 2010-05-24
    4. Pre-experimental stress in patients with irritable bowel syndrome: high cortisol values already before symptom provocation with rectal distensions
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pre-experimental stress in patients with irritable bowel syndrome: high cortisol values already before symptom provocation with rectal distensions
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, Vol. 18, no 12, p. 1069-1077Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Stress is known to affect symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) probably by an alteration of visceral sensitivity. We studied the impact of maximal tolerable rectal distensions on cortisol levels in patients with IBS, chronic constipation and controls, and evaluated the effect of the experimental situation per se. In twenty-four IBS patients, eight patients with chronic constipation and 15 controls salivary cortisol was measured before and after repetitive maximal tolerable rectal balloon distensions and at similar times in their usual environment. Rectal sensitivity thresholds were determined. IBS patients but not controls and constipation patients had higher cortisol levels both before and after the experiment compared with similar times on an ordinary day in their usual environment (P = 0.0034 and 0.0002). There was no difference in salivary cortisol level before compared with after rectal distensions. The IBS patients had significantly lower thresholds for first sensation, urge and maximal tolerable distension than controls (P = 0.0247, 0.0001 and <0.0001) and for urge and maximal tolerable distension than patients with constipation (P = 0.006 and 0.013). IBS patients may be more sensitive to expectancy stress than controls and patients with constipation according to salivary cortisol. Rectal distensions were not associated with a further significant increase in cortisol levels.

    Keywords
    constipation, cortisol, hypersensitivity, IBS, rectaldistensions, stress
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14182 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2982.2006.00833.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-12-07 Created: 2006-12-07 Last updated: 2009-06-08
    5. Sympathetic (electrodermal) activity during repeated maximal rectal distensions in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and constipation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sympathetic (electrodermal) activity during repeated maximal rectal distensions in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and constipation
    2008 (English)In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 43-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is associated with visceral hypersensitivity, stress and autonomic dysfunction. Sympathetic activity during repeated events indicates excitatory or inhibitory mechanisms such as sensitization or habituation. We investigated skin conductance (SC) during repetitive rectal distensions at maximal tolerable pressure in patients with IBS and chronic constipation. Twenty-seven IBS patients, 13 constipation patients and 18 controls underwent two sets of isobaric rectal distensions. First, maximal tolerable distension was determined and then it was repeated five times. Skin conductance was measured continuously. Subjective symptom assessment remained steady in all groups. The baseline values of SC were higher in IBS patients than in patients with constipation and significantly lower in constipation patients than in controls. The maximal SC response to repetitive maximal distensions was higher in IBS patients compared with constipation patients. The amplitude of the initial SC response decreased successively with increased number of distensions in patients with IBS and constipation but not in controls. Irritable bowel syndrome and constipation patients habituated to maximal repetitive rectal distensions with decreasing sympathetic activity. Irritable bowel syndrome patients had higher sympathetic reactivity and baseline activity than constipation patients. A lower basal SC in constipation patients compared with controls suggests an inhibition of the sympathetic drive in constipation patients.

    Keywords
    constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, rectal distensions, skin conductance, sympathetic, visceral hypersensitivity
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14183 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2982.2007.00998.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-12-07 Created: 2006-12-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
  • 32.
    Walter, Susanna A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thorell, Lars-Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pre-experimental stress in patients with irritable bowel syndrome: high cortisol values already before symptom provocation with rectal distensions2006In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, Vol. 18, no 12, p. 1069-1077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress is known to affect symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) probably by an alteration of visceral sensitivity. We studied the impact of maximal tolerable rectal distensions on cortisol levels in patients with IBS, chronic constipation and controls, and evaluated the effect of the experimental situation per se. In twenty-four IBS patients, eight patients with chronic constipation and 15 controls salivary cortisol was measured before and after repetitive maximal tolerable rectal balloon distensions and at similar times in their usual environment. Rectal sensitivity thresholds were determined. IBS patients but not controls and constipation patients had higher cortisol levels both before and after the experiment compared with similar times on an ordinary day in their usual environment (P = 0.0034 and 0.0002). There was no difference in salivary cortisol level before compared with after rectal distensions. The IBS patients had significantly lower thresholds for first sensation, urge and maximal tolerable distension than controls (P = 0.0247, 0.0001 and <0.0001) and for urge and maximal tolerable distension than patients with constipation (P = 0.006 and 0.013). IBS patients may be more sensitive to expectancy stress than controls and patients with constipation according to salivary cortisol. Rectal distensions were not associated with a further significant increase in cortisol levels.

  • 33.
    Walter, Susanna A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thorell, Lars-Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sympathetic (electrodermal) activity during repeated maximal rectal distensions in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and constipation2008In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 43-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is associated with visceral hypersensitivity, stress and autonomic dysfunction. Sympathetic activity during repeated events indicates excitatory or inhibitory mechanisms such as sensitization or habituation. We investigated skin conductance (SC) during repetitive rectal distensions at maximal tolerable pressure in patients with IBS and chronic constipation. Twenty-seven IBS patients, 13 constipation patients and 18 controls underwent two sets of isobaric rectal distensions. First, maximal tolerable distension was determined and then it was repeated five times. Skin conductance was measured continuously. Subjective symptom assessment remained steady in all groups. The baseline values of SC were higher in IBS patients than in patients with constipation and significantly lower in constipation patients than in controls. The maximal SC response to repetitive maximal distensions was higher in IBS patients compared with constipation patients. The amplitude of the initial SC response decreased successively with increased number of distensions in patients with IBS and constipation but not in controls. Irritable bowel syndrome and constipation patients habituated to maximal repetitive rectal distensions with decreasing sympathetic activity. Irritable bowel syndrome patients had higher sympathetic reactivity and baseline activity than constipation patients. A lower basal SC in constipation patients compared with controls suggests an inhibition of the sympathetic drive in constipation patients.

  • 34.
    Walter, Susanna A
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Lundengård, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Simon, Rozalyn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Torkildsen Nilsson, Maritha
    The National Board of Forensic Medicine and Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Söderfeldt, Birgitta
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Positive Allosteric Modulator of GABA Lowers BOLD Responses in the Cingulate Cortex2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge about the neural underpinnings of the negative blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) responses in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is still limited. We hypothesized that pharmacological GABAergic modulation attenuates BOLD responses, and that blood concentrations of a positive allosteric modulator of GABA correlate inversely with BOLD responses in the cingulate cortex. We investigated whether or not pure task-related negative BOLD responses were co-localized with pharmacologically modulated BOLD responses. Twenty healthy adults received either 5 mg diazepam or placebo in a double blind, randomized design. During fMRI the subjects performed a working memory task. Results showed that BOLD responses in the cingulate cortex were inversely correlated with diazepam blood concentrations; that is, the higher the blood diazepam concentration, the lower the BOLD response. This inverse correlation was most pronounced in the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and the anterior mid-cingulate cortex. For subjects with diazepam plasma concentration > 0.1 mg/L we observed negative BOLD responses with respect to fixation baseline. There was minor overlap between cingulate regions with task-related negative BOLD responses and regions where the BOLD responses were inversely correlated with diazepam concentration. We interpret that the inverse correlation between the BOLD response and diazepam was caused by GABA-related neural inhibition. Thus, this study supports the hypothesis that GABA attenuates BOLD responses in fMRI. The minimal overlap between task-related negative BOLD responses and responses attenuated by diazepam suggests that these responses might be caused by different mechanisms.

  • 35.
    Walter, Susanna A
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kjellström, Lars
    Department of Gastroenterology, Sabbatsbergs Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Talley, Nicholas J
    Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.
    Andreasson, Anna Nixon
    Center for Family and Community Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyhlin, Henry
    Department of Gastroenterology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Agréus, Lars
    Center for Family and Community Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Prospective Diary Evaluation of Unexplained Abdominal Pain and Bowel Dysfunction: A Population-Based Colonoscopy Study2011In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 56, no 5, p. 1444-1451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Diagnostic criteria for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have not been validated by prospective symptom diary. We investigated the bowel patterns in community subjects with and without non-organic abdominal pain, and compared the symptoms with subjects fulfilling the Rome II criteria (IBS).

    METHODS: From the Swedish population register, a random sample completed an abdominal symptom questionnaire. Responders were subsequently invited for a clinical evaluation and offered a colonoscopy regardless of whether they had abdominal symptoms or not. A total of 268 subjects underwent colonoscopy, clinical evaluation by gastroenterologist, laboratory investigations, and completed the Rome questionnaire and prospective gastrointestinal (GI) symptom diaries for 1 week. Twenty-three subjects of 268 were excluded due to organic GI disease.

    RESULTS: Subjects recorded 2,194 bowel movements and 370 abdominal pain episodes on 1,504 days. Subjects with pain in the diary (n = 81) had higher stool frequency (P = 0.01), more urgency (P = 0.0002), feelings of incomplete evacuation (P = 0.0002), nausea (P = 0.0009), and abdominal bloating (P = 0.0005) than subjects without pain (n = 151). Twenty-eight subjects (12%) fulfilled the Rome II criteria for IBS. Together, they had 96 pain episodes but only 4% were improved by defecation; 29% of the pain episodes started or worsened after a meal. Subjects with IBS and other subjects with non-organic abdominal pain (n = 64) exhibited no differences in terms of the proportions of pain episodes improved by defecation, bloating, stool frequency, consistency, or defecatory symptoms.

    CONCLUSIONS: Current criteria for IBS that rely on recall of the relationship between abdominal pain and bowel disturbance may overcall this association when measured prospectively.

  • 36.
    Walter, Susanna A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ragnarsson, Gudmundur
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    New criteria for irritable bowel syndrome based on prospective symptom evaluation2005Other (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Walter, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Gotthard, Ricci
    Bergmark, M.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    A population-based study on bowel habits in a Swedish community: prevalence of faecal incontinence and constipation2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, Vol. 37, no 8, p. 911-916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The self-reported bowel habits and the prevalence of faecal incontinence and constipation in men and women between the ages of 31 and 76 are assessed.

    Methods: A postal questionnaire was sent to a random sample ( n = 2000) of the total population of persons between the ages of 31 and 76 living in the County of Östergötland, Sweden.

    Results: The response rate was 80.5%. Overall, 67.8% reported one bowel movement per day and 4.4% had more than 21 or less than 3 bowel movements per week. This means that 95.6% had between 3 bowel movements a day to 3 bowel movements a week. Among women, 4.3%, and among men, 1.7%, reported less than 3 bowel movements per week. Women and men used the same terms to describe the definition of constipation. Women had a significantly higher self-reported prevalence of constipation than men ( P < 0.0001). About 20% of all women considered themselves constipated. The use of laxatives increased with age and 22% and 10% of elderly women and men, respectively, used laxatives including bulking agents for at least every fourth toilet procedure. About 10% reported leakage of faeces more often than once a month in the case of loose stools. With solid faeces, the rate of leakage was 1.4% and 0.4% for women and men, respectively. Soiling of underclothes more than once a month occurred in 21% of men and in 14.5% of women ( P = 0.006) and involuntary daily leakage of gas in 5.9% of men and 4.9% of women (n.s.).

    Conclusions: Constipation and faecal incontinence are common problems in a general Swedish population.

  • 38.
    Walter, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Holmgren, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Association between bowel symptoms, symptom severity, and quality of life in Swedish patients with fecal incontinence2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 6-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The association between abdominal symptoms, disease severity of fecal incontinence (FI), and quality of life (QoL) is not yet clear. We hypothesized that it would become clearer by prospective diary data. We also aimed to compare QoL of FI patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) patients in relapse and remission.

    Material and methods. Sixty-five consecutive female patients with FI recorded bowel symptoms prospectively on diary cards. QoL was evaluated with the disease specific short health scale questionnaire (SHS). Patients with UC in remission and relapse were used as a reference group regarding SHS.

    Results. FI patients had median 3.5 leakage episodes/week. In all, 48% of bowel movements were associated with urgency. Urgency was correlated to decreased QoL according to SHS domains: symptoms (Rho = 0.54, p = 0.0002), function (Rho = 0.48, p = 0.0008), and disease related worry (Rho = 0.32, p = 0.027). Abdominal pain and bloating, reported by nearly half of patients, correlated to deceased QoL but not to number of leakages. QoL of patients with FI compared to UC in active phase (n = 35) was similar. FI patients had decreased QoL compared to UC in remission (n = 94) in all dimensions of SHS: symptoms (p < 0.0001), function (p < 0.0001), disease related worry (p < 0.0001), and general well being (p = 0.03).

    Conclusion. Urgency and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-like symptoms were associated with decreased QoL in FI. Therefore, IBS should be considered as an important confounding factor in FI QoL studies. QoL in patients with FI was considerably decreased, in a similar extent as in patients with UC in relapse.

  • 39.
    Walter, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Jones, M P.
    Macquarie University, Australia .
    Talley, N J.
    University of Newcastle, Australia .
    Kjellstrom, L
    Centre Family Med, Sweden .
    Nyhlin, H
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Andreasson, A N.
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Agreus, L
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Abdominal pain is associated with anxiety and depression scores in a sample of the general adult population with no signs of organic gastrointestinal disease2013In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 741-E576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Abdominal pain is common in the community, but only a subset meet diagnostic criteria for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Although anxiety and depression have been linked to IBS, the role of mood disturbances in the remainder with symptoms remains unclear. We aimed to study the associations between abdominal pain, anxiety, depression, and quality of life in the general population who were free of organic colonic disease by colonoscopy. Methods Two hundred and seventy-two randomly selected subjects from the general population, mean age 54 years (27-71), were clinically evaluated, had a colonoscopy and laboratory investigations to exclude organic gastrointestinal (GI) disease. All subjects completed GI symptom diaries for 1 week, the Rome II modular questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Short Form 36. Key Results Twenty-two subjects were excluded due to organic disease; 1532 daily symptom records were available for analysis in the remainder. Thirty-four percent (n = 83) recorded at least one episode of abdominal pain on the diary. Twelve percent fulfilled Rome II criteria for IBS. Both anxiety and depression scores were higher in subjects who reported abdominal pain vs those who did not (P andlt; 0.0005 and P andlt; 0.0005). Anxiety and depression scores independently from IBS diagnosis (Rome II) predicted pain reporting and also correlated positively with pain burden. Quality of life scores were generally lower in subjects with abdominal pain. Conclusions andamp; Inferences Anxiety and depression are linked to functional abdominal pain, not only in subjects with IBS but also in otherwise healthy people with milder, subtle GI symptoms.

  • 40.
    Walter, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Jones, Michael P
    Talley, Nicholas J
    Validation of ROME III Criteria for Irritable Bowel Syndrome in a Primary Care Setting - A Pilot Study2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Walter, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kjellstrom, Lars
    Karolinska Institute.
    Nyhlin, Henry
    Karolinska Institute.
    Talley, Nicholas J
    Mayo Clinic Florida.
    Agreus, Lars
    Karolinska Institute.
    Assessment of normal bowel habits in the general adult population: the Popcol study2010In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY, ISSN 0036-5521, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 556-566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Defining normal stool habit is important when evaluating diarrhoea or constipation, but common confounders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or the intake of medications with gastrointestinal side effects have not been considered in earlier population based studies defining what is normal. We hypothesized that the exclusion of subjects with common confounders would help to better understand what are "normal bowel habits". We aimed to prospectively study bowel habits in a carefully studied random sample of the general population. Material and methods. Two hundred and sixty-eight randomly selected subjects between 18 and 70 years completed symptom diaries for one week and were clinically evaluated by a gastroenterologist. They also had a colonoscopy and laboratory investigations to exclude organic disease. Results. One hundred and twenty-four subjects had no organic gastrointestinal abnormality, IBS, or relevant medication; 98% of them had between three stools per day and three per week. Seventy-seven percent of all stools were normal, 12% hard, and 10% loose in consistency. Urgency was reported by 36%; straining by 47% and incomplete defecation by 46%. After the exclusion of subjects with organic abnormalities, women had significantly more symptoms than men in terms of abdominal pain, bloating, constipation, urgency, and feeling of incomplete evacuation but these gender differences disappeared after excluding subjects with IBS. Conclusions. This study confirms that normal stool frequency is between three per week and three per day. We could not demonstrate any gender or age differences in terms of stool frequency, defecatory symptoms or abdominal bloating. Some degree of urgency, straining, and incomplete evacuation should be considered normal.

  • 42.
    Walter, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Larsson, Mats
    Tillisch, Kirsten
    IBS Patients With Normal Visceral Sensitivity Differ From HealthyControls During the Expectation but Not the Delivery of an Aversive Distension2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Walter, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lowén, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mayer, Emeran A
    Tillisch, Kirsten
    Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, USA.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Craig, Arthur D.
    Su2113 High-Intense Rectal Urgency and Its Representation in the Brain2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several brain imaging studies have demonstrated that visceral distensions activate the insular cortex but there is limited knowledge about which  subregions of the insula underpin the feeling of rectal urgency. An isobaric rectal balloon distension can be subdivided into the inflation phase when pressure is rising (rise) and a stable phase, when the pressure is constant. The rise phase is characterized by a more distinct sensation of urgency (Akervall et al., 1988). We aimed to study the BOLD response during the rise phase of a standardized rectal distension in subregions of the insula, in healthy controls.

    Method:Twenty right-handed female healthy volunteers (mean age 32.2 yrs, range 21-54) were included. Rectal pressure sensory thresholds were determined before functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) while the subjects were placed in the MR  scanner. Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) signals were measured during the rise periods (6.6-7.2 sec) of 20 rectal distensions (45mmHg). Regions of interest (ROIs) included 10 insula subregions: Left (L) and right (R) anterior ventral, anterior dorsal, posterior ventral, posterior dorsal and mid insula. Results were reported as significant if peak p-value were, 0.05 with familywise error (FWE) correction in the ROIs.

    Results: The mean values for rectal sensory thresholds for first sensation, first sensation of urgency and maximum tolerable distension were 16 mmHg (SD 3.9), 28mmHg (SD 6.2) and 55 mmHg (SD 12.3), respectively. Complete fMRI data were available from 18 subjects. The rise period of the rectal distension generated significant BOLD activation in the right hemisphere in the anterior dorsal, anterior ventral, mid and posterior ventral parts of the insula. On the left side BOLD activity was generated in mid, posterior ventral and posterior dorsal parts of the insula but not in the anterior insula. Akervall S et al, 1988, Manovolumetry: A new method for investigation of anorectal function. Gut 29:614-623.

  • 44.
    Walter, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Morren, Geert
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ryn, Ann-Katrine
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rectal pressure response to a meal in patients with high spinal cord injury2003In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 84, no 1, p. 108-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To determine whether there is a postprandial increase of rectal pressure in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and to compare their rectal pressures with those of healthy volunteers.

    Design: A before-after trial comparing SCI and control subjects.

    Setting: Patients were recruited from the register of an SCI unit at a rehabilitation medicine department, and the study took place at the university hospital laboratory in Sweden.

    Participants: Ten patients with high traumatic SCI and 9 healthy volunteers. Eight patients had a lesion above level T5.

    Intervention: Continuous anorectal manometry was performed. Rectal activity was calculated before and at regular time intervals after a 1000-cal test meal.

    Main Outcome Measure: Rectal activity measured as area under the pressure curve.

    Results: There was a significant increase in rectal activity of 46% after 10 minutes in the patients but of 72% after 5 minutes in the volunteers. There was no difference in fasting rectal activity, but patients had a stronger mean rectal postprandial response during 60 minutes compared with volunteers.

    Conclusions: These results support the theory that the colonic response to food is preserved in patients with high SCI. 

  • 45.
    Walter, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Münch, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ost, A
    Karolinska Institute.
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Anorectal function in patients with collagenous colitis in active and clinically quiescent phase, in comparison with healthy controls2010In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 534-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Collagenous colitis (CC) is characterized by chronic watery diarrhea, a macroscopically normal colonic mucosa but typical microscopic inflammation. Chronic mucosal inflammation of the colon and rectum has earlier been associated with altered visceral sensitivity, but anorectal function has never been reported in cases of CC. Methods Fifteen patients with CC in active phase recorded their symptoms. The severity of inflammation was determined in mucosal biopsies. Anorectal function was assessed and compared with that of 15 healthy volunteers of corresponding age and matched for gender. After 6 weeks of budesonide treatment when the patients were in clinical remission anorectal function was re-assessed. Key Results All patients had inflammation also in rectum. Patients in active phase had, during rectal balloon distension a higher rectal sensory threshold for the feeling of first sensation, compared with controls (P = 0.02). There were no differences in rectal sensory threshold for the feeling of urgency or maximum distension, between patients with CC in active phase and healthy controls. Rectal volume at first sensation was significantly greater in patients than in controls (P = 0.02), but there were no differences at urgency or maximum distension. Twelve of 15 patients completed 6 weeks of budesonide treatment and all went into clinical remission. No differences in anorectal function were measured when patients had active disease, compared with clinical remission. Conclusions andamp; Inferences Collagenous colitis was not associated with rectal hypersensitivity or disturbed anal function despite rectal inflammation. On the contrary, the sensation threshold for light rectal pressure was elevated in patients with active CC.

  • 46.
    Walter, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Skagerström, Eva
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Subgroups of irritable bowel syndrome: a new approach2004In: European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 0954-691X (print) 1473-5687 (online), Vol. 16, no 10, p. 991-994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The newly revised Rome criteria for the definition of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), derived from the consensus of experts in the field, were developed in order to identify subgroups of IBS patients for research. The criteria have, to our knowledge, never been validated. Both when trying to include IBS patients in studies and in clinical practice we found it difficult to apply the Rome 2 supportive criteria.

    Aim: To study the variation of stool consistency and defecatory symptoms in IBS patients prospectively with diary cards and to validate the Rome 2 supportive criteria.

    Methods: Sixty IBS patients, included by interview according to the Rome 1 criteria, recorded their bowel symptoms on diary cards over 40 days. Four subgroups were found, characterised by loose-stool-predominant, hard-stool-predominant, alternating stool consistency, and loose stools only. Urgency, straining and feeling of incomplete evacuation occurred in all but seven individuals, irrespective of subgroup.

    Results: The Rome 2 criteria could subclassify seven patients into diarrhoea-predominant IBS based on stool consistency and absence of straining and could subclassify no patients into constipation-predominant IBS, as urge was present in nearly all patients. Fifty-three patients could not be classified according to the Rome 2 criteria, as they had defecatory symptoms of all kinds.

    Conclusion: As the Rome 2 supportive criteria use the presence or absence of specific defecatory symptoms as an instrument for categorising IBS patients into diarrhoea- and constipation-predominant subgroups, these criteria could not be used for the majority of IBS patients in this study and should be reconsidered.

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