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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics MH.
    Can Lactobacillus Reuteri Prevent Allergic Disease in Early Childhood?2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An altered microbial exposure may be partly responsible for the increase of allergic diseases in populations with a western lifestyle. Activation of the immune system by microbes early in life is probably required for an accurate maturation of the immune system. Probiotics, live bacteria which are considered to confer health when ingested, have been suggested to prevent eczema and sensitisation infants.

    Aim: The general aim of this thesis was to assess the effect of oral supplementation with the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri (L. reuteri) in infancy on the development of allergic disease and sensitisation during the first 2 years of life and to examine mechanisms possibly underlying eventual effects on allergic manifestations.

    Subjects: The thesis is based on results obtained from a prospective double-blind placebo-controlled multicenter trial, comprising 232 families with allergic disease, of whom 188 completed the study.

    Methods: The families were recruited at the antenatal clinic, and the mothers received L. reuteri ATCC 55730 (1 x 108 colony forming units) or placebo daily from gestational week 36 until delivery. Their babies then continued with the same study product from birth until 12 months of age and were followed up for another year. The primary outcomes were allergic disease, with or without positive skin prick test or circulating IgE to food allergens. Bacterial counts and prevalence were assessed in maternal breast milk and faeces and infant faeces, employing conventional cultivation methods. Cytokines and IgA antibodies were analysed in colostrum and mature milk from the mothers with ELISA, and Na/K- ratio in breast milk with ion selective electrodes. Circulating Th1/Th2-associated chemokines were analysed in cord and peripheral blood in the infants with Luminex or ELISA technique.

    Results: The incidence of eczema was similar, 36% in the treated versus 34% in the placebo group. The L. reuteri group had a lower cumulative incidence of IgE-associated allergic disease, 20% versus 35% (p=0.04), and less IgE-associated eczema during the second year, 8% versus 20% (p=0.02). The prevalence of L. reuteri was higher during the first year of life in stool samples from infants, as well as in colostrum, in the active as compared to the placebo treated group. Colostrum from L. reuteri supplemented mothers had lower levels of TGF-β2, and low levels of this cytokine were associated with less sensitisation. Low Th1- and high Th2-associated chemokine levels preceded allergic disease. The presence of L. reuteri in stool was associated with lower levels of the Th2-associated chemokines CCL17 and CCL22 and higher levels of the Th1-associated CXCL11.

    Conclusion: Although a preventive effect of probiotics on infant eczema was not confirmed, the L. reuteri treated infants had lower incidence of IgE-associated allergic disease at two years of age, and therefore possibly run a reduced risk to develop later respiratory allergic disease. The mechanisms underlying this effect require further elucidation.

    List of papers
    1. Probiotics in prevention of IgE-associated eczema: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Probiotics in prevention of IgE-associated eczema: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial
    Show others...
    2007 (English)In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 119, no 5, p. 1174-1180Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: An altered microbial exposure may underlie the increase of allergic diseases in affluent societies. Probiotics may alleviate and even prevent eczema in infants.

    OBJECTIVE: To prevent eczema and sensitization in infants with a family history of allergic disease by oral supplementation with the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri.

    METHODS: Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, which comprised 232 families with allergic disease, of whom 188 completed the study. The mothers received L reuteri ATCC 55730 (1 x 10(8) colony forming units) daily from gestational week 36 until delivery. Their babies then continued with the same product from birth until 12 months of age and were followed up for another year. Primary outcome was allergic disease, with or without positive skin prick test or circulating IgE to food allergens.

    RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of eczema was similar, 36% in the treated versus 34% in the placebo group. The L reuteri group had less IgE-associated eczema during the second year, 8% versus 20% (P = .02), however. Skin prick test reactivity was also less common in the treated than in the placebo group, significantly so for infants with mothers with allergies, 14% versus 31% (P = .02). Wheeze and other potentially allergic diseases were not affected.

    CONCLUSION: Although a preventive effect of probiotics on infant eczema was not confirmed, the treated infants had less IgE-associated eczema at 2 years of age and therefore possibly run a reduced risk to develop later respiratory allergic disease. CLINICAL IMPLICATION: Probiotics may reduce the incidence of IgE-associated eczema in infancy.

    Keywords
    Children, eczema, IgE, Lactobacillus, prevention, probiotics, sensitization, skin prick test
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-20580 (URN)10.1016/j.jaci.2007.01.007 (DOI)17349686 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-09-15 Created: 2009-09-15 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Probiotic lactobacilli in breast milk and infant stool in relation to oral intake during the first year of life
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Probiotic lactobacilli in breast milk and infant stool in relation to oral intake during the first year of life
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition, ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 349-354Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: This is to identify factors affecting the prevalence of Lactobacillus reuteri in maternal faeces and breast milk and infant faeces after oral supplementation with L reuteri and to assess the influence on microbial ecology, particularly Clostridium difficile and Bifidobacterium colonization.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this double-blind trial, 232 mothers with a family history of atopic disease were randomized to a daily intake of either L reuteri American-type culture collection (ATCC) 55730 (1 x 10 colony-forming units [CFU]) or placebo for the last 4 weeks of pregnancy. Their babies then continued with the same study product daily from birth until 12 months of age. Bacterial counts and prevalence were assessed in maternal breast milk and faeces and infant faeces, using conventional cultivation methods.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of L reuteri was higher during the first year of life in the stool samples from infants in the active as compared with the placebo-treated group. The highest prevalence was recorded at 5 to 6 days of age (82% in the treated vs 20% in the placebo group, P < 0.001). Lactobacillus reuteri was isolated from 12% and 2%, respectively, in the colostrum samples (P < 0.05). Breast-feeding seemed to reduce faecal L reuteri counts, although antibiotics did not influence the levels of L reuteri. The administration of L reuteri did not affect bifidobacteria or C difficile colonization.

    CONCLUSION: Lactobacillus reuteri may be detected in breast milk after oral supplementation to the mother and in almost all infants after oral supplementation during the first year of life, as well as occasionally in many untreated infants.

    Keywords
    Bifidobacteria, Clostridium, Faeces, Probiotics, Lactobacillus reuteri
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-20622 (URN)10.1097/MPG.0b013e31818f091b (DOI)19525871 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-09-15 Created: 2009-09-15 Last updated: 2009-09-27Bibliographically approved
    3. Low breast milk TGF-beta2 is induced by Lactobacillus reuteri supplementation and associates with reduced risk of sensitization during infancy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low breast milk TGF-beta2 is induced by Lactobacillus reuteri supplementation and associates with reduced risk of sensitization during infancy
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: Pediatric allergy and immunology : official publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 497-504Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The immunological composition of breast milk differs between mothers. The reasons for these differences and the consequences for the breast-fed infants are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri supplementation on the immunological composition of breast milk in relation to sensitization and eczema in the babies. Total IgA, secretory IgA (SIgA), TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2, IL-10, TNF, soluble CD14 (sCD14), and Na/K ratios were analyzed in colostrum and mature milk obtained from women treated with L. reuteri (n = 54) or placebo (n = 55) from gestational week 36 until delivery. Bacteriological analyses of L. reuteri were performed in faecal samples of the mothers. The infants were followed prospectively for 2 yr regarding development of eczema and sensitization as defined by a positive skin prick test and/or circulating allergen-specific IgE antibodies at 6, 12, and 24 months of age. Supplementation of L. reuteri during pregnancy was associated with low levels of TGF-beta2 and slightly increased levels of IL-10 in colostrum. For TGF-beta2, this association was most pronounced in mothers with detectable L. reuteri in faeces. Infants receiving breast milk with low levels of TGF-beta2 were less likely to become sensitized during their first 2 yr of life. A similar trend was observed for development of IgE-associated eczema. The levels of total IgA, SIgA, TGF-beta1, TNF, sCD14, and Na/K ratios in breast milk were not affected by the intake of L. reuteri. None of these parameters correlated with sensitization or development of eczema in the infant, except for high Na/K ratios that associated with increased risk of sensitization. Supplementation with L. reuteri during late pregnancy reduces breast milk levels of TGF-beta2, and low levels of this cytokine are associated with less sensitization and possibly less IgE-associated eczema in breast-fed infants.

    Keywords
    Lactobacilli, breast milk, TGF-b, sensitization, infancy
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-20623 (URN)10.1111/j.1399-3038.2007.00687.x (DOI)18221472 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-09-15 Created: 2009-09-15 Last updated: 2009-09-27Bibliographically approved
    4. A Th1/Th2-associated chemokine imbalance preceding allergic disease is influenced by birth size, breastfeeding, daycare and probiotics
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Th1/Th2-associated chemokine imbalance preceding allergic disease is influenced by birth size, breastfeeding, daycare and probiotics
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: in Allergy, vol 64, 2009, Vol. 64, p. 56-56Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Analyses of circulating chemokines offer novel tools to investigate the Th1/Th2 imbalance in allergic disease in vivo and explore the influence of pre- and postnatal factors in infancy.

    Objective: To relate circulating Th1- and Th2-associated chemokines to the development of allergic disease, pre- and postnatal factors and probiotic supplementation in infancy.

    Methods: Circulating levels of Th1-associated CXC-chemokine ligand (CXCL)9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 and Th2-associated CC-chemokine ligand (CCL)17, CCL18 and CCL22 were assessed with Luminex and ELISA at birth (n=109), 6 (n=104), 12 (n=116) and 24 months (n=123) in 179 infants completing a double-blind placebo-controlled allergy prevention trial with Lactobacillus reuteri during the last month of gestation and through the first year of life. The infants were followed regarding development of allergic disease and sensitization until two years of age.

    Results: The Th2-associated chemokines were as highest at birth and then decreased, whereas the Th1-associated chemokines increased with age. Low Th1- and high Th2-associated chemokine levels were observed in children developing allergic disease. Sensitization was preceded by elevated CCL22 and reduced CXCL11 levels. High Th2-associated chemokine46 levels were associated with increased birth length and weight and long duration of breastfeeding, and high Th1-associated chemokine levels with day-care attendance. Presence of L. reuteri in stool the first week of life was associated with low CCL17 and CCL22 and high CXCL11 levels at 6 months.

    Conclusion: Allergic disease in infancy was associated with low circulating Th1- and high Th2-associated chemokine levels during the first year of life. The chemokine levels were affected by both pre and –postnatal factors.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-19153 (URN)
    Available from: 2009-06-12 Created: 2009-06-12 Last updated: 2009-09-15Bibliographically approved
  • 2.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Editorial Material: Not all probiotic strains prevent necrotising enterocolitis in premature infants in LANCET, vol 387, issue 10019, pp 624-6252016In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 387, no 10019, p. 624-625Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 3.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Using probiotics to prevent necrotising enterocolitis2017In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 11, p. 1718-1719Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 4.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jakobsson, H.E.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, A.F.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björksten, B.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Örebro University, Sweden .
    Engstrand, L.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Low gut microbiota diversity in early infancy precedes asthma at school age2014In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 842-850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Low total diversity of the gut microbiota during the first year of life is associated with allergic diseases in infancy, but little is known how early microbial diversity is related to allergic disease later in school age.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To assess microbial diversity and characterize the dominant bacteria in stool during the first year of life in relation to the prevalence of different allergic diseases in school age, such as asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC) and eczema.

    METHODS:

    The microbial diversity and composition was analysed with barcoded 16S rDNA 454 pyrosequencing in stool samples at 1 week, 1 month and 12 months of age in 47 infants which were subsequently assessed for allergic disease and skin prick test reactivity at 7 years of age (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01285830).

    RESULTS:

    Children developing asthma (n = 8) had a lower diversity of the total microbiota than non-asthmatic children at 1 week (P = 0.04) and 1 month (P = 0.003) of age, whereas allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (n = 13), eczema (n = 12) and positive skin prick reactivity (n = 14) at 7 years of age did not associate with the gut microbiota diversity. Neither was asthma associated with the microbiota composition later in infancy (at 12 months). Children having IgE-associated eczema in infancy and subsequently developing asthma had lower microbial diversity than those that did not. There were no significant differences, however, in relative abundance of bacterial phyla and genera between children with or without allergic disease.

    CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

    Low total diversity of the gut microbiota during the first month of life was associated with asthma but not ARC in children at 7 years of age. Measures affecting microbial colonization of the infant during the first month of life may impact asthma development in childhood.

  • 5.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jakobsson, Hedvig E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden .
    Bjorksten, Bengt
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Engstrand, Lars
    KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden .
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Reply: Gut microbiota diversity and atopic disease: Does breast-feeding play a role?2013In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 131, no 1, p. 248-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 6.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jakobsson, Hedvig E
    Department of Preparedness, Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control, Solna, Sweden.
    Andersson, Anders F
    Science for Life Laboratory, School of Biotechnology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björksten, Bengt
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, and the School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Department of Preparedness, Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control, Solna, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Low diversity of the gut microbiota in infants with atopic eczema2012In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 129, no 2, p. 434-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    It is debated whether a low total diversity of the gut microbiota in early childhood is more important than an altered prevalence of particular bacterial species for the increasing incidence of allergic disease. The advent of powerful, cultivation-free molecular methods makes it possible to characterize the total microbiome down to the genus level in large cohorts.

    Objective

    We sought to assess microbial diversity and characterize the dominant bacteria in stool during the first year of life in relation to atopic eczema development.

    Methods

    Microbial diversity and composition were analyzed with barcoded 16S rDNA 454-pyrosequencing in stool samples at 1 week, 1 month, and 12 months of age in 20 infants with IgE-associated eczema and 20 infants without any allergic manifestation until 2 years of age (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01285830).

    Results

    Infants with IgE-associated eczema had a lower diversity of the total microbiota at 1 month (P = .004) and a lower diversity of the bacterial phylum Bacteroidetes and the genus Bacteroides at 1 month (P = .02 and P = .01) and the phylum Proteobacteria at 12 months of age (P = .02). The microbiota was less uniform at 1 month than at 12 months of age, with a high interindividual variability. At 12 months, when the microbiota had stabilized, Proteobacteria, comprising gram-negative organisms, were more abundant in infants without allergic manifestation (Empirical Analysis of Digital Gene Expression in R [edgeR] test: P = .008, q = 0.02).

    Conclusion

    Low intestinal microbial diversity during the first month of life was associated with subsequent atopic eczema.

  • 7.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jakobsson, Ted
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björksten, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Oldaeus, Göran
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    No effect of probiotics on respiratory allergies: a seven-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial in infancy2013In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 556-561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Supplementation with the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri reduced the incidence of IgE-associated allergic disease in infancy. This treatment might therefore also reduce the risk of asthma and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in school age.

    Objective

    To evaluate whether perinatal and infant supplementation with L. reuteri reduced the prevalence of respiratory allergic disease in school age and to explore whether this supplementation was associated with any long-term side effects.

    Methods

    A randomized, placebo-controlled trial with oral supplementation with Lreuteri ATCC 55730 (1 × 108 CFU) during the last month of gestation and through the first year of life comprising 232 families with allergic disease, of whom 184 completed a 7-yr follow-up. The primary outcomes at 7 yr of age were allergic disease and skin prick test reactivity (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01285830).

    Results

    The prevalence of asthma (15% in the probiotic vs. 16% in placebo group), allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (27% vs. 20%), eczema (21% vs. 19%) and skin prick test reactivity (29% vs. 26%) was similar in the probiotic and placebo group. Growth indices and gastrointestinal symptoms were similar in the two groups. No severe adverse events were reported.

    Conclusion

    The effect of L. reuteri on sensitization and IgE-associated eczema in infancy did not lead to a lower prevalence of respiratory allergic disease in school age. Thus, the effect of L. reuteri on the immune system seems to be transient. Administration of L. reuteri during the last weeks of gestation and in infancy was not associated with any long-term side effects.

  • 8.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas R
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics MH.
    Jakobsson, Ted
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics MH.
    Böttcher, Malin Fagerås
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria C
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics MH.
    Oldaeus, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Probiotics in prevention of IgE-associated eczema: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial2007In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 119, no 5, p. 1174-1180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: An altered microbial exposure may underlie the increase of allergic diseases in affluent societies. Probiotics may alleviate and even prevent eczema in infants.

    OBJECTIVE: To prevent eczema and sensitization in infants with a family history of allergic disease by oral supplementation with the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri.

    METHODS: Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, which comprised 232 families with allergic disease, of whom 188 completed the study. The mothers received L reuteri ATCC 55730 (1 x 10(8) colony forming units) daily from gestational week 36 until delivery. Their babies then continued with the same product from birth until 12 months of age and were followed up for another year. Primary outcome was allergic disease, with or without positive skin prick test or circulating IgE to food allergens.

    RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of eczema was similar, 36% in the treated versus 34% in the placebo group. The L reuteri group had less IgE-associated eczema during the second year, 8% versus 20% (P = .02), however. Skin prick test reactivity was also less common in the treated than in the placebo group, significantly so for infants with mothers with allergies, 14% versus 31% (P = .02). Wheeze and other potentially allergic diseases were not affected.

    CONCLUSION: Although a preventive effect of probiotics on infant eczema was not confirmed, the treated infants had less IgE-associated eczema at 2 years of age and therefore possibly run a reduced risk to develop later respiratory allergic disease. CLINICAL IMPLICATION: Probiotics may reduce the incidence of IgE-associated eczema in infancy.

  • 9.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas R
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics MH.
    Sinkiewicz, Gabriela
    Department of Biomedical Lab Science, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Ted
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics MH.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics MH.
    Probiotic lactobacilli in breast milk and infant stool in relation to oral intake during the first year of life2009In: Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition, ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 349-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: This is to identify factors affecting the prevalence of Lactobacillus reuteri in maternal faeces and breast milk and infant faeces after oral supplementation with L reuteri and to assess the influence on microbial ecology, particularly Clostridium difficile and Bifidobacterium colonization.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this double-blind trial, 232 mothers with a family history of atopic disease were randomized to a daily intake of either L reuteri American-type culture collection (ATCC) 55730 (1 x 10 colony-forming units [CFU]) or placebo for the last 4 weeks of pregnancy. Their babies then continued with the same study product daily from birth until 12 months of age. Bacterial counts and prevalence were assessed in maternal breast milk and faeces and infant faeces, using conventional cultivation methods.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of L reuteri was higher during the first year of life in the stool samples from infants in the active as compared with the placebo-treated group. The highest prevalence was recorded at 5 to 6 days of age (82% in the treated vs 20% in the placebo group, P < 0.001). Lactobacillus reuteri was isolated from 12% and 2%, respectively, in the colostrum samples (P < 0.05). Breast-feeding seemed to reduce faecal L reuteri counts, although antibiotics did not influence the levels of L reuteri. The administration of L reuteri did not affect bifidobacteria or C difficile colonization.

    CONCLUSION: Lactobacillus reuteri may be detected in breast milk after oral supplementation to the mother and in almost all infants after oral supplementation during the first year of life, as well as occasionally in many untreated infants.

  • 10.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Rautava, Samuli
    University of Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Moore, Aideen M.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Neu, Josef
    University of Florida, FL USA.
    Sherman, Philip M.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Editorial Material: The Time for a Confirmative Necrotizing Enterocolitis Probiotics Prevention Trial in the Extremely Low Birth Weight Infant in North America Is Now! in JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS, vol 165, issue 2, pp 389-3942014In: Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0022-3476, E-ISSN 1097-6833, Vol. 165, no 2, p. 389-394Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 11.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Sandberg, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Forsberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Bjorksten, B
    Karolinska Institute.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Th1/Th2-associated chemokine imbalance during infancy in children developing eczema, wheeze and sensitization2011In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 41, no 12, p. 1729-1739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Analyses of circulating chemokines offer novel tools to investigate the T helper (Th)1/Th2 imbalance in allergic disease in vivo. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjective To relate circulating Th1- and Th2-associated chemokines in infancy to allergic disease, sensitization and probiotic supplementation. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods Circulating levels of Th1-associated CXC-chemokine ligand (CXCL) 9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 and Th2-associated CC-chemokine ligand (CCL)17 and CCL22 were assessed with Luminex and CCL18 with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at birth (n = 109), 6 (n = 104), 12 (n = 116) and 24 months (n = 123) in 161 infants completing a double-blind placebo-controlled allergy prevention trial with Lactobacillus reuteri during the last month of gestation and through the first year of life. The infants were followed regarding the development of allergic disease and sensitization until 2 years of age. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults The Th2-associated chemokines CCL17 and CCL22 were the highest at birth and then decreased, whereas CCL18 and the Th1-associated chemokines increased with age. High Th2-associated chemokine levels were observed in children developing allergic disease. Sensitization was preceded by elevated levels of the Th2-associated CCL22 and reduced levels of the Th1-associated CXCL11 already at birth. The Th2-associated CCL17 was also elevated at birth in infants developing recurrent wheeze. A high Th2/Th1 ratio (CCL22/CXCL10) at birth associated with both sensitization and eczema development. The presence of L. reuteri in stool in the first week of life was associated with low CCL17 and CCL22 and high CXCL11 levels at 6 months of age. High Th1-associated chemokine levels were associated with day-care. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion and Clinical Relevance Allergic disease and sensitization in infancy was associated with low circulating Th1- and high Th2-associated chemokine levels already from birth. Circulating chemokines are useful for investigating the Th1/Th2 imbalance in allergic disease in vivo. Elucidation of the role of chemokines in allergic diseases may lead to future treatments.

  • 12.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Sandberg, Martina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Forsberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bjorksten, B
    Karolinska Institute.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Th1/Th2-associated chemokine imbalance preceding allergic disease is influenced by birth size, breastfeeding, daycare and probiotics2009In: in Allergy, vol 64, 2009, Vol. 64, p. 56-56Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Analyses of circulating chemokines offer novel tools to investigate the Th1/Th2 imbalance in allergic disease in vivo and explore the influence of pre- and postnatal factors in infancy.

    Objective: To relate circulating Th1- and Th2-associated chemokines to the development of allergic disease, pre- and postnatal factors and probiotic supplementation in infancy.

    Methods: Circulating levels of Th1-associated CXC-chemokine ligand (CXCL)9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 and Th2-associated CC-chemokine ligand (CCL)17, CCL18 and CCL22 were assessed with Luminex and ELISA at birth (n=109), 6 (n=104), 12 (n=116) and 24 months (n=123) in 179 infants completing a double-blind placebo-controlled allergy prevention trial with Lactobacillus reuteri during the last month of gestation and through the first year of life. The infants were followed regarding development of allergic disease and sensitization until two years of age.

    Results: The Th2-associated chemokines were as highest at birth and then decreased, whereas the Th1-associated chemokines increased with age. Low Th1- and high Th2-associated chemokine levels were observed in children developing allergic disease. Sensitization was preceded by elevated CCL22 and reduced CXCL11 levels. High Th2-associated chemokine46 levels were associated with increased birth length and weight and long duration of breastfeeding, and high Th1-associated chemokine levels with day-care attendance. Presence of L. reuteri in stool the first week of life was associated with low CCL17 and CCL22 and high CXCL11 levels at 6 months.

    Conclusion: Allergic disease in infancy was associated with low circulating Th1- and high Th2-associated chemokine levels during the first year of life. The chemokine levels were affected by both pre and –postnatal factors.

  • 13.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Sherman, Philip M.
    University of Toronto, Canada .
    Editorial Material: Multifaceted Effects of Human Milk Oligosaccharides2014In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0022-1899, E-ISSN 1537-6613, Vol. 209, no 3, p. 323-324Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 14.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Wu, Richard Y.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Sherman, Philip M.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Microbiota in Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Infancy: Implications for Management2017In: INTESTINAL MICROBIOME: FUNCTIONAL ASPECTS IN HEALTH AND DISEASE, KARGER , 2017, Vol. 88, p. 107-115Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complex and diverse intestinal microbiome is recognized as important in promoting human health. An altered gut microflora, referred to as dysbiosis, is increasingly recognized as having an etiologic role in a variety of conditions, including functional gastrointestinal disorders: colic in infants and irritable bowel syndrome in older children. Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms that, if ingested in sufficient amounts, restore microbial homeostasis and have a benefit on health. Randomized controlled trials indicate that probiotics can be effective in a variety of intestinal conditions, including colic and irritable bowel syndrome. Probiotics may promote gut microbial diversity, but timing of the intervention appears crucial. Strain-specific effects on colonization resistance, epithelial barrier integrity, modulation of signal transduction, impacts on innate and adaptive immune responses, and effects on visceral hyperalgesia likely explain the observed variability in various probiotic strains. In the future, probiotics are likely to be chosen for use in a defined clinical setting based on underlying mechanism(s) of action. The precise component of the probiotic agent mediating observed effects is the subject of current research. Unresolved issues relate to optimal dosages, timing of ingestion, single versus combination formulations, maintenance of viability in storage, and the merits of employing probiotic- derived products. (C) 2017 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 15.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. University of Toronto, Canada.
    You Wu, Richard
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gut microbiota and allergy: the importance of the pregnancy period2015In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 214-219Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Limited microbial exposure is suggested to underlie the increase of allergic diseases in affluent countries, and bacterial diversity seems to be more important than specific bacteria taxa. Prospective studies indicate that the gut microbiota composition during the first months of life influences allergy development, and support the theory that factors influencing the early maturation of the immune system might be important for subsequent allergic disease. However, recent research indicates that microbial exposure during pregnancy may be even more important for the preventative effects against allergic disease. This review gives a background of the epidemiology, immunology, and microbiology literature in this field. It focuses on possible underlying mechanisms such as immune-regulated epigenetic imprinting and bacterial translocation during pregnancy, potentially providing the offspring with a pioneer microbiome. We suggest that a possible reason for the initial exposure of bacterial molecular patterns to the fetus in utero is to prime the immune system and/or the epithelium to respond appropriately to pathogens and commensals after birth.

  • 16.
    Christmann, Benjamin S.
    et al.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bernstein, Charles N.
    University of Manitoba, Canada.
    Wayne Duck, L.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Mannon, Peter J.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bjorksten, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Elson, Charles O.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.
    Human seroreactivity to gut microbiota antigens2015In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 136, no 5, p. 1378-1386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although immune responses directed against antigens from the intestinal microbiota are observed in certain diseases, the normal human adaptive immune response to intestinal microbiota is poorly defined. Objective: Our goal was to assess the adaptive immune response to the intestinal microbiota present in 143 healthy adults and compare this response with the response observed in 52 children and their mothers at risk of having allergic disease. Methods: Human serum was collected from adults and children followed from birth to 7 years of age, and the serum IgG response to a panel of intestinal microbiota antigens was assessed by using a novel protein microarray. Results: Nearly every subject tested, regardless of health status, had serum IgG that recognized a common set of antigens. Seroreactivity to the panel of antigens was significantly lower in atopic adults. Healthy infants expressed the highest level of IgG seroreactivity to intestinal microbiota antigens. This adaptive response developed between 6 and 12 months of age and peaked around 2 years of age. Low IgG responses to certain clusters of microbiota antigens during infancy were associated with allergy development during childhood. Conclusions: There is an observed perturbation of the adaptive response to antigens from the microbiota in allergic subjects. These perturbations are observable even in childhood, suggesting that optimal stimulation of the adaptive immune system by the microbiota might be needed to prevent certain immune-mediated diseases.

  • 17.
    Connolly, Eamonn
    et al.
    Dept of Research, BioGaia, Stockholm.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Centrum för Allergiforskning KI, Stockholm.
    Safety of D(-)-lactic acid producing bacteria in the human infant2005In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 489-492Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Dzidic, Majda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. FISABIO Fdn, Spain; Spanish National Research Council, Spain.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Artacho, Alejandro
    FISABIO Fdn, Spain.
    Björksten, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Collado, Maria Carmen
    Spanish National Research Council, Spain.
    Mira, Alex
    FISABIO Fdn, Spain.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aberrant IgA responses to the gut microbiota during infancy precede asthma and allergy development2017In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 139, no 3, p. 1017-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although a reduced gut microbiota diversity and low mucosal total IgA levels in infancy have been associated with allergy development, IgA responses to the gut microbiota have not yet been studied. Objective: We sought to determine the proportions of IgA coating together with the characterization of the dominant bacteria, bound to IgA or not, in infant stool samples in relation to allergy development. Methods: A combination of flow cytometric cell sorting and deep sequencing of the 16S rDNA gene was used to characterize the bacterial recognition patterns by IgA in stool samples collected at 1 and 12 months of age from children staying healthy or having allergic symptoms up to 7 years of age. Results: The children with allergic manifestations, particularly asthma, during childhood had a lower proportion of IgA bound to fecal bacteria at 12months of age compared with healthy children. These alterations cannot be attributed to differences in IgA levels or bacterial load between the 2 groups. Moreover, the bacterial targets of early IgA responses (including coating of the Bacteroides genus), as well as IgA recognition patterns, differed between healthy children and children with allergic manifestations. Altered IgA recognition patterns in children with allergy were observed already at 1 month of age, when the IgA antibodies are predominantly maternally derived in breast-fed children. Conclusion: An aberrant IgAresponsiveness to the gutmicrobiota during infancy precedes asthma and allergy development, possibly indicating an impaired mucosal barrier function in allergic children.

  • 19.
    Fagerås Böttcher, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics MH.
    Fredriksson, Mats
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics MH.
    Jakobsson, Ted
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics MH.
    Low breast milk TGF-beta2 is induced by Lactobacillus reuteri supplementation and associates with reduced risk of sensitization during infancy2008In: Pediatric allergy and immunology : official publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 497-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The immunological composition of breast milk differs between mothers. The reasons for these differences and the consequences for the breast-fed infants are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri supplementation on the immunological composition of breast milk in relation to sensitization and eczema in the babies. Total IgA, secretory IgA (SIgA), TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2, IL-10, TNF, soluble CD14 (sCD14), and Na/K ratios were analyzed in colostrum and mature milk obtained from women treated with L. reuteri (n = 54) or placebo (n = 55) from gestational week 36 until delivery. Bacteriological analyses of L. reuteri were performed in faecal samples of the mothers. The infants were followed prospectively for 2 yr regarding development of eczema and sensitization as defined by a positive skin prick test and/or circulating allergen-specific IgE antibodies at 6, 12, and 24 months of age. Supplementation of L. reuteri during pregnancy was associated with low levels of TGF-beta2 and slightly increased levels of IL-10 in colostrum. For TGF-beta2, this association was most pronounced in mothers with detectable L. reuteri in faeces. Infants receiving breast milk with low levels of TGF-beta2 were less likely to become sensitized during their first 2 yr of life. A similar trend was observed for development of IgE-associated eczema. The levels of total IgA, SIgA, TGF-beta1, TNF, sCD14, and Na/K ratios in breast milk were not affected by the intake of L. reuteri. None of these parameters correlated with sensitization or development of eczema in the infant, except for high Na/K ratios that associated with increased risk of sensitization. Supplementation with L. reuteri during late pregnancy reduces breast milk levels of TGF-beta2, and low levels of this cytokine are associated with less sensitization and possibly less IgE-associated eczema in breast-fed infants.

  • 20.
    Forsberg, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Björksten, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pre- and post-natal Lactobacillus reuteri supplementation decreases allergen responsiveness in infancy2013In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 434-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    We have previously shown that Lactobacillus reuteri supplementation from pregnancy week 36 and to the infant through the first year of life decreased the prevalence of IgE-associated eczema at 2 years. The underlying immunological mechanisms are unknown, however.

    Objective

    To investigate the immunomodulatory effect of probiotic supplementation on allergen- and mitogen-induced immune responses in children until 2 years of age.

    Methods

    Blood mononuclear cells were collected at birth, 6, 12 and 24 months from 61 children (29 probiotic and 32 placebo treated) and cultured with ovalbumin, birch and cat extract and Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). Cytokine and chemokine secretion was determined using an in-house multiplexed Luminex assay and ELISA. Real-time PCR was performed to investigate the Ebi3, Foxp3, GATA-3 and T-bet mRNA expression.

    Results

    Probiotic treatment was associated with low cat-induced Th2-like responses at 6 months (IL-5, P = 0.01, and IL-13, P = 0.009), with a similar trend for IL-5 at 12 months (P = 0.09). Cat-induced IFN-γ responses were also lower after probiotic than after placebo treatment at 24 months (P = 0.007), with similar findings for the anti-inflammatory IL-10 at birth (P = 0.001) and at 12 months (P = 0.009). At 24 months, Th2-associated CCL22 levels were lower in the probiotic than in the placebo group after birch stimulation (P = 0.02), with a similar trend after ovalbumin stimulation (P = 0.07). Lower CCL22 levels were recorded at 12 and 24 months (P = 0.03 and P = 0.01) after PHA stimulation.

    Conclusion and Clinical Relevance

    Lactobacillus reuteri supplementation decreases allergen responsiveness and may enhance immunoregulatory capacity during infancy. L. reuteri supplementation from week 36 and during the first year of life significantly decreases IgE-associated eczema and lowers allergen and mitogen responsiveness.

  • 21.
    Forsberg, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Örebro University, Sweden .
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pre- and postnatal administration of Lactobacillus reuteri decreases TLR2 responses in infants.2014In: Clinical and translational allergy, ISSN 2045-7022, Vol. 4, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Mice models indicate that intact Toll like receptor (TLR) signaling may be essential for the allergy protective effects of diverse bacterial exposure observed in clinical trials and epidemiological studies. Probiotic supplementation with Lactobacillus reuteri from pregnancy week 36 and to the infant through the first year of life decreased the prevalence of IgE-associated eczema at two years (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01285830). The effect of this supplementation on innate immune responses to bacterial products and the expression of associated TLRs were explored.

    METHODS: Blood mononuclear cells were collected at birth, 6, 12 and 24 months from 61 infants and cultured with TLR2, 4 and 9 ligands. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was determined as well as TLR2, 4 and 9 mRNA expression.

    RESULTS: Probiotic supplementation was associated with decreased LTA (lipoteichoic acid) induced CCL4, CXCL8, IL-1β and IL-6 responses at 12 months and decreased CCL4 and IL-1β secretion at 24 months. TLR2 mRNA expression was not affected by probiotic treatment.

    CONCLUSIONS: Decreased responses to TLR2, the main receptor for LTA from Gram positive bacteria, in probiotic treated children seem to be dependent on factors downstream of TLR mRNA expression.

  • 22.
    Jakobsson, Hedvig E
    et al.
    Department of Preparedness, Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control, Solna, Sweden.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jenmalm, Maria C
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Harris, Keith
    School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK .
    Quince, Christopher
    School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK .
    Jernberg, Cecilia
    Department of Preparedness, Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control, Solna, Sweden .
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Engstrand, Lars
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Anders F
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Science for Life Laboratory, School of Biotechnology, Division of Gene Technology, Solna, Sweden.
    Decreased gut microbiota diversity, delayed Bacteroidetes colonisation and reduced Th1 responses in infants delivered by Caesarean section2014In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 559-566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The early intestinal microbiota exerts important stimuli for immune development, and a reduced microbial exposure as well as caesarean section (CS) has been associated with the development of allergic disease. Here we address how microbiota development in infants is affected by mode of delivery, and relate differences in colonisation patterns to the maturation of a balanced Th1/Th2 immune response.

    Design The postnatal intestinal colonisation pattern was investigated in 24 infants, born vaginally (15) or by CS (nine). The intestinal microbiota were characterised using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes at 1 week and 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after birth. Venous blood levels of Th1- and Th2-associated chemokines were measured at 6, 12 and 24 months.

    Results Infants born through CS had lower total microbiota diversity during the first 2 years of life. CS delivered infants also had a lower abundance and diversity of the Bacteroidetes phylum and were less often colonised with the Bacteroidetes phylum. Infants born through CS had significantly lower levels of the Th1-associated chemokines CXCL10 and CXCL11 in blood.

    Conclusions CS was associated with a lower total microbial diversity, delayed colonisation of the Bacteroidetes phylum and reduced Th1 responses during the first 2 years of life.

  • 23.
    Johnson-Henry, Kathene C.
    et al.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas R.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    You Wu, Richard
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Sherman, Philip M.
    University of Toronto, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Probiotics, Prebiotics, and Synbiotics for the Prevention of Necrotizing Enterocolitis2016In: ADVANCES IN NUTRITION, ISSN 2161-8313, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 928-937Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating intestinal disease in preterm infants characterized by barrier disruption, intestinal microbial dysbiosis, and persistent inflammation of the colon, which results in high mortality rates. Current strategies used to manage this disease are not sufficient, although the use of human breast milk reduces the risk of NEC. Mothers milk is regarded as a fundamental nutritional source for neonates, but pasteurization of donor breast milk affects the composition of bioactive compounds. Current research is evaluating the benefits and potential pitfalls of adding probiotics and prebiotics to pasteurized milk so as to improve the functionality of the milk and thereby reduce the burden of illness caused by NEC. Probiotics (live micro-organisms that confer health to the host) and prebiotics (nondigestible oligosaccharides that stimulate the growth of healthy bacteria) are functional foods known to mediate immune responses and modulate microbial populations in the gut. Clinical research shows strain-and compound specific responses when probiotics or prebiotics are administered in conjunction with donor breast milk for the prevention of NEC. Despite ongoing controversy surrounding optimal treatment strategies, randomized controlled studies are now investigating the use of synbiotics to reduce the incidence and severity of NEC. Synbiotics, a combination of probiotics and prebiotics, have been proposed to enhance beneficial health effects in the intestinal tract more than either agent administered alone. This review considers the implications of using probiotic-, prebiotic-, and synbiotic-supplemented breast milk as a strategy to prevent NEC and issues that could be encountered with the preparations.

  • 24.
    Reid, G.
    et al.
    Lawson Health Research Institute, Canada; University of Western Ontario, Canada; University of Western Ontario, Canada.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Bailey, M.
    Ohio State University, OH 43210 USA; Nationwide Childrens Hospital, OH USA.
    Bindels, L. B.
    Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium.
    Bubnov, R.
    National Academic Science Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Ganguli, K.
    Massachusetts Gen Hospital Children, MA 02114 USA; Harvard Medical Sch, MA 02114 USA.
    Martoni, C.
    UAS Labs, WI 53718 USA.
    ONeill, C.
    University of Manchester, England.
    Savignac, H. M.
    Clasado Research Serv Ltd, England; 4D Pharma PLC, Scotland.
    Stanton, C.
    University of Coll Cork, Ireland.
    Ship, N.
    Bio K Pharma Inc, Canada.
    Surette, M.
    McMaster University, Canada.
    Tuohy, K.
    Fdn Edmund Mach, Italy.
    van Hemert, S.
    Winclove Probiot, Netherlands.
    How do probiotics and prebiotics function at distant sites?2017In: Beneficial Microbes, ISSN 1876-2883, E-ISSN 1876-2891, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 521-533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The realisation that microbes regarded as beneficial to the host can impart effects at sites distant from their habitat, has raised many possibilities for treatment of diseases. The objective of a workshop hosted in Turku, Finland, by the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics, was to assess the evidence for these effects and the extent to which early life microbiome programming influences how the gut microbiota communicates with distant sites. In addition, we examined how probiotics and prebiotics might affect the skin, airways, heart, brain and metabolism. The growing levels of scientific and clinical evidence showing how microbes influence the physiology of many body sites, leads us to call for more funding to advance a potentially exciting avenue for novel therapies for many chronic diseases.

  • 25.
    Stensson, M.
    et al.
    Center of Oral Health, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping.
    Koch, G.
    Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping.
    Coric, S.
    Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Birkhed, D.
    Department of Cariology, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wendt, L.-W.
    Center of Oral Health, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping.
    Oral Administration of Lactobacillus reuteri during the First Year of Life Reduces Caries Prevalence in the Primary Dentition at 9 Years of Age2014In: Caries Research, ISSN 0008-6568, E-ISSN 1421-976X, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 111-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect on oral health, at age 9 years, of daily oral supplementation with the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri, strain ATCC 55730, to mothers during the last month of gestation and to children through the first year of life. The study was a single-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial involving 113 children: 60 in the probiotic and 53 in the placebo group. The subjects underwent clinical and radiographic examination of the primary dentition and carious lesions, plaque and gingivitis were recorded. Saliva and plaque were sampled for determination of mutans streptococci (MS) and lactobacilli (LB) in saliva and plaque as well as salivary secretory IgA (SIgA). Forty-nine (82%) children in the probiotic group and 31 (58%) in the placebo group were caries-free (p < 0.01). The prevalence of approximal caries lesions was lower in the probiotic group (0.67 ± 1.61 vs. 1.53 ± 2.64; p < 0.05) and there were fewer sites with gingivitis compared to the placebo group (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to frequency of toothbrushing, plaque and dietary habits, but to intake of fluoride supplements (p < 0.05). There were no intergroup differences with respect to L. reuteri, MS, LB or SIgA in saliva. Within the limitation of this study it seems that daily supplementation with L. reuteri from birth and during the first year of life is associated with reduced caries prevalence and gingivitis score in the primary dentition at 9 years of age.

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