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  • 1.
    Azios, Jamie H.
    et al.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Bellon-Harn, Monica
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Dockens, Ashley L.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Quality and readability of English-language internet information for aphasia2019In: International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, ISSN 1754-9507, E-ISSN 1754-9515, Vol. 21, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Little is known about the quality and readability of treatment information in specific neurogenic disorders, such as aphasia. The purpose of this study was to assess quality and readability of English-language Internet information available for aphasia treatment. Method: Forty-three aphasia treatment websites were aggregated using five different country-specific search engines. Websites were then analysed using quality and readability assessments. Statistical calculations were employed to examine website ratings, differences between website origin and quality and readability scores, and correlations between readability instruments. Result: Websites exhibited low quality with few websites obtaining Health On the Net (HON) certification or clear, thorough information as measured by the DISCERN. Regardless of website origin, readability scores were also poor. Approximate educational levels required to comprehend information on aphasia treatment websites ranged from 13 to 16 years of education. Significant differences were found between website origin and readability measures with higher levels of education required to understand information on websites of non-profit organisations. Conclusion: Current aphasia treatment websites were found to exhibit low levels of quality and readability, creating potential accessibility problems for people with aphasia and significant others. Websites including treatment information for aphasia must be improved in order to increase greater information accessibility.

  • 2.
    Bellon-Harn, Monica L.
    et al.
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Hartwell Azios, Jamie
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Dockens, Ashley L.
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Speech-language pathologists preferences for patient-centeredness2017In: Journal of Communication Disorders, ISSN 0021-9924, E-ISSN 1873-7994, Vol. 68, p. 81-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Preferences for patient-centeredness is an important indicator in healthcare service delivery. However, it remains largely unexplored in the field of communication science and disorders. This study investigated speech-language pathologists (SLPs) preferences for patient-centeredness Method: The study involved a cross-sectional survey design. SLPs (n = 102) fully completed the modified Patient-Practitioner Orientation Scale (PPOS; Krupat et al, 2000) and also provided demographic details. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlation, and linear regression methods. Results: Mean PPOS scores indicated that SLPs value patient-centeredness. There was a strong positive correlation among sharing and caring subscales with the full-scale. Results from the linear regression modeling suggested no relationship between demographic factors and preferences for patient-centeredness. Conclusions: SLPs value patient-centeredness, although there may be regional and cultural variations. Qualitative investigations may help uncover dimensions of patient-centeredness that were not captured in the PPOS scale. In addition, further research should explore congruence in preferences for patient-centeredness among SLPs and patients.

  • 3.
    Beukes, E. W.
    et al.
    Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA; Audiology India, Mysore, India; Department of Speech and Hearing, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University, Karnataka, India.
    Valien, T. E.
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA.
    Baguley, D. M.
    Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK; National Institute for Health Research, Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, Ropewalk House, The Ropewalk, Nottingham, UK; Otology and Hearing Group, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
    Allen, P. M.
    Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK; Vision and Eye Research Unit, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Positive experiences related to living with tinnitus: A cross-sectional survey2018In: Clinical Otolaryngology, ISSN 1749-4478, E-ISSN 1365-2273, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 489-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The aim of this study was to gain insights related to positive experiences reported by adults with tinnitus living in the United Kingdom.

    Design

    A cross‐sectional survey design was used in a sample of adults with tinnitus who were interested in undertaking an Internet‐based intervention for tinnitus.

    Setting

    The study was UK wide and data collection was online.

    Participants

    Participants consisted of 240 adults (137 males, 103 females), with an average age of 48.16 years and average tinnitus duration of 11.52 years (SD: 11.88).

    Main outcome measures

    Tinnitus severity was measured by means of the Tinnitus Functional Index. To evaluate the secondary effects of tinnitus, the Insomnia Severity Index, the Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults‐Screening Version and the Cognitive Failures Questionnaires were administered. Positive experiences related to tinnitus were explored using an open‐ended question format.

    Results

    Around a third of participants (32.5%) reported positive experiences associated with tinnitus. The number of positive responses ranged from one to eight responses per participant, although there were fewer participants with more than one positive response. The predominant themes concerned for (i) coping; (ii) personal development; (iii) support, and to a lesser extent (iv) outlook. Younger participants, those with a lower hearing disability and those with fewer cognitive failures were more likely to report positive experiences associated with having tinnitus.

    Conclusions

    This study has identified that personal development and a positive outlook are possible despite experiencing tinnitus. Ways to facilitate positive experiences related to tinnitus should be promoted, as these may reduce the negative consequences associated with tinnitus. The most prevalent positive theme was the ability to cope with tinnitus. Positive experiences were also drawn from having clinical and other support networks. This highlights the importance of providing tinnitus interventions that can assist people in coping with tinnitus, particularly to those less likely to relate tinnitus to any positive experiences. Those most likely to be helped include those who are older with greater cognitive difficulties and a greater hearing disability.

  • 4.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England; Anglia Ruskin University, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England; University of Nottingham, England.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Internet-Based Intervention for Tinnitus: Outcome of a Single-Group Open Trial2017In: Journal of american academy of audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, E-ISSN 2157-3107, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 340-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Managing chronic tinnitus is challenging, and innovative ways to address the resulting health-care burden are required. Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) for tinnitus shows promise as a cost-effective treatment option. The feasibility and effectiveness of iCBT in the United Kingdom are yet to be explored. Furthermore, it is not known if iCBT can be supported by an audiologist rather than a psychologist. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the feasibility of guided iCBT using audiological support on tinnitus distress and tinnitus-related comorbidities. Furthermore, it aimed to establish the feasibility of iCBT for tinnitus distress in the United Kingdom, by determining recruitment, attrition, and compliance rates. Finally, it aimed to identify which aspects of the protocol require refinement for subsequent clinical trials. Research Design: A single-group open trial design was implemented. This study would serve as a prerequisite study, to identify barriers, before undertaking effectiveness trials. Study Sample: Participants consisted of 37 adults (18 males, 19 females), with an age range of between 50 and 59 yr. The mean preintervention tinnitus severity rating was 56.15 (standard deviation = 18.35), which is categorized as "severe tinnitus" as measured by the Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI). Five participants withdrew during the study, and 29 of the remaining participants completed the postintervention questionnaire. Intervention: The guided iCBT intervention ran over an eight-week period and consisted of 16 obligatory modules and five optional modules. The intervention was designed to be interactive, interesting, and stimulating. A key element was the provision of support from an audiologist throughout the program. Data Collection and Analysis: Online questionnaires were used throughout the study. These were administered at baseline and postintervention to determine attrition and compliance rates and to facilitate sample size estimates for further clinical trials. Outcome measures for tinnitus severity, hearing handicap, insomnia, cognitive functioning, hyperacusis, anxiety, depression, and life satisfaction were used to investigate the effects of iCBT with audiological support. In addition, a weekly questionnaire was incorporated to monitor change in tinnitus distress while undertaking the intervention. Results: Feasibility was established using an audiologist to support this guided iCBT intervention, as a significant change postintervention was found for tinnitus severity, as measured by the TFI and the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, Screening version. The attrition rate was 22% and compliance was variable. Although these results were based on a small sample, they provide encouraging evidence for the feasibility of delivering iCBT treatment for tinnitus symptoms with audiology support in the United Kingdom. Conclusions: An Internet-based intervention of tinnitus appears to be feasible in the United Kingdom when using audiological support. Randomized controlled trials to further investigate the effectiveness of iCBT for tinnitus in the United Kingdom are required.

  • 5.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Nottingham Biomed Res Ctr, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal Univ, India.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Audiologist-Guided Internet-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Adults With Tinnitus in the United Kingdom: A Randomized Controlled Trial2018In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 423-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Specialist tinnitus services are in high demand as a result of the negative effect tinnitus may have on quality of life. Additional clinically and cost-effective tinnitus management routes are needed. One potential route is providing Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for tinnitus via the Internet (iCBT). This study aimed to determine the efficacy of guided iCBT, using audiological support, on tinnitus distress and tinnitus-related comorbidities, in the United Kingdom. A further aim was to establish the stability of intervention effects 2-months postintervention. The hypothesis was that iCBT for tinnitus would be more effective at reducing tinnitus distress than weekly monitoring. Design: A randomized, delayed intervention efficacy trial, with a 2-month follow-up was implemented to evaluate the efficacy of iCBT in the United Kingdom. Participants were randomly assigned to the experimental (n = 73) or weekly monitoring control group (n = 73) after being stratified for tinnitus severity and age. After the experimental group completed the 8-week long iCBT intervention, the control group undertook the same intervention. Intervention effects were, therefore, evaluated in two independent groups at two time points. The primary outcome was a change in tinnitus distress between the groups as assessed by the Tinnitus Functional Index. Secondary assessment measures were included for insomnia, anxiety, depression, hearing disability, hyperacusis, cognitive failures, and satisfaction with life. These were completed at baseline, postintervention, and at a 2-month postintervention follow-up. Results: After undertaking the iCBT intervention, the experimental group had a greater reduction in tinnitus distress when compared with the control group. This reduction was statistically significant (Cohens d = 0.7) and was clinically significant for 51% of the experimental group and 5% of the control group. This reduction was evident 4 weeks after commencing the iCBT intervention. Furthermore, the experimental group had a greater reduction in insomnia, depression, hyperacusis, cognitive failures, and a greater improvement in quality of life, as evidenced by the significant differences in these assessment measures postintervention. Results were maintained 2 months postintervention. Conclusions: Guided (using audiological support) iCBT for tinnitus resulted in statistically significant reductions in tinnitus distress and comorbidities (insomnia, depression, hyperacusis, cognitive failures) and a significant increase in quality of life. These effects remained stable at 2-months postintervention. Further trials to determine the longer term efficacy of ICBT to investigate predictors of outcome and to compare iCBT with standard clinical care in the United Kingdom are required.

  • 6.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England; Nottingham Biomed Research Centre, England; University of Nottingham, England.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England; Anglia Ruskin University, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal University, India.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Guided Internet-based versus face-to-face clinical care in the management of tinnitus: study protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial2017In: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 18, article id 186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Innovative strategies are required to improve access to evidence-based tinnitus interventions. A guided Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) intervention for tinnitus was therefore developed for a U.K. population. Initial clinical trials indicated efficacy of iCBT at reducing tinnitus severity and associated comorbidities such as insomnia and depression. The aim of this phase III randomised controlled trial is to compare this new iCBT intervention with an established intervention, namely face-to-face clinical care for tinnitus. Methods/design: This will be a multi-centre study undertaken across three hospitals in the East of England. The design is a randomised, two-arm, parallel-group, non-inferiority trial with a 2-month follow-up. The experimental group will receive the guided iCBT intervention, whereas the active control group will receive the usual face-to-face clinical care. An independent researcher will randomly assign participants, using a computer-generated randomisation schedule, after stratification for tinnitus severity. There will be 46 participants in each group. The primary assessment measure will be the Tinnitus Functional Index. Data analysis will establish whether non-inferiority is achieved using a pre-defined non-inferiority margin. Discussion: This protocol outlines phase III of a clinical trial comparing a new iCBT with established face-to-face care for tinnitus. If guided iCBT for tinnitus proves to be as effective as the usual tinnitus care, it may be a viable additional management route for individuals with tinnitus. This could increase access to evidence-based effective tinnitus care and reduce the pressures on existing health care systems.

  • 7.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England; Anglia Ruskin University, England.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England; Cambridge University Hospital NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for adults with tinnitus in the UK: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial2015In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 9, p. e008241-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Tinnitus is one of the most distressing hearing-related symptoms. Innovative ways of managing tinnitus distress and the related healthcare burden of treating tinnitus are required. An internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) intervention has been developed in Sweden to improve access to evidence-based tinnitus treatments. This study aims to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of iCBT in reducing the impact associated with tinnitus, in the UK. It, furthermore, aims to establish whether there are subgroups of tinnitus sufferers for whom this iCBT intervention may be more suitable. Methods and analysis: A two-armed randomised control trial-with a 1-year follow-up design-will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of iCBT on tinnitus distress. A delayed treatment design using a weekly check-in control group will be used. 70 participants will be randomly assigned to each group by an independent researcher by using a computer-generated randomisation schedule, and after being prestratified for age and tinnitus severity. They will undergo the iCBT e-health intervention online together with audiological therapeutic support. The main outcome measure is the Tinnitus Functional Index. Process evaluation of the intervention will also be conducted. Data analysis will be in accordance with Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials guidelines. Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval has been granted. If this intervention proves effective, it may be possible that at least some tinnitus sufferers can be managed though an iCBT e-learning treatment programme. This would be cost effective and potentially will free up services for those with more severe problems that need face-to-face treatment.

  • 8.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal Univ, India.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Terlizzi, Paige M.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Nottingham Biomed Res Ctr, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Situationally influenced tinnitus coping strategies: a mixed methods approach2018In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 40, no 24, p. 2884-2894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The primary aim of this study was to identify coping strategies used to manage problematic tinnitus situations. A secondary aim was to determine whether different approaches were related to the level of tinnitus distress, anxiety, depression, and insomnia experienced. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional survey design was implemented. The study sample was adults interested in undertaking an Internet-based intervention for tinnitus. Self-reported measures assessed the level of tinnitus distress, depression, anxiety, and insomnia. An open-ended question was used to obtain information about how problematic tinnitus situations were dealt with. Responses were investigated using qualitative content analysis to identify problematic situations. Further data analysis comprised of both qualitative and quantitative methods. Results: There were 240 participants (137 males, 103 females), with an average age of 48.16 years (SD: 22.70). Qualitative content analysis identified eight problematic tinnitus situations. Participants had either habituated to their tinnitus (7.9%), used active (63.3%), or passive (28.8%) coping styles to manage these situations. Those who had habituated to tinnitus or used active coping strategies had lower levels of tinnitus distress, anxiety, and depression. Conclusions: The main problematic tinnitus situations for this cohort were identified. Both active and passive coping styles were applied to approach these situations. The coping strategies used most frequently and utilised in the widest range of problematic situations were using sound enrichment and diverting attention.

  • 9.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal Univ, India.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; NIHR, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Process evaluation of Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for adults with tinnitus in the context of a randomised control trial2018In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 98-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The research objective was to identify processes that could either facilitate or hinder clinical implementation of an Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy intervention for tinnitus in the UK. This was done by exploring the research context, the intervention components and the factors that contributed to the outcomes obtained. Design: This study investigated eight processes including the recruitment strategies, reach, research context, treatment dose delivered and received, implementation fidelity, barriers to implementation and effectiveness of the intervention. Study sample: Of the 169 registered participants, 146 were randomly assigned to the experimental or control groups (23 were excluded). The mean age was 55.57 years with an average tinnitus duration of 11.63 years. Results: The intended sample of people with distressing tinnitus who were underserved with evidence-based tinnitus interventions was reached. The full guided intervention was delivered. The recommended modules were read more than the optional modules. Intervention components such as the easily readable format and the benefits of the applied relaxation programme facilitated significant positive post-intervention outcomes. Barriers hampering the intervention application included time pressures and low self-motivation. Conclusions: Results of this process evaluation together with the outcome data can be used to facilitate translating this research into clinical practice.

  • 10.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    et al.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Manipal Univ, India; Audiol India, India.
    Davies, Alice S. A.
    Swansea Univ, Wales; Princess Wales Hosp, Wales.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Baguley, David M.
    Nottingham Biomed Res Ctr, England; Univ Nottingham, England; Nottingham Univ Hosp, England.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Participants experiences of an Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy intervention for tinnitus2018In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 12, p. 947-954Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aimed to explore participants experiences after undertaking an Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy intervention (ICBT) for tinnitus. Design: Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted 6-8 months after participants undertook the ICBT intervention. Qualitative thematic analysis was used to interpret the interview data. Study sample: A purposeful sampling strategy was used to identify a diverse range of participants. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 15 participants. The mean age was 58.5 years, 7 men and 8 women participated. Results: The analysis generated the following main themes: (1) expectations and motivation for doing the intervention, (2) experiences of the intervention, (3) intervention engagement and (4) intervention effects. Most participants expectations were hopeful that the intervention would lessen the impact of their tinnitus. Aspects of the intervention that were beneficial, as well as difficult, were identified together with the impact they had on engagement. Intervention effects were evident on both tinnitus and activities of daily life. Conclusions: The benefits described by participants indicate the potential of ICBT as an alternate form of intervention delivery. The difficulties that hampered engagement need to be addressed to enhance the application and to optimise the clinical acceptability of ICBT for tinnitus.

  • 11.
    Beukes, Eldré W.
    et al.
    Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge CB1 1PT, United Kingdom.
    Vlaescu, George
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710, USA.
    Baguley, David M.
    Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge CB1 1PT, United Kingdom Audiology Department, Cambridge University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, United Kingdom.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge CB1 1PT, United Kingdom Vision and Eye Research Unit, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge CB1 1PT, United Kingdom.
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Division of Psychiatry, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Center for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Development and technical functionality of an Internet-based intervention for tinnitus in the UK2016In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 6, p. 6-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Creative approaches to improve access to evidence-based tinnitus treatments are required. The purpose of this study was to develop an Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) intervention, for those experiencing tinnitus in the United Kingdom (UK). Furthermore, it aimed, through technical functionality testing, to identify specific aspects of the iCBT that require improving.

    Method

    An innovative iCBT intervention for treating tinnitus in the UK has been developed using a cognitive-behavioural theoretical framework. This iCBT was evaluated by two user groups during this developmental phase. Initially, five expert reviews evaluated the intervention, prior to evaluation by a group of 29 adults experiencing significant levels of tinnitus distress. Both groups evaluated iCBT in an independent measures design, using a specifically designed satisfaction outcome measure.

    Results

    Overall, similar ratings were given by the expert reviewers and adults with tinnitus, showing a high level of satisfaction regarding the content, suitability, presentation, usability and exercises provided in the intervention. The iCBT intervention has been refined following technical functionality testing.

    Conclusions

    Rigorous testing of the developed iCBT intervention has been undertaken. These evaluations provide confidence that further clinical trials can commence in the UK, to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of this iCBT intervention for tinnitus.

  • 12.
    C. Manchaiah, Vinaya K.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Evaluating the process of change: Studies on patient journey, hearing disability acceptance and stages-of-change2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Person with hearing impairment (PHI) and their Communication partners (CPs) have a range of experiences and milestones before, during and after their audiological assessment and/or rehabilitation sessions. The term ‘patient journey’ refers to understanding the experiences and the processes the patient goes through during the course of the disease and the treatment regime. The aims of the current thesis were: (1) to further develop patient journey models of individuals with gradual-onset hearing impairment and CPs by taking their views into consideration; (2) to develop the patient journey model for PHI of sudden-onset; (3) to develop a self-reported measure of hearing disability acceptance and to study its construct and concurrent validity; (4) to investigate the health behaviour change characteristics of people noticing hearing difficulties using the stages-of-change model. 

    Papers I (n=32) and III (n=9) were aimed at further developing the journey model of PHI and their CPs proposed by the Ida Institute. Both studies employed qualitative methods (i.e., focus groups and interviews for data collection and thematic analysis for data analysis), and defined the models based on the perspectives of PHI and CPs both of which had seven main phases. These data were compared with the professionals’ perspectives of the journey as reported in the Ida Institute model which had six main phases. Our studies highlight new phases (i.e., self-evaluation in PHI journey and adaptation in CP journey) and also various commonalities and differences in the perspectives expressed by professionals and patients.

    Paper II included a pilot study to explore the patient journey of sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment from both professionals (n=16) and patients (n=4) perspectives. Both identified all the six main phases, which include: awareness; movement; diagnostics; rehabilitation; self-evaluation; and resolution. The pre-awareness phase may hinder the realisation of hearing loss in persons with gradual onset hearing loss, whereas it is far more straightforward in persons with sudden-onset due to its nature of onset.

    Papers IV and V employed a cross-sectional design (n=90). Paper IV was aimed at developing a Hearing Disability Acceptance Questionnaire (HDAQ), and to study its construct and concurrent validity. Results suggested that the HDAQ has a two factor structure which explains 75.7% of the variance and had good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha of 0.86). Also, the scale had good concurrent validity in relation to self-reported hearing disability, self-reported anxiety and depression and readiness to change measures. Paper V was aimed at understanding the stages-of-change in adults with hearing disability using the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment Scale.  As predicted a high percentage of participants (over 90%) were in the contemplation and preparation stages, supporting the stages-of-change model.

    Overall, the papers presented in this thesis may contribute to a better understanding of process of change through hearing impairment in PHI and their CPs. 

    List of papers
    1. The patient journey of adults with hearing impairment: the patients’ views
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The patient journey of adults with hearing impairment: the patients’ views
    2011 (English)In: Clinical Otolaryngology, ISSN 1749-4478, E-ISSN 1365-2273, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 227-234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:  The term ‘patient journey’ refers to the experiences and processes the patient goes through during the course of a disease and its treatment. The study explores the perspectives of adults with acquired hearing impairment and to further develop the patient journey template based on the Ida model. Design:  Qualitative approach using thematic analysis and process mapping. Setting:  Support groups of people with hearing impairment. Participants:  Thirty-two adults with acquired hearing impairment from two hearing impaired groups in Wales. All were hearing aid users. Main outcome measure:  Participants worked in small groups to describe their experiences through hearing loss. These data were used to develop a template of the patients’ perspective of the journey. This was then compared with the perspective of professionals, and a ‘patient journey template for adults with acquired hearing impairment’ was developed. Results:  This template identifies seven main phases as follows: (i) pre-awareness; (ii) awareness; (iii) movement; (iv) diagnostics; (v) rehabilitation; (vi) self-evaluation; and (vii) resolution. The study identified a number of new components. The self-evaluation component was not defined by professionals and reflects the need for patients to consider the costs, benefits and alternatives to the approach provided by audiologists. It is important for audiologists to be aware of this. Conclusion:  The study highlighted the differences and commonalities in perspectives of professionals and patients. Use of the patient journey can help clinicians to understand the unique experiences their patients go through help them to develop patient-centred treatment.

    National Category
    Otorhinolaryngology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-87637 (URN)10.1111/j.1749-4486.2011.02320.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2013-01-20 Created: 2013-01-20 Last updated: 2018-04-25
    2. The patient journey of adults with sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment: a pilot study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The patient journey of adults with sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment: a pilot study
    2012 (English)In: Journal of Laryngology and Otology, ISSN 0022-2151, E-ISSN 1748-5460, Vol. 126, no 5, p. 475-481Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: A previous study examined the patient journey of adults with gradual-onset acquired hearing impairment. This study examined the same for adults with sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment, and assessed differences. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanStudy design: Data were collected from 16 audiologists, using the Ida Institute template, and from four adults with sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment, through semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and presented using a process mapping model. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: A patient journey template for sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment was developed based on the professionals and patients perspectives. The main difference between these two groups perspectives was seen in the self-evaluation phase: some stages within this phase were recognised by the patients but not by the professionals. The main difference between the current and the previous study was the absence of a pre-awareness phase in the journey described by patients with sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment, compared with that described by patients with gradual-onset acquired hearing impairment. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Patient journey templates could be useful counselling tools for ear and hearing healthcare specialists. However, such templates should be used only as a baseline; it is important to take a detailed case history to understand each patients unique experience, including the psychosocial impact of hearing impairment.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Cambridge University Press (CUP), 2012
    Keywords
    Hearing Impairment, Natural History, Prognosis, Rehabilitation, Patient journey, Sudden-onset hearing impairment
    National Category
    Otorhinolaryngology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77869 (URN)10.1017/S0022215111003197 (DOI)000303893900008 ()
    Available from: 2012-05-31 Created: 2012-05-31 Last updated: 2018-04-25
    3. Communication partners’ journey through their partner’s hearing impairment
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communication partners’ journey through their partner’s hearing impairment
    2013 (English)In: International Journal of Otolaryngology, ISSN 1687-9201, E-ISSN 1687-921X, Vol. 2013, no 707910, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the study was to further the Ida Institute model on communication partner’s (CPs) journey through experiences of person with hearing impairment (PHI), based on the perspectives of CPs. Qualitative approach using thematic analysis and process mapping. Nine CPs of hearing aid users participated in the study, recruited through the Swansea hearing impaired support group. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and the data were used to develop a CP journey template. The Ida Institute model (based on professionals’ perspective) was compared with the new template developed (based on CPs perspectives). Seven main phases were identified which include: (1) contemplation; (2) awareness; (3) persuasion; (4) validation; (5) rehabilitation; (6) adaptation; and (7) resolution. The results suggest some commonalities and differences between the views of professionals and CPs. A new phase ‘adaptation’ was identified from CPs’ reported experiences, which was not identified by professionals in the Ida Institute model. The CP journey model could be a useful tool during audiological enablement/rehabilitation sessions to promote discussion between the PHI and the CP. In addition, it can be used in the training of hearing healthcare professionals.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2013
    Keywords
    Patient journey, Communication partners, significant others, hearing impairment, hearing loss
    National Category
    Otorhinolaryngology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-87633 (URN)10.1155/2013/707910 (DOI)
    Available from: 2013-01-20 Created: 2013-01-20 Last updated: 2018-04-25
    4. The acceptance of hearing disability among adults experiencing hearing difficulties: a cross-sectional study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The acceptance of hearing disability among adults experiencing hearing difficulties: a cross-sectional study
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 4, no e004066Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective This study developed the Hearing Disability Acceptance Questionnaire (HDAQ) and tested its construct and concurrent validities.

    Design Cross-sectional.

    Participants A total of 90 participants who were experiencing hearing difficulties were recruited in the UK.

    Outcome measures The HDAQ was developed based on the Tinnitus Acceptance Questionnaire (TAQ). Participants completed self-report measures regarding hearing disability acceptance, hearing disability, symptoms of anxiety and depression and a measure of stages of change.

    Results The HDAQ has a two-factor structure that explains 75.69% of its variance. The factors identified were activity engagement and avoidance and suppression. The scale showed a sufficient internal consistency (Cronbach's α=0.86). The HDAQ also had acceptable concurrent validity with regard to self-reported hearing disability, self-reported anxiety and depression and readiness to change measures.

    Conclusions Acceptance is likely an important aspect of coping with chronic health conditions. To our knowledge, no previously published and validated scale measures the acceptance of hearing disability; therefore, the HDAQ might be useful in future research. However, the role of acceptance in adjusting to hearing disability must be further investigated

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BMJ Open, 2014
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102999 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004066 (DOI)000337363700020 ()
    Available from: 2014-01-09 Created: 2014-01-09 Last updated: 2018-04-25
    5. Stages of change in adults noticing hearing difficulties but not using hearing aids
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stages of change in adults noticing hearing difficulties but not using hearing aids
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to investigate health behaviour change characteristics based on the transtheoretical stages-of-change model in adults noticing hearing difficulties but not using hearing aids using the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA) scale.

    Design: The study employed a cross-sectional design.

    Study Sample: The study was conducted in United Kingdom and 90 pre-clinical participants completed URICA as well as measures of self-reported hearing disability, self-reported anxiety and depression, self-reported hearing disability acceptance and also provided some demographic details online.

    Results: As predicted, the results indicate that a high percentage of participants (over 90%) were in the contemplation and preparation stages. This was in contrast to a previous study, which included participants attending audiology clinic, where most participants (about 80%) were in the action stage (Laplante-Lévesque et al., 2013). In addition, statistically significant differences were observed in terms of readiness to change composite and committed action composite between the study samples in the current and the previous study.

    Conclusions: Study results support the stages-of-change model. In addition, implications of the current study and areas for future research are discussed.

    Keywords
    Hearing disability, hearing loss, stages of change, readiness for change, hearing helpseeking, audiological rehabilitation
    National Category
    Otorhinolaryngology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-95919 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-08-09 Created: 2013-08-09 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
  • 13.
    C. Manchaiah, Vinaya K.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Health behaviour change in hearing healthcare: A discussion paper2012In: Audiology Research, ISSN 2039-4330, E-ISSN 2039-4349, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 12-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health behavior change (HBC) refers to facilitating changes to habits and/or behavior related to health. In healthcare practice, it is quite common that the interactions between practitioner and patient involve conversations related to HBC. This could be mainly in relation to the practitioner trying to directly persuade the patients to make some changes in their health behavior. However, the patients may not be motivated to do so as they do not see this change as important. For this reason, direct persuasion may result in a breakdown of communication. In such instances, alternative approaches and means of indirect persuasion, such as empowering the patient and their family members, could be helpful. Furthermore, there are several models and/or theories proposed which explain the health behavior and also provide a structured framework for health behavior change. Many such models/approaches have been proven effective in facilitating HBC and health promotion in areas such as cessation of smoking, weight loss and so on. This paper provides an overview of main models/theories related to HBC and some insights into how these models/approaches could be adapted to facilitate behavior change in hearing healthcare, mainly in relation to: i) hearing help-seeking and hearing-aid uptake; and ii) hearing conservation in relation to music-induced hearing loss (MIHL). In addition, elements of current research related to this area and future directions are highlighted.

  • 14.
    C. Manchaiah, Vinaya K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stages of change in adults noticing hearing difficulties but not using hearing aidsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to investigate health behaviour change characteristics based on the transtheoretical stages-of-change model in adults noticing hearing difficulties but not using hearing aids using the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA) scale.

    Design: The study employed a cross-sectional design.

    Study Sample: The study was conducted in United Kingdom and 90 pre-clinical participants completed URICA as well as measures of self-reported hearing disability, self-reported anxiety and depression, self-reported hearing disability acceptance and also provided some demographic details online.

    Results: As predicted, the results indicate that a high percentage of participants (over 90%) were in the contemplation and preparation stages. This was in contrast to a previous study, which included participants attending audiology clinic, where most participants (about 80%) were in the action stage (Laplante-Lévesque et al., 2013). In addition, statistically significant differences were observed in terms of readiness to change composite and committed action composite between the study samples in the current and the previous study.

    Conclusions: Study results support the stages-of-change model. In addition, implications of the current study and areas for future research are discussed.

  • 15.
    C. Manchaiah, Vinaya K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Staphens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Models to represent communication partners within the social networks of people with hearing impairment2011In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 103-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: People with hearing impairment have relatively smaller social networks than their normally hearing peers, and may experience more feelings of loneliness. The effects on the person with hearing impairment (PHI) can also impact on their communication partners (CPs). This report discusses the currently available model representing the CPs within the social network context of the PHI and proposes a new model. Study design: The ‘Communication Rings’ proposed and developed by the Ida Institute is discussed. We believe that this model is too simple to represent the complexity and dynamic nature of the CP's role in the life of the PHI and highlights the need for a new model. Results: We suggest that the model ‘Communication World’ based on the analogy of the solar system, may help overcome some of the problems identified. Clinical examples of how to apply this model and its usefulness in rehabilitation are presented. Conclusions: The expanded model could provide novel information, and provision of a visual representation will help CPs understand the problems of the PHI.

  • 16.
    C. Manchaiah, Vinaya K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University.
    Life consequences and positive experiences reported by communication partners of person with hearing impairment: A pilot study2013In: Speech, Language and Hearing, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to obtain insights into the life consequences and positive experiences reported by the communication partners (CPs) of person with hearing impairment (PHI). Open-ended questionnaires and semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine CPs who were recruited through the Swansea hearing impaired support group. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. The results identified a number of life consequences and positive experiences of CPs and PHIs as reported by the CPs. The main life consequences experienced by both CPs and PHIs were related to communication and psychological aspects. The main positive experiences for the CPs were related to personal development and improved relationships and for PHIs were related to the use of hearing loss for self-advantage. Surprisingly, most of the participants were able to identify at least one positive experience. The study also suggested that open-ended questionnaires were a good way to understand life consequences and positive experiences by CPs and such responses can be further elicited by providing some prompts through a semi-structured interview. The study method and results could be useful in involving CPs in audiological enablement/rehabilitation sessions. These findings add to the growing literature that reported positive experiences canbe used during counseling sessions, to motivate the PHIs and their CPs and to boost their positive morale.

  • 17.
    C. Manchaiah, Vinaya K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University.
    Perspectives in defining ‘hearing loss’ and its consequences2013In: Hearing, Balance and CommunicationArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This discussion paper aims to highlight factors that may be important in defining hearing loss and its consequences and to present different perspectives based on various models of disability. Method: Relevant literature was reviewed to develop the discussion. Results: Hearing is a complex function that has both cognitive and emotional aspects. A person with hearing loss may have consequences in the physical, mental and social domains. Hearing loss in the context of clinical audiology is currently defined based on type of pathology and severity. However, evidence from both clinical findings and research suggest that this may not cover all the aspects of ‘hearing loss’ as a disability. Conclusion: Defining and describing hearing loss and its consequences with a holistic approach has some clinical value particularly in the context of audiological enablement/rehabilitation.

  • 18.
    C. Manchaiah, Vinaya K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    The Patient journey: Living with acquired hearing impairment2011In: Journal of the Academy of Rehabilitative Audiology, Vol. 44, p. 29-40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    C. Manchaiah, Vinaya K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Centre for Long Term and Chronic Conditions, College of Human and Health Sciences, Swansea University, Swansea , UK.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Department of Psychological Medicine and Neurology, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff , UK.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten , Denmark.
    Information about the prognosis given to sudden-sensorineural hearing loss patients: Implications to 'patient journey' process2012In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 109-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this short paper is to highlight the implications of information provision about prognosis given to sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) patients. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with four SSNHL patients to develop the patient journey model that is published in our previous paper (12). In this study the implications from general, ethical and legal perspectives about the information provision were considered (i.e. discussion with experts and the use of relevant literature). Results: Three out of four patients interviewed reported that their doctors (both general practitioners and ENT specialists) gave false hopes about prognosis. From the preliminary data it appears that there is considerable variability in the views expressed by patients about preference in information provision. However, this issue needs consideration as the information provided by professionals may have a serious impact on service provision and outcome. Conclusions: It is our view that even though, in some instances, it may appear that false hope provides short-term psychological benefit to patients, providing full and honest information is necessary for general (i.e. to facilitate patient journey process), ethical and legal reasons.

  • 20.
    C. Manchaiah, Vinaya K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Zhao, Fei
    Bristol University, UK.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    VU University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    The role of communication partners in the audiological enablement/rehabilitation of a person with hearing impairment: An overview2012In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 21-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Hearing impairment is known to have various effects upon both the person with hearing impairment (PHI) and their communication partners (CPs). In addition, CPs are reported to play an important role in making the decision to seek a consultation and the acceptance of intervention by the PHI. The overall aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of the role of the CP in the audiological enablement/rehabilitation of the PHI keeping clinical practice in focus. Method: A literature review was conducted using a number of resources including electronic databases, books and websites. Results: An overview of the literature was presented in the following sections: 1) Factors influencing the audiological enablement/rehabilitation of the PHI; 2) Effect of the PHI's hearing impairment on their CPs; 3) CPs’ influence on their PHI's audiological enablement/rehabilitation; 4) Positive experiences reported by CPs of the PHI; 5) Models to represent CPs within the social network context of the PHI; and 6) CP involvement in the audiological enablement/rehabilitation. This paper also identifies gaps in the literature and provides recommendations for further research. Conclusion: It is clear that involvement of the CP in the audiological enablement/rehabilitation can result in mutual advantages for both the PHI and their CPs.

  • 21.
    Chundu, Srikanth
    et al.
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, UK .
    Kumar, Neeraj
    Bihar Sharif, Nalanda, Bihar, India .
    Parental reported benefits and shortcomings of cochlear implantation: Pilot study findings from Southeast Asia2013In: Cochlear Implants International, ISSN 1467-0100, E-ISSN 1754-7628, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 22-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The aim of the study was to understand the reported benefits and shortcomings by parents of children with cochlear implants and who contribute towards the cost of the implant. Method Thirty parents of children with cochlear implants from a hearing impaired school in Southeast Asia completed open-ended questionnaires and the data were analysed using content analysis. Results A wide range of benefits and shortcomings were reported. However, it is notable that the single most reported shortcoming was related to cost. Discussion The results suggest that, even though, in general, the reports about benefits and shortcomings were similar to previous results from western countries, the emphasis given to various aspects of shortcomings was different. In particular, it appears that parentally reported outcomes could be related to many factors including the hearing healthcare system with the costs involved for the implanted individuals and their families. These findings help us understand the parental perspectives of the success of cochlear implantation and will be useful during parental counselling sessions.

  • 22.
    Dockens, Ashley L.
    et al.
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA.
    Bellon-Harn, Monica L.
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA.
    Burns, Erin S.
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA; Audiology India, Mysore, Karnataka, India.
    Hinojosa, Orlando
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA.
    Examination of an Audiologists Response to Patients Expression of Symptoms: A Pilot Study2017In: Journal of audiology and otology, ISSN 2384-1621, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 115-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This pilot study explores audiologist-patient interactions during initial evaluations or consultations. In particular, an audiologist’s response to patient symptoms is examined. Conversations between audiologist and patients were recorded using a digital recorder, which were transcribed, and analyzed using the Codes for Human Analysis of Transcripts and Child Language Analysis computer programs. Mean length of turn and frequency of utterances related to explicit discussion or description of symptoms or the patient’s interpretation of symptoms was determined. Study sample: six audiologist-patient interactions were recorded and transcribed. A single audiologist was used for this pilot investigation. Results suggest that during the initial audiological consultations related to hearing difficulties the audiologist produced more utterances related to explicit description of the symptoms, whereas when during the sessions about complex disorder and hearing aid consultation the audiologist produced more utterances related to the patient’s interpretation of the symptoms. Also, a more equitable distribution of words and utterances per turn are observed during the initial consultation about hearing difficulties when compared to complex disorders and hearing aid consultation sessions where the audiologist was dominant within the interaction. This preliminary study reveals unique insights to audiologist’s communication behavior during audiology consultation session. Efforts are needed to educate and promote appropriate communication between audiologists’ and patients, which could result in increased patient satisfaction.

  • 23.
    Dueppen, Abigail J.
    et al.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Bellon-Harn, Monica L.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Radhakrishnan, Nandhakumar
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Quality and Readability of English-Language Internet Information for Voice Disorders2019In: Journal of Voice, ISSN 0892-1997, E-ISSN 1873-4588, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 290-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the readability and quality of English-language Internet information related to vocal hygiene, vocal health, and prevention of voice disorders. This study extends recent work because it evaluates readability, content quality, and website origin across broader search criteria than previous studies evaluating online voice material. Method. Eighty-five websites were aggregated using five different country-specific search engines. Websites were then analyzed using quality and readability assessments. The entire web page was evaluated; however, no information or links beyond the first page was reviewed. Statistical calculations were employed to examine website ratings, differences between website origin and quality and readability scores, and correlations between readability instruments. Result. Websites exhibited acceptable quality as measured by the DISCERN. However, only one website obtained the Health On the Net certification. Significant differences in quality were found among website origin, with government websites receiving higher quality ratings. Approximate educational levels required to comprehend information on the websites ranged from 8 to 9 years of education. Significant differences were found between website origin and readability measures with higher levels of education required to understand information on websites of nonprofit organizations. Conclusion. Current vocal hygiene, vocal health, and prevention of voice disorders websites were found to exhibit acceptable levels of quality and readability. However, highly rated Internet information related to voice care should be made more accessible to voice clients through Health On the Net certification.

  • 24.
    Durisala, N.
    et al.
    Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya Kumar Channapatna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Granberg, S.
    Örebro University, Sweden; Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Moeller, K.
    Örebro University, Sweden; Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Determination and classification of the problems experienced by adults with single-sided deafness using ICF classification: an exploratory study using 26 participants2017In: Clinical Otolaryngology, ISSN 1749-4478, E-ISSN 1365-2273, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 748-752Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 25.
    Evans, Rachel
    et al.
    Swansea University, UK.
    Bardsley, Barry
    Swansea University, UK.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    Swansea University, UK.
    Auditory Complaints in Scuba Divers: an Overview2012In: Indian Journal of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery, ISSN 2231-3796, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pre-1970s, diving was seen as a predominantly male working occupation. Since then it has become a popular hobby, with increasing access to SCUBA diving while on holiday. For a leisure activity, diving puts the auditory system at the risk of a wide variety of complaints. However, there is still insufficient consensus on the frequency of these conditions, which ultimately would require more attention from hearing-healthcare professionals. A literature search of epidemiology studies of eight auditory complaints was conducted, using both individual and large-scale diving studies, with some reference to large-scale non-diving populations. A higher incidence was found for middle ear barotrauma, eustachian tube dysfunction, and alternobaric vertigo with a high correlation among females. Comparing these findings with a non-diving population found no statistically significant difference for hearing loss or tinnitus. Increased awareness of health professionals is required, training, and implementation of the Frenzel technique would help resolve the ambiguities of the Valsalva technique underwater.

  • 26.
    Germundsson, Per
    et al.
    Malmo Univ, Sweden.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal Univ, India.
    Ratinaud, Pierre
    Univ Toulouse, France.
    Tympas, Aristotle
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Danermark, Berth
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Patterns in the social representation of "hearing loss" across countries: how do demographic factors influence this representation?2018In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 12, p. 925-932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to understand patterns in the social representation of hearing loss reported by adults across different countries and explore the impact of different demographic factors on response patterns. The study used a cross-sectional survey design. Data were collected using a free association task and analysed using qualitative content analysis, cluster analysis and chi-square analysis. The study sample included 404 adults (18 years and over) in the general population from four countries (India, Iran, Portugal and UK). The cluster analysis included 380 responses out of 404 (94.06%) and resulted in five clusters. The clusters were named: (1) individual aspects; (2) aetiology; (3) the surrounding society; (4) limitations and (5) exposed. Various demographic factors (age, occupation type, education and country) showed an association with different clusters, although country of origin seemed to be associated with most clusters. The study results suggest that how hearing loss is represented in adults in general population varies and is mainly related to country of origin. These findings strengthen the argument about cross-cultural differences in perception of hearing loss, which calls for a need to make necessary accommodations while developing public health strategies about hearing loss.

  • 27.
    Hall, Deborah A.
    et al.
    Natl Inst Hlth Res NIHR, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Domingo, Silvia Zaragoza
    Neuropsychol Res Org, Spain.
    Hamdache, Leila Z.
    Carlton Acad, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar State Univ, TX USA; Manipal Univ, India; All India Inst Speech and Hearing, India.
    Thammaiah, Spoorthi
    All India Inst Speech and Hearing, India.
    Evans, Chris
    Univ Roehampton, England.
    Wong, Lena L. N.
    Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    A good practice guide for translating and adapting hearing-related questionnaires for different languages and cultures2018In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 161-175Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To raise awareness and propose a good practice guide for translating and adapting any hearing-related questionnaire to be used for comparisons across populations divided by language or culture, and to encourage investigators to publish detailed steps. Design: From a synthesis of existing guidelines, we propose important considerations for getting started, followed by six early steps: (1) Preparation, (2, 3) Translation steps, (4) Committee Review, (5) Field testing and (6) Reviewing and finalising the translation. Study sample: Not applicable. Results: Across these six steps, 22 different items are specified for creating a questionnaire that promotes equivalence to the original by accounting for any cultural differences. Published examples illustrate how these steps have been implemented and reported, with shared experiences from the authors, members of the International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology and TINnitus research NETwork. Conclusions: A checklist of the preferred reporting items is included to help researchers and clinicians make informed choices about conducting or omitting any items. We also recommend using the checklist to document these decisions in any resulting report or publication. Following this step-by-step guide would promote quality assurance in multinational trials and outcome evaluations but, to confirm functional equivalence, large-scale evaluation of psychometric properties should follow.

  • 28.
    Jiang, Wen
    et al.
    Affiliated Hospital Xuzhou Medical Coll, Peoples R China.
    Zhao, Fei
    Cardiff Metropolitan University, Wales; Sun Yat Sen University, Peoples R China.
    Guderley, Nicola
    Guys and St Thomas Hospital, England.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Daily music exposure dose and hearing problems using personal listening devices in adolescents and young adults: A systematic review2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 197-205Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This systematic review aimed to explore the evidence on whether the preferred listening levels (PLLs) and durations of music listening through personal listening devices (PLDs) in adolescents and young adults exceed the current recommended 100% daily noise dose; together with the impact on hearing and possible influential factors of such listening behaviours. Design: A systematic search was conducted using multiple online bibliographic databases. Study sample: The 26 studies were included on the basis of the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: The results showed that up to 58.2% of participants exceeded the 100% daily noise dose, particularly in the presence of background noise. Significantly positive correlations were found among background noise levels and mean PLLs, as well as the proportion of participants exceeding the 100% daily noise dose. Moreover, significantly worse hearing thresholds were found in PLD users using audiometry, and significantly poor results in otoacoustic emission (OAE), even in the participants with self-reported normal hearing. Conclusion: It is crucial to develop appropriate standards and safe recommendations for daily music exposure dose in future studies. Providing an essential guide and effective education to adolescents and young adults will help raise awareness, increase knowledge, and consequently change attitudes and listening habits.

  • 29.
    Kumar Channapatna Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK .
    Danermark, Berth
    The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, 702 81 Örebro, Sweden.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, 20 Rørtangvej, 3070 Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Importance of “Process Evaluation” in Audiological Rehabilitation: Examples from Studies on Hearing Impairment2014In: International Journal of Otolaryngology, ISSN 1687-9201, E-ISSN 1687-921X, Vol. 2014, p. 1-7, article id 168684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main focus of this paper is to discuss the importance of “evaluating the process of change” (i.e., process evaluation) in people with disability by studying their lived experiences. Detailed discussion is made about “why and how to investigate the process of change in people with disability?” and some specific examples are provided from studies on patient journey of persons with hearing impairment (PHI) and their communication partners (CPs). In addition, methodological aspects in process evaluation are discussed in relation to various metatheoretical perspectives. The discussion has been supplemented with relevant literature. The healthcare practice and disability research in general are dominated by the use of outcome measures. Even though the values of outcome measures are not questioned, there seems to be a little focus on understanding the process of change over time in relation to health and disability. We suggest that the process evaluation has an additional temporal dimension and has applications in both clinical practice and research in relation to health and disability.

  • 30.
    Kumar Channapatna Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK .
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Use of the ‘patient journey’ model in the internet-based pre-fitting counseling of a person with hearing disability: lessons from a failed clinical trial2014In: BMC Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders, ISSN 1472-6815, E-ISSN 1472-6815, Vol. 14, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Persons with a hearing impairment have various experiences during their ‘journey’ through hearing loss. In our previous studies we have developed ‘patient journey’ models of person with hearing impairment and their communication partners (CPs). The study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of using the patient journey model in the internet-based pre-fitting counseling of a person with hearing disability (ClinicalTrials.gov Protocol Registration System: NCT01611129, registered 2012 May 14).

    Method

    The study employed a randomized controlled trial (RCT) with waiting list control (WLC) design. Even though we had intended to recruit 158 participants, we only managed to recruit 80 participants who were assigned to one of two groups: (1) Intervention group; and (2) WLC. Participants from both groups completed a 30 day internet-based counseling program (group 2 waited for a month before intervention) based on the ‘patient journey’ model. Various outcome measures which focus on self-reported hearing disability, self-reported depression and anxiety, readiness to change and self-reported hearing disability acceptance were administered pre- and post-intervention.

    Results

    The trial results suggest that the intervention was not feasible. Treatment compliancy was one of the main problems with a high number of dropouts. Only 18 participants completed both pre- and post-intervention outcome measures. Their results were included in the analysis. Results suggest no statistically significant differences among groups over time in all four measures.

    Conclusions

    Due to the limited sample size, no concrete conclusions can be drawn about the hypotheses from the current study. Furthermore, possible reasons for failure of this trial and directions for future research are discussed.

  • 31.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Role of self-reported hearing disability and measured hearing sensitivity in understanding participation restrictions and health-related quality of life: a study with hundred and three older adults with hearing loss2017In: Clinical Otolaryngology, ISSN 1749-4478, E-ISSN 1365-2273, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 924-926Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 32.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal Univ, India.
    Abrams, Harvey
    Univ S Florida, FL USA.
    Bailey, Abram
    Hearing Tracker Inc, TX USA.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Negative Side Effects Associated with Hearing Aid Use in Adults with Hearing Loss2019In: Journal of american academy of audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, E-ISSN 2157-3107, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 472-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    The low uptake of hearing aids in the United States has been attributed to a number of reasons, including low perceived hearing disability, limited perceived benefit and cost. Another possible reason may be related to negative side effects associated with hearing aid use.

    Purpose:

    The present study was aimed at determining and classifying the negative side effects associated with hearing aid use in adults with hearing loss.

    Research Design:

    The study used a cross-sectional survey design.

    Study Sample:

    Five hundred and twelve participants completed an electronic survey.

    Data Collection and Analysis:

    The data was collected using the negative side effects of hearing aids (NSE-HAs) questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Chi square analysis, principal components analysis, and calculation of Cronbach’s alpha.

    Results:

    Some individuals reported negative side effects for all 32 items. However, careful examination of results suggests that, as a whole, reported negative side effects tend to be mild with mean scores falling close to the lower quartile of the total scores. Chi square test results suggest that the variables of age, gender, duration of hearing loss, self-reported hearing disability, and duration of hearing aid use seem to be significantly associated with the reported negative side effects. The NSE-HAs questionnaire was found to have a complex structure as indicated by the principal components analysis. However, good internal consistency was found in both the full scale and subscales.

    Conclusions:

    The present study suggests that, although a large number of adults with hearing loss who use hearing aids experience some degree of negative side effects, those effects tend to be mild.

  • 33.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal Univ, India.
    Beukes, Eldre W.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Granberg, Sarah
    Orebro Univ, Sweden; Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Durisala, Naresh
    GN Hearing Pte Ltd, Singapore.
    Baguley, David M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Univ Nottingham, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Allen, Peter M.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Problems and Life Effects Experienced by Tinnitus Research Study Volunteers: An Exploratory Study Using the ICF Classification2018In: Journal of american academy of audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, E-ISSN 2157-3107, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 936-947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Tinnitus is one of the most distressing hearing-related symptoms. It is often associated with a range of physiological and psychological complications, such as depression, anxiety, and insomnia. Hence, approaching tinnitus from a biopsychological perspective may be more appropriate than from purely a biomedical model. Objective: The present study was aimed at determining the relationship between tinnitus and the problems and life effects experienced by UK-based tinnitus research study volunteers. Open-ended questions were used. Responses were classified using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework to understand the impact of tinnitus in a multidimensional manner using a biopsychosocial perspective. Research Design: A cross-sectional survey design was used. Study Sample: Study sample included a sample of 240 adults with tinnitus who were interested in undertaking an Internet-based intervention for tinnitus. Data Collection and Analysis: The data were collated using two open-ended questions. The first focused on problems related to having tinnitus and the second to life effects as a result of tinnitus. Responses were analyzed using a simplified content analysis approach to link concepts to ICF categories in accordance with established linking rules. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was performed to compare the number of responses between the two questions. Results: There were 764 responses related to problems identified, 797 responses associated with life effects due to tinnitus, and 37 responses that did not fit into any ICF category. No significant differences were observed in the number of responses between the two questions. In addition, no significant association between the number of responses reported and demographic variables was found. Most of the problems and life effects experienced by tinnitus sufferers were related to body function, followed by activity limitations, and participation restrictions. Only a few responses were related to environmental and personal factors. The most frequent responses related to body function involved "emotional functions" (b152), "sleep functions" (b134), "hearing functions" (b230), "sustaining attention" (b1400), and "energy level" (b1300). For activity limitations and participation restrictions they were "communicating with-receiving-spoken messages" (d310), "socialization" (d9205), "handling stress and other psychological demands" (d240), and "recreation and leisure" (d920). The most frequently occurring responses related to environmental factors were "sound intensity" (e2500), "sound quality" (e2501), and "general products and technology for communication" (e1250). "Coping styles" was the most frequently occurring personal factor. Conclusions: The study highlights the use of open-ended questions in gathering useful information about the impact of tinnitus. The responses coded to ICF show that tinnitus impacts many domains, not only particularly body function, but also activity limitations and participation restrictions. The results demonstrate the heterogeneous nature of the impact of tinnitus on people affected.

  • 34.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Dockens, Ashley L.
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Bellon-Harn, Monica
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Burns, Erin S.
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Noncongruence between Audiologist and Patient Preferences for Patient-Centeredness2017In: Journal of american academy of audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, E-ISSN 2157-3107, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 636-643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Trends in preferences of both healthcare providers and patients to patient-centeredness have been emphasized in research. However, an understanding of the nature of preferences to patient-centeredness within the context of the audiologist patient relationship is needed. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the congruence between audiologist and patient preferences for patient-centeredness. Research Design: A cross-sectional survey design was used to gather data from audiologists and patients with hearing loss. Study Sample: Participants included 75 audiologists and 105 consecutive patients with hearing loss. Data Collection and Analysis: Participants completed the modified Patient Practitioner Orientation Scale (PPOS) and provided selected demographic information. Data were analyzed using an independent sample t test to evaluate the differences between audiologist and patient congruence. Regression analysis was performed to evaluate factors contributing to preferences for patient-centeredness. Results: Patients had significantly lower scores in PPOS full scale when compared to the audiologists [t((170)) = 0.78; p amp;lt;= 0.001] with a very large effect size (Cohens d = 1.43). Patients also had significantly lower scores when compared to the audiologists on both the sharing [t((170)) = 1.01; p amp;lt;= 0.001] and caring [tom) = 0.56; p amp;lt;= 0.001] subscales. Statistically significant lower scores were noted for patients when compared to audiologists on 12 items on the PPOS. No relationship between any demographic factors and preferences for patient-centeredness were found. Conclusions: The current study results indicated noncongruence in preferences for patient-centeredness among audiologists and patients with hearing loss. Results point toward the need for more research considering the nature and impact of patient-centered audiology practice.

  • 35.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal Univ, India.
    Dockens, Ashley L.
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Flagge, Ashley
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Bellon-Harn, Monica
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Azios, Jamie Hartwell
    Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA.
    Kelly-Campbell, Rebecca J.
    Univ Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Quality and Readability of English-Language Internet Information for Tinnitus2019In: Journal of american academy of audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, E-ISSN 2157-3107, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 31-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Because of the wealth of information available on the internet and increasing numbers of individuals relying on websites as a primary source of information for health-related questions, it is important that the readability of their content is within the comprehension level of most readers.

    Objective:

    The study evaluated the quality and readability of English-language Internet information for tinnitus.

    Research Design:

    Analysis of Internet websites on tinnitus.

    Study Sample:

    A total of 134 websites with tinnitus information.

    Data Collection and Analysis:

    Three key words (i.e., tinnitus, ringing in the ear, and buzzing in the ear) were entered in five country-specific versions of the most commonly used internet search engine in August 2016. For each of the 15 searches, the first 20 relevant websites were examined. After removing duplicates, a total of 134 websites were assessed. Their origin (commercial, nonprofit organization, government, personal, or university), quality (Health On the Net [HON] certification and DISCERN scores), and readability (Flesch Reading Ease score, Flesch-Kincaid Reading Grade Level Formula, and Simple Measure of Gobbledygook) were assessed.

    Results:

    Most websites were of commercial (49.3%) or nonprofit organization (38.8%) origin. Their quality and readability was highly variable. Only 13.5% of websites had HON certification. χ2 analysis showed that there was significant association between website origin and HON certification [χ2(4) = 132.9, p < 0.0001]. The mean DISCERN scores were 2.39. No association between DISCERN scores and website origin was found. Readability measures showed that on average, only people with at least 10‐12 yr of education could read and understand the internet information for tinnitus in websites. Almost all the websites exceeded the most stringent reading level recommended for health information.

    Conclusions:

    The results highlight great variability in the quality and readability of health information, specifically for tinnitus in the internet. These findings underscores the need for stakeholders (e.g., web-developers, clinicians) to be aware of this and to develop more user-friendly health information on websites to make it more accessible for people with low literacy.

  • 36.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Anglia Ruskin University, England.
    Gomersall, Philip A.
    Anglia Ruskin University, England.
    Tome, David
    Polytech Institute Porto, Portugal.
    Ahmadi, Tayebeh
    University of Social Welf and Rehabil Science, Iran.
    Krishna, Rajalakshmi
    University of Mysore, India.
    Audiologists preferences for patient-centredness: a cross-sectional questionnaire study of cross-cultural differences and similarities among professionals in Portugal, India and Iran2014In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 4, no 10, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Patient-centredness has become an important aspect of health service delivery; however, there are a limited number of studies that focus on this concept in the domain of hearing healthcare. The objective of this study was to examine and compare audiologists preferences for patient-centredness in Portugal, India and Iran. Design: The study used a cross-sectional survey design with audiologists recruited from three different countries. Participants: A total of 191 fully-completed responses were included in the analysis (55 from Portugal, 78 from India and 58 from Iran). Main outcome measure: The Patient-Practitioner Orientation Scale (PPOS). Results: PPOS mean scores suggest that audiologists have a preference for patient-centredness (ie, mean of 3.6 in a 5-point scale). However, marked differences were observed between specific PPOS items suggesting these preferences vary across clinical situations. A significant level of difference (pless than0.001) was found between audiologists preferences for patient-centredness in three countries. Audiologists in Portugal had a greater preference for patient-centredness when compared to audiologists in India and Iran, although no significant differences were found in terms of age and duration of experience among these sample populations. Conclusions: There are differences and similarities in audiologists preferences for patient-centredness among countries. These findings may have implications for the training of professionals and also for clinical practice in terms of optimising hearing healthcare across countries.

  • 37.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA; Audiology India, Mysore, Karnataka, India; Department of Speech and Hearing, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University, Karnataka, India.
    Hernandez, Barbara Michiels
    Department of Health and Kinesiology, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA.
    Beck, Douglas L.
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA; Oticon Inc, Somerset, New Jersey, NJ, USA; Department of Communication Disorders, State University of New York at Buffalo, USA.
    Application of Transtheoretical (Stages of Change) Model in Studying Attitudes and Behaviors of Adults with Hearing Loss: A Descriptive Review2018In: Journal of american academy of audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, E-ISSN 2157-3107, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 548-560Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health Behavior Change (HBC) refers to facilitating changes to habits and/or behaviors related to health. There are a number of models/theories of HBC, which provide a structured framework to better understand the HBCs of individuals. The Transtheoretical Model (TTM, aka "the Stages of Change" model) is an integrative model used to conceptualize the process of intentional behavior change and is applied to a variety of behaviors, populations, and settings. In the last few years, use of TTM by the profession of audiology has been increasing.

  • 38.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    et al.
    Swansea University, UK.
    Eyles, Julie
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Verschuur, Carl
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Effect of Stimulation Rate on Speech Perception in Individuals using Nucleus Freedom Cochlear Implant2009In: Journal of Indian Speech & Hearing Association, Vol. 23, p. 61-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of high electrical stimulation rates in cochlear implants (CI) on speech perception. Four participants using Nucleus Freedom CI and five adult participants with normal hearing performed a vowel consonant vowel (VCV) consonant (iCi) recognition task in quiet and a (Bamford-Kowal-Bench) BKB sentence recognition task in noise at +10 dB signal to noise ratio (SNR). The performance of the participants was measured for three stimulation rates, namely 1800 pulses per second per channel (pps/ch), 2400 pps/ch and 3500 pps/ch, with the Advanced Combination Encoder Revised i.e. ACE (RE) speech coding strategy. Participants with normal hearing were also studied to see the effect of overlap on CI acoustic modelling. The speech perception results of the participants using the Nucleus Freedom system were compared with those of participants with normal hearing on CI acoustic modelling. The VCV test scores were further analyzed for feature transmission errors in place and manner of articulation as well as in voicing features. The results showed that there was no advantage of high stimulation rates for both consonant recognition in quiet and sentence recognition in noise. The CI acoustic models were found to be useful in studying the effect of rates in those using a CI. Although CI acoustic model with overlap lead to poor performance in consonant recognition in quiet and sentence recognition in noise test, they seemed to be the better approximation of the scores among the users of CI.

  • 39.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K C
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK .
    Molander, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    The acceptance of hearing disability among adults experiencing hearing difficulties: a cross-sectional study2014In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 4, no e004066Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective This study developed the Hearing Disability Acceptance Questionnaire (HDAQ) and tested its construct and concurrent validities.

    Design Cross-sectional.

    Participants A total of 90 participants who were experiencing hearing difficulties were recruited in the UK.

    Outcome measures The HDAQ was developed based on the Tinnitus Acceptance Questionnaire (TAQ). Participants completed self-report measures regarding hearing disability acceptance, hearing disability, symptoms of anxiety and depression and a measure of stages of change.

    Results The HDAQ has a two-factor structure that explains 75.69% of its variance. The factors identified were activity engagement and avoidance and suppression. The scale showed a sufficient internal consistency (Cronbach's α=0.86). The HDAQ also had acceptable concurrent validity with regard to self-reported hearing disability, self-reported anxiety and depression and readiness to change measures.

    Conclusions Acceptance is likely an important aspect of coping with chronic health conditions. To our knowledge, no previously published and validated scale measures the acceptance of hearing disability; therefore, the HDAQ might be useful in future research. However, the role of acceptance in adjusting to hearing disability must be further investigated

  • 40.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar Univ, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal Univ, India.
    Pyykko, Ilmari
    Univ Hosp Tampere, Finland.
    Levo, Hilla
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Kentala, Erna
    Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Impact of Menieres Disease on Significant Others Health and Lives2018In: Journal of american academy of audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, E-ISSN 2157-3107, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 63-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Ménière’s disease (MD) is a chronic and, in part, intermittent illness that poses multiple challenges for both the physical and psychological well-being of patients, as well as on those around them. The patients face psychosocial consequences, which include disruptions to life goals, employment, income, relationships, leisure activities, and daily living activities that also influence their family members and friends. However, there is a limited understanding of the impact of MD on significant others (SOs).

    Purpose:

    The current study was aimed at identifying how the SOs of patients with MD respond to different aspects of the impact of the disorder on health and life (i.e., psychological aspects, activities, participation, and positive aspects).

    Research Design:

    The study employed a cross-sectional survey design.

    Study Sample:

    The study sample was 186 SOs of patients with MD who were recruited through Finnish Ménière’s Federation.

    Data Collection and Analysis:

    Participants completed a 25-item structured questionnaire focusing on different aspects of the impact of the disorder on health and life, and also provided some demographic information. Data were analyzed using Kruskal‐Wallis test, Pearson’s correlation, and K-means cluster analysis techniques.

    Results:

    Examination of response patterns suggests that the disorder had, on average, a marginal effect on SOs’ psychological aspects, activities, and participation as the SOs generally focused on complaints. Interestingly, SOs reported some positive consequences as a result of their partners’ condition. The results show a limited association between SOs’ demographic variables and response patterns. The Pearson’s correlation suggested a strong association between the subscales psychological aspects, activity limitations, and participation restrictions. Also, a weak negative correlation was observed among positive aspects and participation restrictions. The cluster analysis resulted in three clusters, namely, (1) “nonengaged,” (2) “supportive,” and (3) “concerned.”

    Conclusions:

    The current study results identify that the SOs’ reaction to patients’ condition varies and this may be from coping with victimization. Although the impact of MD on SOs is limited, some of the SOs may have more severe consequences and may require rehabilitation. The information gathered about SOs’ coping and adjustment in this study can also help while developing management and/or rehabilitation plan for people with MD.

  • 41.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, UK.
    The patient journey of adults with sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment: a pilot study2012In: Journal of Laryngology and Otology, ISSN 0022-2151, E-ISSN 1748-5460, Vol. 126, no 5, p. 475-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: A previous study examined the patient journey of adults with gradual-onset acquired hearing impairment. This study examined the same for adults with sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment, and assessed differences. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanStudy design: Data were collected from 16 audiologists, using the Ida Institute template, and from four adults with sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment, through semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and presented using a process mapping model. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: A patient journey template for sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment was developed based on the professionals and patients perspectives. The main difference between these two groups perspectives was seen in the self-evaluation phase: some stages within this phase were recognised by the patients but not by the professionals. The main difference between the current and the previous study was the absence of a pre-awareness phase in the journey described by patients with sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment, compared with that described by patients with gradual-onset acquired hearing impairment. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Patient journey templates could be useful counselling tools for ear and hearing healthcare specialists. However, such templates should be used only as a baseline; it is important to take a detailed case history to understand each patients unique experience, including the psychosocial impact of hearing impairment.

  • 42.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Use of the ‘patient journey’ model in the internet-based pre-fitting counseling of a person with hearing disability: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial2013In: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 14, no 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Hearing impairment is one of the most frequent chronic conditions. Persons with a hearing impairment (PHI) have various experiences during their ‘journey’ through hearing loss. In our previous studies we have developed a ‘patient journey’ model of PHI and their communication partners (CPs). We suggest this model could be useful in internet-based pre-fitting counseling of a person with hearing disability (PHD).

    Methods/Design

    A randomized controlled trial (RCT) with waiting list control (WLC) design will be used in this study. One hundred and fifty eight participants with self-reported hearing disability (that is, score >20 in the Hearing Handicap Questionnaire (HHQ)) will be recruited to participate in this study. They will be assigned to one of two groups (79 participants in each group): (1) Information and counseling provision using the ‘patient journey’ model; and (2) WLC. They will participate in a 30 day (4 weeks) internet-based counseling program based on the ‘patient journey’ model. Various outcome measures which focuses on hearing disability, depression and anxiety, readiness to change and acceptance of hearing disability will be administered pre (one week before) and post (one week and six months after) intervention to evaluate the effectiveness of counseling.

    Discussion

    Internet-based counseling is being introduced as a viable option for audiological rehabilitation. We predict that the ‘patient journey’ model will have several advantages during counseling of a PHD. Such a program, if proven effective, could yield cost and time-efficient ways of managing hearing disability.

  • 43.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Communication partners’ journey through their partner’s hearing impairment2013In: International Journal of Otolaryngology, ISSN 1687-9201, E-ISSN 1687-921X, Vol. 2013, no 707910, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the study was to further the Ida Institute model on communication partner’s (CPs) journey through experiences of person with hearing impairment (PHI), based on the perspectives of CPs. Qualitative approach using thematic analysis and process mapping. Nine CPs of hearing aid users participated in the study, recruited through the Swansea hearing impaired support group. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and the data were used to develop a CP journey template. The Ida Institute model (based on professionals’ perspective) was compared with the new template developed (based on CPs perspectives). Seven main phases were identified which include: (1) contemplation; (2) awareness; (3) persuasion; (4) validation; (5) rehabilitation; (6) adaptation; and (7) resolution. The results suggest some commonalities and differences between the views of professionals and CPs. A new phase ‘adaptation’ was identified from CPs’ reported experiences, which was not identified by professionals in the Ida Institute model. The CP journey model could be a useful tool during audiological enablement/rehabilitation sessions to promote discussion between the PHI and the CP. In addition, it can be used in the training of hearing healthcare professionals.

  • 44.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    et al.
    Swansea University, UK.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Meredith, Rhys
    Singleton Hospital, ABM University Health Board, Swansea, UK.
    The patient journey of adults with hearing impairment: the patients’ views2011In: Clinical Otolaryngology, ISSN 1749-4478, E-ISSN 1365-2273, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 227-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:  The term ‘patient journey’ refers to the experiences and processes the patient goes through during the course of a disease and its treatment. The study explores the perspectives of adults with acquired hearing impairment and to further develop the patient journey template based on the Ida model. Design:  Qualitative approach using thematic analysis and process mapping. Setting:  Support groups of people with hearing impairment. Participants:  Thirty-two adults with acquired hearing impairment from two hearing impaired groups in Wales. All were hearing aid users. Main outcome measure:  Participants worked in small groups to describe their experiences through hearing loss. These data were used to develop a template of the patients’ perspective of the journey. This was then compared with the perspective of professionals, and a ‘patient journey template for adults with acquired hearing impairment’ was developed. Results:  This template identifies seven main phases as follows: (i) pre-awareness; (ii) awareness; (iii) movement; (iv) diagnostics; (v) rehabilitation; (vi) self-evaluation; and (vii) resolution. The study identified a number of new components. The self-evaluation component was not defined by professionals and reflects the need for patients to consider the costs, benefits and alternatives to the approach provided by audiologists. It is important for audiologists to be aware of this. Conclusion:  The study highlighted the differences and commonalities in perspectives of professionals and patients. Use of the patient journey can help clinicians to understand the unique experiences their patients go through help them to develop patient-centred treatment.

  • 45.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    et al.
    Swansea University, UK.
    Zhao, Fei
    University of Bristol, UK.
    Professor Dafydd Stephens 1942–20122012In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 10, p. 714-714Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zhao, Fei
    Bristol University.
    Storytelling in different cultural context: Applications to hearing loss public awareness campaign2012In: Journal of Behavioral Health, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 322-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hearing impairment is known to be one of the most frequent sensory impairments. This condition is known to be a hidden disorder which is under recognised and under treated all around the world. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates suggest that there are over 275 million people with hearing impairment and 80% of them living in low and middle income countries. Moreover, the estimates suggest that incidence and prevalence of hearing loss and also the number of people with hearing loss accessing services varies considerably across countries. This rises the need for health promotion (or public awareness campaigns) directed to increase awareness and education of hearing loss and hearing healthcare. This paper provides brief discussion on ‘Stories and storytelling’, ‘Cross-culture and cross-cultural communication’ and ‘Health promotion and cultural sensitivity’. The central focus of this paper is to highlight the applications of storytelling in different cultural context in health promotion, particularly to hearing loss public awareness campaigns.

  • 47.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.
    et al.
    Swansea University, United Kingdom.
    Zhao, Fei
    University of Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Danesh, Ali A.
    Florida Atlantic University, United States.
    Duprey, Rachel
    Ystrad Mynach Hospital, Aneurin Bevan Health Board, United Kingdom.
    The genetic basis of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD)2011In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 75, no 2, p. 151-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Auditory neuropathy is a hearing disorder where outer hair cell function within the cochlea is normal, but inner hair cell and/or the auditory nerve function is disrupted. It is a heterogeneous disorder which can have either congenital or acquired causes. Furthermore, the aetiology of auditory neuropathy is vast, which may include prematurity, hyperbilirubinaemia, anoxia, hypoxia, congenital brain anomalies, ototoxic drug exposure, and genetic factors. It is estimated that approximately 40% of cases have an underlying genetic basis, which can be inherited in both syndromic and non syndromic conditions. This review paper provides an overview of the genetic conditions associated with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorders (ANSDs) and highlights some of the defective genes that have been found to be linked to the pathological auditory changes.Method: Literature search was conducted using a number of resources including textbooks, professional journals and the relevant websites. Results:  The largest proportion of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorders (ANSDs) is due to genetic factors which can be syndromic, non-syndromic or mitochondrial related. The inheritance pattern can include all the four main types of inheritances such as autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked and mitochondrial. Conclusion: This paper has provided an overview of mutation with some of the genes and/or loci discovered to be the cause for auditory neuropathy spectrum disorders (ANSDs). It has been noted that different gene mutations may trigger different pathological changes in patients with this disorder. These discoveries have provided us with vital information as to the sites of pathology in auditory neuropathy spectrum disorders (ANSDs), and the results highlight the heterogeneity of the disorder.

  • 48.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya Kumar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Stages of Change Profiles among Adults Experiencing Hearing Difficulties Who Have Not Taken Any Action: A Cross-Sectional Study2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the current study was to test the hypothesis that adults experiencing hearing difficulties who are aware of their difficulties but have not taken any action would fall under contemplation and preparation stages based on the transtheoretical stages-of-change model. The study employed a cross-sectional design. The study was conducted in United Kingdom and 90 participants completed University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA) scale as well as measures of self-reported hearing disability, self-reported anxiety and depression, self-reported hearing disability acceptance, and provided additional demographic details online. As predicted, the results indicate that a high percentage of participants (over 90%) were in the contemplation and preparation stages. No statistically significant differences were observed among groups of stage with highest URICA scores and factors such as: years since hearing disability, self-reported hearing disability, self-reported anxiety and depression, and self-reported hearing disability acceptance. Cluster analysis identified three stages-of-change clusters, which were named as: decision making (53% of sample), participation (28% of sample), and disinterest (19% of sample). Study results support the stages-of-change model. In addition, implications of the current study and areas for future research are discussed.

  • 49.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77010 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal University, India.
    Pyykko, Ilmari
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Zou, Jing
    University of Tampere, Finland; Second Mil Medical University, Peoples R China.
    Levo, Hilla
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Kentala, Erna
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Patient-reported benefits from patient organization magazines and Internet-based peer support in Menieres disease2017In: Patient Preference and Adherence, ISSN 1177-889X, E-ISSN 1177-889X, Vol. 11, p. 1851-1857Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To facilitate self-help, the Finnish Menieres Federation (FMF) provides various kinds of support to persons with Menieres disease (MD), which includes patient magazines (PM) and Internet-based peer support (iPS). The current study aimed to evaluate the benefits reported by MD patients in terms of PM and iPS. Method: The study used a cross-sectional survey design with a mixture of structured and open-ended questions administered online. A sample of 185 patients from the FMF membership database provided complete data. Results: Ninety-two percent of the respondents rated PM as useful, or very useful. The main benefits of PM included: information on the disease and complaints, information about elements of peer support program, patients experience with useful positive case studies, relevant news on MD, and information of activity of the FMF. Of the 185 persons, 68 reported that they did not have a need for peer support as their disease was either in silent phase or did not cause any annoyance. The main reasons for nonuse were: mild disease, personal reasons, and problems in using. Regarding the benefits of iPS, 75% of recent and 64% of chronic MD patients said that they would benefit from such a program. The main benefits of iPS included: reliable information on the disease and its management, peer support useful for coping with the disease, information about managing MD symptoms, information about managing attitude, and information about therapy. Moreover, the study identified different groups of individuals, which included: nonusers of support from patient organizations, those who used the support but did not feel they benefited, and those who used and also benefited from such programs. Conclusion: The current study results provide some information about the preferences of MD patients regarding different forms of support and could certainly prove helpful while developing wider support strategies.

  • 50.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India; Manipal University, India.
    Taylor, Brian
    Taylor Audio LLC, MN USA.
    Dockens, Ashley L.
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Tran, Nicole R.
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Lane, Kayla
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Castle, Mariana
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Grover, Vibhu
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Applications of direct-to-consumer hearing devices for adults with hearing loss: a review2017In: Clinical Interventions in Aging, ISSN 1176-9092, E-ISSN 1178-1998, Vol. 12, p. 859-871Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This systematic literature review is aimed at investigating applications of direct-to-consumer hearing devices for adults with hearing loss. This review discusses three categories of direct-to-consumer hearing devices: 1) personal sound amplification products (PSAPs), 2) direct-mail hearing aids, and 3) over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids. Method: A literature review was conducted using EBSCOhost and included the databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO. After applying prior agreed inclusion and exclusion criteria, 13 reports were included in the review. Results: Included studies fell into three domains: 1) electroacoustic characteristics, 2) consumer surveys, and 3) outcome evaluations. Electroacoustic characteristics of these devices vary significantly with some meeting the stringent acoustic criteria used for hearing aids, while others producing dangerous output levels (ie, over 120-dB sound pressure level). Low-end (or low-cost) devices were typically poor in acoustic quality and did not meet gain levels necessary for most adult and elderly hearing loss patterns (eg, presbycusis), especially in high frequencies. Despite direct-mail hearing aids and PSAPs being associated with lower satisfaction when compared to hearing aids purchased through hearing health care professionals, consumer surveys suggest that 5%-19% of people with hearing loss purchase hearing aids through direct-mail or online. Studies on outcome evaluation suggest positive outcomes of OTC devices in the elderly population. Of note, OTC outcomes appear better when a hearing health care professional supports these users. Conclusion: While some direct-to-consumer hearing devices have the capability to produce adverse effects due to production of dangerously high sound levels and internal noise, the existing literature suggests that there are potential benefits of these devices. Research of direct-to-consumer hearing devices is limited, and current published studies are of weak quality. Much effort is needed to understand the benefits and limitations of such devices on people with hearing loss.

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