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  • 1.
    Persson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Baeckmann, John
    Natl Board Forens Med Linkoping, Dept Forens Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Berge, Johan
    Natl Board Forens Med Linkoping, Dept Forens Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Jackowski, Christian
    Univ Bern, Switzerland.
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Zech, Wolf-Dieter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Natl Board Forens Med Linkoping, Dept Forens Med, Linkoping, Sweden; Univ Bern, Switzerland.
    Temperature-corrected postmortem 3-T MR quantification of histopathological early acute and chronic myocardial infarction: a feasibility study2018In: International journal of legal medicine, ISSN 0937-9827, E-ISSN 1437-1596, Vol. 132, no 2, p. 541-549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate if quantitative postmortem cardiac 3-T magnetic resonance (QPMCMR) T1 and T2 relaxation times and proton density values of histopathological early acute and chronic myocardial infarction differ to the quantitative values of non-pathologic myocardium and other histopathological age stages of myocardial infarction with regard to varying corpse temperatures. In 60 forensic corpses (25 female, 35 male), a cardiac 3-T MR quantification sequence was performed prior to autopsy and cardiac dissection. Core body temperature was assessed during MR examinations. Focal myocardial signal alterations in synthetically generated MR images were measured for their T1, T2, and proton density (PD) values. Locations of signal alteration measurements in PMCMR were targeted at heart dissection, and myocardial tissue specimens were taken for histologic examinations. Quantified signal alterations in QPMCMR were correlated to their according histologic age stage of myocardial infarction, and quantitative values were corrected for a temperature of 37 A degrees C. In QPMCMR, 49 myocardial signal alterations were detected in 43 of 60 investigated hearts. Signal alterations were diagnosed histologically as early acute (n = 16), acute (n = 10), acute with hemorrhagic component (n = 9), subacute (n = 3), and chronic (n = 11) myocardial infarction. Statistical analysis revealed that based on their temperature-corrected quantitative T1, T2, and PD values, a significant difference between early acute, acute, and chronic myocardial infarction can be determined. It can be concluded that quantitative 3-T postmortem cardiac MR based on temperature-corrected T1, T2, and PD values may be feasible for pre-autopsy diagnosis of histopathological early acute, acute, and chronic myocardial infarction, which needs to be confirmed histologically.

  • 2.
    Schwendener, Nicole
    et al.
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Jackowski, Christian
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Schuster, Frederick
    University of Bern, Switzerland; Hospital and University of Bern Inselspital, Switzerland.
    Riva, Fabiano
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Zech, Wolf-Dieter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Detection and differentiation of early acute and following age stages of myocardial infarction with quantitative post-mortem cardiac 1.5 T MR2017In: Forensic Science International, ISSN 0379-0738, E-ISSN 1872-6283, Vol. 270, p. 248-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, quantitative MR sequences have started being used in post-mortem imaging. The goal of the present study was to evaluate if early acute and following age stages of myocardial infarction can be detected and discerned by quantitative 1.5 T post-mortem cardiac magnetic resonance (PMCMR) based on quantitative T1, T2 and PD values. In 80 deceased individuals (25 female, 55 male), a cardiac MR quantification sequence was performed prior to cardiac dissection at autopsy in a prospective study. Focal myocardial signal alterations detected in synthetically generated MR images were MR quantified for their T1, T2 and PD values. The locations of signal alteration measurements in PMCMR were targeted at autopsy heart dissection and cardiac tissue specimens were taken for histologic examinations. Quantified signal alterations in PMCMR were correlated to their according histologic age stage of myocardial infarction. In PMCMR seventy-three focal myocardial signal alterations were detected in 49 of 80 investigated hearts. These signal alterations were diagnosed histologically as early acute (n = 39), acute (n = 14), subacute (n = 10) and chronic (n = 10) age stages of myocardial infarction. Statistical analysis revealed that based on their quantitative T1, T2 and PD values, a significant difference between all defined age groups of myocardial infarction can be determined. It can be concluded that quantitative 1.5 T PMCMR quantification based on quantitative T1, T2 and PD values is feasible for characterization and differentiation of early acute and following age stages of myocardial infarction. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Schwendener, Nicole
    et al.
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Jackowski, Christian
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Schuster, Frederick
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Zech, Wolf-Dieter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Temperature-corrected post-mortem 1.5 T MRI quantification of non-pathologic upper abdominal organs2017In: International journal of legal medicine, ISSN 0937-9827, E-ISSN 1437-1596, Vol. 131, no 5, p. 1369-1376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aimed to evaluate if simultaneous temperature-corrected T1, T2, and proton density (PD) 1.5 T post-mortem MR quantification [quantitative post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging (QPMMRI)] is feasible for characterizing and discerning non-pathologic upper abdominal organs (liver, spleen, pancreas, kidney) with regard to varying body temperatures. QPMMRI was performed on 80 corpses (25 females, 55 males; mean age 56.2 years, SD 17.2) prior to autopsy. Core body temperature was measured during QPMMRI. Quantitative T1, T2, and PD values were measured in the liver, pancreas, spleen, and left kidney and temperature corrected to 37 A degrees C. Histologic examinations were conducted on each measured organ to determine non-pathologic organs. Quantitative T1, T2, and PD values of non-pathologic organs were ANOVA tested against values of other non-pathologic organ types. Based on temperature-corrected quantitative T1, T2, and PD values, ANOVA testing verified significant differences between the non-pathologic liver, spleen, pancreas, and left kidneys. Temperature-corrected 1.5 T QPMMRI based on T1, T2, and PD values may be feasible for characterization and differentiation of the non-pathologic liver, spleen, pancreas, and kidney. The results may provide a base for future specific pathology diagnosis of upper abdominal organs in post-mortem imaging.

  • 4.
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). SyntheticMR AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Berge, J.
    Institute Forens Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Zech, Wolf-Dieter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Institute Forens Med, Linkoping, Sweden; University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Myelin Detection Using Rapid Quantitative MR Imaging Correlated to Macroscopically Registered Luxol Fast Blue-Stained Brain Specimens2017In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 1096-1102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Myelin detection is of great value in monitoring diseases such as multiple sclerosis and dementia. However, most MR imaging methods to measure myelin are challenging for routine clinical use. Recently, a novel method was published, in which the presence of myelin is inferred by using its effect on the intra- and extracellular water relaxation rates and proton density, observable by rapid quantitative MR imaging. The purpose of this work was to validate this method further on the brains of 12 fresh, intact cadavers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The 12 brains were scanned with a quantification sequence to determine the longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and proton density as input for the myelin estimations. Subsequently, the brains were excised at postmortem examination, and brain slices were stained with Luxol fast blue to verify the presence of myelin. The optical density values of photographs of the stained brain slices were registered with the MR images and correlated with the myelin estimation performed by quantitative MR imaging. RESULTS: A correlation was found between the 2 methods with a mean Spearman for all subjects of 0.74 0.11. Linear regression showed a mean intercept of 1.50% +/- 2.84% and a mean slope of 4.37% +/- 1.73%/%. A lower correlation was found for the separate longitudinal relaxation rates and proton density ( = 0.63 +/- 0.12 and -0.73 +/- 0.09, respectively). For transverse relaxation rates, the was very low (0.11 +/- 0.28). CONCLUSIONS: The observed correlation supports the validity of myelin measurement by using the MR imaging quantification method.

  • 5.
    Zech, Wolf-Dieter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Hottinger, Anna-Lena
    Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Schwendener, Nicole
    Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Schuster, Frederick
    Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University of Bern, Inselspital, Bern, Switzerland.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Jackowski, Christian
    Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Post-mortem 1.5T MR quantification of regular anatomical brain structures2016In: International journal of legal medicine, ISSN 0937-9827, E-ISSN 1437-1596, Vol. 130, no 4, p. 1071-1080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, post-mortem MR quantification has been introduced to the field of post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging. By usage of a particular MR quantification sequence, T1 and T2 relaxation times and proton density (PD) of tissues and organs can be quantified simultaneously. The aim of the present basic research study was to assess the quantitative T1, T2, and PD values of regular anatomical brain structures for a 1.5T application and to correlate the assessed values with corpse temperatures. In a prospective study, 30 forensic cases were MR-scanned with a quantification sequence prior to autopsy. Body temperature was assessed during MR scans. In synthetically calculated T1, T2, and PD-weighted images, quantitative T1, T2 (both in ms) and PD (in %) values of anatomical structures of cerebrum (Group 1: frontal gray matter, frontal white matter, thalamus, internal capsule, caudate nucleus, putamen, and globus pallidus) and brainstem/cerebellum (Group 2: cerebral crus, substantia nigra, red nucleus, pons, cerebellar hemisphere, and superior cerebellar peduncle) were assessed. The investigated brain structures of cerebrum and brainstem/cerebellum could be characterized and differentiated based on a combination of their quantitative T1, T2, and PD values. MANOVA testing verified significant differences between the investigated anatomical brain structures among each other in Group 1 and Group 2 based on their quantitative values. Temperature dependence was observed mainly for T1 values, which were slightly increasing with rising temperature in the investigated brain structures in both groups. The results provide a base for future computer-aided diagnosis of brain pathologies and lesions in post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging.

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