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  • 1.
    Sallnäs, Uni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Björklund, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eng-Larsson, Fredrik
    Stockholms universitet, Sweden.
    Green distribution alternatives: actors, roles and responsibilities2024In: Environmentally Responsible Supply Chains in an Era of Digital Transformation: Research Developments and Future Prospects / [ed] Pietro Evangelista, Jukka Hallikas, Mohamad Y. Jaber, Cheltenhamn: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2024, 1, p. 105-122Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    E-commerce presents a fantastic opportunity for consumers to receive product deliveries anytime, anyhow and anywhere. However, a major challenge for all logistics systems is that of environmental sustainability, and for e-commerce, the distribution of products to consumers constitutes one of the largest environmental challenges. This chapter focusses on green distribution alternatives for consumers, and thereby provides an overview of how e-commerce can become more environmentally sustainable through offering such alternatives. The chapter starts by pointing to two major trends behind the greening of e-commerce: the growth of e-commerce itself and the increasing societal and corporate concern for environmental sustainability. Building on a series of studies of e-commerce development on the Swedish market, the perspectives of consumers, retailers and logistics service providers paint a broad picture of e-commerce delivery. Finally, today’s as well as potential future challenges for sustainable e-commerce deliveries are discussed.

    The full text will be freely available from 2025-05-07 13:52
  • 2.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sallnäs, Uni
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Martin, Jason
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Learning in the supply chain to accelerate the electrification of freight transport2024Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Among a multitude of initiatives that can contribute to decarbonize freight transport (McKinnon, 2018), electrification has surficed as a main strategy (Li et al, 2022). The transition towards electrification has commenced, but in particular for long-haul transportation it is slow. Obstacles to the transition include the price of the new technology, lack of infrastructure and lack of policy incentives. In addition, the technology is new to all actors. This new-ness, together with the acknowledged complexity of the transition to electrified freight proposes learning challenges for all involved actors, for example vehicle manufacturers, haulier firms, logistics service providers and shippers. The necessary knowledge to navigate and operate the freight transport system cannot reside in one single orchestrator of the supply chain, but must be shared among actors, which in turn highlight the need for interaction with the purpose to share knowledge and experiences, and to jointly build new knowledge. 

    This paper aims to address how learning among actors in the supply chain can contribute to accelerate the electrification of freight transport.

    Design / Methodology / Approach: This conceotual paper presents a framework for describing and analysing learning between actors in a supply chain. The framework takes a stance in a model for organisational learning (Crossan, Lane & White, 1999) adapted to the context of inter-organisational learning. This model will be adapted to the context of electrification of freight based on findings from a range of ongoing research projects into electrification of freight transport. 

    Findings: The paper presents a model for describing and analysing learning between organisations in a supply chain. The model is conceptual and is intended to be used for analysing multi-actor learning processes in the context of electrification of freight.

    Practical implications: The results of the paper include suggestions for how learning between actors in supply chains can increase, by which the transition towards electrification of freight can be accelerated.

    Relevance / Contribution: Supply chain collaboration has only scaresly been analysed with a learning perspective. The application of learning as mechanisms for supply chain integration in a context of ongoing transition suggests that the results are both novel and relevant.

  • 3.
    Osman, Mary Catherine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Jenny
    Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Exploring green logistics practices in freight transport and logistics: a study of biomethane use in Sweden2023In: International Journal of Logistics, ISSN 1367-5567, E-ISSN 1469-848X, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 548-567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Logistics networks need to conform to arising market trends and public requirements for greening freight transport through a series of Green Logistics Practices (GLPs). This study sets out to explore the use of fossil-free fuels as a GLP and possible influence on business strategy and system design. A literature review was conducted which concluded that literature about the use of fossil-free fuels is limited. An explorative interview study was conducted to further explore the use of biomethane among actors in logistics networks. Customers increasingly request green freight transport typically accepting moderately higher prices for green transport. Development of green logistics services is predominately driven by corporate stakeholders and internal initiatives, while public regulation appeared to have a weak influence. The study revealed new insights into how GLPs can relate to each other.

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  • 4.
    Sallnäs, Uni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eng-Larsson, Fredrik
    Stockholms universitet.
    Haag, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Björklund, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Slutrapport: Hållbar distribution i e-handeln: Hur kan klimatsmarta leveransalternativ underlättas?2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Inom ramen för det VINNOVA-finansierade projektet ”Hållbar distribution i e-handeln: Hur kan klimatsmarta leveransalternativ underlättas” (HELSMART) har syftet varit att ta fram kunskap om hur e-handlare kan utforma och presentera klimatsmarta leveransalternativ till konsumenter för att minimera klimatpåverkan från e-handelsdistributionen, och på så sätt bidra till ett fossilfritt samhälle. I denna rapport presenteras resultaten från projektet, som pågått under 2020-2023 och som varit ett samarbete mellan Linköpings Universitet och Stockholms Universitet. 

    Projektet har kombinerat olika datainsamlingsmetoder, vilket gett möjlighet att förstå utmaningen med hållbara e-handelsleveranser ur olika perspektiv. Metoderna inkluderar dels en genomgång av e-handlares hemsidor, dels fallstudier och intervjuer med e-handlare, logistikföretag och transportplattformsföretag, och dels konsumentdata från faktiska köp före och efter introduktionen av ”miljömärkning” av leveranser. Sammantaget har det här projektet följt utvecklingen av miljömässigt hållbar e-handelsdistribution i en svensk kontext under de senaste nästan fyra åren. 

    Resultaten visar att det finns en enorm komplexitet kopplat till miljömässigt hållbara leveransalternativ. För att belysa denna komplexitet så presenteras i rapporten en process som beskriver tre steg för att kunna utforma och presentera klimatsmarta leveransalternativ till konsumenter. Dessa innefattar: 

    1. Identifiera miljömässigt hållbara leveransalternativ, 
    2. Erbjuda miljömässigt hållbara leveransalternativ till konsumenter, och 
    3. Vägleda konsumenters val av miljömässigt hållbara leveransalternativ. 

    Genomgång av de tre stegen leder sedan fram till en avslutande diskussion där fyra centrala budskap lyfts. För det första är det inte självklart vad som menas med miljömässigt hållbar leverans. Här finns t.ex. oklarheter i vad man är ute efter att minimera när man vill uppnå miljömässigt hållbara leveranser, och om och hur det går att jämföra olika logistikföretags utsläpp på ett rättvisande sätt. För det andra så befinner sig e-handlarna inte i ett vakuum utan är beroende av andra aktörer, vilket gör att de slutgiltiga utsläppen beror på beslut från en mängd olika och starkt skilda beslutsfattare. För det tredje så skapar externa märkningar transparens, samtidigt som de riskerar att skapa förvirring. För samtidigt som externa märkningar har sina fördelar, så kan de också leda till att för många typer av miljömässigt hållbara leveransalternativ kommuniceras parallellt. För det fjärde så visar resultaten att hållbara leveransalternativ är viktiga för konsumenter, men inte lika viktigt som allt annat. Men genom att placera det miljömässigt hållbara leveransalternativet högst upp i checkouten och markera det som förvalt, så ökar sannolikheten för att konsumenter ska välja detta alternativ. Små knuffar på tillräckligt många kan på sikt ha enormt stor effekt på totala utsläpp.

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  • 5.
    Osman, Mary Catherine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. VTI.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kjellsdotter Ivert, Linea
    VTI.
    Actor’s Drivers and Barriers switching to Fossil-Free Fuels: A Multiple-case Study2022In: The 34th ANNUAL NOFOMA CONFERENCE, Reykjavik, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose 

    Implementation of fossil free fuels in the supply chain requires the involvement of multiple actors, each of which have different drivers and barriers undergoing the switch. The aim of this research is to begin to explore these drivers and barriers additionally how they relate to each other across the different actors.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A multiple case study was performed, interviewing multiple representatives from each actor. The drivers and barriers from the respective actors were compared across the actors in the network 

    Findings

    The study is ongoing however some findings may be suggested. Among others, some drivers and barriers identified were customer demands, available infrastructure, and financial costs. 

    Research limitations/implications

    While there are multiple possible fossil-free fuels to be used in the future, this research looked deeper into the implantation of biomethane. Future research conducted could investigate the drivers and barriers of other fossil-free alternatives. 

    Practical implications

    Understanding the impact from drivers and barriers for each actor in the network during the initial implementation of a fossil free fuel will allow further organizations to properly prepare for the switch. 

    Original/value

    Little research on fossil free fuel use has been completed from the perspective of certain actors, namely the haulier and forwarder. Studying these previously understated actors help in moving forward towards a more comprehensive understanding of the network. 

  • 6.
    Osman, Mary Catherine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. VTI.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kjellsdotter Ivert, Linea
    VTI.
    Business Practices for Transition to Fossil-Free Fuel for Freight2022In: Logistics Research Network Conference: Supply Chain Innovation: People, Process, Technology, Reykjavik, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: One ambition of organizations is to create and provide value to its stakeholders. As more and more customers are demanding environmentally sustainable freight transport, it is becoming a valuable service for a freight forwarder to provide. Some companies experience better success in offering this service to customers than others despite operating in the same infrastructure and regulatory circumstances. The aim of this paper is to describe different business practices utilized by the freight forwarder when providing value to its stakeholder by offering fossil-free transport. 

    Research Approach: The research was conducted through a series of interviews including five actors representing the focal actor – freight forwarder – and its primary stakeholders. The analysis takes stance in stakeholder theory, which was used as a framework for understanding relationships, influence, and interactions with the freight forwarder as the focal organization.  

    Findings and Originality: Analysis is ongoing, however preliminary findings can be shared. Four overarching business practices were identified: collaboration, pricing, workplace culture and pursuit of a circular economy. Primary stakeholders were identified as well as secondary, and their influence on the focal actor and its business practices is described. Once the analysis is completed results and discussion on value provision (if any exist) through these four business practices will be available. These findings reveal how a shift of technology – in this case the energy source – may shape future sustainable freight transport with consideration to multiple actors and their business practices.

    Research Impact: This paper plans to build upon previously written stakeholder theory literature and its theory development. Additionally, the paper will explain the role of business practices and the subsequent stakeholder value development via offering fossil-free freight transport, which historically has been an overlooked topic within sustainable logistics.

    Practical Impact: This paper allows organizations with various roles in freight transport to gain deeper knowledge of how to implement and provide fossil-free freight transport to their customers and stakeholders and which business practices may aid them in their endeavors. Furthermore, the paper’s results will provide guidance for how to understand the business environment particularly for freight forwarders.

  • 7.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Green construction logistics – a multi-actor challenge2022In: Research in Transportation Business and Management (RTBM), ISSN 2210-5395, E-ISSN 2210-5409, Vol. 45, article id 100830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Construction transport have a severe environmental impact. To address the environmental problems requires that the complexity of construction, including the many different actors and their goals, is captured. The purpose of this article is to propose a new conceptual model for construction logistics systems, with the aim of advancing the transition to more environmentally friendly construction transport. The conceptual model was developed based on different theoretical frameworks, and also improved based on practitioner's workshops. The conceptual model is based on five interconnected layers of activities: urban land use; construction; construction supply chain; transport; and infrastructure and three subsystems. The model indicates on what layers different actors in the subsystems act and how different actors can influence the environmental performance of construction logistics systems by their decisions. In relation to similar multi-layer models, construction logistics also need to embrace municipal actors. For example, the traffic planning may offer available infrastructure to improve fill rates and energy efficiency, but fill rate is the direct result of the suppliers decisions, which is indirectly affected by the main contractor's schedule. In particular, modal split is influenced by a range of decisions by different actors, complicating the selection of a more environmentally friendly transport mode.

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  • 8.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Green Karma - promoting environmental initiatives by adapting and using QFD as a proactive tool2022In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, no 15-16, p. 1826-1845Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a lack of feasible managerial tools to support companies in their greening initiatives. The objective of this paper is to propose a tool - Green Karma - for monitoring and proactively managing initiatives for environmental sustainability. We present findings from an action research project involving two freight transport companies. The tool is based on Quality Function Deployment but has been adapted to capture various dimensions of environmental efforts. As goals, in traditional QFD labelled as customer needs, we applied national environmental goals, thereby widening the scope of the customer to a societal perspective. Regarding the means, traditionally labelled as functions, we instead documented greening initiatives in the companies and applied them in the tool. Using the Green Karma tool resulted in increased pro-activity. New initiatives were taken among the companies. Furthermore, a more structured approach and firm commitment to realise ideas were observed. Thus, the tool has shown its potential to increase the pace of greening the companies operations and strategies. QFD has previously been used to analyse and prioritise environmental activities but it has not been used before as a proactive tool for driving and implementing environmental initiatives. In this paper, such an application is presented.

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  • 9.
    Sallnäs, Uni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eng-Larsson, Fredrik
    Operations Management, Stockholms universitet.
    Björklund, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Haag, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Blumenthal, Louise
    Logistikutveckling, Apotek Hjärtat.
    Johansson, Daniel
    Supply Chain Director, Stadium.
    Klimatsmart e-handelsdistribution: Hur svårt kan det vara?2022In: Supply chain effect, no 4, p. 12-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Logistik spelar en viktig roll för e-handelns miljöpåverkan och e-handelns framfart medför att konsumenten i allt större utsträckning kan, och vill, påverka den miljömässiga hållbarheten i logistiken. Särskilt i den senare delen av försörjningskedjan, det som ofta kallas sista milen, så har konsumenten stor makt att påverka.

  • 10.
    Sallnäs, Uni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eng-Larsson, Fredrik
    Stockholms universitet.
    Björklund, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management.
    Haag, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management.
    Blumenthal, Louise
    Apotek Hjärtat.
    Johansson, Daniel
    Stadium.
    Klimatsmart e-handelsdistribution– Hur svårt kan det vara?2022In: Supply Chain Effect, p. 13-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Abrahamsson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kjellsdotter-Ivert, Linea
    VTI, Sverige.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Engevall, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Slutrapport Fossilfri Bygglogistik2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Byggtransporter står för en betydande andel av CO2-utsläppen i byggprojekt (ca 10%) och en bättre logistik leder till lägre utsläpp, mindre trängseleffekter och lägre kostnader. Projektet Fossilfri Bygglogistik, finansierat av Trafikverket genom Triple F, har 2019-2021 studerat potentialen i att minska utsläppen från byggtransporter med förbättrad logistik baserat på ett systemsynsätt. Projektet har varit ett samarbete mellan Linköpings universitet, VTI, Logistikia, Energifabriken, Renall, Almroths, SanktKors, Stångåstaden, Hyresbostäder, Peab, NCC, RagnSells, PreZero, Lambertsson och Byggföretagen.

    Projektet har utgått från tre frågeställningar:

    • Vad är potentialerna med samordnad bygglogistik och vad krävs för att hämta hem dessa?

    • Vilka metoder/lösningar är användbara för att nå målet om fossilfrihet?

    • Vad är rollfördelningen mellan aktörer. som är delaktiga i ett bygglogistiksystem, och behöver den förändras för att uppnå fossilfrihet

    Projektet har tre huvudsakliga resultat:

    1) Utvärdering av piloter såsom nyttan av bygglogistiklösningar i olika projekt och för olika aktörer, mätetal för byggtransporter och möjliga data för att följa upp, samt effekterna av en HVO-tank på site.

    2) Potentialerna i att arbeta med en fossilfri bygglogistik utifrån ett systemperspektiv där inte bara enskilda byggen studeras utan även större bygglogistiksystem samt hur man kan beräkna CO2 emissionerna från bygglogistiken för den samlade byggvolymen i en stad.

    3) En beskrivning av hur aktörerna i bygglogistiksystemet och hur de påverkar olika åtgärder för att minska utsläppen genom sina respektive roller har också identifierats.En av de viktigaste slutsatserna är att det idag saknas rätt förutsättningarna för att implementera en fossilfri bygglogistik i stor skala. Det saknas gemensamma målbilder för logistiken.

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  • 12.
    Oskarsson, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hallström, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Learning, Aesthetics, Natural Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Systems Thinking in a Mechanical Engineering Program2022In: The 18th International CDIO Conference, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In engineering programs, systems thinking capability has been promoted for a long time. The capability of students to apply various systems thinking approaches is not only supported by educational staff, but also highly required by various employers. The aim of the study is to investigate the inclusion of systems thinking aspects in the Mechanical Engineering program at Linköping University. Two research questions address this aim. According to involved teachers, (1) What aspects of systems thinking are included in the Master Program in Mechanical Engineering?, and (2) What teaching and learning activities concerning systems thinking are included in the Master Program in Mechanical Engineering? Empirical data was gathered through focus group interviews with involved teachers from two Master profiles. The results indicate that systems thinking is present in the respective Master profiles, however not explicitly communicated with the students. Systems thinking is often coupled with disciplinary knowledge, which supports CDIO standard 3. Some examples of how systems thinking is taught relating to disciplinary knowledge (CDIO standard 7) were presented by the teachers. Examples of teaching activities specifically aimed at systems thinking were however missing, alongside examination of systems thinking in particular.

  • 13.
    Osman, Mary Catherine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Jenny
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Biomethane in Freight and Logistics: Stakeholder Perspectives2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose

    The growing awareness of climate impact from combustion has triggered massive development efforts towards fossil fuel alternatives. The main future alternative appears to be electrification, which directly reduces tailpipe emissions. However, for freight and logistics - in particular heavy and long-haul transportation - electrification will be slower than for passenger transport. At the same time, we need to act fast and promptly to reduce emissions from fossil fuels. In this context, the alternative of biomethane (vehicle gas produced from anaerobic digestion of biowaste) surfaces as a climate-wise very interesting option. Proponents even suggest that biomethane can entail a positive climate impact, depending on its origin. Albeit, the transformation from traditional combustion technology to gas technology comes with a range of challenges as well as opportunities for actors in the supply chain. This paper aims to explore these challenges and opportunities through a stakeholder perspective.

    Literature

    Research into green logistics and sustainable freight often mentions the fuel aspect as important in greening the operations. As a more detailed picture is lacking with respect to particular fuels, the literature is complemented by research into biomethane, and its various business aspects.

    Methodology

    Literature was collected through a systematic literature review supplemented by peer advice. The empirical findings are based on interviews with purposefully selected respondents representing stakeholder groups in the supply chain: shippers (buying logistics services); forwarders (transforming customer requests into logistics services); hauliers (performing the transport part of the logistics service also making investments in the novel technology); and fuel providers (producing and distributing the biomethane). The research mainly addresses the Swedish market. The empirical findings are analysed in relation to literature, and important challenges as well as opportunities are explained.

    Findings

    As literature in total offers few details on stakeholder perspectives of using biomethane in a logistics/freight context, the research took an explorative direction. This is also supported by the relative novelty of the biomethane solution among logistics actors. The various stakeholders present different, and sometimes consistent experiences from using biomethane.

    • Shippers require a green fuel solution. Many shippers want the forwarder to dedicate the biomethane truck to their transports, although it may be better used for other transports. Some shippers are interested in sharing the investment in gas vehicles.
    • Forwarders - as orchestrators of the shippers needs vs. the available resources - find that biomethane solutions work best in long-haul traffic. Their role as mediators become even more central as they may need to support the hauliers in investing in new technology. Forwarders recognize a conflict between the “best use” of the biomethane truck and specific customer requirements.
    • Hauliers can clearly see a business opportunity in biomethane and gas technology. Although the price for the vehicle is higher, the operating costs are comparable, and improved environmental performance is increasing as a competitive argument. However the investment is a challenge, particularly in light of short term customer contracts. Another important challenge is to plan the operations of the gas vehicles to make full use of the fuel. Yet another challenge is the relatively restricted infrastructure for fuel supply, which requires careful planning.
    • Fuel providers consider the logistics market as still quite small but growing. Unlike most providers of e.g. biodiesel, one of the interviewed providers presents a market offer with a set price based on production cost, and not relating to fluctuating market prices for fossil fuels. The infrastructure is still underdeveloped compared to that for fossil fuels, however it requires less efforts than developing infrastructure for e.g. electrified transportation.

    Conclusions

    The use of biomethane in logistics and freight is still in an early phase. However, the biomethane alternative presents a range of opportunities. The transformation for hauliers from traditional fuels to biomethane is relatively fast, and the infrastructure is comparably easy to develop. Although in an early phase, there appears to be an agreement among the stakeholders that biomethane is a viable alternative for long-haul traffic, although not as evident a solution for last-mile deliveries. The main obstacle is the investment, which often require close relationships among the stakeholders including longer-term contracts and shared investments. Using biomethane for logistics and freight is growing in Sweden, but continued development requires a wider contextual approach both for research and for technology development.

  • 14.
    Gutierrez Chiriboga, Jorge
    et al.
    Scania CV AB.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sallnäs, Uni
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Business model alignment in supply chain management: A literature review2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Efficient interaction between actors within supply chains is crucial for their effectiveness. It could be argued that a certain degree of alignment between the different actors’ business model is a prerequisite for the success of interaction. The purpose is to explore how business model alignment between different supply chain actors is described and analysed in the context of Supply Chain Management (SCM).

    Design/methodology/approach: A systematic literature review on business models in the context of SCM was performed. Based on holistic meta-business model (Kindström, 2005), the findings were analysed with respect to the business model and to the supply chain.

    Findings: The findings confirm that business models in the context of SCM is a relatively unexplored area, and that the topic has been addressed in a wide variety of journals.In relation to the supply chain, alignment is discussed between buyers and suppliers, between actors in the transport provision chain, between the supply chain and the transport provision chain, and internally. Overall, alignment between buyers and suppliers is confirmed as positive for supply chain performance.

    Research limitations/implications: The results provide bases for further research into more focused areas within the business model frame. In particular, the connection between transport provision and their suppliers –the automotive industry –is missing in the literature.

    Original/value: The business model concept is poorly addressed with the perspective of alignment. Research into business model alignment can contribute to literature on strategic SCM.

  • 15.
    Sallnäs, Uni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eng-Larsson, Fredrik
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Björklund, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Facilitating green delivery options for consumers through interaction: A retailer perspective2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficient goods distribution is key to the success of e-commerce and can even be a means for retailers to stay ahead of competition. However, e-commerce distribution also has a negative environmental impact. In fact, e-commerce distribution is often the most inefficient and the least environmentally sustainable part of the supply chain (Gevaers et al., 2014; Mangiaracina et al., 2015). Given the rate of e-commerce growth, measures need to be taken to reduce the environmental impact from e-commerce distribution. 

    Retailers are under pressure to act sustainably and are even suggested to have a responsibility to support consumers in behaving more sustainably (Wiese et al., 2015). Consumers are also vital to the challenge of improving environmental sustainability of e-commerce distribution (Buldeo Rai et al., 2019). They are often given a number of delivery options to choose from, and their choices affect the environmental impact. For example, consumers that are willing to wait a few extra days for their ordered products create better conditions for logistics service providers (LSPs), on which many retailers rely to execute the distribution of sold goods, to increase fill-rates of their vehicles and thereby decrease the environmental impact. For consumers to be able to make more environmentally sound choices of distribution, they need guidance when choosing delivery options. Providing such guidance constitutes a large challenge for retailers, as the most environmentally sustainable choice is far from intuitive (e.g. van Loon et al., 2015). In fact, retailers are largely dependent on other actors to succeed. For example, LSPs have the expertise related to the environmental effects of their logistics operations. As a retailer, taking on the challenge of offering green delivery options is often more complex than it would seem at first hand, since LSPs and retailers need to coordinate their respective networks and efforts. This paper takes an interaction perspective of this challenge, as a means to expand the understanding of the actors that need to be involved for green delivery options as presented to consumers. The purpose of the paper is to increase the understanding of how retailers can facilitate green delivery options for consumers through interaction with other actors.

     

    A literature review of green logistics literature serves as a point of departure as to what can constitute a green delivery option for consumers. Empirically, the paper is based on a single case study of a Swedish retailer with both physical stores and an online sales channel. The case company was selected due to its high ambition and determination to be able to offer green delivery options to consumers. Data was gathered through meetings, semi-structured interviews and documents provided by the company.

     

    Early results suggest that retailers need to interact with a number of actors to be able to offer green delivery options for consumers. In order for the green delivery options to be trustworthy, the retailer needs to have an understanding of the environmental impact of their different distribution alternatives. To gain such knowledge, interaction with their contracted LSPs is necessary, as they have the knowledge of the environmental impact of their operations in different contexts. Interestingly, the studied retailer also had close interaction with a consulting firm, whose role was to secure the quality of the LSPs’ data and to compare the delivery options in terms of environmental impact. When a retailer has an overview of the environmental impact of different delivery options, this knowledge needs to be transferred into green delivery options that are understandable and accessible for consumers. As retailers often rely on other actors to provide platforms though which consumers make their choice of delivery, interaction with such companies can be vital. In the studied case, the interaction between the retailer and the platform developer, combined with extensive internal interaction on the retailer’s part, lead to a website presentation of the green delivery options for consumers. Finally, interaction with consumers is of importance for retailers to understand how consumers react to the green delivery options.

     

    The findings suggest that for retailers to be able to offer green delivery options for consumers, a larger number of actors need to be involved than what has been suggested in previous literature, in which retailers, LSPs and consumers are commonly mentioned. Furthermore, LSPs may have a surprisingly peripheral role in the development of the green aspect of the service offering compared to what earlier research has suggested. By studying green distribution in relation to consumer offerings, this paper helps bridge the gap between the two research fields green logistics and e-commerce. In terms of practical implications, this study can be used by retailers to better understand how they can proceed in order to offer green delivery options to consumers.

  • 16.
    Osman, Mary Catherine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. VTI.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Jenny
    VTI.
    Fossil-Free Fuels for Freight and Logistics: A Literature-Based Study2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research Question & Brief Overview:

     

    Importance of the logistics industry has developed dramatically with the globalization of economies thereby raising the stakes of creating and implementing sustainable business practices across all actors within the logistics industry (Centobelli et al., 2017).  Many modes of transportation are still reliant on fossil fuels. As road transportation consistently is responsible for the majority of the transportation industry’s  emissions in the European Union, stakeholders have focused on methods and alternatives to decrease the amount of emission (Pieters et al., 2012). These methods and alternatives are known as Green Logistics Practices (GLPs) vary in technology, innovation and motivation thus providing varying results of carbon emission decrease. The purpose of this study is to summarize the research currently represented in published literature discussing green practice options in freight transport and logistics exploring the possible implementation of fossil-free fuels. With this background and current challenge, the researchers posed the following research questions: 

    (RQ1) Which GLPs are used and suggested for designing more environmentally sustainable logistics systems? 

    (RQ2) What challenges and opportunities lie in the use of fossil-free fuels for increasing the environmental sustainability of freight transport in a supply chain context?  

     

    Method: 

     

    This study contains two parts: systematic literature review and exploratory semi-structured interviews. The systematic literature review has been completed while the interviews are still ongoing. It is planned to present the study in its entirety at the National Transport Forum.   

    To support the discussion and further understand the implications of large-scale use of fossil-free fuels, the specific choice of using biomethane was selected. Several exploratory, semi-structured interviews were held with stakeholders who either utilize biomethane in their operations or produce biomethane. The interview guide was developed following the analysis of the literature. The findings from these interviews enriched the discussion and supported importance relevant to opportunities and challenges from fossil-free fuels, in response to RQ2. 

     

    As the paper is written in conjunction of a project with a particular focus on fossil-free fuels, namely biomethane, the categories were all discussed from the project’s focus. Biomethane was chosen as a focal alternative fuel due to its importance to Östergötland, where the research group resides. 

     

    Results and Analysis:

     

    As this is a work in progress, only the results and analysis for the literature review will be discussed in the abstract with the aim of presenting the entire study at the forum. 

     

    The literature review provided patterns and trends in the sustainable innovations and technologies as well as their drivers and involved stakeholders. From these patterns and trends, the researchers were able to decern four groups of GLPs: Business Strategy, Logistics Systems, Social, and Energy & Emissions. Practices considered Business Strategy focus on an aspect or aspects in organizational practice or behavior which resulted in a greener business solution rather than desiring to create an environmentally friendly business solution. Logistics System GLPs simultaneously addresses improving an aspect of the logistical system and reducing environmental impact. The smallest, but still noteworthy category, Social GLPs are practices implemented by stakeholder typically outside the transport or logistics sphere that attempt to steer business practices towards a larger goal dictated by a governing body. The final group, Energy & Emissions, include practices that directly address the amount of carbon emission produced in transport activities. 

     

    GLPs found in the Energy & Emissions are some of the more technologically advanced and innovative solutions. However, many of these Energy & Emissions GLPs have yet to be implemented on a wide scale. 

     

    This research begins to explore the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead for all stakeholders in support of creating greener freight transport and logistics. While the supporting discussions from the industry were rooted in the Swedish transport sector, there are possibilities to generalize organizational mindsets and actions to other geographical regions. 

  • 17.
    Osman, Mary Catherine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Jenny
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fossil-Free Fuels for Freight and Logistics: A Literature-Based Study2021In: Logistics Research Network Conference: Sustainable and resilient supply chains in disruptive times / [ed] Cardiff Business School, Cardiff, Wales, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose 

    The need to reduce greenhouse emissions through changes in transportation operation is dire leading the industry to implement a variety of Green Logistic Practices (GLP). However, the freight industry to date still relies heavily on the use of fossil fuels. The question of fuel alternatives is present but passive in current research, thus opening the gap for further exploration into fossil-fuel alternatives. The purpose of this study is to summarize the research currently represented in published literature discussing green practice options in freight transport and logistics and to explore the use of fossil-free fuels. Focus on biomethane derives from its regional importance for the research group.

     

    Research Approach 

    This study was completed in two parts. The literature review was completed in a systematic manner to ensure quality. The authors collected additional information through semi-structured, exploratory interviews from various stakeholders involved in research and general interest of switching to biomethane with a purpose of ensuring the practical relevance.  

     

    Findings and Originality

    The literature review identifies patterns and trends among discussed GLPs. Practices utilized and researched include but are not limited to intermodal transport, platooning, and implementation of fossil-free fuels. Most of the practices researched involve limited new technology or innovation rather a repurposing of traditional techniques. While the revisiting and greenifying of traditional techniques aids in reducing the emission of greenhouse gases, freight transport and logistics lags in understanding of switching to fossil-free fuels. 

     

    Research Impact 

    This research shows that despite much research on implementation of Green Logistic Practices in supply chains, a gap in knowledge exists relating to the use of fossil-free fuels in freight transport and logistics. The research explores how companies can adopt fossil-free fuel solutions. More research is required to adequately prepare businesses, governments, and customers to ensure smooth transition to fossil-free fuels. 

     

    Practical Impact 

    This research begins to explore the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead for business attempting to implement GLPs.

  • 18.
    Eng-Larsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Sallnäs, Uni
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Björklund, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Green distribution options in e-commerce: Display versus content2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Lately, some e-commerce retailers have started displaying climate labels – i.e., eco-labels focusing on greenhouse gas emissions – on distribution or fulfilment alternatives in the check-out of the online store. Using actual purchase data, the purpose of this research is to understand the impact of climate labelling on customers’ choice of fulfillment.

    Design/methodology/approach: We analyse six months of customer checkout data from a market-leading pharmacy in Northern Europe using a nested logit formulation.

    Findings: We find that climate labels have a large and significant impact on the probability that a fulfillment alternative is selected by the customer. Further, if the label is attached to a top alternative, it increases the probability that the alternative is chosen. We also find that preselection has a strong effect on the impact of climate labels.

    Research limitations/implications:We note that climate labelling seems to have a strong impact on customer behavior, it opens up several venues for further research. For instance, there may be other relevant ways to slice the data to bring additional insights. And as climate labelling from more “well-known” labels are being used in e-commerce, the impact might be different.

    Research limitations/implications: The results have implications for retailers and logistics service providers alike, by indicating both how the content of the fulfillment option and the display of the option in the check-out impacts the business. The results further underline the importance of coordination between retailers and logistics service providers to provide support to consumers.

    Original/value: Contrary to previous research into greening e-commerce distribution, this paper takes a quantitative approach to address green consumer preferences.

  • 19.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sweeney, Edward
    Aston Univ, England.
    Evangelista, Pietro
    Inst Res Innovat & Serv Dev IRISS CNR, Italy.
    Environmental alignment between logistics service providers and shippers - a supply chain perspective2020In: The International Journal of Logistics Management, ISSN 0957-4093, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 575-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Various suggested paths for greening logistics and supply chains often address the specific perspectives of single supply chain actors. Drawing on stakeholder theory, the purpose of this paper is to develop a deeper understanding of the alignment between logistics service providers (LSPs) and shippers in the context of adopting more environmentally sustainable logistics practices. Design/methodology/approach With a case study approach, a dual perspective is taken in which both LSPs and shippers were researched. The cases comprise eight LSPs and six shipper companies in Sweden, Italy and Ireland. Information was first analysed in relation to levels of environmental awareness, customer requirements and provider offerings and critical success factors (CSFs) and inhibitors. In a second step, the findings were analysed using stakeholder theory. Findings LSPs demonstrate higher ambition levels and more concrete offerings compared to shippers requirements for green logistics services. Paradoxically, customers are an important CSF and also an inhibitor for both LSPs and shippers. Both LSPs and shippers perceive financial factors and senior management priorities as important CSFs. The application of stakeholder theory helps to illuminate the importance of the many secondary stakeholders vs that of one or a relatively small number of primary stakeholders. Originality/value The three-dimensional analysis of environmental alignment between LSPs and shippers reinforces existing knowledge and provides new insights. A novel use of stakeholder theory in a supply chain context underlines its usefulness in research of this kind.

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  • 20.
    Sallnäs, Uni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Exploring retailers’ learning towards greener supply chains2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    In order for retailers to decrease environmental impact from logistics, there is a need for a better understanding of what can be done from a retailer perspective in their relationships with logistics service providers (LSPs). This paper aims to explore how retailers can learn in order to become more environmentally sustainable in their relationships with LSPs.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The paper is based on an in-depth, single case study of a Swedish retailer. The paper relies on learning theories, which are applied to the case study that is of longitudinal nature and covers a period of six years. 

    Findings

    Findings indicate that there are different ways to learn in order to improve environmental sustainability in relationships with LSPs. Specifically, both single- and double-loop learning is of relevance. In terms of what can be learnt, the results suggest a number of different learning items that have potential to contribute to a decrease in environmental impact.

    Research limitations/implications

    This paper presents a first attempt to categorise different ways of learning for retailers who want to improve their environmental sustainability in relationships with LSPs. Deeper analysis is needed to understand if the learning items can be divided into more specific categories, such as different types of environmental practices (e.g. technological or managerial).

    Practical implications

    The results will provide retailers with a better understanding of how to take the next step in terms of greening their relationships with LSPs. Environmentally ambitious LSPs can, in turn, benefit from deeper insight into their customers’ internal work and take action based on this knowledge.

    Original/value

    Due to its longitudinal approach and the application of theory on organisational learning, this paper offers a novel perspective on retailers’ strive in increasing environmental sustainability in relationships with LSPs.

  • 21.
    Tälle, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wiréhn, Lotten
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Ellström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lindström, Tom
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Wennergren, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Metson, Genevieve
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Synergies and Trade-Offs for Sustainable Food Production in Sweden: An Integrated Approach2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The production of food can have large impacts on sustainable development in relation to various socio-ecological dimensions, like climate change, the environment, animal welfare, livestock epidemiology, and the economy. To achieve a sustainable food production system in Sweden, an integrated approach that considers all five of these dimensions, and all parts of the food production chain, is necessary. This paper systematically reviewed the literature related to food production in Sweden, especially in association with resource distribution and recycling logistics, and identified potential sustainability interventions and assessed their effects according to the five dimensions. Participation of stakeholders across the food production chain contributed with the focus of the literature search and subsequent synthesis. In general, there were synergies between the sustainability interventions and their effect on climate change and the environment, while there often were trade-offs between effects on the economy and the other dimensions. Few interventions considered effects on animal welfare or livestock epidemiology and few studies dealt with resource distribution and recycling logistics. This indicates that there is a need for future research that considers this in particular, as well as research that considers the whole food production chain and all dimensions at once, and investigates effects across multiple scales.

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  • 22.
    Sallnäs, Uni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    De-greening of logistics?: Why environmental practices flourish and fade in provider-shipper relationships and networks2018In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 74, p. 276-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the challenge of making transports and logistics greener, logistics service providers (LSPs) play a central role as the operators of freight transport. Their customers, the shippers, also play an important role in environmental development. Research has identified discrepancies between LSPs and shippers in their environmental practices. This paper takes a relational approach addressing these discrepancies, and the purpose is to develop the understanding of why environmental practices can both flourish and fade in provider-shipper relationships and networks. Paradoxes provide a theoretical lens, while an in-depth case study of two networks provides the empirical basis for the paper. The networks include relationships between LSPs and shippers. Findings show that paradoxes help to raise contextual awareness in the greening of these relationships. Paradoxes in many instances cause environmental practices to fade. One example is when an LSP's environmental ambition gives opportunities for environmental practices, but is limited by the financial goals of the shippers. Findings also indicate that if there are possibilities to relax the paradoxes, environmental practices may instead flourish in the relationships. One example of such a relaxation is environmental competence sustained and cultivated by an LSP, since such competence can increase the power position of the LSP.

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  • 23.
    Navarro, Priscilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greening logistics by introducing process management: A viable tool for freight transport companies going green2018In: Supply Chain Forum: an International Journal, ISSN 1625-8312, E-ISSN 1624-6039, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 204-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the usage of process management within the freight transport industry is unknown and presumed low, it has been used within other sectors as an efficient approach for dealing with and fulfilling customer demands as well as environmental requirements. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how process management can enhance a customer focused greening in the transport and logistics sector. We present a literature review of the intersections of process management, freight transport and environmental sustainability. Furthermore, we conducted a case study of how two environmentally ambitious Swedish freight transport companies use process management to enhance environmental sustainability. We found that environmentally ambitious freight transport companies do not proactively use process management, and that workshops with topical experts and practitioners can be a way for introducing process management to enhance environmental sustainability in such companies.

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    Greening logistics by introducing process management: A viable tool for freight transport companies going green
  • 24.
    Johannes, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekman, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sustainable Timber Transport: Economic Aspects of Aerodynamic Reconfiguration2018In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need to reduce fuel consumption, and thereby reduce CO2-emissions in all parts of the transport sector. It is also well known that aerodynamic resistance affects the fuel consumption in a major way. By improving the aerodynamics of the vehicles, the fuel consumption will also decrease. A special type of transportation is that of timber, which is performed by specialized trucks with few alternative uses. This paper follows up on earlier papers concerning Swedish timber trucks where aerodynamic improvements for timber trucks were tested. By mapping the entire fleet of timber trucks in Sweden and investigating reduced fuel consumption of 2–10%, financial calculations were performed on how these improvements would affect the transport costs. Certain parameters are investigated, such as investment cost, extra changeover time and weight of installments. By combining these results with the mapping of the fleet, it can be seen under which circumstances these improvements would be sustainable. The results show that it is possible through aerodynamics to lower the transportation costs and make an investment plausible, with changeover time being the most important parameter. They also show that certain criteria for a reduced transportation cost already exist within the vehicle fleet today.

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  • 25.
    Evangelista, Pietro
    et al.
    CNR - IRISS, Naples, Italy.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sweeney, Edward
    ESM Group, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Birmingham, the UK.
    Morvillo, Alfonso
    CNR - IRISS, Naples, Italy.
    Putting together environmental sustainability and profitability in logistics and supply chains2017In: International Journal of Business and Systems Research, ISSN 1751-200X, E-ISSN 1751-2018, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 345-348Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Isaksson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Evangelista, Pietro
    IRAT-CNR and Department of Management and Engineering, University of Naples Federico II.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liimatainen, Heikki
    Transport Research Centre Verne, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Sweeney, Edward
    ESM Group, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Birmingham, the UK.
    The adoption of green initiatives in logistics service providers - a strategic perspective2017In: International Journal of Business and Systems Research, ISSN 1751-200X, E-ISSN 1751-2018, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 349-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Logistics service providers (LSPs) have started to transform their operations and strategy to be more effective from a green perspective. One concern that is of particular interest of LSPs is how to create organisational green awareness and translate this into practice in their operations. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the roles of green strategic commitment and organisation in LSPs’ adoption of green initiatives. The data for this study were collected through a questionnaire survey, investigating a sample of LSPs operating in the Swedish, Finnish and Italian markets. From the literature analysis, a set of testable hypotheses was developed. The results indicate that there are relationships between the nature, as well as the scope, of functional involvement and the green strategic priority. The results further suggest that the inclusion of environmental consideration in the overall business strategy is positively related to the involvement and coordination of multiple functions as well as existence of a separate environmental function.

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  • 27.
    Navarro, Priscilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Using Process Management within Green Logistics – A case study2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    While Process Management has not commonly been used within the freight transport business, it has been used within other sectors as an efficient approach for dealing with and fulfilling customer demands as well as environmental requirements. The purpose of the current paper is to present a case study of how Swedish freight transport companies use Process Management to enhance environmental sustainability.

    Methodology/Approach

    We developed a case study with two environmentally ambitious Swedish freight transport companies. Information was collected by interviews, observations and workshops. We also studied three larger freight transport companies. The analysis is a comparison between empirical findings and literature.

    Findings

    Environmentally ambitious freight transport companies do not proactively use Process Management, and workshops with topical experts and practitioners can be a way for introducing Process Management to enhance environmental sustainability in such companies.

    Research Limitation/implication

    The results will be the basis for propositions for further research, and for practical implications for transport companies.

    Originality/Value of the paper

    A previous study of the intersection between Process Management and Green Logistics identified a void in literature, which makes this paper unique. Academically, this paper contributes to filling that void. Practically, the paper is useful for freight transport practitioners with interest in increasing sustainability in their operations.

  • 28.
    Navarro, Priscilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    What is the potential of process management to enhance sustainability in the freight transport sector?2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The freight transport sector largely contributes to the environmental footprint, and the freight transport industry lacks practical tools for implementing green initiatives. Process Management is an efficient approach for fulfilling customer demands as well as environmental requirements within other sectors. This paper presents a literature review of Process Management activities within the freight transport sector, with emphasis on environmental sustainability. While Green Logistics and Process Management are established academic research disciplines, there is little research found in the intersection between the two. Hence, there is a need for future research in this field.

  • 29.
    Sandberg, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Björklund, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Buyer-supplier relationships - A comparison between European and Asian supplier relationships2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Sandberg, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Björklund, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huge Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Buyer-supplier relationships, a comparison between European and Asian supplier relationships2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Martinsen (Sallnäs), Uni
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Sustainable Logistics Service Providers: A strategic perspective on green logistics service provision2015In: Proceedings from the 20th Annual Logistics Research Network Conference: Resource Efficiency and Sustainability in Logistics and Supply Chain Management / [ed] Lim, M., Jones, C., Day, J. and Smith, S., Derby: The Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport & Derby University , 2015, p. 1-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Environmental sustainability is of increasing importance. The Logistics Service Industry is of specific interest: its impact from mainly transports is still increasing. However, the sustainability of any company also includes a long-term prosperous business. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how a hauler, as an example of a logistics service provider (LSP), through approaching environmental sustainability from an overall strategic business perspective, can succeed long-term.

    Research Approach: The paper builds on an in-depth case study of a medium sized privately held LSP. The case was selected as it stands out compared to its competitors with respect to environmental engagement and long-term commitment to sustainability related issues. Starting from a framework based on RBT (Resource Based Theory), the case is analysed regarding how various types of resources and dynamic capabilities can contribute to sustainable competitive advantage.

    Findings and Originality: The case study illustrates how an LSP can put various resources to work and how resources can be combined. It is demonstrated that these combinations of resources are valuable, rare and perfectly inimitable, and that they to a high extent are well established in the company, and hence not rely in certain individuals. The cases study further demonstrates how an LSP can sense possibilities, seize opportunities and, when needed, reshape its business accordingly, and hence possess critical dynamic capabilities. This research contributes by analysing an LSP that, in contrast to most of its competitors, has succeeded in making its sustainable development a strategic asset. This asset reaches beyond the commonly acknowledged efficiency gains, and is an interesting example of how an LSP through its dynamic capabilities can gain a unique position.

    Research Impact: The strategic perspective through an RBT lens has previously been applied to LSPs mainly in survey based research. The results of this paper are rare, as they build on a real-case situation of a successful and sustainable LSP, while the extant research of success among LSPs going greener mostly suggest future development to become successful. This paper suggests how sustainable development can become a strategic asset for an LSP, and how dynamic capabilities can support that. Theories on dynamic capabilities have previously only been applied to a very limited extent on the analysis of LSPs aiming for going greener

    Practical Impact: Based on this case, other LSPs may get inspiration to how they can develop their business to become more sustainable. The analysis points to that greening efforts cannot be seen in isolation, rather it is the combination of efforts, uniquely orchestrated for each case, that can make a difference. Therefore, the results point to relationships between various efforts, as well as how the different greening efforts fit the context of the LSP.

  • 32.
    Jensen, Jesper Kronborg
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark.
    Arlbjörn, JAn Stentoft
    University of Southern Denmark.
    Huemer, Lars
    BI Norwegian Business School.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Drivers and Barriers for Collaborative Environmental Sustainability: Transport Buyers' Perceptions2014In: Competitiveness through Supply Chain Management and Global Logistics: Proceedings from the 26th Conference of the Nordic Logistics Research Network / [ed] Gammelgard, B. et al., Copenhagen: Copenhagen Business School Press, 2014, p. 458-474Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate transport byers perception of drivers and barriers for collaborative environmental sustainability and how this interrelate with the companies’ degree of knowledge about logistics service providers and their degree of collaboration with these logistics service providers.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This research is based on an electronic questionnaire-survey distributed to Danish transport buyers. The questionnaire was distributed to 344 transport purchasers of which 82 have made complete and useful answers leading to an overall response rate of 24 per cent.

    Findings

    The main drivers for environmental sustainability are identified as: 1) demand from top management to focus on environmental sustainability, 2) avoiding loosing reputation, and 3) a feeling of ethical obligation. The main barriers are identified as: 1) difficulties to visualize the benefits of sustainability, 2) lack of data and information about sustainability, and 3) customers are not willing to pay for sustainability. In addition, the paper provides evidence for that the drivers for environmental sustainability positively affect knowledge of logistics service providers and collaboration with environmental issues.

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    NOFOMA 2014 Proceedings Copenhagen Business School

    Research limitations/implications

    This research is based on a survey of Danish companies purchasing logistic services and thus solely represents a Danish transport buyer perspective. Thus, future research can explore how the view is different in specific logistics buyer and service provider relationships and other national contexts.

    Practical implications

    More research is needed on a differentiated perspective on environmental sustainability in the relation to the purchase of materials versus service offerings.

    Originality/value

    This paper provides evidence of a paradoxical nature of drivers and barriers for environmental sustainability grounded in the extant body of literature compared with the empirical findings in this study. 

  • 33.
    Martinsen (Sallnäs), Uni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Environmental practices as offerings and requirements in the logistics market2014In: Logistics Research, ISSN 1865-0368, Vol. 7, no 115, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of environmental consider- ation for companies is mounting. This applies particularly well to logistics service providers (LSPs) who will have a possibility to compete by being greener than their com- petitors by offering services that include different green practices. As their customers play a vital role with regard to the extent to which LSPs can include environmental practices in their business, the interface between these actors is of interest. The purpose of this article is to describe and explain how environmental practices are reflected in offerings and requirements on the logistics market. A systematic literature review of what has been published on environmental practices as parts of offerings and requirements was complemented by a wider literature review. Empirical data were collected through a home page scan and a case study of four LSP–shipper dyads. With a starting point in stakeholder theory, the different data sets were analysed separately as well as combined, and similarities and differences were discussed. The findings point to differences in the way that LSPs and shippers offer and require environmental practices on their home pages and reasons for this are suggested to be due to their different types of stakeholders. Further, the environmental practices in relationships between LSP and shippers are often more relationship specific than practices on home pages. Based on the combined findings of the data sets, a classification of environmental practices as reflected in offerings and requirements on the logistics market is proposed. The article is mainly based on com- panies’ practices in Sweden and thereby provides a pos- sibility to extend the research into other countries as well. By taking two perspectives, the findings from this research can have implications both for purchasing and marketing of logistic services. The paper suggests which environ- mental practices that LSPs and shippers can offer or require in different stages of their business relationships. Contrary to most research within green logistics, this paper takes a business perspective on environmental practices. Further, the dual perspective of LSPs and shippers taken in this paper offers novel insight into how environmental practices can be included at different stages of LSP–shipper relationships. 

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  • 34.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Huemer, Lars
    BI Norwegian Business School.
    Arlbjörn, JAn Stentoft
    University of Southern Denmark.
    Jensen, Jesper Kronborg
    University of Southern Denmark.
    Greening Logistics Through and Beyond Transport Efficiency2014In: Competitiveness though Supply Chain Management and Global Logistics: Proceedings from the 26th Conference of the Nordic Logistics Research Network / [ed] Gammelgard, G. et al., 2014, p. 612-629Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT

    Purpose

    In order for logistics to become greener, logistics service providers (LSPs) need to be included in the greening of supply chains. A key to become proactive members of a supply chain is that their business supports the greening of their activities – otherwise greening will not reach beyond single initiatives and demonstration projects. The purpose of this paper is to explore how LSPs’ underlying business logics can help in understanding LSPs green activities and aspects.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A multiple case study was carried out of three LSPs in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. The analysis relies on the growing literature on LSPs and their environmental efforts, and the business logic is based on a strategic approach to business literature.

    Findings

    The findings indicate that the efficiency-based business logic commonly applied by LSPs in some respect supports the greening of logistics. Differences among the cases suggest that customer interaction is crucial for realising a greening of LSPs business models.

    Research limitations/implications

    The results rely on case studies of large LSPs in the Nordic countries. To a certain extent the results of this research can be generalised also to smaller LSPs, however with restrictions. The results are discussed in relation to the geographical markets for the researched cases.

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    NOFOMA 2014 Proceedings Copenhagen Business School

    Practical implications

    The customer interaction and the customer selection has a great impact on the development of green logistics services, as these aspects both influence the efficiency in the activities and the dynamics in the development of new services.

    Originality/value

    The business logic approach to greening LSPs’ activities is suggested as important but seldom applied in empirically based research. This paper demonstrates how such an approach can support the identification of viable green efforts among LSPs. Furthermore, the paper contributes to the understanding of environmental issues in relation to the business of LSPs. 

  • 35.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Martinsen (Sallnäs), Uni
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsosn, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    The Slowness of Greening Transports in Supply Chains: Barriers and Enablers when Introducing Green Activities2014In: Competitiveness through Supply Chain Management and Global Logistics: Proceedings form the 26th Conference of the Nordic Logistics Research Network / [ed] Gammelgard, B. et al., 2014, p. 962-964Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Martinsen (Sallnäs), Uni
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    De-greening of logistics through provider-shipper interaction2013In: The 29th Annual IMP Conference: Building and Managing Relationships in a Global Network: Challenges and Necessary Capabilities / [ed] Johnston, Weslsy, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of the paper

    In contrast to the general perception of logistics service providers, recent research suggests that logistics service providers can be considered as more open to developing green services than their customers are to require them. The purpose of this paper is to explain how green efforts and ambitions are transformed when logistics service providers co-operate with their customers.

    Research method

    The paper is based on a multiple case study of two networks, symmetrically composed of two relationships each with an LSP as the common actor. The networks are analysed first on a dyad level, which is the basis for a network analysis of the cases. The two cases are finally compared in order to identify patterns between the cases.

    Research findings

    The findings suggest that even though the logistics service providers display a certain level of greenness in their own appearance, the level of greenness decreases to different extent in the interaction with the shippers. The attitude among the shippers is an important reason to how the green efforts are transformed in the relationships, as they are in overall control of the relationships. In addition, even if the shipper is positive and contributes to a positive development the shipper’s customers can constitute a barrier in the LSP-shipper interaction. On the other hand, a mutually positive attitude may impose synergetic effects in the dyad.

    Contribution

    The paper applies the concept of network paradoxes to greening logistics in LSP-shipper dyads, and increases the understanding of why the green efforts among logistics service providers are not directly transferred to the surrounding network of shippers/customers. This contributes to the small but emerging body of literature on the greening of industrial networks, but also to a further understanding of the role of inter-organisational relationships in literature on green supply chain management and green logistics. 

  • 37.
    Oskarsson, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Huge Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Investigation method – a key skill in logistics education?2013In: Digital proceedings of the 25th NOFOMA Conference, 2013, p. 1-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeStructured investigations is important as a prerequisite when entering change projects. Investigation method is a valuable skill among logistics practitioners. Therefore, it is desired that logistics students learn investigation method during their studies. It is however not clear what investigation method is. The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework for describing investigation method.

    Design/methodology/approach – The framework was created with inspiration from literature. It was then used to examine to what extent investigation method was learned in a specific logistics education at master level. The course curriculum and intended learning outcomes were studied and compared with the students’ perceptions, gathered through a questionnaire to 47 students at the end of their logistics studies.

    Findings – The proposed framework was successfully tested. The results indicate that students have gained good skills within investigation method. They point out projects in various forms as being most useful for their learning.

    Research limitations/implications - The study was performed on one specific case, and should be expanded to a wider range of logistics educational programmes, in order to reach more reliable findings.

    Practical implications This study is rather a starting point for research that can be of high relevance for how to design and conduct logistics education, and that might lead to graduates better prepared for conducting investigations.

    Originality/value - Research into general pedagogical aspects related to logistics is only sparsely addressed in research, in which the role of investigation method is mostly ignored. This paper aims at putting investigation method on the ‘skill agenda’ for logistics education.

  • 38.
    Evangelista, Pietro
    et al.
    IRAT-CNR and Department of Management and Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Isaksson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sweeney, Edward
    National Institute for Transport and Logistics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland.
    Purchasing Green Transport and Logistics Services: Implications from the Environmental Sustainability Attitude of 3PLs2013In: Outsourcing Management for Supply Chain Operations and Logistics Services / [ed] Dimitris Folinas, Hershey, PA USA: IGI Global, 2013, p. 449-465Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental sustainability is an area of increasing importance for third party logistics (3PL) com- panies. As the design and implementation of services requires interaction between buyer and 3PL, the 3PLs are in a critical position to support the efforts towards greening operations of different supply chain participants. However the literature in this field reflects a gap between the perspectives of buy- ers and 3PLs. This chapter attempts to fill this void through an explorative case study analysis on the environmental attitude of 3PLs in order to derive implications for buyers’ behavior. The results indicate that the buyer’s role is critical in different ways in the development of green initiatives among 3PLs. An increased orientation towards longer-term contracts and joint development would likely enhance the level of green initiatives. Indirectly, the buyer has the opportunity to influence its 3PLs through interac- tion with employees on different levels in the company, including top management. 

  • 39.
    Sweeney, Edward
    et al.
    Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland.
    Evangelista, Pietro
    University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Isaksson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The Role of Third Party Logistics Providers (3PLs) in the Adoption of Green Supply Chain Initiatives2013In: The European Financial Review, ISSN 1389-6539, no July/August, p. 32-34Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing importance of environmental sustainability has sharpened the focus on the need for innovative approaches to the purchasing of transport and logistics services. This article points out some of the challenges that purchasers of transport and logistics services, as well as their suppliers in the third party logistics (3PL) industry, are facing. These include the need for closer collaboration between 3PLs and their customers, as well as developing systems for the robust assessment of the environmental sustainability of services. The article is based on several years’ research experience in Ireland, Italy and Sweden.

  • 40.
    Isaksson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Understanding efficiencies behind logistics service providers' green offerings2013In: Management Research Review, ISSN 2040-8269, E-ISSN 2040-8277, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 216-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Awareness of environmental impacts on society is increasing among companies. In order to turn environmental problems into business opportunities, many companies are beginning to consider how environmental, or green aspects can be integrated into their service offerings. This opportunity can be of specific interest to logistics service providers, whose core business is an environmental impact in itself. The purpose of this article is to indicate where green-labelled logistics service providers are positioned today in their development, and to seek the underlying rationale in development of green service offerings.

    Design/methodology/approach – This article takes a logistics service provider's perspective and is based on a multiple case study of six companies. The analysis is based on cross-case analysis, and empirical, as well as theoretical, pattern matching.

    Findings – The attitude towards a green approach differs among the case companies: while some are working towards a green integration throughout the entire business, others offer green alternatives to the original service offering. The results point to possible explanations for these differences, and include differences in range of service offerings, size, and to different management principles for green aspects.

    Practical implications – The article can inspire logistics service providers in their continuing work to integrate green initiatives into the company. By introducing alternative green approaches in the development of service offerings, logistics service providers can match their own business and context with alternative rationales.

    Originality/value – While most of the green logistics research focuses on the logistics system's characteristics, this article offers initial insights into how the integration of green aspects into logistics services can impact logistics service providers.

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  • 41.
    Evangelista, Pietro
    et al.
    IRAT-CNR and Department of Management and Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Isaksson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sweeney, Edward
    National Institute for Transport and Logistics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland.
    A case study investigation on purchasing green transport and logistics services2012In: Purchasing & Supply Management in a Changing World: IPSERA 2012 Conference Proceedings / [ed] Esposito, E., Evangelista, P., Pastore, G., Raffa, M., Napoli, Italia: Edizioni Scientifiche Italiane , 2012, p. WP17-1-WP17-13Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n the context of green supply chain management, green purchasing has received increased attention over the past decade and the strategic importance of introducing green aspects into purchasing practices has been recognised. Despite this growing importance, little has been written in relation to purchasing green transport and logistics services. Considering the strong environmental impact associated with transport and logistics activities, much remains to be learned concerning buyer’s practices when sourcing more sustainable services from third party logistics companies (3PLs). The aim of this paper is to explore practices of buying green transport and logistics services in three different European countries (Italy, Ireland and Sweden) using a multiple case study research approach. The paper analyses how general environmental company ambitions and environmental purchasing practices are reflected when green transport and logistics services are purchased. The results of the paper indicate that while the case companies show a relatively high concern of green issues at company level, a lower importance is attributed to green issues at the purchasing function level. When green concerns in purchasing transport and logistics services are analysed the level of importance decrease dramatically. It emerges a conflicting attitude among the overall company level and the purchasing of transport and logistics services. This suggests that there is the potential for improvements especially in the area of green collaboration in buyer and supplier relationships. 

  • 42.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Lunds Tekniska Högskola.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björklund, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Applying a network level in environmental impact assessments2012In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 247-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers and society devote increasing interest to environmental impact assessments. The study here discusses and questions current assessment models by relating them to inter-organizational network analyses, and demonstrates that single entities as the basis for environmental impact assessments may not be in the best interests of society. Three case studies focusing on logistical solutions illustrate environmental effects on a single-entity and a network level. The paper concludes that considering environmental impacts on a single-entity level disregards indirect effects, which in turn has consequences for the environment. The paper points to the importance of identifying the appropriate level for analysis of environmental impacts since the single entity as the basis for assessments may undermine environmentally friendly intentions.

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  • 43.
    Evangelista, Pietro
    et al.
    University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Isaksson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sweeney, Edward
    Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland.
    Purchasing green transport and logistics services: implications for small business2012In: Piccola Impresa / Small Business, ISSN 0394-7947, no 2, p. 43-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Considering its strong environmental impact, logistics plays a critical role in green supply chain management. It provides strategic links in the supply chain and is an essential function in the delivery of green products to the consumer. There is a general consensus on the fact that more environmentally sustainable companies may be achieved only if transport and logistics activities also become greener. To achieve this objective, buyer companies need to incorporate green considerations in the purchasing of transport and logistics services. This appears particularly challenging for small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) because of their traditional lack of managerial, organisational and financial resources that often result in failure to adopt an environmental perspective. In the extant literature, green purchasing has received increased attention over the past decade and the strategic importance of introducing green aspects into purchasing practices has been recognised. However, little has been written in relation to purchasing green transport and logistics services. The aim of this paper is to explore practices in the buying of green transport and logistics services and to derive implications for small buyer companies. The paper analyses how general environmental company ambitions and environmental purchasing practices are reflected when green transport and logistics services are purchased in three different European countries (Italy, Ireland and Sweden) using a multiple case study research approach. The results of the paper indicate that while the case companies show a relatively high concern for green issues at corporate level, a lower importance is attributed to green issues at the purchasing function level. When green concerns in the purchasing of transport and logistics services are analysed the level of importance decreases further. Thus, a conflicting attitude is evident between the overall corporate level and the purchasing of transport and logistics services specifically. This suggests that there is potential for improvement especially in the area of green collaboration in buyer and supplier relationships.

  • 44.
    Fristedt, Mårten
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hansson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rehme, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sandberg, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Supply chain management in practice: a case study of McDonald’s Sweden2012In: NOFOMA 2012: Proceedings of 24th  Annual Nordic Logistics Research Network Conference / [ed] Juuso Töyli, Laura Johansson, Harri Lorentz, Lauri Ojala and Sini Laari, Naantali, Finland, 2012, p. 875-877Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Fristedt, Mårten
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hansson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rehme, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sandberg, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Supply chain management in practice: a case study of McDonald’s Sweden2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although much discussed in theory, supply chain management (SCM) is often problematic to carry out in practice. One exception is McDonald’s Sweden, which since its establishment has worked with suppliers and restaurants (franchisees) in a way that reminds of what SCM literature recommends. The purpose of this report is to describe and analyse the supply chain of McDonald’s Sweden from suppliers to franchisees.

    Based on interviews with McDonald’s Sweden, suppliers and franchisees, McDonald’s supply chain is described and analysed according to SCM literature. Cooper and Ellram’s (1993) framework of SCM characteristics is used complemented with several other writers.

    The study describes a supply chain where its members to a large extent collaborate as described in SCM literature. The report identifies and describes how significant SCM characteristics, such as information sharing, joint planning, and the sharing of risks and rewards are managed in the case. Finally, the report identifies market saturation and the search for economies of scale outside the primary supply chain as a challenge for future SCM practices. The case constitutes an interesting showcase where the ways in which the studied features are managed can inspire others businesses in succeeding in SCM.

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    Supply Chain Management in practice
  • 46.
    Martinsen (Sallnäs), Uni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björklund, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The importance of stakeholder relationships in city logistics projects2012In: NoFoMa Conference, Book of proceedings / [ed] Juuso Töyli, Laura Johansson, Harri Lorentz, Lauri Ojala and Sini Laari, Naantali, Finland., 2012, p. 602-617Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of this paper: As a result of the negative impact of freight transport on the environment, logistics solutions in city centres have recently attracted increasing attention. In order to succeed with city logistics projects, collaboration between various stakeholders such as local authorities, logistics companies, retailers and property owners is essential, which is one reason why the interdependence among the stakeholders is a crucial aspect in relation to the projects. The purpose of this paper is to explore city logistics projects based on stakeholders’ cooperative relationships and to suggest how the nature of dependence between the stakeholders can affect the project.

    Design/methodology/approach: A wide range of documented city logistics projects is narrowed down in an iterative process, and three projects where relationships are described are analysed, supported by literature on interorganisational relationships. The analysis is based on the official documentation of city logistics projects.

    Findings: This paper illustrates how dependence between stakeholders in city logistics solutions can affect the project. The local authorities’ dependence on the commercial stakeholders is a common pattern, while the residents/consumers are those most often neglected. Although local authorities apply different strategies to involve various stakeholder groups, the poor documentation of stakeholder relationships suggests that this issue has been given limited attention in city logistics projects.

    Research limitations/implications (if applicable): Because of the impact of stakeholder relationships on city logistics projects, it is suggested that future projects would benefit from increased attention being paid to such relationships.

    Practical implications (if applicable): The notion of how various dependencies between actors may affect the projects can be beneficial for local authorities as it leads to a better understanding of their dependence on other stakeholders.

    Originality/value: With support from literature on inter-organisational relationships, this research addresses the often omitted aspects of stakeholder collaboration and, specifically, the impact of stakeholder dependence in city logistics projects.

  • 47.
    Isaksson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liimatainen, Heikki
    Transport Research Centre Verne, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Evangelista, Pietro
    IRAT-CNR and Department of Management and Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Who is responsible when it finally happens?: - Functional involvement in adopting green initiatives among logistics service providers2012In: Go for Gold - Winning the Supply Chain Triathlon:: Creating Social, Economic and Environmental Value / [ed] Richard Wilding, 2012, p. Green Logistics 6-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Isaksson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björklund, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Evangelista, Pietro
    IRAT-CNR and Department of Management Engineering, University of Naples Federico II.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The Challenge andAdoption of Green Initiatives for Transport and Logistics Service Providers2011In: Proceedings of the 16th Annual Logistics Research Network Conference: Smarter Logistics: Innovation for Efficiency, Performance and Austerity / [ed] Ben Waterson, 2011, p. 1-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The role of logistics service providers (LSPs) has started to change both when it comes to content and complexity and LSPs have been identified to have potential to become more value-adding actors in supply chains. This applies when LSPs begin to transform their operations and strategy to become more effective from a green perspective. In response, the purpose of this paper is to develop a base for further investigations of green initiatives carried out by LSPs and analyse if the green initiatives implemented are dependent on firm characteristics of the LSPs, as well as drivers and barriers experienced.

    Research approach: A questionnaire survey has been launched and it is still ongoing. The survey investigates a sample of LSPs operating on the Swedish and the Italian market. The questionnaire is derived from the researchers’ earlier research projects based on case studies and literature reviews. Data and information collected through the questionnaire allow identifying current and future green initiatives, influencing factors (drivers and barriers) and firm characteristics. The analysis suggests how these dimensions depend on each other.

    Findings and Originality: The survey is still ongoing and the paper will present the first results of the research. The first results discern different green initiatives and the type of drivers and barriers affecting these companies. Prior research has focused on the perspective of the buyer of green logistics services and little attention has been paid to the role of green initiatives in the strategy of LSPs, their impact on customer relationship and performance, the role of ICT as well as drivers and barriers affecting such initiatives.

    Research impact: The expected contribution of this paper is to illustrate and give a deeper knowledge of how LSPs respond to changing market conditions when it comes to green pressures from society. This study may provide a broad base for further research on LSPs’ continued strategy development and adaption to future green requirements both from customers and government.

    Practical impact: The paper will describe the way LSPs have started to adopt and manage green initiatives into their operations. Furthermore, the study will also provide a deeper understanding among practitioners of how logistics green services can be approached and also what drives and inhibits that process. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    The challenge and adoption of green initiatives for transport and logistics service providers
  • 49.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The role of Logistics Service Providers in the Development of Sustainability-Related Innovation2011In: Supply Chain Innovation for Competing in Highly Dynamic Markets:  Challenges and Solutions / [ed] Evangelista, Pietro; McKinnon, Alan; Sweeney, Edward & Esposito, Emilio, IGI , 2011, 1, p. 343-Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Logistics service providers (LSPs) are important actors in the supply chain, and due to the transport intensive activities they manage, they can make a large contribution to the development of sustain- able supply chains. They are often considered as reactive and quite passive in their role vis-à-vis their customers though many possess the critical logistics capabilities required to make distribution opera- tions less damaging to the environment. Developing green logistics service offerings can be one way of greening the whole supply chain, though today there appears to be little demand for these services. In the longer term, however LSPs are likely to benefit from being an environmentally innovative and to apply their environmental knowledge more effectively inside their organisations. This will strengthen their competitive position in a future logistics market in which environmental capabilities become ma- jor selection criteria. Many of the innovative systems and practices may not be motivated primarily by a desire to preserve the environment but will, nevertheless, contribute to sustainable development. To make a major commitment to greening client’s supply chain, an LSP will often require a longer-term contract that supports investment in more environmentally friendly technology and business processes.

  • 50.
    Isaksson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Driving forces and barriers when pricing the environmental service offering - a cross case study of logistics companies2010In: LRN 2010 Book of proceedings, Leeds, 2010, p. 303-311Conference paper (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 88
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