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  • 1.
    Aspeqvist, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Hedvig
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Korhonen, Laura
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Barnafrid.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zetterqvist, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Measurement and stratification of nonsuicidal self-injury in adolescents2024In: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundNonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is highly prevalent in adolescents. In survey and interview studies assessing NSSI, methods of assessment have been shown to influence prevalence estimates. However, knowledge of which groups of adolescents that are identified with different measurement methods is lacking, and the characteristics of identified groups are yet to be investigated. Further, only a handful of studies have been carried out using exploratory methods to identify subgroups among adolescents with NSSI.MethodsThe performance of two prevalence measures (single-item vs. behavioral checklist) in the same cross-sectional community sample (n = 266, age M = 14.21, 58.3% female) of adolescents was compared regarding prevalence estimates and also characterization of the identified groups with lifetime NSSI prevalence. A cluster analysis was carried out in the same sample. Identified clusters were compared to the two groups defined using the prevalence measures.ResultsA total of 118 (44.4%) participants acknowledged having engaged in NSSI at least once. Of these, a group of 55 (20.7%) adolescents confirmed NSSI on a single item and 63 (23.7%) adolescents confirmed NSSI only on a behavioral checklist, while denying NSSI on the single item. Groups differed significantly, with the single-item group being more severely affected and having higher mean scores on difficulties in emotion regulation, self-criticism, number of methods, higher frequency of NSSI, higher rates of suicidal ideation and suicidal behavior and lower mean score on health-related quality of life. All cases with higher severity were not identified by the single-item question. Cluster analysis identified three clusters, two of which fit well with the groups identified by single-item and behavioral checklist measures.ConclusionsWhen investigating NSSI prevalence in adolescents, findings are influenced by the researchers' choice of measures. The present study provides some directions toward what kind of influence to expect given the type of measure used, both with regards to the size of the identified group and its composition. Implications for future research as well as clinical and preventive work are discussed.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Hedvig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svensson, E.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Magnusson, A.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zetterqvist, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Young adults looking back at their experiences of treatment and care for nonsuicidal self-injury during adolescence: a qualitative study2024In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundNonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is associated with stigma, and negative attitudes among healthcare professionals toward NSSI have been reported. A person-centered approach that focuses on how individuals with lived experience of NSSI perceive the treatment and care they receive is invaluable in reducing barriers to help-seeking and improving treatment and mental healthcare services. The aim of the current qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of young adults when they look back upon their experiences of psychiatric treatment for NSSI during adolescence.MethodsTwenty-six individuals with lived experience of NSSI who were in contact with child and adolescent psychiatry during adolescence were interviewed. The interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis.ResultsThree main themes were developed: Changed perceptions in retrospect, The importance of a collaborative conceptualization and Lasting impression of the relationship. Participants' perception of themselves as well as the treatment changed over time. The importance of a joint understanding of NSSI and an agreed-upon treatment focus was emphasized. The relationship to the mental health professionals, and experiences of how NSSI was communicated, were salient several years later.ConclusionsHealthcare professionals need to communicate about NSSI in a respectful manner and include the perspective of the adolescent with lived experience of NSSI in a joint conceptualization of NSSI and treatment focus.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Hedvig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Aspeqvist, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Marie Cederschiold Univ, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Linda S.
    Marie Cederschiold Univ, Sweden.
    Landberg, Åsa
    Marie Cederschiold Univ, Sweden.
    Zetterqvist, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Emotional Dysregulation and Trauma Symptoms Mediate the Relationship Between Childhood Abuse and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in Adolescents2022In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 13, article id 897081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundNonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is common in adolescents. Emotion dysregulation has been identified as a core mechanism in the development and maintenance of NSSI and it is therefore an important target when addressing NSSI. The pathogenic connection between different kinds of childhood abuse, difficulties in emotion regulation and NSSI needs further investigation. The objective of this study was to examine whether difficulties with emotion regulation and trauma symptoms, separately and together, mediate the relationships between sexual, physical and emotional abuse and NSSI. MethodCross-sectional data was collected from 3,169 adolescent high-school students aged 16-19 years (M = 18.12, SD = 0.45). Data from self-reported experiences of childhood abuse, current difficulties with emotion regulation (measured with the Difficulties with Emotion Regulation Scale, DERS-16) and trauma symptoms (measured with the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children, TSCC), and NSSI were collected. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to test the proposed relationships between variables. ResultsThe prevalence of life-time NSSI was 27.4%. Prevalence of reported childhood abuse was 9.2, 17.5, and 18.0% for sexual, physical, and emotional abuse, respectively. Childhood abuse, difficulties with emotion regulation and trauma symptoms exhibited significant positive associations with NSSI in adolescents. Emotional dysregulation and trauma symptoms were both found to mediate the relationship between childhood abuse and NSSI. Latent variable models were found to fit data well. ConclusionResults indicate that increased levels of emotional dysregulation and trauma symptoms in relation to childhood abuse contribute to the increased risk of NSSI. Further, results point to some aspects of emotional dysregulation and trauma symptoms being more important in this regard. Clinical implications are discussed.

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